The Courtauld

The Courtauld World-famous Gallery and international centre for the teaching, research and enjoyment of art history. The Courtauld Gallery will reopen in November 2021.
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Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne.

Operating as usual

After 1900, the city of Munich rivalled Paris as a cosmopolitan hub of experiment. Our Study Tour Online, 'Munich in the...
24/08/2021

After 1900, the city of Munich rivalled Paris as a cosmopolitan hub of experiment. Our Study Tour Online, 'Munich in the Early Twentieth Century' will provide a close encounter with art works from Munich’s modernist collections, beginning with a virtual tour of the Lenbachhaus, where the celebrated collection of Expressionist paintings presents the unfolding path towards abstraction.

It will also address the broader picture of cultural life in this art-loving city, from the Wittelsbach kings through the period of democracy after 1918, to the rise of N**i dictatorship.

Find out more: https://courtauld.ac.uk/short-courses/study-tours-online/munich-in-the-early-twentieth-century/

After 1900, the city of Munich rivalled Paris as a cosmopolitan hub of experiment. Our Study Tour Online, 'Munich in the Early Twentieth Century' will provide a close encounter with art works from Munich’s modernist collections, beginning with a virtual tour of the Lenbachhaus, where the celebrated collection of Expressionist paintings presents the unfolding path towards abstraction.

It will also address the broader picture of cultural life in this art-loving city, from the Wittelsbach kings through the period of democracy after 1918, to the rise of N**i dictatorship.

Find out more: https://courtauld.ac.uk/short-courses/study-tours-online/munich-in-the-early-twentieth-century/

Experience the vastness and expansive beauty of Pieter Bruegel’s Landscape with the Flight into Egypt until 31 August at...
23/08/2021

Experience the vastness and expansive beauty of Pieter Bruegel’s Landscape with the Flight into Egypt until 31 August at The National Gallery.

It’s your last chance to see this landscape, on loan to The National Gallery, alongside a selection of our other works, before they return to The Courtauld ahead of our reopening in November.

Selected highlights on display from our pre-19th century collection also include Islamic metalwork, as well as pieces by Bernardo Daddi and Biagio d’Antonio.

Visit our website to find out more:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/whats-on/the-courtauld-at-the-national-gallery/

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Landscape with the Flight into Egypt (1563) oil on panel, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Experience the vastness and expansive beauty of Pieter Bruegel’s Landscape with the Flight into Egypt until 31 August at The National Gallery.

It’s your last chance to see this landscape, on loan to The National Gallery, alongside a selection of our other works, before they return to The Courtauld ahead of our reopening in November.

Selected highlights on display from our pre-19th century collection also include Islamic metalwork, as well as pieces by Bernardo Daddi and Biagio d’Antonio.

Visit our website to find out more:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/whats-on/the-courtauld-at-the-national-gallery/

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Landscape with the Flight into Egypt (1563) oil on panel, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

23/08/2021

Professor Aviva Burnstock joins the Fake or Fortune team to investigate a small painting depicting the Last Supper, purchased by Anglesey farmer Huw Lewis for £50 on the internet. Can the team prove it’s an eighteenth-century work by the artist Benjamin West?

Watch the full episode on BBC iPlayer: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000ywsf

As a series of works #fromthecollection by Paul Cézanne continue to be shown as part of our ongoing collaboration with K...
20/08/2021

As a series of works #fromthecollection by Paul Cézanne continue to be shown as part of our ongoing collaboration with KODE we are highlighting a piece from the French artist each week.

You can visit Masterpieces from The Courtauld at KODE 1 until 10 October.

This large landscape by Cézanne shows a view of a village across an almost abstract pattern of fields and trees. The titular road winds through the landscape and takes the viewer from the foreground to the roofs and steeple in the distance.

Cézanne left areas of the canvas unpainted and integrated them into his composition. Such rejection of academic rules contributed to Cézanne’s posthumous status as the “father of modernism” among avant-garde artists of the early twentieth century.

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Turning Road, c. 1905, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

As a series of works #fromthecollection by Paul Cézanne continue to be shown as part of our ongoing collaboration with KODE we are highlighting a piece from the French artist each week.

You can visit Masterpieces from The Courtauld at KODE 1 until 10 October.

This large landscape by Cézanne shows a view of a village across an almost abstract pattern of fields and trees. The titular road winds through the landscape and takes the viewer from the foreground to the roofs and steeple in the distance.

Cézanne left areas of the canvas unpainted and integrated them into his composition. Such rejection of academic rules contributed to Cézanne’s posthumous status as the “father of modernism” among avant-garde artists of the early twentieth century.

