The Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Museum

The Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Museum The UK's newest cavalry museum displays the historic collections of The Royal Lancers & Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry and South Notts Hussars Yeomanry

The Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Museum is accommodated in a refurbished space spanning the front of Thoresby Courtyard, set within the stunning surroundings of Thoresby Park. The museum was opened by HRH Princess Alexandra on Tuesday 26th July 2011. Since then thousands of visitors have toured this fascinating new display. The museum tells the story of cavalry in the British Army, f

The Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Museum is accommodated in a refurbished space spanning the front of Thoresby Courtyard, set within the stunning surroundings of Thoresby Park. The museum was opened by HRH Princess Alexandra on Tuesday 26th July 2011. Since then thousands of visitors have toured this fascinating new display. The museum tells the story of cavalry in the British Army, f

Operating as usual

31/10/2021

Many thanks to everyone who visited our exhibition over the last two weeks.

From the ArchivesPalestine 1917 - 18During the Great War, the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry and the South Notts Hussars Yeom...
31/10/2021

From the Archives

Palestine 1917 - 18

During the Great War, the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry and the South Notts Hussars Yeomanry were brigaded with the Derbyshire Yeomanry in the Notts and Derby Mounted Brigade, later to be renamed the 7th Mounted Brigade.

They were initially sent to Egypt, before being dispatched to take part in the ill fated Gallipolli campaign as infantry.

The Brigade then returned to Egypt, were re-united with their horses and transferred to fight in northern Greece and Macedonia.

In June 1917 the the Debyshire Yeomanry remained in Macedonia, whilst the SRY & SNY returned to Egypt and were attached to the Desert Mounted Corps, taking part in Allenby’s great cavalry advance against the Turks from Gaza to Jerusalem.

In April 1918, the South Notts Hussars left the Brigade, and were dismounted to form the B Battalion, Machine Gun Corps with the 1/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry.
The battalion left Egypt for France, arriving in June 1918.
It was later numbered as the 100th (Warwickshire and South Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, and served with great distinction on the Western Front.
At the Armistice, it was serving as Army Troops with the Fourth Army.

The Sherwood Rangers remained in Palestine, finally taking a prominent part in Allenby's annihilation of the 105,000 strong Turkish Army in the Autumn of 1918, which was achieved despite being outnumbered.
The cavalry advanced at speed, in numbers to outflank and bypass the Turks positions.
The 5th Cavalry Division advanced 540 miles in 36 days from Jerusalem to Aleppo forcing the Turks into a wholesale retreat. Allenby's troops taking 80,000 prisoners with very little fighting.
It is regarded as one of the finest actions by cavalry in the history of warfare and was also one of the last.

For their part in the campaign, the Sherwood Rangers and the South Notts Hussars were awarded the Battle Honour ‘Palestine 1917 - 18'

From the Archives

Palestine 1917 - 18

During the Great War, the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry and the South Notts Hussars Yeomanry were brigaded with the Derbyshire Yeomanry in the Notts and Derby Mounted Brigade, later to be renamed the 7th Mounted Brigade.

They were initially sent to Egypt, before being dispatched to take part in the ill fated Gallipolli campaign as infantry.

The Brigade then returned to Egypt, were re-united with their horses and transferred to fight in northern Greece and Macedonia.

In June 1917 the the Debyshire Yeomanry remained in Macedonia, whilst the SRY & SNY returned to Egypt and were attached to the Desert Mounted Corps, taking part in Allenby’s great cavalry advance against the Turks from Gaza to Jerusalem.

In April 1918, the South Notts Hussars left the Brigade, and were dismounted to form the B Battalion, Machine Gun Corps with the 1/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry.
The battalion left Egypt for France, arriving in June 1918.
It was later numbered as the 100th (Warwickshire and South Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, and served with great distinction on the Western Front.
At the Armistice, it was serving as Army Troops with the Fourth Army.

