Engine Shed

Engine Shed We’re Scotland’s building conservation centre, part of Historic Environment Scotland. Explore the country’s built heritage with us through events, activities, training and advice.
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This account is monitored Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm. Welcome to the official Engine Shed page. We're part of Historic Environment Scotland, the organisation that makes sure Scotland's history and heritage makes a real difference to people’s lives. Take a look at our Social Media House Rules and help keep this page an inspiring and enjoyable space: http://ow.ly/LVFc50uglsv

This account is monitored Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm. Welcome to the official Engine Shed page. We're part of Historic Environment Scotland, the organisation that makes sure Scotland's history and heritage makes a real difference to people’s lives. Take a look at our Social Media House Rules and help keep this page an inspiring and enjoyable space: http://ow.ly/LVFc50uglsv

Operating as usual

Do you live in an older home like this? Has it been keeping you safe and dry from all this wet, blustery weather? ☔Some ...
17/11/2020

Do you live in an older home like this? Has it been keeping you safe and dry from all this wet, blustery weather? ☔

Some of us are lucky to be able to take shelter from the rain in our historic homes, but how does the weather impact the buildings themselves? And what effect is climate change having?

While buildings will always need maintenance, changing weather patterns caused by climate change will increase the rate buildings decay over time. And storms could cause more severe damage instantly. #ClimateHeritageWeek

Regular repair and looking after traditional buildings has never been more important!

Not sure what to do or where to start?

SPAB Scotland #NationalMaintenanceWeek begins this Friday, and we’ll be sharing our top tips with you for taking care of your older home, along with our friends Stirling City Heritage Trust.

Look out for our practical tips to make sure your buildings are ready for whatever winter might bring. And we suspect that might be more wind and rain!

Do you own or care for a traditional building in the Glasgow area? Or are you interested in learning a traditional build...
13/11/2020
Glasgow City Heritage Trust

Do you own or care for a traditional building in the Glasgow area? Or are you interested in learning a traditional building craft? Glasgow City Heritage Trust might be able to help you with some financial support! Get a grip on their grants with this upcoming event ⬇️

We give out almost £1million in funding each year to help people in Glasgow protect, repair and promote the city's historic buildings and places.
❓Have you always wanted to know more about how our grants scheme works?
❓Do you have a project in mind but are not sure if it would be eligible?
👉🏽 Then our Get a Grip on Grants event is for you!

The next event is on Thursday 10th December at 6pm and it will focus on our Building Repair and Traditional Skills Grants with the help of our first two brilliant speakers: Colin Baillie from� Baillie Baillie Architects and Gemma Park, Traditional Skills Officer at GCHT.

Our four Get A Grip on Grants events are running on Zoom from September 2020 to March 2021.

Each event will highlight two different grant programmes. You will have the chance to learn the ins and outs of GCHT’s grants funding scheme, with special focus on eligibility and the application process, and the opportunity to ask as many questions as you like to our past grantees and officers!

More details and booking in the link below. See you there? #getagripongrants

Many war memorials were erected following the First World War, as a way for communities throughout the country to expres...
11/11/2020

Many war memorials were erected following the First World War, as a way for communities throughout the country to express their grief over the lives that were lost in the war. In place of graves, communities had a place to mourn their dead.

As well as being sobering reminders of the sacrifices of ordinary people, Scotland’s war memorials collectively represent a fine example of largely 19th and 20th century art and architecture.

They range from simple plaques to statues, gardens, gates and even entire buildings. A unique example is the Scottish National War Memorial at Edinburgh Castle, which is an entire building.

In Scotland, they’re most often built of stone. Outside, they're typically monuments carved with names of the fallen. Inside, they’re usually stone, timber and metal panels fixed to walls.

There are thousands of war memorials throughout Scotland. They're an important record those who died for their country and are often beautifully crafted monuments, using age-old traditional skills.

Understanding how to care for them is essential for their survival. Our guide has more: http://ow.ly/A1VO50ChPj8

07/11/2020
Building a future for our past: a virtual tour of the Engine Shed

What goes on inside our building? And what even is a building conservation centre?

As far as we know, we’re the first of our kind, so we can forgive you for asking 😉. We're working safely from home right now, but that doesn't mean we can't give you a tour... virtually!

We’ve recorded a very special video tour so you can find out how we're helping people understand Scotland's traditional building materials and skills.

Tune in to meet six of our staff who tell you about their work and our building. ⬇️

Hoping to explore some heritage on your doorstep this weekend? Look no further than your local historic graveyard!Our la...
06/11/2020
A Beginners Guide to Scotland's Historic Burials Sites | Engine Shed

Hoping to explore some heritage on your doorstep this weekend? Look no further than your local historic graveyard!

