The Sheriff of Nottingham

The Sheriff of Nottingham Everyone knows Robin Hood. Robin has always been closely associated with the Sheriff of Nottingham
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Using the role of the Sheriff of Nottingham to shed light on the legend of Robin Hood

A wintery scene from the weekend. Same tree 70 odd years ago
06/12/2023

A wintery scene from the weekend. Same tree 70 odd years ago

Another wonderful ancient oak from Sherwood Forest. An after the snow came and a before the snow came. 📸 by Tammy Herd
05/12/2023

Another wonderful ancient oak from Sherwood Forest.

An after the snow came and a before the snow came.

📸 by Tammy Herd

A very wintery scene at the Major oak as all Sherwood laid under a good thick blanket of snow 📸 by the very talented Tam...
04/12/2023

A very wintery scene at the Major oak as all Sherwood laid under a good thick blanket of snow

📸 by the very talented Tammy Herd

Happy 1st of Advent everyone
03/12/2023

Happy 1st of Advent everyone

Tis the season!! Join The Sheriff of Nottingham this winter at Visit Sherwood Forest for three very special winter event...
02/12/2023

Tis the season!!

Join The Sheriff of Nottingham this winter at Visit Sherwood Forest for three very special winter events.

Cry Christmas on Sunday 17th of December when the Sheriff might grant a pardon to the outlaws for Christmas.

Twelfth Night on Saturday 6th January when we celebrate the end of Christmas

And finally the wonderful wassailing weekend when we join together to chase away the bad spirits and bless our forest for another year

OTD King Henry I died 1st December 1135.  He was the fourth son of William the Conqueror. Henry was born in England, he ...
01/12/2023

OTD King Henry I died 1st December 1135.

He was the fourth son of William the Conqueror. Henry was born in England, he seized the throne after his brother King William Rufus died in a hunting “accident”. Henry is credited with fathering more than twenty acknowledged illegitimate children, more than any other English king.

Henry I ruled for thirty five years. By the time of his death the Anglo-Norman monarchy and government was deeply rooted in England. He left behind a well established effective and efficient government machine which included string local administration in the Shires via the county Sheriffs.

1377 a most significant year. 1377c The poem Piers Plowman by William Langland published. Piers Plowman contains the fir...
30/11/2023

1377 a most significant year.

1377c The poem Piers Plowman by William Langland published. Piers Plowman contains the first known reference to a literary tradition of Robin Hood tales. Langland believed that his audience would be familiar with tales of Robin Hood.

1377 the Bad Parliament granted to the King the first Poll Tax, a tax of four pence or a groat to be taken from the goods of each man and woman in the kingdom over fourteen, with the exception of genuine beggars.Special commissions were appointed to collect the tax, and the county sheriffs were ordered to aid with the collection. The tax netted £22,607, 2 s., 6d. paid by 1,376, 442 persons. The Poll Tax helped fuel the Peasants Revolt a few years later.

1377 Thursday 16th July the Coronantion of King Richard II. Deposed in 1399 Richard after 245 years of rule and eight generations the unbroken succession of the Plantagenets ended.

Queen Eleanor died on the 28th November 1290 at Harby in Nottinghamshire. The distraught King was by her side. For three...
29/11/2023

Queen Eleanor died on the 28th November 1290 at Harby in Nottinghamshire. The distraught King was by her side. For three days afterward, the machinery of government came to a halt and no writs were sealed.

Eleanor's body was then taken to Lincoln Cathedral. The Queen was afforded the most elaborate of funeral rites. Eleanor had a "triple" burial – separate burial of viscera, heart and body. Eleanor's viscera were buried in Lincoln Cathedral, where Edward placed a duplicate of her Westminster tomb. The Lincoln tomb's original stone chest survives; its effigy was destroyed in the 17th century and has been replaced with a 19th-century copy. On the outside of Lincoln Cathedral are two statues often identified as Edward and Eleanor.