The Sherwood Rangers remained in Palestine, finally taking a prominent part in Allenby's annihilation of the 105,000 strong Turkish Army in the Autumn of 1918, which was achieved despite being outnumbered.
The cavalry advanced at speed, in numbers to outflank and bypass the Turks positions.
The 5th Cavalry Division advanced 540 miles in 36 days from Jerusalem to Aleppo forcing the Turks into a wholesale retreat. Allenby's troops taking 80,000 prisoners with very little fighting.
It is regarded as one of the finest actions by cavalry in the history of warfare and was also one of the last.

For their part in the campaign, the Sherwood Rangers and the South Notts Hussars were awarded the Battle Honour ‘Palestine 1917 - 18'

Photos from The Royal Lancers's post
29/10/2021

Photos from The Royal Lancers's post

From the ArchivesThe Defence of Ladysmith 28 October 1899 – 27 February 1900The first major war the 5th Royal Irish foug...
28/10/2021

From the Archives

The Defence of Ladysmith 28 October 1899 – 27 February 1900

The first major war the 5th Royal Irish fought as Lancers was the Boer War. By the time they embarked from India for Africa they had acquired a fine reputation; GOC Bengal described them as: "A first rate Regiment in first rate order; I never saw a better."
But the Boer War demonstrated that the new century required new tactics. The invention of smokeless gunpowder and rapid firing rifles meant that the role of the cavalry had to change, although the 5th Lancers did make a traditional cavalry charge at Elandslaagte on the 21st October 1899.
Subsequently the Regiment had the dubious honour of being besieged in the town of Ladysmith in General Sir George White's garrison; the Boers besieged the garrison for four months before the it was eventually relieved. So short were the rations that one officer wrote: "Emaciated troop horse was issued to the troops in a disguised and more palatable form - as paste, sausage meat and even calves-foot jelly."
Sir George Stuart White had been the commander of the besieged British Garrison at Ladysmith. When the situation seemed to have become untenable he was instructed by General Sir Redvers Buller to destroy the guns and surrender the garrison on the best terms he could.
White responded "I hold Ladysmith for the Queen" and held out for another four months before being relieved in February 1900.
The first party of the relief column, under Major Hubert Gough and of which Winston Churchill was a part, rode in on the evening of 28 February.
White reportedly greeted them saying, "Thank God we kept the flag flying".

For their participation in the Siege, the 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers were awarded the Battle Honour 'Defence of Ladysmith'

Photos from The Royal Lancers's post
26/10/2021

Photos from The Royal Lancers's post

Some of our veterans friends close to Nottingham might be interested in this.
26/10/2021

Some of our veterans friends close to Nottingham might be interested in this.

Fancy a bit of tri-forces banter?

We're hosting another #veterans coffee morning this Saturday.

If you're a veteran and want to see what it's all about, sign up☕️🥓🥪

📍City Ground
📅 Saturday 30th October
⏰ 10am-12

Book your spot✏️
https://buff.ly/3m1Wvu7

Happy Balaclava Day to all Lancers
25/10/2021

Happy Balaclava Day to all Lancers

Happy Balaclava Day to all Lancers

Heroes of the LancersSergeant-Major (later Lieutenant and Quartermaster) Charles Wooden VC17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridg...
25/10/2021

Heroes of the Lancers

Sergeant-Major (later Lieutenant and Quartermaster) Charles Wooden VC
17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own.)

Charles Wooden was born on: 24th March 1827 at Kiel, Denmark (now Germany).
He enlisted 17th Lancers c.1845, and served with the Regiment in the Crimean war 1854-55, and was present at Alma, Balaclava (Light Brigade Charge), Inkerman and the siege of Sebastopol
He rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade 25.10.1854 (His horse was killed).
Wooden was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry at Balaclava.

The citation reads "For having after the retreat of the Light Cavalry at the Battle of Balaclava, being instrumental, together with Dr James Mouat C.B. in saving the life of Lieutenant Colonel Morris C.B. 17th Lancers, by proceeding under a heavy fire to his assistance when he was lying very dangerously wounded in an exposed situation".
London Gazetted on 26th October 1858.

