Manchester Museum

Manchester Museum We're the Museum on Oxford Road at The University of Manchester with the dinosaurs. We are open seven days a week, and free to all.
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Operating as usual

This week @McrMuseum is in the running with other UK organisations for the national Fantastic for Families Awards.The wi...
07/09/2020

This week @McrMuseum is in the running with other UK organisations for the national Fantastic for Families Awards.

The winner will be announced at a social media awards ceremony ‪at 10am on Wednesday 9 September‬ on the Fantastic For Families page:

https://facebook.com/FantasticForFamilies/

Manchester Museum is nominated in the Audience Impact Award category - for our creativity in overcoming barriers to reach and engage families.

This is a recognition of our work towards #mmhellofuture , for outstanding contribution to family friendly arts and culture, including Family Lates, Calm evenings, Muso Baby, and more! Find out more here:

https://mmhellofuture.wordpress.com/2020/05/15/autism-friendly-programming

Fantastic for Families are managed by the Family Arts Campaign, an organisation creating opportunities for all families to access arts and culture in their local areas.

We are delighted to be shortlisted and big congratulations to all shortlisted nominees!

We’re delighted to be joining our friends from @pure_artstudio, part of Pure Innovation, in celebrating their work with ...
03/09/2020

We’re delighted to be joining our friends from @pure_artstudio, part of Pure Innovation, in celebrating their work with Manchester Museum for #mcrhistDigiFest2020 for #CalmNight and the #Hierlooms exhibition.
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Swipe up on our Insta Story for the full programme.
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Artist Sarah Bradbury introduces ‘The Museum at Night’, a @pure_artstudio animation workshop which was part of #CalmNight, at 1.12pm on Saturday 5 September.
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Also on Saturday 5 September at 1.16pm there's a short film about the #Heirlooms project, in which Pure Art Studio artists responded to Manchester Museum objects, creating their own in ceramics with ceramist-in-residence.
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@manchesterhistories #mcrhistDigiFest2020

We’re delighted to be joining our friends from Pure Art Studio, part of Pure Innovations, in celebrating their work with...
03/09/2020

We’re delighted to be joining our friends from Pure Art Studio, part of Pure Innovations, in celebrating their work with Manchester Museum for #mcrhistDigiFest2020 for #CalmNight and the #Hierlooms exhibition.

Check out the full programme here:
https://e.issuu.com/issuu-reader3-embed-files/latest/twittercard.html?u=manchesterhistories&d=manchester_histories_digifest_2020_celebrating_alf&p=1

Artist Sarah Bradbury introduces ‘The Museum at Night’, a Pure Art Studio animation workshop which was part of #CalmNight, at 1.12pm on Saturday 5 September.

Also on Saturday 5 September at 1.16pm there's a short film about the #Heirlooms project, in which Pure Art Studio artists responded to Manchester Museum objects, creating their own in ceramics with ceramist-in-residence.
Manchester Histories #mcrhistDigiFest2020

Today, some 3,000 insects are known to be vulnerable, endangered or at risk of extinction. In our Beauty and the Beasts ...
01/09/2020

Today, some 3,000 insects are known to be vulnerable, endangered or at risk of extinction. In our Beauty and the Beasts exhibition the public were invited to write a Letter to the Insects in response to the threats that many of them are facing. Culture Declares Emergency #LettersToPower
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The invitation was open to interpretation and to all. Letters of love, hope and action were written by many visitors.
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The campaign is still running on the #MMBeautyandtheBeasts exhibition website where you can keep writing letters and read the others. http://bit.ly/2Gja469
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What would you say to the insects? Would you like to tell butterflies that they are beautiful, or be helpful to bees?
https://mmbeautyandthebeasts.wixsite.com/mmbeautyandthebeasts/dear-insect-form
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Like #LettertotheEarth, this is an invitation to write a letter in response to a crisis; to think beyond the human narrative and challenge the significance of by who the power is really held.
The idea is open to interpretation: from a personal experience or a call to action.
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To find out more about why @McrMuseum declares a climate emergency read our statement here: https://museum.manchester.ac.uk/whatson/causeswecareabout/culturedeclaresemergency/

On Blackout Tuesday, we made a commitment to share, each month, our actions and efforts in tackling systemic racism, bui...
31/08/2020

On Blackout Tuesday, we made a commitment to share, each month, our actions and efforts in tackling systemic racism, building antiracist practices and supporting #BlackLivesMatter.

For the past month we have been:

1) Continuing to listen, read, learn and share

2) We are undertaking a decolonising audit of our displays to identify areas to address immediately & for future work. A blog critiquing our current displays, in partnership by undergraduates at The University of Manchester & Hong Kong University, will be published as we reopen on 16 September.