After Lincoln the embalmed body of the Queen was borne in great state to Westminster Abbey, and accompanied for most of the way by Edward, and a substantial cortege of mourners. Edward gave orders that memorial crosses be erected at the site of each overnight stop between Lincoln and Westminster. The "Eleanor crosses" stood at Lincoln, Grantham, Stamford, Geddington, Hardingstone near Northampton, Stony Stratford, Woburn, Dunstable, St Albans, Waltham, Westcheap, and Charing – only three survive, none in its entirety. The best preserved is that at Geddington. All three have lost the crosses "of immense height" that originally surmounted them; only the lower stages remain.

The body of the Queen was buried at Westminster Abbey. The queen's heart was buried in the Dominican priory at Blackfriars in London.

When Edward remarried a decade after her death, he and his second wife Margaret of France, named their only daughter Eleanor in honour of her.

On this day, 28th November 1290, Eleanor of Castile, Queen of England first and beloved wife of King Edward I died at Ha...
28/11/2023

On this day, 28th November 1290, Eleanor of Castile, Queen of England first and beloved wife of King Edward I died at Harby, here in Nottinghamshire.

The death of the Queen after a protracted illness that kept the royal couple in Sherwood for months ended an extraordinary royal marriage.

The King and Queen had set out from the Royal hunting lodge at Clipstone heading for Lincoln. Her final stop was at the village of Harby, less than 7 miles from Lincoln. The journey was abandoned, and the queen was lodged in the house of Richard de Weston, the foundations of which can still be seen near Harby's parish church. After receiving the last rites, she died there on the evening of 28 November 1290, aged 49 and after 36 years of marriage. Edward was at her bedside to hear her final requests. In his profound grief for three days afterward, the machinery of government came to a halt and no writs were sealed.

Eleanor of Castile born 1241 was Queen of England as the first wife of Edward I. She married the then Prince Edward in 1...
27/11/2023

Eleanor of Castile born 1241 was Queen of England as the first wife of Edward I. She married the then Prince Edward in 1254 when she was aged just 13 and he 15, as part of a political deal to affirm English sovereignty over Gascony. The marriage was a very close one and Eleanor travelled extensively with her husband. She was even with him on Crusade in 1271.

In the summer of 1290, the King and Queen commenced a tour north through Eleanor's properties but proceeded at a much slower pace than usual as it was clear that the Queen was ill.

In the autumn the King and Queen stopped at the Royal Hunting palace at Clipstone, here in Sherwood Forest, because the Queen was too ill to travel further. The King even convened a Parliament in Clipstone, rather than London. Eleanor’s children were summoned to visit her at Clipstone.

At the end of the parliament Eleanor and Edward set out the short distance from Clipstone to Lincoln. Eleanor was travelling fewer than eight miles a day.

Her final stop was at the village of Harby, Nottinghamshire, less than 7 miles from Lincoln

Pigging out in the Royal Forest! Pannage season is now about over and all you commoners should get your pigs back out of...
26/11/2023

Pigging out in the Royal Forest!

Pannage season is now about over and all you commoners should get your pigs back out of the forest and pay up your pannage fees. Pannage is the medieval practice of releasing pigs into forests to eat acorns.

Pannage served three useful purposes. One it fattened pigs ready for slaughter which would help families feed themselves through a winter. Two the pigs in rooting around looking for nuts, turned the soil and broke it. Pig-rooting prevented soil compaction and released nutrients for plant growth. It was good for the Forest. Three the owners of the pigs paid a fee for the right either in coin or by offering a fattened pig per certain numbers of pigs loosed in the Forest.

The pannage season usually lasted for a couple of months and ends about now.

It's certainly getting chilly now❄️ in Sherwood and tomorrow is Stir Up Sunday. The Lord Sheriff is a great fan!! Stir u...
25/11/2023

It's certainly getting chilly now❄️ in Sherwood and tomorrow is Stir Up Sunday. The Lord Sheriff is a great fan!! Stir up Sunday is traditionally the day people started to make their Christmas pudding and stirred up the mixture.

It's also that time of year when birds need high-energy and high-fat foods and we're inviting you to make the ideal pudding for them on Sunday (26th) You can have fun making bird-seed cakes at Sherwood to take home and place in your garden or outdoor space.

You don't need to be Bake-Off level 🍰 to make this cake and we'll have our team here to tell you how to make these tasty🐦treats.