He was promoted Troop Sergeant Major 1.10.1855, and Regimental Sergeant Major 18.4.1856).

He was later promoted to Lieutenant and Quartermaster in the 6th Dragoons 26.10.1860.
Exchanged into 5th Lancers 21.3.1865.
Left the regiment in 1871 and exchanged into 104th Bengal Fusiliers 4.2.1871.
Died on 24th April 1876 at Dover, Kent It is believed that he shot himself at the age of 49, one month after his birthday.
Buried at St. James's Cemetery, Dover in unmarked grave.
Wooden appeared as a witness at the Court Martial of Lieutenant Colonel Crawley of the 6th Dragoons at Aldershot on 17.11.1863.
He had a ginger beard and was known in the 17th Lancers as, "tish me--the devil."
The nick-name came about because of a broken English reply he gave when challenged by a sentry who didn't recognise him.

His Medals and Clasps : VICTORIA CROSS, Crimea (clasps Alma, Balaclava, Inkerman, Sebastopol), Turkish Medal, French War Medal, Indian Mutiny Medal.

Heroes of the LancersSergeant John Farrell VC 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own)John Farrell Born on in March 1826 a...
25/10/2021

Heroes of the Lancers

Sergeant John Farrell VC 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own)

John Farrell Born on in March 1826 at Dublin. He enlisted 17th Lancers 1842.
Farrell rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava 25.10.1854. His horse was killed.
He Was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry at Balaclava.
The citation stated "For having remained, amidst a shower of shot and shell, with Captain Webb, who was severely wounded and whom he and Sergeant Berryman had carried as far as the pain of his wounds would allow, until a stretcher was procured, when he assisted Berryman and a Private of the 13th Dragoons [Malone] to carry that officer off the field".
London Gazetted on 20th November 1857.

He was promoted to Troop Sergeant Major 2.5.1856, and later promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant.
He died on 31st August 1865 at Secunderabad, India, and is buried in an unmarked grave in Secunderabad Cemetery.
.
His Medals & clasps:
Victoria Cross, Crimea (clasps Alma, Balaclava, Inkerman, Sebastopol).

Heroes of the Lancers

Sergeant John Farrell VC 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own)

John Farrell Born on in March 1826 at Dublin. He enlisted 17th Lancers 1842.
Farrell rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava 25.10.1854. His horse was killed.
He Was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry at Balaclava.
The citation stated "For having remained, amidst a shower of shot and shell, with Captain Webb, who was severely wounded and whom he and Sergeant Berryman had carried as far as the pain of his wounds would allow, until a stretcher was procured, when he assisted Berryman and a Private of the 13th Dragoons [Malone] to carry that officer off the field".
London Gazetted on 20th November 1857.

He was promoted to Troop Sergeant Major 2.5.1856, and later promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant.
He died on 31st August 1865 at Secunderabad, India, and is buried in an unmarked grave in Secunderabad Cemetery.
.
His Medals & clasps:
Victoria Cross, Crimea (clasps Alma, Balaclava, Inkerman, Sebastopol).

From our friends The Reflection & Remembrance SocietySocirty
25/10/2021

From our friends The Reflection & Remembrance SocietySocirty

17th Lancers 1854

The Charge of the Light Brigade
By Alfred Lord Tennyson -1809-1892

Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
"Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!" he said:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

"Forward, the Light Brigade!"
Was there a man dismay’d?
Not tho’ the soldier knew
Some one had blunder’d:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley’d and thunder’d;
Storm’d at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred.

Flash’d all their sabres bare,
Flash’d as they turn’d in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wonder’d:
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro’ the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reel’d from the sabre-stroke
Shatter’d and sunder’d.
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley’d and thunder’d;
Storm’d at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro’ the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder’d.
Honor the charge they made!
Honor the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred.....

