Arundells

Arundells A beautiful Grade II Listed House with 2 acres of garden in the heart of Salisbury and former home of Sir Edward Heath. The house is filled with beautiful items and collections. Events and Exhibitions held year round.
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Arundells, in Salisbury's Cathedral Close, reflects Sir Edward's time in public office and contains his collections of: paintings, (including Wyllie, Singer Sargent, Piper, Churchill, Sickert, Augustus and Gwen John, John Nash, Lowry and many more), sailing and musical memorabilia, Oriental and European ceramics, cartoons, bronzes, Chinese and Japanese artworks, photographs and much more, just as they were when he lived there, along with access to the beautiful two acre garden

I find the garden always gives solace .Even in busy times it provides a tranquil haven. It has provided me with peace an...
06/05/2020

I find the garden always gives solace .Even in busy times it provides a tranquil haven. It has provided me with peace and tranquility in recent sad times. Who provided that perfect glimpse of a beautiful statue ? Who planted that magnificent black iris ? What is creating that heavenly perfume ? Look at that awe inspiring vista !I hope these pictures give you a fraction of the peace that actually walking there provides 😥😘

It’s a bit of a gloomy start here in Salisbury. Luckily I have some more photographs, taken yesterday , in the garden, t...
03/05/2020

It’s a bit of a gloomy start here in Salisbury. Luckily I have some more photographs, taken yesterday , in the garden, to brighten your Facebook feed!

It was a beautiful morning for a dog walk .
02/05/2020

It was a beautiful morning for a dog walk .

We have a great bunch of volunteers, There is tremendous camaraderie amongst them. I love it when we mix up the Sunday v...
01/05/2020

We have a great bunch of volunteers, There is tremendous camaraderie amongst them. I love it when we mix up the Sunday volunteers , with, for example, the Tuesday lot (!)at training days or social events- they all have at least one thing in common and it can all get a bit raucous... look forward to when we can all get together again!

“Woods at Mimizan, Les Landes” By Sir Winston Churchill (1925/8)During the spring of 1920 Winston Churchill went on his ...
30/04/2020

“Woods at Mimizan, Les Landes”
By Sir Winston Churchill (1925/8)

During the spring of 1920 Winston Churchill went on his first holiday to The Woolsack at Mimizan,(South of Bordeaux in Les Landes) as guest of Bendor, the Duke of Westminster, accompanied by General Lord Rawlinson, who also loved painting (but in watercolours.) The Duke was unwell, but Churchill and the General alternated their days with painting and boar hunting, the latter with the Duke’s pack of hounds. Churchill commented in a letter home, how difficult the trees were to paint. A few years later he was accompanied at Mimizan by John Lavery who helped him come to grips with painting the pine trees of this region. As this painting is said to date from the mid twenties it is presumably from this trip rather than the former. His enjoyment at the use of oil paint is apparent in this artwork.

A gift of a painting was promised to Edward Heath by Winston Churchill , at a dinner in July 1958 ;
“ …he murmured quietly to me, as he sipped his cognac, “my dear, I must give you one of my pictures.” He was as good as his word, and that picture has hung in my home ever since. It was followed later by a second.”

It is generally held to be one of EH’s favourite paintings and was hung, so that it could be seen by Sir Edward when sitting at the head of his dining table, through the newly reopened doorway in his dining room at Arundells.