3) We’ve announced an Indigenising Manchester Museum programme supported by @EllermanUK & advertised a new role, Curator of Indigenous Perspectives.
Find out more here:
https://bit.ly/34NJHQ4

We are working hard to ensure our recruitment practices are inclusive and connect with a wide audience.

4) We participated in 'A Conversation for Change', a Manchester-wide event on #BLM, convened by Manchester International Festival Young People’s Forum to discuss how to bring about change in the arts sector in Manchester in the wake of Black Lives Matter.
https://mif.co.uk/whats-on/a-conversation-for-change/

5) We are scheduling our first series of podcasts for the autumn, exploring the role of museums in the fight for a more just world. This will amplify and bring new voices from beyond the museum to discuss social, environmental and racial justice in Manchester and beyond.

6) We've been thinking & talking about racism. During #SAHM #OSCH young people organised a community discussing the links between colonialism, colourism & racism. We will share further anti-racist reading & undertaking anti-racism training across Manchester Museum in the coming weeks.


There is more to learn, and so much still to do.

We will return with an update in September.
#BlackLivesMatter #BlackLivesMatterUK

Join us on Youtube at 6pm on Thursday 3 September, when Cheddar Gorgeous, Adam Lowe / Beyoncé Holes, The Vicar's Daughte...
31/08/2020

Join us on Youtube at 6pm on Thursday 3 September, when Cheddar Gorgeous, Adam Lowe / Beyoncé Holes, The Vicar's Daughter, Holly Johnston and Paul Marks-Jones from The University of Manchester will reflect on 'Queer Tales: Myths and Monsters' and the power of storytelling in museums.

Find out more here:
https://queermuseum.wixsite.com/queermuseum/queer-tales-conversation

Over on Instagram, we are sharing stories curated by The Queer Muslim Project of Queer people from across South Asia and...
29/08/2020

Over on Instagram, we are sharing stories curated by The Queer Muslim Project of Queer people from across South Asia and the diaspora.

Share your own stories using #desiQheritage

#SouthAsianHeritageMonth

Manchester Museum declares a climate emergency. Still. Again. More than ever.At Manchester Museum, we are urgently trans...
28/08/2020

Manchester Museum declares a climate emergency. Still. Again. More than ever.

At Manchester Museum, we are urgently transforming how we support ecological thinking and action, build more sustainable futures and inspire cooperation and change in our city.

#CultureDeclaresEmergency

This is a global crisis and we are all partners in a great common reinvention project.

Manchester Museum’s international work (in Costa Rica, Australia & India) highlights the immediate and grim impacts of the climate crisis and biodiversity loss on communities and the land.

It reminds us of the inequalities that exist between and within nations. Our work in Manchester also highlights inequalities closer to home. Climate emergency is a cultural and social justice issue.

In caring for the past, museums are essentially staking a claim on what matters in the future. At Manchester Museum, The University of Manchester, we believe a better future requires us to reframe how we care and take action to build understanding, empathy and love for our world and each other.

Using #CultureTakesAction, Manchester Museum will share their actions, which include foregrounding indigenous perspectives, reimagining education for future survival and producing a register of green practitioners across Manchester.

The Museum’s Director Esme Ward also leads on the climate response for Manchester Cultural Leaders group and will convene an assembly in October to address the emergency.

#CultureDeclaresEmergency

Manchester Museum's cover photo
27/08/2020

Manchester Museum's cover photo

Manchester Museum's cover photo
27/08/2020

Manchester Museum's cover photo

27/08/2020

We are delighted to announce that we will reopen to the public on Wednesday 16 September.

We have been working hard to put measures in place that will keep our staff and visitors safe. With our new one-way route around the museum you will see all your favourite objects in our Natural History galleries.

Our admission remains free, and our new opening times are 11am to 4pm Wednesday to Sunday. We will be sharing information about how to book a timed ticket soon. You can find more information about visiting here:
https://www.museum.manchester.ac.uk/visit/

26/08/2020

For #NationalDogDay we’re looking for dogs in our archaeology collection.

This Roman Republican silver coin shows a famous scene from the Odyssey. The Greek hero Odysseus was away for 20 years, and was recognised by his faithful hound Argus on his return.

Just like today there, were a number of different breeds of dog in ancient Greece and Rome and they were used in hunting, shepherding, guarding the home and even in war. Dogs as pets were rare because only the elite could afford to keep them.

A dog might be used as a sacrifice to accompany the spirit of someone who had died to the afterlife. There is a fine ancient Greek tombstone in the collection at Manchester Museum. It shows a man with a small dog pulling at his robes.

Dog skeletons have been found during archaeological excavations. But there are other traces of our four-legged friends... We have a roof tile with paw print made in the soft clay. Having been fired in a kiln, the hardened clay has preserved the print clay for 2,000-years!

