Teaspoon Museum

Teaspoon Museum Welcome to the world's first Teaspoon Museum. Enter the remarkable world of Teaspoons. Visits by appointment, entry £2.00 per person. Nowadays we take them for granted but spoons, in one form or another, have existed for thousands of years, since the Paleolithic.
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The earliest spoons were made of natural materials such as wood, bone and shells, indeed the word spoon comes from the ancient English word spon (or spun in Scotland) meaning a chip of wood or horn. The French word cuillere is probably derived from the Latin word coclear or cochlea meaning snail or spiral. Archeological evidence shows that Iron Age Celts (c 250 BC) used them. First century Roman s

The earliest spoons were made of natural materials such as wood, bone and shells, indeed the word spoon comes from the ancient English word spon (or spun in Scotland) meaning a chip of wood or horn. The French word cuillere is probably derived from the Latin word coclear or cochlea meaning snail or spiral. Archeological evidence shows that Iron Age Celts (c 250 BC) used them. First century Roman s

Operating as usual

Teaspoon of the Day.Quite a well preserved spoon with "The Last Spike" at the top and "Rocky Mountaineer Railtours" etch...
08/07/2021

Teaspoon of the Day.
Quite a well preserved spoon with "The Last Spike" at the top and "Rocky Mountaineer Railtours" etched into the bowl.
On the morning of November the 7th 1885 the final ceremonial Spike was driven into the Canadian Pacific Railway track to mark the completion of the 3,000 mile trans-continental project. It was the last of about 30 million that had been used. After 5 years work, crews had converged from East and West in the Monashee mountains. A small group of company officials and labourers witnessed the ceremony that took place in Craigellachie, near Eagle Pass, British Columbia. No reporters or politicians were present. Craigellachie, BC was named after the place that the CPR company president George Stephen and director Donald Smith (who drove the last spike in after bending the 2nd last) grew up in, it is a small village in Moray, Scotland, at the confluence of the Rivers Spey and Fiddich. The last Spike ceremony was said to signify national unity.
Rocky Mountaineer is a Canadian rail-tour company in Western Canada that operates trains on three rail routes through British Columbia and Alberta.

Teaspoon of the Day.
Quite a well preserved spoon with "The Last Spike" at the top and "Rocky Mountaineer Railtours" etched into the bowl.
On the morning of November the 7th 1885 the final ceremonial Spike was driven into the Canadian Pacific Railway track to mark the completion of the 3,000 mile trans-continental project. It was the last of about 30 million that had been used. After 5 years work, crews had converged from East and West in the Monashee mountains. A small group of company officials and labourers witnessed the ceremony that took place in Craigellachie, near Eagle Pass, British Columbia. No reporters or politicians were present. Craigellachie, BC was named after the place that the CPR company president George Stephen and director Donald Smith (who drove the last spike in after bending the 2nd last) grew up in, it is a small village in Moray, Scotland, at the confluence of the Rivers Spey and Fiddich. The last Spike ceremony was said to signify national unity.
Rocky Mountaineer is a Canadian rail-tour company in Western Canada that operates trains on three rail routes through British Columbia and Alberta.

Teaspoon of the Day.This spoon has two ceramic pictures. There is a Trilllium in the bowl and the little yacht with a fu...
07/07/2021

Teaspoon of the Day.
This spoon has two ceramic pictures. There is a Trilllium in the bowl and the little yacht with a full spinnaker at the top has the word Bayfield below it.
Trilliums are spring flower perennials with 3 petals sitting on 3 leaves, like a teacup siting on a saucer. Also known as Wake-Robin or Wood Lily or Birthwort, Trilliums are woodland plants native to temperate regions of N. America and Asia. In some cases they have been harvested from the wild to an unsustainable degree. Some species are listed as endangered and it may be illegal to pick them.
Bayfield is a city with the smallest population in Wisconcin. It was named after Henry Bayfield, a British Royal Topographer, who explored the Chequamegon Bay area in 1822. Prior to European discovery, Ojibwe (Chippewa), Huron, Ottawa and Sioux lived there. In 1855, the locks at Sault St. Marie opened, allowing large ships to enter Lake Superior. In those days Bayfield was dependent on lake transportation to provide goods and passage to the outside, however, boats stopped running in December or January when the Chequamegon Bay froze over. Ice boats carried travelers during the long 4 or 5 month winter, until the spring thaw melted the icy waters. Forestry, quarrying and fishing were already established by the time the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Omaha Railroad finally steamed into Bayfield in 1883.
These days, despite only having about 500 residents, Bayfield boasts many restaurants, hotels, galleries, pick-it-yourself orchards, shops and marine services and is known as the "gateway to the Apostle Islands", a group of 21 delightful islands in Lake Superior. It was voted the best little town in the mid-west.
Bayfield has a regatta in July and an Apple Fest in October. 50 to 75 teams compete in the Apostle Islands dog sled race which takes place the first weekend of every February.