“Between Aix and Arles”
By Sir Winston Churchill 1948
Twenty years, at least 250 paintings, and advice by Sickert, Lavery, Nicholson and Maze, amongst others, divide the two Winston Churchill Paintings in Sir Edward’s collection.
This painting was created whilst on a month long holiday in August 1948, at the Hotel du Roy Rene in Aix-en Provence, with his family. Mary Soames describes his work of this period as being somewhat “picture postcard,” with her mother encouraging him to use softer and more subtle colourings.
The painting is used by the author David Dilks to illustrate Churchill’s need for “leitmotif” in many aspects of life.
“In a landscape of Provence, between Aix and Ales he took as his theme, the strong vertical line of the cypresses, the long lateral shadows which they cast, the strips of cultivation in the fields across which the shadows lie at a different angle and the horizontal bands of country in the middle distance. “
The painting is unusual, if not unique, in that it is signed twice. EH returned the painting to WC, claiming he had forgotten to sign it, it was signed again, the original had blended in to the dark foliage in one corner of the painting. In 1974, whilst EH was returning from the annual carol concert at Broadstairs, the IRA bombed his flat in Wilton Street. This painting , was described as being the only thing of value, which was damaged, and had to be restored.

Both paintings are described, by various biographers ,as having been the most treasured possessions of Sir Edward Heath.
Note :The attached image of Woods at Mimizan is from Wikipedia with commons use, the photographs held at Arundells of the painting are very poor quality because of the heavy glaze.

Yesterday we talked about the oldest part of the house, the north range. When it was built it had a cellar beneath with ...
29/04/2020

Yesterday we talked about the oldest part of the house, the north range. When it was built it had a cellar beneath with the canon’s private rooms above, lit by the beautiful window, which you can see at the back of the house. His wine was probably delivered by the door which staff and volunteers use, at the back, in these photos ( porch a later addition.) At some point an extra floor was added , certainly by the 1600s, if not before. There were three floors until the 1960s. If you went from the south side of the house to the north side you would have to climb up stairs ( a difference of about three feet. ) You still do if you access the Blue Bedroom. These pictures illustrate how the Hawkings returned it to two floors ( with a shallow cellar) and rationalised the windows .

On this day 800 years ago the foundation stone of Salisbury Cathedral was laid. So what was going on across the road on ...
28/04/2020

On this day 800 years ago the foundation stone of Salisbury Cathedral was laid. So what was going on across the road on “our plot”? Had our man finished his fair house of stone, near the river that compasses the close, and two stone walls to enclose the ground assigned to him? He might have done. Some Canons were ready to move in by the end of 1219 and were certainly being encouraged to do so by the Feast of All Saints 1220. Our man, whoever he was, his name has sadly been lost to history, had certainly been given a large, prime plot on the west side of The Close, with access to the river and a short commute. Perhaps he was the laid back type who hadn’t started building yet, if so he would certainly have started building pretty quickly, because by 1222 the canons were told that if they hadn’t start to build by Whitsuntide the following year their land would be taken back.

The North Range of that building , the canon's private rooms, still exists in the fabric of Arundells today. (The current dining room and kitchen, and the cellar beneath, and rooms above and parts of the panic room and boiler room. ) Parts of the ancient hall have been reused in the attic and as floor joists.

The houses were built of mainly flint rubble. Some walls were heavily laced with herringbone courses of roof tiles. This decorative feature suggests access to a large supply of roof tiles, which wouldn’t have been available at that time in Salisbury. It would appear that the canons had access to a supply of damaged ones, presumably from Old Sarum. Such detail can be seen in the south boundary wall at Arundells, much of which is original to the 1220s .(Look to the right as you come out of the front door or at the shared wall with the North Canonry, near reception. That’s when we are open again of course!)
Sadly there aren’t any pictures of the original house.
Happy 800th Birthday cathedral and house that would become Arundells!

New openings ...
27/04/2020

New openings ...

23/04/2020

The tranquility interrupted by Eddie foraging in the undergrowth ...and a bee ...all that was missing was a glass of Pimms and some company !