Our latest blog is taking you on a whistlestop tour through their history and how they've evolved and adapted over time ⬇️

http://ow.ly/vUXv50Cdd46

Explore Scotland's historic graveyards, the incredible craft skills used to create them and the challenges of caring for them today.

Traditional craft skills have been passed down for generations but some are becoming increasingly rare today.From brick-...
05/11/2020
Apply to the Endangered Crafts Fund

Traditional craft skills have been passed down for generations but some are becoming increasingly rare today.

From brick-making and gilding, to roof-slating and iron founding, many of these skills are still needed to care for Scotland’s older buildings.

So if you’re interested in caring for heritage, learning a new endangered craft yourself or passing on your own skills and knowledge by training an apprentice, this fund could help 👇

The advocacy body for traditional heritage crafts

Ever stepped into a historic, gothic church or abbey and had shivers run down your spine? Gothic architecture does have ...
31/10/2020
How to spot gothic architecture | Engine Shed | Hist Env Scotland

Ever stepped into a historic, gothic church or abbey and had shivers run down your spine? Gothic architecture does have a bit of a Halloween connection!

From gruesome and grotesque gargoyles, to towering ceilings made from timber and stone, do you know what else gives gothic architecture it's name? Discover more in our blog: http://ow.ly/HMn650C7s4x

What is gothic architecture, what traditional skills were used to create it and how do you spot it in Scotland? Read on to find out.

Happy Halloween! 🎃👻
31/10/2020

Happy Halloween! 🎃👻

Careers in conservation can take you anywhere – including the mighty Edinburgh Castle! Historic Environment Scotland are...
28/10/2020

Careers in conservation can take you anywhere – including the mighty Edinburgh Castle! Historic Environment Scotland are looking for a Works Manager to manage the team of trade staff who look after the castle day-to-day.

This is an exciting role, helping to care for one of the biggest visitor attractions in the country.

Apply by Wednesday 4 November: http://ow.ly/MK7Z50BYmRE

Wandering through your local historic graveyard, what do you see? Look closely, and you’ll see historic graveyards are r...
27/10/2020

Wandering through your local historic graveyard, what do you see? Look closely, and you’ll see historic graveyards are rife with symbolism.

Gravestones were embellished with motifs that told a story about the deceased, their lives, their values and beliefs.

Unsurprisingly, death and immortality are some of the most common symbols found in graveyards.

Tombs often include depictions of skulls as “memento mori” – a reminder to the living that they, too, will die!

But did you know that symbols of a person’s trade were also common? Compasses show someone as a master mariner whilst books can indicate they were a writer, bookseller or scholar.

Key events of a person’s life were also told through graveyard symbology. Stars like those seen on the tombstone inside Historic Scotland’s St Bride’s Church, Bothwell, indicate protection against evil.

What springs to mind when you think about climate change? Do you think about recycling, using less plastic in every day ...
23/10/2020
Planning for the future - Historic Environment Scotland Blog

What springs to mind when you think about climate change? Do you think about recycling, using less plastic in every day life, using the car less? What about when it comes to the buildings all around us?

There is much more value in reusing existing buildings over new builds. By repairing, restoring and reusing historic buildings, we can help breathe new life in to communities. In turn, this attracts further investment, jobs and tourism. So the benefits are widespread!

This is just one of the ways Scotland’s past can lead the way to a green recovery and an energy efficient future. Discover a few more in this Historic Environment Scotland blog: http://ow.ly/wv1w50BYt2Z

We believe that Scotland's past can lead the way to an energy efficient future – after all, the greenest building is the one that already exists!

Scotland was once a global centre of ironwork. Many architectural iron founders were set up across the central belt, and...
22/10/2020

Scotland was once a global centre of ironwork. Many architectural iron founders were set up across the central belt, and most towns had a foundry that might make simple products.

The legacy of Scotland’s phenomenal ironwork industry can be seen on our streets today, including buildings like this one.

Historic Environment Scotland has newly listed 34 and 34A Inverleith Terrace in Edinburgh, partly because of its very special ironwork!

The house was built in 1899 to designs by Henry Francis Kerr for Robert Alexander Douglas.

Douglas trained as an ironmonger, becoming the sole partner of the large and successful ironmongers, James Gray's and Sons in Edinburgh.

The highly decorative wrought iron gateposts are a distinctive feature of the house.

In the late 19th century there was renewed interest in decorative wrought ironwork inspired by the distinctive style of 17th century Scottish ironwork.