Teaspoon of the Day.
This spoon has two ceramic pictures. There is a Trilllium in the bowl and the little yacht with a full spinnaker at the top has the word Bayfield below it.
Trilliums are spring flower perennials with 3 petals sitting on 3 leaves, like a teacup siting on a saucer. Also known as Wake-Robin or Wood Lily or Birthwort, Trilliums are woodland plants native to temperate regions of N. America and Asia. In some cases they have been harvested from the wild to an unsustainable degree. Some species are listed as endangered and it may be illegal to pick them.
Bayfield is a city with the smallest population in Wisconcin. It was named after Henry Bayfield, a British Royal Topographer, who explored the Chequamegon Bay area in 1822. Prior to European discovery, Ojibwe (Chippewa), Huron, Ottawa and Sioux lived there. In 1855, the locks at Sault St. Marie opened, allowing large ships to enter Lake Superior. In those days Bayfield was dependent on lake transportation to provide goods and passage to the outside, however, boats stopped running in December or January when the Chequamegon Bay froze over. Ice boats carried travelers during the long 4 or 5 month winter, until the spring thaw melted the icy waters. Forestry, quarrying and fishing were already established by the time the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Omaha Railroad finally steamed into Bayfield in 1883.
These days, despite only having about 500 residents, Bayfield boasts many restaurants, hotels, galleries, pick-it-yourself orchards, shops and marine services and is known as the "gateway to the Apostle Islands", a group of 21 delightful islands in Lake Superior. It was voted the best little town in the mid-west.
Bayfield has a regatta in July and an Apple Fest in October. 50 to 75 teams compete in the Apostle Islands dog sled race which takes place the first weekend of every February.

Teaspoon of the Day.Showing signs of age this spoon has models at the top of a bunch of blue flowers and a red card that...
06/07/2021

Teaspoon of the Day.
Showing signs of age this spoon has models at the top of a bunch of blue flowers and a red card that says With love on Mothers Day, (the word love is replaced by a heart shape).
Mother's Day is celebrated in different forms in many countries.
Festivals honouring mothers date back to the ancient Greeks who celebrated Rhea, (the Mother of the Gods and Goddesses), every spring with festivals of worship. The Romans adapted the practice to their own pantheon and celebrated a mother Goddess, Cybele, and the festival of Hilaria every March as far back as 250BC.
During the Middle Ages in Britain, a custom developed of allowing people who had moved away from where they grew up to come back to visit their 'mother' churches, and their mothers, on the fourth Sunday of Lent. At the time children as young as 10 may have left home to find work as domestic servants or as apprentices, so these gatherings were an opportunity for family reunions. The spread of Christianity throughout Europe in the 16th century increased these celebrations and put Mothering Sunday on the calendar. Traditionally, after church, families would tuck into a Sunday dinner and mother would be made Queen of the feast. Nowadays Mother’s day typically focuses on spoiling mum and making her feel happy and appreciated, often with gifts of flowers and fruit cake.
A precursor to Mother’s Day in the United States came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe (1819 to 1910). She wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” in 1870, a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.
Another woman historically connected with the establishment of Mother's Day in the US is Anna Maria Jarvis (1864 to 1948). She held a memorial service for her own mother, (who had organized women’s groups to promote friendship and health) on the 12 May 1907. She argued that American holidays were biased toward male achievements and started a letter writing campaign to newspapers and prominent politicians urging the adoption of a special day honoring motherhood. Within five years almost every state was observing the day and in 1914, the US president, Woodrow Wilson, made the second Sunday of May each year a national holiday. Over time the day became more of a retail extravaganza and expanded to include everyone who played a mothering role. In protest against its burgeoning commercialization, Jarvis spent the last years of her life trying to abolish the holiday she had brought into being.

In Thailand, Mother’s Day is celebrated in August on the birthday of the current queen, Sirikit. In Ethiopia, families gather each autumn to sing songs and eat a large feast as part of Antrosht, a multi-day celebration honoring motherhood. Durga-puja, honouring the goddess Durga, remains an important festival in India.