William and Marjory Bown lived in Arundells from 1941-1947. Reginald William Bown was a managing director at Lloyds bank...
23/04/2020

William and Marjory Bown lived in Arundells from 1941-1947. Reginald William Bown was a managing director at Lloyds bank in London. The 4 directors left London during the war and William Bown was the director for the Southwest, based in Salisbury.
The Red Cross had commandeered two rooms in the house. The “Music room”, seen in the photo, now demolished and the foundations used for the terrace, was the Wool depot. Wool was donated, collected by keen knitters to make socks and balaclavas and the finished items returned to be dispatched on to troops. The Entrance Hall was used by the Red Cross as their library depot. Books were sorted and then distributed to hospitals and army camps on Salisbury Plain.
William Bown is in this photograph with their cat, “Tribulation”.
Elizabeth Bown, who was a teenager when she lived at Arundells, visited last year and she shared several memories with us, this is one;
“ My father used to shed the cares of his day’s work by picking up his split cane fishing rod and walking down to the river, to cast up the Avon or across to the point where Avon and Nadder met and merged. Trout and Grayling were a welcome addition to the limited menu provided by rations."
Elizabeth Allsop nee Bown

No history today, just some lovely flowers from the gardens at Arundells...
22/04/2020

No history today, just some lovely flowers from the gardens at Arundells...

Happy 94th Birthday to Her Majesty from all of us who would usually be at Arundells!
21/04/2020

Happy 94th Birthday to Her Majesty from all of us who would usually be at Arundells!

21/04/2020

A year ago.

Edward Heath’s father, William, would today be called an “anti -vaxxer.”On the third day of joining the army E H reporte...
20/04/2020

Edward Heath’s father, William, would today be called an “anti -vaxxer.”
On the third day of joining the army E H reported to the medical centre.
“ My father had always barred me from being vaccinated because he was convinced that this procedure was unjustifiably dangerous. But the Medical Officer insisted. I began to believe that my father had been right all along when about four of five days after the vaccination, my left arm began to swell considerably, then to stiffen and finally turn black.” (E H “The Course of My Life “)
He was rushed to hospital and luckily recovered, not without having thought he was going to die and having written an emergency will.

Compare this to James and Ann Arundell , who embraced the relatively new and risky business of inoculation against small pox. In September 1771 they paid Mr. Wick, the Salisbury Surgeon, to inoculate their family and all of their servants. Payments were also made to victims of the disease from whom pus was taken. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu introduced smallpox inoculation to Western medicine after witnessing it during her travels and stay in the Ottoman Empire. She saw first hand the practice of inoculation against small pox, variolation – which she called engrafting, and wrote home about it in a number of her letters. Variolation used live smallpox virus in the pus taken from a smallpox blister in a mild case of the disease and introduced it into scratched skin of a previously uninfected person to promote immunity to the disease.

What is the connection between these 4 photographs? I'm so disappointed that no one wanted to guess!In 1751 Ann Wyndham,...
19/04/2020

What is the connection between these 4 photographs?
I'm so disappointed that no one wanted to guess!
In 1751 Ann Wyndham, soon to be Arundell, inherited several properties and much land. When married, the couple and then family split their time between two properties, Arundells, in Salisbury, for “The Season” and Ashcombe for the summer. They undertook major renovations at the latter.
In 1930 the property was leased to Cecil Beaton .He entertained lavishly there, and his houseguests included many notable people of the time, including actors and artists such as Tallulah Bankhead, Diana Cooper, Ruth Ford and Lord Berners. Artists Whistler, Salvador Dalí, Christian Bérard, Augustus John and stage designer Oliver Messel painted murals in the house, and Dalí used it as the backdrop of one of his paintings. It was said that Beaton never got over having to leave the house (the landlord refused to renew the lease.)
When the house came up for sale in 2001, the first time it had been on the open market since just after World War I, there was a great deal of interest. Madonna and Guy Ritchie were the successful purchasers. The latter received the house as part of his divorce settlement.

The gardens after the rain Friday 17th of April 2020
17/04/2020

The gardens after the rain Friday 17th of April 2020

“I have always had the greatest respect for Sickert as a painter and draughtsman, as well as a writer. One of the first ...
17/04/2020

“I have always had the greatest respect for Sickert as a painter and draughtsman, as well as a writer. One of the first works I bought to hang on my walls when I started collecting after the Second World War was a signed etching of his “Ennui”. I got it for the small sum of £19 from the Leicester Gallery….”
Edward Heath “Music, A Joy for Life.”