A moving example is the cast of the body of a dog from Pompeii. The dog was suffocated during the eruption. As its body decayed, a void was created in the hardened ash. Archaeologists filled such voids with wet plaster. When it hardened they excavated and revealed the body cast.

Have a look at our Story for more images!

#internationaldogday #dogday #MMinQuarantine #MuseumFromHome

24/08/2020

We're recruiting. Would you like to set indigenous perspectives at the heart of one of the world’s leading university museums?

The exciting new post of Curator of Indigenous Perspectives @McrMuseum is supported by John Ellerman Foundation.

Find out more here:

https://www.jobs.manchester.ac.uk/displayjob.aspx?jobid=19024 (active link in our Insta story).

Manchester Museum is committed to providing safe and welcoming spaces where diversity of gender and identity is celebrat...
24/08/2020

Manchester Museum is committed to providing safe and welcoming spaces where diversity of gender and identity is celebrated. We are excited to share our LGBTQ+ programme, Queering Manchester Museum:

https://queermuseum.wixsite.com/queermuseum

This year Manchester Pride are inviting you to celebrate Pride at home, with an Alternative Festival that you can watch live from your living room! Check out their website for a superb programme of events:

https://www.manchesterpride.com/

Manchester Museum will also be celebrating #Pride in spectacular style with a fabulous family-friendly digital drag show co-curated with Cheddar Gorgeous, which brings queer storytelling to objects and specimens from our collection.

https://queermuseum.wixsite.com/queermuseum/queer-tales-myths-monsters

Do you see yourself in museum collections? We think museums should be spaces where people can find & tell their own stories. Our digital trail brings LGBTQ+ voices to some of our most iconic objects!

What stories would you tell?

https://queermuseum.wixsite.com/queermuseum/lgbtq-trail

This is an ongoing project where we explore new ways to tell the stories and amplify the voices of marginalised people. We will continue building on partnerships and sharing resources from organisations doing great work with LGBTQ+ people and their families.

We’re delighted to announce that Manchester Museum has been given a grant from Esmee Fairbairn Collections Fund, provide...
21/08/2020

We’re delighted to announce that Manchester Museum has been given a grant from Esmee Fairbairn Collections Fund, provided by the Museums Association, to continue our work reaching new audiences.

Our new project, ‘To Have and To Heal’ aims to bring the beauty and joy of our #Egyptology collections to greater numbers of vulnerable groups and those at risk of social isolation.

Building on our popular #EgyptologyInLockdown #Periscope home broadcasts by Curator of Egypt & Sudan, Dr Campbell Price, we hope to reach many more people.

We are commissioning new photography of little-known parts of our collections in order to share objects with people in innovative and dynamic ways.

We are looking to connect with interested groups and invite enquiries about working with the programme.

Our project #ToHaveandToheal is all about encouraging meaningful and emotional engagement.

More information coming soon...

20/08/2020

Get ready for #Jurassic Beasts...

On Tuesday 25 August, 12 noon LIVE on #Periscope , join our Curator of Earth Sciences David Gelsthorpe and Jan Freedman, Natural History Curator, The Box Plymouth for some Jurassic Beasts stories!

More info: https://www.mminquarantine.com/jurassic-beasts

FESTIVAL LINE UP LAUNCH! The digital edition of Journeys Festival International is almost here and has some amazing plan...
19/08/2020

FESTIVAL LINE UP LAUNCH! The digital edition of Journeys Festival International is almost here and has some amazing plans in store.

Take your pick from a wide-ranging programme of:
Talented artists
Captivating films
Intriguing installations
Amazing animations
Inspiring exhibitions
Fascinating conversations
Collaborative poetry
Thoughtful Magazines
Artist-led workshops
28 September - 18 October

Discover the line-up and sign up for festival news at:
www.journeysfestival.com

#JourneysFestival #ACESupported

16/08/2020

In 1880, a botanist called Herbert Dobbie produced something known as ‘The Blue Book’. Bleached into the blue pages were a series of ghostly white silhouettes, eternal imprints in time of what Dante might have believed to be a close-up of an angel’s wing.

“Treasure, from the pirate stories of olde, has always been gold and silver. Never has it been blue. This made it all the more surprising when, beneath the dusty pages, I spotted something rather peculiar” writes PhD student James Dowling.

https://herbologymanchester.wordpress.com/2020/01/22/rare-blue-treasure-found-in-manchester-museum-herbarium/

James discovered this treasure when searching for ‘interesting’ things in the Herbarium, and along with Rachel Webster, Curator of Botany, did some research and found a paper describing this book in detail.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/0028825X.1989.10414116

It was made using ‘the blue-print system’ which involves exposing sensitised mounting paper to sunlight, then washing with potassium bichromate, leaving the characteristic white-on-blue visual effect.

The amount of labour that went into making one ‘Blue Book’ was enormous, there probably weren’t many of these made. In fact, only 15 copies are known to have survived (with this discovery there are 15), 11 of which are in New Zealand libraries.