The Visitor Centre is open from 10am and there are lots of hot food and drink options to keep you warm.

Take a walk in the forest and keep your eyes and ears open for robins, wrens, nuthatches, long-tailed t**s and may be even a woodpecker or two.

Stir-Up Sunday gets underway at 11am.

Find out what else is happening at Sherwood Forest https://bit.ly/Sherwoodevents

A copy of Magna Carta to hang in every Cathedral and collegiate church in England?? That was the plan of Archbishop of C...
25/11/2023

A copy of Magna Carta to hang in every Cathedral and collegiate church in England??

That was the plan of Archbishop of Canterbury John Peckham. In January 1279 he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by Pope Nicholas III who had prevented the election of Robert Burnell, Edward I's preferred candidate.

Peckham offended the king when he ordered that a copy of Magna Carta should be hung in all cathedral and collegiate churches. The king saw this as an unnecessary intrusion into political affairs. The archbishop compromised and Parliament invalidated any regulation of the archbishop dealing with royal policies or power. The copies of Magna Carta were taken down.

A map and description of the County of  Nottinghamshire, the description points out that Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire ...
24/11/2023

A map and description of the County of Nottinghamshire, the description points out that Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire were not so divided that they continued to have one Sheriff until the tenth year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Them and us We are in our accounts of the tales of Robin Hood used  to talk of those in power - the landowners, as the n...
23/11/2023

Them and us

We are in our accounts of the tales of Robin Hood used to talk of those in power - the landowners, as the nobles. Throughout the thirteenth century contemporary chroniclers talked of the baronage. These men dominated politics and public affairs and were key players in a hierarchical society with the king at its head.

Who and what were these people?

At the top of the pile, just below the kings majesty were the Earls, a group of less than a dozen men,for most of the period, although the number fluctuated. These men were the tenants in chief and controlled vast estates stretching across many counties and regions. William the Conqueror had made it policy to ensure his earls had a wide “national” interest rather than be all powerful in one locality.

Below the earls were the barons. These were men who held baronies. They numbered about 200. Often these men held their land in return for military service from either king or Earl.

Below the barons were the knights although considered noble they were not part of the higher aristocracy around the king like the earls and barons.

In the Parliament of 1299 eleven earls and seventy nine barons were summoned to attend by name. The right to offer council to and be heard by the king was jealously guarded by the higher nobility.

Robin Hood and King Arthur part II Compare and contrast Glastonbury Abbey burned down in 1184. After the fire King Henry...
22/11/2023

Robin Hood and King Arthur part II
Compare and contrast

Glastonbury Abbey burned down in 1184. After the fire King Henry II encouraged the monks to say that they had found the tomb of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. Visitors flocked to Glastonbury. The young king Edward I even took his bride Eleanor of Castile to see the tomb. The Arthur venerated by King Edward was courtly, gallant, and chivalrous. The legend of Arthur spoke of a romantic chivalry, full of lordly ideas and ideals. Arthur was now fully anglicised.

Arthur inspired Kings, barons and nobles but perhaps didn’t play so well in tavern and market place where ordinary people wanted a hero more relatable and accessible. A hero of their own.

Robin Hood appears to have been that hero. In all the early stories Robin Hood is a yeoman not a noble or aristocrat in any way. Robin dwells in the greenwood not the castle or court. Like Arthur, Robin is brave and skilled at arms but prefers the bow rather than the knightly sword.

Arthur speaks to lofty ambitions and enterprise. Robin to more realistic and ordinary affairs. Yet Robin also worked to a code of ethics. He is respectful of women and seeks to do no harm to farmers, yeomen or gentlemen.

If working men sitting in a tavern at the end of a long hard day of work wanted a story to entertain them then what better that a tale of a folk hero of their own class?? Living in circumstances and locations they could understand and relate to.

Finally a hero who made a fool of and bested the highest authority of tjt crown they were ever likely to face or meet or knoe of — The Sheriff.

King Arthur and Robin Hood Two sides of the same coin?? If we seek the origin of the Robin Hood legends we must surely s...
21/11/2023

King Arthur and Robin Hood
Two sides of the same coin??