In this book he mentions "meeting" Walter Sickert, who had moved into a house near St Peter’s Church, Thanet. It was 1934 and EH was carol singing .They sang two carols outside Sickert’s house. There was no response, so they rang the bell and used the knocker but were ignored. Eventually the door was opened a fraction, with the chain on, and they were told in no uncertain tones to “Go away!”😂

The Honourable Reverend Douglas Hamilton Gordon lived in Arundells in the late 1890s. He was the third son of George Gor...
16/04/2020

The Honourable Reverend Douglas Hamilton Gordon lived in Arundells in the late 1890s. He was the third son of George Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen, who was Prime Minister during the Battle of Balaclava and the infamous Charge of The Light Brigade. His memorial in the cathedral is just to the right of another former occupant of Arundells, Sir Richard Mompesson.

Canon Montague Frederick Alderson lived in Arundells from September 1947 until his death on 14 Jul 1962, at the age of 9...
15/04/2020

Canon Montague Frederick Alderson lived in Arundells from September 1947 until his death on 14 Jul 1962, at the age of 92. His grandfather was Judge Sir Edward Alderson, Baron of the Exchequer and his Uncle, by marriage, was Lord Salisbury who was Prime Minister 1885-1886,1886-1892.
Lord Salisbury was Prime minister 3 times, he was preceded and succeeded by William Gladstone on two occasions. During his tenures he helped build up the Royal Navy, Africa was divided into colonies and Britain fought the second Boer War. He married Georgina Alderson in 1857; he defied his father who wanted him to marry a rich heiress.

What is the connection between Arundells and The Seymour Monument in the cathedral?(It’s a tenuous one but interesting!)...
14/04/2020

What is the connection between Arundells and The Seymour Monument in the cathedral?

(It’s a tenuous one but interesting!)

As you are probably aware Leonard Bilson was the last canon to live in the house, which would come to be called Arundells, until the 20th Century. In 1561 he was arrested, pilloried and imprisoned in the Tower of London for witchcraft and sorcery. On the 5th of September 1562 a list was compiled of those currently imprisoned in the Tower. There were 22 prisoners including Bilson, and in that small number also, Lady Katherine Grey, The Earl of Hertford and Henry Howard.
Lady Catherine Grey (1540-1568), who was the sister of Lady Jane Grey, who was Queen of England for nine days in 1553, had secretly married Edward Seymour, The Earl of Hertford. The Queen was furious! They were both arrested and put in the tower. In 1562, the marriage was annulled and the Seymours were censured as fornicators for their "carnal copulation" by the Archbishop of Canterbury's commission. Despite being imprisoned separately from Edward Seymour, whilst in the Tower, Catherine gave birth to 2 sons.
When Catherine died Edward was allowed out of the Tower, but officially his children remained bastards to prevent any claims of succession.
Lady Katherine Grey and her husband The Earl of Hertford are buried in Salisbury Cathedral and commemorated by The Seymour Monument.

Ginger Hare Art
13/04/2020

Ginger Hare Art

I wanted to put a teddy in our window as I like seeing them on my daily walk. I also wanted to paint a rainbow... so I have had great fun doing both !

24 Feb 1766 Salisbury and Winchester Journal“ Thomas Goddard, gardener to the Honourable James Everard Arundell, in the ...
13/04/2020

24 Feb 1766 Salisbury and Winchester Journal

“ Thomas Goddard, gardener to the Honourable James Everard Arundell, in the Close, has got a remarkable large onion, full two pounds weight and seventeen inches and half round, which he is now going to plant for feed .“
This was sandwiched in between an announcement of an imprisonment and the death of an 8th child in Poole due to stomach gout and had more lines than either.