Until the latter half of the 18th century decorative ironwork was largely undertaken in wrought iron but cast iron became increasingly popular because of mass-production.

As an ironmonger, it’s not surprising that Douglas wanted bespoke wrought-iron work for his home and he may have been influenced by his architect's assistant, Bailey Scott Murphy.

Murphy had a keen interest in 17th century decorative ironwork and spent two years measuring and recording the subject from 1902-4.

In 1905, he published ‘English and Scottish Ironwork’ with detailed drawings of the best examples. Among the book's subscribers were Kerr and Douglas.

The designer of the gateposts at No.34/34A is not known, but they may be the early work of Thomas Hadden (1871-1940), who was also a subscriber to Murphy's publication.

Hadden set up his firm in 1901 and was the leading manufacturer of wrought-iron work in Scotland in the early part of the 20th century.

Learn about Scotland’s ironwork history on our website: http://ow.ly/QUoh50BXcn8

We love helping people learn traditional skills, and if you work for an organisation that is the same then listen up! If...
20/10/2020

We love helping people learn traditional skills, and if you work for an organisation that is the same then listen up! If you deliver traditional skills training courses and are feeling the impacts of COVID-19, funding help is on hand...

The Historic Environment Scotland Recovery Fund is here to support the historic environment sector in these extraordinarily challenging times.

Funding can be used to invest in additional space or equipment, or develop new ways of delivering traditional skills courses, like online.

Apply here before Monday 2 November: http://ow.ly/jlnK50BXwhs

Did you know we have a lab?At the moment we're working from home, but usually lots of scientific analysis happens in our...
16/10/2020

Did you know we have a lab?

At the moment we're working from home, but usually lots of scientific analysis happens in our building behind-the-scenes!

The Historic Environment Scotland conservation science team are based here. In the lab, they analyse traditional building materials so we can understand them and better care for historic places.

Now we're sharing some of that scientific magic with you as part of Stirling: Alive with Scotland Science Festival!

Join in online: http://ow.ly/uo4x50BOufj

Because today is International Day of Rural women, we’ve had a dig in the SCRAN archives to celebrate Scotland’s rural w...
15/10/2020

Because today is International Day of Rural women, we’ve had a dig in the SCRAN archives to celebrate Scotland’s rural women!

This woman is sitting outside the doorway of her cottage in Loch Carnan in South Uist in 1937, spinning wool on a wheel.

Her cottage is typical of traditional vernacular homes; you can just see the eaves of a thatched roof, roped and weighted with stones. Before industrialisation, cottage industries, often textiles, took place in buildings like this. The buildings themselves were often made by whatever came to hand.

Although we don’t know what the woman was making in this photograph or why, the traditional of cottage industries continued in rural areas in Scotland for much longer.

In the mid-eighteenth century approximately eighty percent of adult women in Scotland were involved in spinning, many producing yarn for sale.

Domestic spinning continued in parts of the Hebrides and Northern Isles until well after World War II (1939 - 1945). The custom continued of sitting outside at the spinning wheel, making the most of the light.

Meanwhile, on Scotland’s slate islands, women and children had a different role: carrying slates in wicker baskets on their backs from quarries to the harbour. This strenuous work supported what was one of Scotland’s most significant industries throughout the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.

Explore more fascinating archive images of Scotland’s rural woman: http://ow.ly/JeTa50BOzav

"Where are the trains?" 🤔We're Scotland's building conservation centre, so have you ever wondered why we're called the E...
15/10/2020

"Where are the trains?" 🤔

We're Scotland's building conservation centre, so have you ever wondered why we're called the Engine Shed but don't actually have any trains inside?

It's all in our history, which we're celebrating this Stations Day!

Our building was once part of an important military complex. This strategic base was a key resource for the army in the run up to and during both World Wars.

Originally the train track entered the shed, and elevated platforms ran along one or both sides. As part of the restoration, we took the floor down to the original level and the rails and platforms removed, but we still pay homage to our train history - if you know where to look!

For example, did you know the lectern in our auditorium actually includes some parts of the old tracks that ran into the shed?

Discover more about our history and building restoration: http://ow.ly/Haxv50BOwZC

Happy October break!Every year we run fun, free, hands-on events for all the family exploring how Scotland's older build...
12/10/2020

Happy October break!

Every year we run fun, free, hands-on events for all the family exploring how Scotland's older buildings were made. AND how they're cared for today.

Though this mid-term we can't swing open our doors, get messy with mud or crafty with brick, we do have some fun ways of exploring Scotland's built heritage from home.

Take a look at our free activities: http://ow.ly/KpLg50BOyH9

07/10/2020

Do you live in a home like this? Traditional buildings come in all shapes and sizes – and in Scotland one in five of us lives in a historic home!