If we seek the origin of the Robin Hood legends we must surely start our search in thirteenth century England? At the same time as tales of Robin Hood were likely circulating there was also a popular craze for that other great legend King Arthur.

The legend of Arthur long predates the 13th Century (and is Welsh is origin) going back at least to the 9th Century, of a native Briton who fought against both Roman and Anglo-Saxon. It was in the 13th Century however that Arthur became an English legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 1130s included Arthur is his book “The History of the Kings of Britain”. Arthur then became an heroic warrior Christian King, chivalrous and courtly. An exemplar to the high and mighty.

It is not difficult to see why the tales of Arthur appealed to the English medieval nobility, barons, lords, knights and of course their ladies. In the 13th Century Arthur becomes a significant part of English aristocratic culture. Arthur was the hero of the people who owned and governed England.

Robin Hood was originally only ever styled as a yeoman. An ordinary free man. Robin did for ordinary or middle England what Arthur did for the upper crust. They are I suggest two sides of the same coin.

Today we remember a remarkable medieval woman. On this day, 20th November 1230 Nicola de la Haye died. Nicola was the fi...
20/11/2023

Today we remember a remarkable medieval woman. On this day, 20th November 1230 Nicola de la Haye died.

Nicola was the first woman to be appointed as a medieval Sheriff. She was made Sheriff of Lincolnshire by King John on his deathbed at Newark Castle. On her own, she twice defended Lincoln castle against prolonged sieges.

If you want to know more about this remarkable woman (and you should) I recommend “King John's Right Hand Lady: The Story of Nicholaa de la Haye” Book by Sharon Bennett Connolly

Pity the Sheriff of Nottingham
19/11/2023

Pity the Sheriff of Nottingham

It is beginning to feel a bit like Christmas but it’s NOT Christmas in Sherwood Forest until the Sheriff says so!!Join T...
18/11/2023

It is beginning to feel a bit like Christmas but it’s NOT Christmas in Sherwood Forest until the Sheriff says so!!

Join The Sheriff for the custom of Crying Christmas – the official start of festivities in the Forest and a chance for you to dress up and join in the Fools Parade to the Major Oak.

The Sheriff of Nottingham will proclaim an amnesty for outlaws but will he include Robin Hood??

Event highlights and timings:

12:30pm – The Sheriffs proclamation

12:45pm – Costume competition

1:00pm – Choosing of the Lord of Misrule

1:15pm – Parade to the Major Oak

2:00pm – Longbow demonstration

3:00pm – Longbow demonstration

Our costume competition is made up of 3 categories; loudest costume, most colourful costume and best outlaw costume (under 12’s only). Their will be prizes for the winners of each category with the winners being decided by our 3 judges, The Sheriff, Will Scarlett and Maid Marian.

Then it’s the choosing of the Lord of Misrule, the person in charge of the party, and it could be you!

Finally, join the outlaws on a parade to the Major Oak and the Outlaw encampment to witness an impressive display of one of the most fearsome weapons in medieval history, the longbow.

This is a free event. Parking costs just £5 per vehicle per day at Sherwood for non-RSPB members, and helps the RSPB to carry out its vital conservation work, but there is no admission charge to enter the reserve.

This event is suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs.

Dogs on leads welcome.

Today we celebrate the feast of St Hugh of Lincoln. Hugh’s Shrine stands at the heart of the very magnificent Lincoln Ca...
17/11/2023

Today we celebrate the feast of St Hugh of Lincoln. Hugh’s Shrine stands at the heart of the very magnificent Lincoln Cathedral , and his feast provides an opportunity to give thanks for his rebuilding of the Cathedral in the 12th century.

He is especially remembered by all those who live or work in Royal Forests like Sherwood as he once excommunicated the King’s Chief Forester for his harshness and cruelty

OTD 16 November 1272, king Henry III died at Westminster, London. The son of King John he ascended the throne aged nine....
16/11/2023

OTD 16 November 1272, king Henry III died at Westminster, London. The son of King John he ascended the throne aged nine. He was succeeded by his son Edward I.