Teaspoon of the Day.
Showing signs of age this spoon has models at the top of a bunch of blue flowers and a red card that says With love on Mothers Day, (the word love is replaced by a heart shape).
Mother's Day is celebrated in different forms in many countries.
Festivals honouring mothers date back to the ancient Greeks who celebrated Rhea, (the Mother of the Gods and Goddesses), every spring with festivals of worship. The Romans adapted the practice to their own pantheon and celebrated a mother Goddess, Cybele, and the festival of Hilaria every March as far back as 250BC.
During the Middle Ages in Britain, a custom developed of allowing people who had moved away from where they grew up to come back to visit their 'mother' churches, and their mothers, on the fourth Sunday of Lent. At the time children as young as 10 may have left home to find work as domestic servants or as apprentices, so these gatherings were an opportunity for family reunions. The spread of Christianity throughout Europe in the 16th century increased these celebrations and put Mothering Sunday on the calendar. Traditionally, after church, families would tuck into a Sunday dinner and mother would be made Queen of the feast. Nowadays Mother’s day typically focuses on spoiling mum and making her feel happy and appreciated, often with gifts of flowers and fruit cake.
A precursor to Mother’s Day in the United States came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe (1819 to 1910). She wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” in 1870, a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.
Another woman historically connected with the establishment of Mother's Day in the US is Anna Maria Jarvis (1864 to 1948). She held a memorial service for her own mother, (who had organized women’s groups to promote friendship and health) on the 12 May 1907. She argued that American holidays were biased toward male achievements and started a letter writing campaign to newspapers and prominent politicians urging the adoption of a special day honoring motherhood. Within five years almost every state was observing the day and in 1914, the US president, Woodrow Wilson, made the second Sunday of May each year a national holiday. Over time the day became more of a retail extravaganza and expanded to include everyone who played a mothering role. In protest against its burgeoning commercialization, Jarvis spent the last years of her life trying to abolish the holiday she had brought into being.

In Thailand, Mother’s Day is celebrated in August on the birthday of the current queen, Sirikit. In Ethiopia, families gather each autumn to sing songs and eat a large feast as part of Antrosht, a multi-day celebration honoring motherhood. Durga-puja, honouring the goddess Durga, remains an important festival in India.

Teaspoon of the Day.Gold coloured spoon that has a hand like decoration at the top with the word Tunis on the palm.    T...
05/07/2021

Teaspoon of the Day.
Gold coloured spoon that has a hand like decoration at the top with the word Tunis on the palm.
The Hamsa symbol is lucky, a charm that is said to provide a defense against the evil eye. Hamsa, or khamsa, is an Arabic word that literally means "five", or "the five fingers of the hand." The exact origins of the open right hand image are unknown but it has been used as a sign of protection that can bring its owner happiness, luck, good health, and good fortune by many societies throughout history. It may also represent blessings, power and strength. The symbol can often be seen in jewelry, amulets, above doorways and on wall hangings and is found in many places in Tunisia.
Among Jewish people, the hamsa is a respected, holy, and common symbol. It is used in the Ketubah, or marriage contracts, as well as items that dress the Torah such as pointers, and the Passover Haggadah.
For Hindus and Buddhists, it symbolizes the interplay of the chakras, which is the energy flow in your body, the five senses, and the mudras that effect them.
Each finger is thought to have it’s own energy:
Thumb- Fire element, solar plexus chakra.
Forefinger- Air element, heart chakra.
Middle Finger- Ethereal elements, throat chakra.
Ring Finger- Earth element, root chakra.
Pinkie Finger- Water element, sacral chakra.
The earliest known appearance of the Hamsa hand was in Mesopotamia. A connection has been suggested between the khamsa and the Mano Pantea, or Hand-of-the-All-Goddess, an amulet known to ancient Egyptians as the Two Fingers, that represent Isis and Osiris and the thumb, their child Horus. Another theory traces the origins of the hamsa to Carthage (Phoenicia) where the hand of the supreme deity Tanit was used to ward off the evil eye.

Teaspoon of the Day.
Gold coloured spoon that has a hand like decoration at the top with the word Tunis on the palm.
The Hamsa symbol is lucky, a charm that is said to provide a defense against the evil eye. Hamsa, or khamsa, is an Arabic word that literally means "five", or "the five fingers of the hand." The exact origins of the open right hand image are unknown but it has been used as a sign of protection that can bring its owner happiness, luck, good health, and good fortune by many societies throughout history. It may also represent blessings, power and strength. The symbol can often be seen in jewelry, amulets, above doorways and on wall hangings and is found in many places in Tunisia.
Among Jewish people, the hamsa is a respected, holy, and common symbol. It is used in the Ketubah, or marriage contracts, as well as items that dress the Torah such as pointers, and the Passover Haggadah.
For Hindus and Buddhists, it symbolizes the interplay of the chakras, which is the energy flow in your body, the five senses, and the mudras that effect them.
Each finger is thought to have it’s own energy:
Thumb- Fire element, solar plexus chakra.
Forefinger- Air element, heart chakra.
Middle Finger- Ethereal elements, throat chakra.
Ring Finger- Earth element, root chakra.
Pinkie Finger- Water element, sacral chakra.
The earliest known appearance of the Hamsa hand was in Mesopotamia. A connection has been suggested between the khamsa and the Mano Pantea, or Hand-of-the-All-Goddess, an amulet known to ancient Egyptians as the Two Fingers, that represent Isis and Osiris and the thumb, their child Horus. Another theory traces the origins of the hamsa to Carthage (Phoenicia) where the hand of the supreme deity Tanit was used to ward off the evil eye.