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Turning Road, c. 1905, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

On World Photography Day we’re revisiting this powerful image of a Yazidi girl, photographed in Lalish, Iraqi Kurdistan ...
19/08/2021

On World Photography Day we’re revisiting this powerful image of a Yazidi girl, photographed in Lalish, Iraqi Kurdistan in 1944 by Anthony Kersting, a 20th Century British photographer acclaimed for his extensive travels across the Middle East throughout the 1940s and 50s.

His archive spans over 42,000 photographic prints and negatives which were given to the Conway Library at The Courtauld upon his death in 2008.

20 compelling photographs from the collection documenting the life of the Yazidi community in Kurdistan, taken by Kersting on a trip in 1944, will go on display when The Courtauld reopens in November this year. The exhibition also includes portraits and city photography of Erbil, often considered the oldest continually inhabited place on earth, and the Mosque at Nebi Yunus, the burial place of Jonah destroyed by Isis in 2014.

The display will be the first to be presented in the Gallery’s new Project Space, a new room to spotlight smaller temporary projects that give visitors insight into The Courtauld’s broader teaching, conservation and research expertise.

Read more about the exhibition here:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/whats-on/kurdistan-in-the-1940s/

The Anthony Kersting Archive, The Courtauld. Released under a Creative Commons CCBYNC license.

On World Photography Day we’re revisiting this powerful image of a Yazidi girl, photographed in Lalish, Iraqi Kurdistan in 1944 by Anthony Kersting, a 20th Century British photographer acclaimed for his extensive travels across the Middle East throughout the 1940s and 50s.

His archive spans over 42,000 photographic prints and negatives which were given to the Conway Library at The Courtauld upon his death in 2008.

20 compelling photographs from the collection documenting the life of the Yazidi community in Kurdistan, taken by Kersting on a trip in 1944, will go on display when The Courtauld reopens in November this year. The exhibition also includes portraits and city photography of Erbil, often considered the oldest continually inhabited place on earth, and the Mosque at Nebi Yunus, the burial place of Jonah destroyed by Isis in 2014.

The display will be the first to be presented in the Gallery’s new Project Space, a new room to spotlight smaller temporary projects that give visitors insight into The Courtauld’s broader teaching, conservation and research expertise.

Read more about the exhibition here:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/whats-on/kurdistan-in-the-1940s/

The Anthony Kersting Archive, The Courtauld. Released under a Creative Commons CCBYNC license.

As the temperature rises and people take to parks across the land, we’re shining some (sun)light on artworks #fromthecol...
18/08/2021

As the temperature rises and people take to parks across the land, we’re shining some (sun)light on artworks #fromthecollection depicting Summer time!

This work originates from a sketchbook that Turner used in the seaside resort of Margate. Turner apparently gave the book to his companion Sophia Booth who sold it to the critic John Ruskin after the artist’s death.

Turner conjures up the blustery scene with vibrant shades of gouache. Blurred shapes and highlights, dashed in with minimal brushstrokes, convey a palpable sense of the gusting wind, while the zigzag perspective adds depth and movement to the scene.

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851), Margate Pier, c.1835, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust), © The Courtauld

As the temperature rises and people take to parks across the land, we’re shining some (sun)light on artworks #fromthecollection depicting Summer time!

This work originates from a sketchbook that Turner used in the seaside resort of Margate. Turner apparently gave the book to his companion Sophia Booth who sold it to the critic John Ruskin after the artist’s death.

Turner conjures up the blustery scene with vibrant shades of gouache. Blurred shapes and highlights, dashed in with minimal brushstrokes, convey a palpable sense of the gusting wind, while the zigzag perspective adds depth and movement to the scene.

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851), Margate Pier, c.1835, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust), © The Courtauld

Professor in Conservation, Aviva Burnstock, will be appearing on tonight's episode of Fake or Fortune.Titled 'A King’s L...
18/08/2021
BBC One - Fake or Fortune?, Series 9, A King’s Last Supper

Professor in Conservation, Aviva Burnstock, will be appearing on tonight's episode of Fake or Fortune.

Titled 'A King’s Last Supper', Anglesey farmer Huw Lewis bought a small painting depicting the Last Supper for £50 on the internet. Can the team prove it is an eighteenth-century work by the artist Benjamin West?

Watch on BBC 1 at 21:00 BST: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000ywsf

Could a picture bought online for £50 be a missing 18th-century work by Benjamin West?

A panel of international experts mark the bicentenary of Napoleon's death with 10 online lectures, released weekly, and ...
16/08/2021

A panel of international experts mark the bicentenary of Napoleon's death with 10 online lectures, released weekly, and live online discussions held from 5 October to 7 December.

We’ll explore the use of art and design for propaganda purposes, looting and restitution of art works, Orientalism and ‘Romanticism’, the beginnings of a modern art market and a modern museum world, the art of resistance, and much more.