As king Henry he left his mark on Nottingham Castle. He added to the Castle by constructing twin towers to protect the outer gate. He left Nottingham Castle to fight in the Battle of Lewes, where he was roundly defeated by the rebel Simon de Montfort.

A trivia question: which other king left Nottingham to meet his defeat in battle.

It was all about the money !! The Forest Eyre held for Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire in October 1250 to April 1251 rais...
15/11/2023

It was all about the money !!

The Forest Eyre held for Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire in October 1250 to April 1251 raised in fines and charges £1,588. Compare that with the cost of building Beaumaris Castle in Wales an estimated £14,000.

The proceeds from one Eyre court in just two shires yielded the tenth of the cost of building a massive castle like this one.

The Royal Forests had gone from royal hunting grounds to royal cash cows

The name of Geoffrey De Langley should send a tremor of fear across Sherwood Forest. Geoffrey was a favoured royal serva...
14/11/2023

The name of Geoffrey De Langley should send a tremor of fear across Sherwood Forest.

Geoffrey was a favoured royal servant who in 1250 conducted a Forest Court Eyre in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. He sat in judgment of serious Forest offences in both Sherwood Forest and the High Peak. The court sat from 22nd October. Pleas for Sherwood were concluded by 30th January 1251 and for Derbyshire not until 27th April 1251.

During the Eyre the men who held lands in the Clay, in Nottinghamshire and other deforested parts of the two counties offered a fine of 300 marks to be quit of all common summons of the Eyre. Meaning they would not have to attend any further Forest courts due to the land that had once been covered by Forest law.

The total adjustments (fines and charges) raised for the Eyre was £1,588 12s and 7d.

Not bad for six months work. A Forest Eyre was a very lucrative business for the crown.

Those pesky Squirrels
13/11/2023

Those pesky Squirrels

Today is Remembrance Sunday and we remember all those who served and sacrificed. For five hundred years Derbyshire and D...
12/11/2023

Today is Remembrance Sunday and we remember all those who served and sacrificed.

For five hundred years Derbyshire and Derbyshire shared a Sheriff but we also shared a common regiment. The Notts and Derbyshire Regiment the Sherwood Foresters. They have a very special memorial at Crich. This unique lanterne des mortes, is in the form of a lighthouse, and stands on a hill above the village of Crich close to the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire border. From it you can see seven counties.

The memorial is dedicated to the memory of the 11,409 Sherwood Foresters who fell in the Great War; the 1,520 who fell in the Second World War; those who gave their lives for their country between 1945 - 1970; those of The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment who have fallen since 1970 until 2007, and those of The Mercian Regiment since 2007.

Today we remember them and especially the men of the Sherwood Foresters.

Nottingham’s Very First Robin Hood Visitor Centre at St Ann’s Holly Well part II The Well and the adjacent Woodwards hou...
11/11/2023

Nottingham’s Very First Robin Hood Visitor Centre at St Ann’s Holly Well part II

The Well and the adjacent Woodwards house situated less than a mile from the medieval town of Nottingham had by the 18th Century become a significant tourism attraction. Attracting visitors to eat and drink and see the countryside away from the hustle of the city.

The landlord exploited the supposed connect to Robin Hood with his collection of items said to have once belonged to the outlaw. These included his bow, his arrows, his cap, a metal helmet and even a tooth! The star attraction was a wicker chair.

It is believed that the well was finally built over in 1887 and sits now beneath more recent housing development.

A Mr Charles Deerimh described the well in 1751: “The People who keep the Green and Public House to promote a Holy-day Trade, shew an old wickered Chair, which they call Robin Hood's Chair, a Bow, and an old Cap, both these they affirm to have been this famous Robber's Property; [...] this little Artifice takes so well with the People in low-Life, that at Christmas, Easter and Whitsuntide, it procures them a great deal of Business, for at those Times great Numbers of young Men bring their Sweethearts to this Well, and give them a Treat, and the Girls think themselves ill-used, if they have not been saluted by their Lovers in Robin Hood's Chair”

In 1827 the collection of Robin Hood paraphernalia was sold at auction to a Lionel Raynor, "a famous actor on the London stage", and "introduced into a melo-drama at one of the London theatres"

The photo shows Robin Hood’s Well, c. 1867–73 / thanks to The Paul Nix Collection

The very first Robin Hood visitor centre part I Set foot out of that gates of medieval Nottingham and you were immediate...
10/11/2023

The very first Robin Hood visitor centre part I

Set foot out of that gates of medieval Nottingham and you were immediately in Sherwood Forest. Places like Sherwood, Hyson Green and St Ann’s now essential parts of the modern city were once part of the lands covered by the Royal Forest and Forest law.