"OR GLORY LIVING ON" ☠

Heroes of the LancersTroop Sergeant-Major John Berryman VC 17th (The Duke of Cambridge’s Own) LancersJohn Berryman was b...
25/10/2021

Heroes of the Lancers

Troop Sergeant-Major John Berryman VC
17th (The Duke of Cambridge’s Own) Lancers

John Berryman was born on the 28th July 1825 at Dudley, Worcestershire.
He was working as a cabinet maker prior to enlistment in 17th Lancers 18.10.1843.
He was promoted to Corporal 21.10.1851, and Sergeant 2.8.1854.
He rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade (Horse shot) 25.10.1854.
Berryman was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry at Balaclava.
The citation stated "Served with his Regiment the whole of the war, was present at the Battle of Alma, and also engaged in the pursuit at Mackenzie's Farm, where he succeeded in capturing three Russian prisoners, when they were within reach of their own guns. Was present and charged at the Battle of Balaklava, where, his horse being shot under him, he stopped on the field with a wounded officer (Captain Webb) amidst a shower of shot and shell, although repeatedly told by that officer to consult his own safety and leave him, but he refused to do so, and on Sergeant John Farrell coming by, with his assistance carried Captain Webb out of range of the guns".
Promoted Troop Sergeant Major 18.4.1856.
London Gazetted on 24th February 1857.
He also served during Indian Mutiny 1858
Married 14.1.1861 to Miss Eliza Suright in India.
Lieutenant and Quartermaster 12.4.1864.
One child, Florence, born 21.3.1865.
Attended First Balaclava Banquet 25.10.1875.
Member Balaclava Commemoration Society 1879.
Zulu War 1879
Promoted from ranks of 17th Lancers to be Quarter Master in 5th Lancers on 19.5.1880,
Honorary Captain 1881, Honorary Major 1883.
Attended Annual Dinners in 1890, 1892, 1893 and 1895
Died 27.6.1896 at Upper Court, Woldingham, Surrey.
Memorial in St. Agatha's Churchyard, Woldingham.

His Medals:
VICTORIA CROSS, Crimea (clasps Alma, Balaclava, Inkerman, Sebastopol), Turkish Medal, Indian Mutiny Medal (clasp for Central India), South African Medal (clasp for Ulundi)

Heroes of the Lancers

Troop Sergeant-Major John Berryman VC
17th (The Duke of Cambridge’s Own) Lancers

John Berryman was born on the 28th July 1825 at Dudley, Worcestershire.
He was working as a cabinet maker prior to enlistment in 17th Lancers 18.10.1843.
He was promoted to Corporal 21.10.1851, and Sergeant 2.8.1854.
He rode in the Charge of the Light Brigade (Horse shot) 25.10.1854.
Berryman was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry at Balaclava.
The citation stated "Served with his Regiment the whole of the war, was present at the Battle of Alma, and also engaged in the pursuit at Mackenzie's Farm, where he succeeded in capturing three Russian prisoners, when they were within reach of their own guns. Was present and charged at the Battle of Balaklava, where, his horse being shot under him, he stopped on the field with a wounded officer (Captain Webb) amidst a shower of shot and shell, although repeatedly told by that officer to consult his own safety and leave him, but he refused to do so, and on Sergeant John Farrell coming by, with his assistance carried Captain Webb out of range of the guns".
Promoted Troop Sergeant Major 18.4.1856.
London Gazetted on 24th February 1857.
He also served during Indian Mutiny 1858
Married 14.1.1861 to Miss Eliza Suright in India.
Lieutenant and Quartermaster 12.4.1864.
One child, Florence, born 21.3.1865.
Attended First Balaclava Banquet 25.10.1875.
Member Balaclava Commemoration Society 1879.
Zulu War 1879
Promoted from ranks of 17th Lancers to be Quarter Master in 5th Lancers on 19.5.1880,
Honorary Captain 1881, Honorary Major 1883.
Attended Annual Dinners in 1890, 1892, 1893 and 1895
Died 27.6.1896 at Upper Court, Woldingham, Surrey.
Memorial in St. Agatha's Churchyard, Woldingham.