A rainbow photographed in the garden at Arundells this morning.😍
11/04/2020

A rainbow photographed in the garden at Arundells this morning.😍

If you are of a certain age you will remember that Sir Edward was the first British Prime Minister to visit China and he...
10/04/2020

If you are of a certain age you will remember that Sir Edward was the first British Prime Minister to visit China and he came back with a gift from the Chinese Government -two pandas for London Zoo. Most people remember the name of the female panda ... can you remember both names??
And the answer was ...Ching Ching and Chia Chia

This balcony in the study at Arundells is so perfectly positioned you would think it had always been here. However it wa...
09/04/2020

This balcony in the study at Arundells is so perfectly positioned you would think it had always been here. However it was created by the Hawkings, who saved the house from demolition in the 1960s.The Victorian Drawing Room (which was below)was doomed from their first viewing; they created in its place a stone garden terrace with steps to the garden. Surplus stone from the demolition of the room was given to the cathedral works yard.
The chimneys and fireplaces were removed from the West facing library and bedroom above. They installed light enhancing French windows, and upstairs, a balcony in their place. They wanted to reflect the beautiful hand crafted wrought iron work at the front of the house, but had problems sourcing some good second hand railings for the new balcony. Ironically they then discovered that they had some in their own sale rooms in Marylebone (they were auctioneers). They bought them for £26. They learned later that they had formed a moveable communion rail in the saloon of an ocean going liner. So, as I delight in telling visitors- those railings have been on the high seas and come back to the house of a sailor!
Photo credits to Renu with thanks!

The gardens, this morning, Tuesday 7 April 2020, looking absolutely beautiful.
07/04/2020

The gardens, this morning, Tuesday 7 April 2020, looking absolutely beautiful.

Address

59 Cathedral Close
Salisbury
SP1 2EN

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 15:30
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

01722 326546

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Former home of Sir Edward Heath: Prime Minister, Sailor, Musician

House, Garden, Art Collection & much more in the heart of Salisbury.

From 1985, Arundells was the home of Sir Edward Heath KG MBE, Prime Minister, statesman, sailor and musician. Heath bequeathed Arundells to the Charitable Foundation set up in his name following his death in 2005.

Arundells is presented today as it was when Sir Edward lived here, with gifts from famous leaders such as Nixon, Chairman Mao and Fidel Castro sitting alongside beautiful collections of ceramics, glassware and sculpture.

THE HOUSE

Bringing together six architectural periods, Arundells is one of the finest houses in Salisbury’s Cathedral Close, with parts of the property dating back to the 13th Century.

THE GARDEN

The house is surrounded by a beautiful, two-acre walled garden that stretches down to the confluence of the rivers Avon and Nadder, offering a spectacular view of Salisbury Cathedral.

THE COLLECTION

The house features artwork by Sir Winston Churchill, L S Lowry, John Singer Sargent, John Piper, Walter Sickert and Augustus John. As well as a cartoon gallery, model ships made by Napoleonic prisoners of war, Sir Edward’s sailing and musical memorabilia, there are treasures from the Far East- including hand painted Chinese wallpaper, a stunning collection of Japanese woodcut prints and much more.

EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS

Arundells hosts a number of events and exhibitions throughout the year, from outdoor theatre and historical and political talks, to intimate concerts. Please visit our website or page for more details and tickets.

We are also available for private events and parties, so please get in touch to see how we can help you celebrate that special occasion.


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Comments

Visited today and it is well worth a visit.
Amazing poppies on Cathedral
The talk given by Sir Max Hastings on Vietnam was absolutely brilliant! Thank you to all involved in the organisation.
Our friend's daughter enjoying Wendy's musical bottles!
Who put the grand piano in the tumble dryer?
Amazing new exhibition on music Wendy, but how much did you have to drink for it!
Really old lead drain pipe at Arundells, slightly older than the one at Mompesson House.
Arundells from a different perspective!
Welcome to Top 100 Attractions
Missing all my colleagues. Will drop by soon to say hello.
Really enjoyed our visit today - thanks to all volunteers that showed us round. :)
I will check it out sometime.