Teaspoon of the Day.Independence day spoon with a large Route 66 roadsign at the top.Route 66 is a famous and legendary ...
04/07/2021

Teaspoon of the Day.
Independence day spoon with a large Route 66 roadsign at the top.
Route 66 is a famous and legendary road between Chicago and Los Angeles. Spanning 2400 miles and 8 states it passes through St Louis, Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Amarillo, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Flagstaff, Sedona and Santa Monica, the heart of the USA.
This transcontinental corridor was once the National Old Trails Highway. Designated 66 in 1926 Route 66 was completely paved by 1938 earning the name "Main Street of America". It wound its way through many small towns lined by cafes, motels, petrol stations and quirky, tempting tourist attractions. It was realigned many times, shortened, straightened out, extended and had loops cut out. The road became very popular and improvements were always needed. The Interstate system in the mid 1950s provided safer and more efficient highways. This marked the beginning of the end for the historic Route 66 and, starting in 1964, it began to be replaced. Route 66 was finally decommissioned in 1984, only about 80%of the original route can still be driven.
Sadly, many of the businesses that sprung up to support the Route 66 traffic are long gone, leaving behind ruined buildings, dark neon signs, crumbling motels, and even isolated ghost towns which have also become noteworthy attractions themselves. Natural wonders such as the Mojave Desert, Painted Desert, the Petrified Forest, Meramec Caverns, and the Mississippi River are along the route. Giant statue highlights include an enormous blue whale, dinosaurs, a soda bottle, huge cowboys, a large cross, the Muffler men, the world’s largest concrete totem pole, and the world’s largest rocking chair. There are also a number of Route 66 museums featuring all sort of things from barbed wire to snakes to Jesse James to cowboys to motorcycles.
It has inspired songs, movies, books and clothes. John Steinbeck referred to it as "the road of flight" in recognition of all those who fled the dust bowl and ravages of the great depression.
"Get your kicks on Route 66" was written in 1946 by Bobby Troup, and has become a standard. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bk41aYJzimM

Teaspoon of the Day.
Independence day spoon with a large Route 66 roadsign at the top.
Route 66 is a famous and legendary road between Chicago and Los Angeles. Spanning 2400 miles and 8 states it passes through St Louis, Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Amarillo, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Flagstaff, Sedona and Santa Monica, the heart of the USA.
This transcontinental corridor was once the National Old Trails Highway. Designated 66 in 1926 Route 66 was completely paved by 1938 earning the name "Main Street of America". It wound its way through many small towns lined by cafes, motels, petrol stations and quirky, tempting tourist attractions. It was realigned many times, shortened, straightened out, extended and had loops cut out. The road became very popular and improvements were always needed. The Interstate system in the mid 1950s provided safer and more efficient highways. This marked the beginning of the end for the historic Route 66 and, starting in 1964, it began to be replaced. Route 66 was finally decommissioned in 1984, only about 80%of the original route can still be driven.
Sadly, many of the businesses that sprung up to support the Route 66 traffic are long gone, leaving behind ruined buildings, dark neon signs, crumbling motels, and even isolated ghost towns which have also become noteworthy attractions themselves. Natural wonders such as the Mojave Desert, Painted Desert, the Petrified Forest, Meramec Caverns, and the Mississippi River are along the route. Giant statue highlights include an enormous blue whale, dinosaurs, a soda bottle, huge cowboys, a large cross, the Muffler men, the world’s largest concrete totem pole, and the world’s largest rocking chair. There are also a number of Route 66 museums featuring all sort of things from barbed wire to snakes to Jesse James to cowboys to motorcycles.
It has inspired songs, movies, books and clothes. John Steinbeck referred to it as "the road of flight" in recognition of all those who fled the dust bowl and ravages of the great depression.
"Get your kicks on Route 66" was written in 1946 by Bobby Troup, and has become a standard. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bk41aYJzimM

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Middlepart
Saltcoats
KA21 6NH

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