The area of St Ann’s has a particular connection with the legend of Robin Hood because it contained the very first ‘museum’ of Robin Hood artefacts and memorabilia. This museum (if we might call it that l) was housed by the ancient holy well of St Ann’s know locally as Robin Hood’s Well.

He Sherwood!!  😝
09/11/2023

He Sherwood!! 😝

The Charter of the Forest who gained the most??806 years ago this week the Charter of the Forest was issued. It was orig...
08/11/2023

The Charter of the Forest who gained the most??

806 years ago this week the Charter of the Forest was issued. It was originally sealed in England by the young King Henry III, acting under the regency of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke. It was reissued in 1225 with some minor changes to wording, but cancelled in 1227 when Henry III reached his adulthood.

The principal beneficiaries were those who owned or worked land within the boundaries of royal forests.

The first article and the most significant said :

[1] In the first place, all the forests which king Henry our grandfather made forest shall be viewed by good and law-worthy men, and if he made forest any wood that was not his demesne to the injury of him whose wood it was, it shall be disafforested. And if he made his own wood forest, it shall remain forest, saving common of pasture and other things in that forest to those who were accustomed to have them previously.

Basically all land made Royal Forest under King Henry II not belonging to the king was to be disafforested. A huge burden was lifted from those landowners whose land had been declared to be within royal forests.

In article 3 carried on

All woods made forest by king Richard our uncle, or by king John our father, up to the time of our first coronation shall be immediately disafforested unless it be our demesne wood.

Any woods made forest under Richard or John were immediately disafforested. Unless owned by the crown.

Article [4] granted Archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, earls, barons, knights and freeholders who have woods within forests shall have them as they had them at the time of the first coronation of the aforesaid king Henry our grandfather, so that they shall be quit forever in respect of all purprestures, wastes and assarts made in those woods between that time and the beginning of the second year of our coronation. And those who in future make waste, purpresture or assart in them without licence from us shall answer for wastes, purprestures and assarts.

[5] Our regarders shall go through the forests making the regard as it used to be made at the time of the first coronation of the aforesaid king Henry our grandfather, and not otherwise.

Basically the first 5 articles of the Charter were intended to set the clock back to the beginning of the reign of King Henry II much to the benefit of those landowners listed above.

The Charter of the Forest - the devil is in the details. Read the small print. The Charter which was issued on 6th Novem...
07/11/2023

The Charter of the Forest - the devil is in the details. Read the small print.

The Charter which was issued on 6th November 1217 is often trumpeted as a triumph for the common man reasserting rights taken away by nasty Norman kings. That is not quite true. First it is important to remember that a Royal Forest meant an extensive area of land (not always or often wooded) where Forest law applied regardless of who owned the land. The principle beneficiaries were the landowners.

The Charter of the Forest had one immediate and universal benefit. Article 10 grants:

No one shall henceforth lose life or limb because of our venison, but if anyone has been arrested and convicted of taking venison he shall be fined heavily if he has the means; and if he has not the means, he shall lie in our prison for a year and a day; and if after a year and a day he can find pledges he may leave prison; but if not, he shall abjure the realm of England.

Henceforth punishments for breach of forest law would be fines or prison not mutilation or death.

On this day 6th November in 1217 The Charter of the Forest was first issued at St Paul's Cathedral, London. It lifted fo...
06/11/2023

On this day 6th November in 1217 The Charter of the Forest was first issued at St Paul's Cathedral, London.