His Medals:
VICTORIA CROSS, Crimea (clasps Alma, Balaclava, Inkerman, Sebastopol), Turkish Medal, Indian Mutiny Medal (clasp for Central India), South African Medal (clasp for Ulundi)

From the ArchivesThe Battle of Balaklava 25 October 1854After a period of 30 years home service, it was not until 1854 t...
25/10/2021

From the Archives

The Battle of Balaklava 25 October 1854

After a period of 30 years home service, it was not until 1854 that the 17th Lancers again found themselves abroad and at war.

Russia, under the pretext of a religious dispute in Jerusalem had gone to war against the Turkish Ottoman Empire.
In the initial stages of the war the Russians had defeated the Turkish Fleet in the Black Sea.
Both Britain and France feared that this might result in the Russian Fleet moving into the Mediterranean, which would have drastically shifted the balance of European power.
As a result the British and French decided to mount a joint expedition in support of the Turks.
By the time the expedition arrived in theatre the Turks had already managed to lift the siege of Silistria and push the Russians back into their own territory.

Although the initial goals of the war had been achieved it was decided by the allies to use this opportunity to destroy the menace of the Russian fleet once and for all by invading the Crimea and destroying the Russian naval port at Sevastopol.
It was during the initial stages of the siege of Sevastopol that the 17th Lancers made their most famous charge as part of the Light Brigade at Balaklava.
The allies had laid siege to Sevastopol and in an attempt to break the siege on the 25th of October 1854, the Russians launched an attack on the Causeway Heights to cut the British off from their supply chain.
Initially the Russians met with success taking both the Heights and the redoubts defending them.
The stubborn defence of the 93rd Regiment of Foot and the successful Charge of the Heavy Brigade halted their advance.

It was not until the later stages of the battle that the famous Charge of the Light Brigade took place. In fact it was caused by confusion of orders. From his position on the Sapoune Heights, Lord Raglan could see that the Russians were about to carry away the captured guns from the Causeway Heights. Raglan therefore ordered Lord Lucan, the commander of the Cavalry Division, to launch the Light Brigade to retake the guns. From his position in the valley Lucan could not see the guns. When he asked for further clarification from Captain Nolan, the ADC who had brought the message, Nolan pointed not to the guns on the Causeway Heights, but to a Russian Battery at the end of the valley. Having received the clarification he required, he directed Lord Cardigan, his brother-in-law and Commander of the Light Brigade, to advance down the valley. On orders Cardigan advanced the five regiments of the Light Brigade towards the line of Russian guns at a trot.

The first salvo was fired when the brigade had advanced only 200 yards. Each subsequent salvo took a heavy toll on the 17th, who were positioned forward left in the Brigade, but the advance continued unabated with the gaps in the line being filled quickly.
As they neared the guns, the Light Brigade broke into a charge, and were met within eighty yards by a final salvo. The 17th, led by Captain Morris, swept down on the enemy, carrying the guns and driving the Russian cavalry, who were massed behind the guns, back in disarray. "Half a dozen of us leaped in among the guns, and I with one blow brained a Russian gunner." (Private John Vahey, Regimental butcher). The force was however too small to maintain the position unaided and were forced to withdraw back up the valley, again under constant musket and artillery fire from the flanking Heights, and harassed by Cossacks who rode down among them.

Of the 147 17th Lancers that charged, only 38 answered the roll call after the battle. For their gallant actions that day, three Victoria Crosses were awarded to members of the Regiment, all for rescuing wounded comrades.

Although the 17th remained in the Crimea for the rest of the campaign they did not play a major role in any of the remaining battles, which were predominantly infantry affairs.