If you’re lucky enough to own one of these fascinating pieces of Scotland’s heritage, we’re here to help give you advice on how to care for it.

And this #EnergyEfficiencyDay, we’ve got some top tips on making older buildings energy efficient.

Doing this can help tackle climate change and save you money.

We have advice and resources on our website, and if you do have any questions, we’re over here, please ask us! 👋

Our advice: http://ow.ly/HWiR50BLNwP

🚨 Funding alert! 🚨If you're a heritage organisation impacted by COVID-19, Historic Environment Scotland have launched a ...
06/10/2020

🚨 Funding alert! 🚨

If you're a heritage organisation impacted by COVID-19, Historic Environment Scotland have launched a new fund that could support you, with applications opening on Monday 12 October.

The fund can help with everything from urgent repairs for historic visitor attractions, to helping those delivering traditional skills courses. Organisations can also apply to this grant fund to protect jobs or skills training posts. Get the details and find out how to apply ⬇️

Spread the word!

Today we’ve launched a £2.6 million recovery fund to help Scotland’s historic environment sector cope with the impacts of Covid-19.

Organisations can apply for grants from £10,000 - £100,000 through the Historic Environment Recovery Fund.

The fund is split into two streams designed to deliver essential support to the sector:

🛠️ Reopening Historic Buildings and Sites
💪 Sector Resilience and Recovery

Find out more over on our website at http://ow.ly/9XEX50BKCu2

“Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,I must now conclude my layBy telling the world fearlessly without the least dis...
01/10/2020
The Tay Bridge Disaster: A Lesson in Design and Maintenance | Engine Shed

“Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
I must now conclude my lay
By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,
That your central girders would not have given way,
At least many sensible men do say,
Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,
At least many sensible men confesses,
For the stronger we our houses do build,
The less chance we have of being killed.”

We're not sharing Burns this National Poetry Day, this poem is by William McGonagall - sometimes regarded as Scotland's worst poet! But in this poem, McGonagall makes an important point about the the Tay Bridge Disaster of 1879....

In December of that year, the bridge collapsed during a severe gale, while a train was passing across. 75 people were killed.

Flaws in the design caused the bridge to collapse, but so did the bridge's lack of maintenance and poor repairs.

Catch up on the story this evening in our blog ⬇️

http://ow.ly/na2i50BGKuk

Poor maintenance was a factor in the 1879 Tay Bridge Disaster. Avoid disasters in your home and learn about how to maintain ironwork in buildings.

It's no secret that we love a tenement, and we know you do too! Some great news to celebrate about repairs to these much...
30/09/2020
Historic Canongate tenements returned to former glory | Edinburgh World Heritage

It's no secret that we love a tenement, and we know you do too! Some great news to celebrate about repairs to these much loved buildings in Edinburgh 👏👏

Major conservation work, led by Edinburgh World Heritage, has just been completed on the last of three historic tenements on the Canongate comprising of 16 residential dwellings and 5 shops. Work was funded by the charity’s Conservation Funding Programme, which is supported by Historic Environment...

Address

Forthside Way
Stirling
FK8 1QZ

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

01786 234800

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Comments

Can you please tell me how long the Suffragette embroidered banner is going to be on show/ I can see your post about the banner heere, but it doesn't mention dates, i can't find anything on your website 9and the search doesn't work!) I just tried to phone the Engine Shed, but it just rang out for ages. Please let me know Thank you
What a fantastic place... I have a 3 year old and a 7 year old and they loved every minute... very educational, fun, great people working there, super helpful. This week during the school holidays was all about measurement. They have a new subject every week during the school holidays... we totally recommend as a family.
Been a few times for workshops. Great place. Son enjoys it. Friendly staff
Thank you all for another great session last week at Wee Builders,,wee ones had a brilliant time ,And thank to the Lady that helped me over the bridge with pram n toddlers ### staff are Fantastic x
Well worth a visit!
Could you please tell me how to access your large car park without driving over grass or over a kerb and pavement?
Enjoyed a first visit - very dynamic and most impressive.
Do you have an expert on wool insulation for buildings?
My sons really enjoyed the free pewter casting workshop his morning, fantastic event and the guys running it were great. Thanks!
Hi would you happen to have anything for children that are under 5? We'd be very interested! (I realise that under 5's are not of compulsory educational age but just wondered if you had anything at all?) Thank you, K
On behalf of In Care Survivors Service (our group/charity) had a great time, very interesting and enlightening to hear Annie tell us about Scottish History. Good fun. Thanks from all of us, Paul
Help each other out?