It lifted for free men some of the harshest restrictions applied to those living or owning land in the Royal Forests of England. It was a complementary charter to the Magna Carta from which it had evolved. In contrast to the Magna Carta, which had a focus on the rights of barons, the Charter of the Forest restored to the common man some rights, privileges and protections against the abuses of Forest Law.

It is believed that only two copies of the 1217 Charter of the Forest survive, one belonging to Durham Cathedral and the other to Lincoln Cathedral.

Robin Hood and the Potter part III The story, one of the very oldest recorded tales of Robin Hood includes some key feat...
05/11/2023

Robin Hood and the Potter part III

The story, one of the very oldest recorded tales of Robin Hood includes some key features which reoccur often in later Robin Hood stories. These features include; disguise, Robin dresses as the potter to trick the Sheriff, an archery contest which Robin wins, a personal combat between Robin Hood and the new guy, this time the potter which Robin looses. Having been beaten fair and square he befriends the potter and draws him into his plot to fool the Sheriff. Finally the Sheriff is robbed and made to look foolish bested by Robin.

What is unusual is the introduction of the wife of the Sheriff who is treated very sympathetically.

Also there are no deaths in this tale, unlike Robin Hood and the Monk which has a death toll of a dozen or more including a two beheadings one of an unarmed page boy. This could reflect the audience? Perhaps more of a family show therefore a more comic tale with no need for a bloodbath. The Monk tale was perhaps aimed at an ale house crowd?

The Wife of the Sheriff, The Sheriff of Nottingham and Robin Hood (thinly disguised as a potter) Part IIAfter a fight wh...
04/11/2023

The Wife of the Sheriff, The Sheriff of Nottingham and Robin Hood (thinly disguised as a potter) Part II

After a fight which the potter wins Robin takes the wares of the potter and goes to Nottingham. He sells them a cut prices right outside the Sheriff’s home in the town. He saves the last pots as a gift for the sheriff’s wife. She takes the gift and invites Robin to dinner with the Sheriff and her. After the meal there is an archery match between the Sheriff’s men which Robin wins. He tells the Sheriff he knows Robin Hood. He offers to lead the Sheriff to Robin. Once in the Forest he robs him and sends him home on foot.

Robin says to the Sheriff

“You came here in your horse so high,
And home you’ll go on foot,
But greet your wife when you get home,
That women is so good”

The wife of the Sheriff of Nottingham is the first woman who plays a part in the tales of Robin Hood.

Today we celebrate the wife of the Sheriff of Nottingham because “that woman is so good”

The Wife of the Sheriff, the Sheriff, a potter and Robin Hood. Part IRobin Hood and the Potter is one of the earliest ta...
03/11/2023

The Wife of the Sheriff, the Sheriff, a potter and Robin Hood. Part I

Robin Hood and the Potter is one of the earliest tales of Robin Hood and features very prominently the wife of the Sheriff of Nottingham.

The tale is a simple one of disguise and trickery where the Sheriff is made a fool of and no one dies. It appears to have been written to be recited rather than sung so is more like a poem than a ballad. It is more comedy and much less violent than other early stories.

Captions please
02/11/2023

Captions please

Did you know that the wife of the Sheriff of Nottingham was the first woman (other than the Virgin Mary) to appear in th...
01/11/2023

Did you know that the wife of the Sheriff of Nottingham was the first woman (other than the Virgin Mary) to appear in the legends of Robin Hood??

A few autumn images of Sherwood Forest taken by the Sheriff on his recent perambulation
31/10/2023

A few autumn images of Sherwood Forest taken by the Sheriff on his recent perambulation

Then and now A young lad dressed as Robin Hood explores a tree in Sherwood ForestCirca 1955.  The same tree from yesterd...
30/10/2023

Then and now

A young lad dressed as Robin Hood explores a tree in Sherwood Forest
Circa 1955. The same tree from yesterday

Happy international Robin Hood Day Today, Sunday 29th October 29, 2023 it is International Robin Hood Day we honour a le...
29/10/2023

Happy international Robin Hood Day

Today, Sunday 29th October 29, 2023 it is International Robin Hood Day we honour a legend, an icon, a revolutionary, and a rebel - Robin Hood. His world famous story comes from here the heart of Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire, where outlaws dwelt.

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