For their part in this famous battle, the 17th Lancers were awarded the Battle Honour 'Balaklava'

Address

Thoresby Courtyard
Newark
NG22 9EP

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:30am - 4:30pm
Thursday 10:30am - 4:30pm
Friday 10:30am - 4:30pm
Saturday 10:30am - 4:30pm
Sunday 10:30am - 4:30pm

Telephone

01623824222

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Our Story

The Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Museum is accommodated in a refurbished space spanning the front of Th0resby Courtyard, set within the stunning surroundings of Thoresby Park. The museum was opened by HRH Princess Alexandra on Tuesday 26th July 2011. Since then thousands of visitors have toured this fascinating new display. The museum tells the story of cavalry in the British Army, from the days of the horseback charge, through the great tank battles of the Second World War, to present-day operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. A series of graphic panels and display cases, learning zones and video presentations, take visitors through our fascinating story. Entry to the museum is free. Establishing our new museum at Thoresby was made possible by a partnership with the Stonebridge Trust, which provided space in the Courtyard and contributed to the capital costs, the Leader Project, which provides European funds for rural regeneration, and the Heretiage Lottery Fund. The project is also supported by Friends of the Museum.

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Comments

Saw this logo matching the logo on this group not sure if it’s any relevance?
As an ex 9" Queen's Royal Lancer is there a magazine available recording past and present information please?.
Thanks for the archive search for, Gefreiter Walter Vehlow, 917th Grenadier Regiment, Wehrmacht, German POW at Camp 1012 Thoresby Park, Perlethorpe cm Budby.
Good morning. Photos of some of your lads resting in our soil in South Africa. Diamond Hill Cemetery, East of Pretoria on the Diamond Hill battlefield (11/12 June 1900). Including the Earl of Airlie who was killed in action leading his regiment at that battle. "In the corner of some foreign field a Lancer sleeps tonight".
I'm trying to find out more about a WW2 CWGC grave in the churchyard of my home village of Underwood, Nottinghamshire. It belongs to a Cpl Joseph Arthur Castledine, 316876, 17th/21st Lancers, who died on 26 October 1940, at Ashington, West Sussex. Aged 32, Joe had been in the Army since 1930; apparently, he originally enlisted in the Royal Tank Corps. Joe's parents Joseph and Bertha, lived opposite my grandad's butcher's shop on Alfreton Road, Underwood and according to my mum, when Joe died, his mum had him lying in his open coffin in her front room. Sadly, Joe's name doesn't appear on the Underwood War Memorial in the churchyard so I'm trying to find out why and particularly, the cause of his death. I really would like to see his name now added to Underwood's WW2 Roll of Honour and will be contacting the vicar shortly, to see if that can be redressed. Joe's grave appears to be well tended so I can only assume that he has relatives still around the area. If anyone can throw any light on the circumstances surrounding Joe's death and maybe the reason why he is not commemorated, then I would really appreciate it. Lest we forget.
Pete Bradbury 16th/5th Queens Royal lancers Jack Ashley MP visit Pete Jablonski in the background
Want to help? to work alongside other veterans and ex emergency services...volunteers needed nationwide, but especially Birmingham, Walsall, Leicester and Nottingham. Contact me if you want to know more, or google RE:ACT
Watched a clip on Youtube yesterday from Armed Forces TV. It was an interview with "Chalky" White of The 17/21st L about his time in the SAS. Seem to remember him showing up at Carlton TAC with Bob Locke once? Can anyone remember him?
Well worth purchasing. OR GLORY LIVING ON ☠
The release details for the new regimental history, Death or Glory The 17th/21st Lancers 1922-1993 by Kevin Shannon.
The Reflection and Remembrance Society had a bit of an exclusive reveal yesterday. The up and coming New History by Kevin Shannon of The 17th/21st Lancers 1922-1993. Look out for the launch date soon. OR GLORY LIVING ON ☠
THIS DAY IN HISTORY Deaths - We will remember them 1945 JONES. ALBERT WINFIELD Age: 23 Trooper 27th Lancers United Kingdom '3771772'