The unique visual qualities of ferns attract many unique methods of display. This is another artistic presentation using screen printing by one of Manchester University’s Contemporary Photography students.

https://herbologymanchester.wordpress.com/2017/01/05/contemporary-photography-ferns-2/

#MMinQuarantine #MuseumFromHome #FromTheArchives

Join MACFEST tomorrow from 2pm for a Mini Festival celebrating South Asian Heritage: South Asian Art and Culture Bonanza...
14/08/2020

Join MACFEST tomorrow from 2pm for a Mini Festival celebrating South Asian Heritage:

South Asian Art and Culture Bonanza

Register for the event on the MACFESTUK website: macfest.org.uk

12/08/2020

Face to face with the past: in this case Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. This ground-breaking facial reconstruction was created by Prof John Prag and Dr Richard Neave at The University of Manchester and Manchester Musrum.

The facial reconstruction of someone from the past is now a commonplace of archaeology documentaries. It can now be done digitally rather than by using plaster casts, modelling clay and prosthetics.

The bone fragments on which this was based came from a very rich tomb beneath a mound at Vergina in northern Greece. Unfortunately, there wasn’t an inscription to confirm the name of the man whose final resting place this was.

The splendour of the funerary offerings, dating and circumstantial evidence suggested this was Philip’s tomb. And also, intriguingly, Philip was hit by an arrow and lost his right eye whilst besieging the city of Methone in 355-4 BCE.

Evidence on the skull of this healed injury proved to be the key to this identification. You can read more about how Prof John Prag and Dr Richard Neave pieced together the evidence and produced the reconstruction here:

www.jstor.org/stable/505951

Although we cannot be sure this man was Philip II, this makes the reconstruction even more interesting because it encourages us to explore the evidence and present a reasoned case. This is a great case study in archaeological interpretation.

#MMinQuarantine #MuseumFromHome

10/08/2020

It is certainly the weather for ice cream today!🍦

Vanilla is the fruit and seeds from a tropical, climbing orchid. There are over 100 orchid species in the Vanilla genus, but the most commonly cultivated species is Vanilla planifolia (more commonly known as Madagascan or Bourbon vanilla).

Vanilla is native to Central and South America, and was first domesticated by the Totonac people of east Mexico, who used it exclusively until Aztec conquerors demanded vanilla as a tribute.

The Spanish conquistador Cortez brought vanilla to Europe, where it was mixed with cocoa and drunk & later used in other deserts. Vanilla was very expensive during 16th-19th century; Melipona bees which pollinate the flowers have a very limited range, giving Mexico a monopoly.

In 1841, Edmond Albius, a 12-year-old slave boy on the island of Réunion, figured out how to hand-pollinate the vanilla, his simple technique had far-reaching implications. Vanilla plantations sprang up across the globe.

Nevertheless, the only way to cultivate vanilla elsewhere is still by hand pollination. It is labour intensive to produce, so natural vanilla is still the second most expensive spice (after saffron). Today about 75% of the world’s vanilla comes from Madagascar and Réunion.

Synthetic vanillin can now be manufactured at a fraction of the cost of natural vanilla, which explains how 20,000 metric tons are produced per year. If you’re eating something vanilla flavoured, chances are that you’re enjoying synthetic vanillin, not natural vanilla.

Find out more on the Herbarium blog:

https://herbologymanchester.wordpress.com/2016/12/23/advent-botany-day-23-vanilla-nothing-plain-about-this-flavour/

#MMinQuarantine #MuseumFromHome

Address

Manchester Museum, The University Of Manchester, Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PL

https://www.museum.manchester.ac.uk/visit/gettinghere/

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

0161 275 2648

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Manchester Museum

We are open seven days a week, and free to all.

Explore our collection on curator blogs, while the international research that takes place here and within the university is often open to our visitors.

Want to dig deeper? Contact us if you would like to explore our collection in greater depth, talk to an expert or would like to find out more about our research and how you can get involved.

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Comments

are you open??
Are you open today?
Hi are you open at the moment? & do we need to book a time if so? Thank you x
When do you reopen?
Good Evening, please can you advise when you might be opening again please?
Hello, could you help me? My son found that on the sand on the beach in France, Manche department. No one here knows what it is? I add some pics on comment below. Does anyone here knows what's this?
When are you back open to the public please 😀
Any idea when you will reopen?
Me with Kitchener foto,its Mattel of ambosse work's foto of kitchener foto,its may collection foto...jk
We found some fossils in Bury over the bank holiday. Mussels and leaves
We found this on Kersal Moor in Salford It’s a fairly dense rock and heavy for its size approx 5cmx4cm It has lots of holes on one side (shown) none on the other Can you shed any light on it?
#dinoselfie