Find out more and book your place: https://courtauld.ac.uk/whats-on/napoleon/

Image: Jacques-Louis David, Napoleon Crossing the Alps, 1801. Château de Malmaison, Rueil-Malmaison.

A panel of international experts mark the bicentenary of Napoleon's death with 10 online lectures, released weekly, and live online discussions held from 5 October to 7 December.

We’ll explore the use of art and design for propaganda purposes, looting and restitution of art works, Orientalism and ‘Romanticism’, the beginnings of a modern art market and a modern museum world, the art of resistance, and much more.

Find out more and book your place: https://courtauld.ac.uk/whats-on/napoleon/

Image: Jacques-Louis David, Napoleon Crossing the Alps, 1801. Château de Malmaison, Rueil-Malmaison.

Did you know that approximately 10% of the world is left-handed? One of the most famous artists in the world, Leonardo d...
13/08/2021

Did you know that approximately 10% of the world is left-handed? One of the most famous artists in the world, Leonardo da Vinci, was also left-handed.

Why not celebrate International Lefthanders Day 2021 by enjoying this captivating work from our collection; Studies for Saint Mary Magdalene by da Vinci?

These rapid and lively pen-and-ink sketches show Leonardo exploring alternative ideas for the arrangement of this single figure. The artist began by drawing the larger version, later adding the smaller, more summary drawing below.

In the first composition, the figure is shown looking away from the jar that she has just opened, implying that she has been interrupted and is turning to look at something. The jar she holds refers to the biblical episode in which Mary Magdalen anoints Christ’s feet.

Leonardo da Vinci, Studies for Saint Mary Magdalene, 1480-82, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Did you know that approximately 10% of the world is left-handed? One of the most famous artists in the world, Leonardo da Vinci, was also left-handed.

Why not celebrate International Lefthanders Day 2021 by enjoying this captivating work from our collection; Studies for Saint Mary Magdalene by da Vinci?

These rapid and lively pen-and-ink sketches show Leonardo exploring alternative ideas for the arrangement of this single figure. The artist began by drawing the larger version, later adding the smaller, more summary drawing below.

In the first composition, the figure is shown looking away from the jar that she has just opened, implying that she has been interrupted and is turning to look at something. The jar she holds refers to the biblical episode in which Mary Magdalen anoints Christ’s feet.

Leonardo da Vinci, Studies for Saint Mary Magdalene, 1480-82, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Did you know that The Courtauld introduced the first academic course to be taught in History of Dress in 1965?Stella Mar...
12/08/2021

Did you know that The Courtauld introduced the first academic course to be taught in History of Dress in 1965?

Stella Mary Newton, who led the department, brought a rich background of couture, theatre design and art history experience to the subject, and set the foundations for its subsequent development.

Today, the subject is integrated into teaching at all levels, including MA Documenting Fashion: Modernity, Film & Image in America & Europe, 1920-60. The course links to the ways photography, cinema and non-fiction film connected with fashion and its evolution and representation during this period of rapid change and experimentation.

Find out more on The Courtauld website:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/ma-history-of-art/documenting-fashion/

Schiaparelli, Paris Fashions, (1938), Image: History of Dress Collection, © The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Did you know that The Courtauld introduced the first academic course to be taught in History of Dress in 1965?

Stella Mary Newton, who led the department, brought a rich background of couture, theatre design and art history experience to the subject, and set the foundations for its subsequent development.

Today, the subject is integrated into teaching at all levels, including MA Documenting Fashion: Modernity, Film & Image in America & Europe, 1920-60. The course links to the ways photography, cinema and non-fiction film connected with fashion and its evolution and representation during this period of rapid change and experimentation.

Find out more on The Courtauld website:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/ma-history-of-art/documenting-fashion/

Schiaparelli, Paris Fashions, (1938), Image: History of Dress Collection, © The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

The Courtauld Gallery will reopen in November 2021 following the most significant modernisation project in its history, ...
11/08/2021
Introducing the Katja and Nicolai Tangen 20th Century Gallery

The Courtauld Gallery will reopen in November 2021 following the most significant modernisation project in its history, providing a transformed home for one of the UK’s greatest art collections.

As well as the redisplayed permanent collection and temporary exhibition programme, visitors can look forward to the return of The Myth of Prometheus (1950), an epic modern painting by the great Austrian Expressionist Oskar Kokoschka consisting of three canvases measuring over eight metres long. It is considered to be one of the artist’s most important works, and will be displayed at The Courtauld for the first time in over a decade in the Katja and Nicolai Tangen 20th Century Gallery.

The painting will be exhibited alongside a selection of photographs documenting Kokoschka working on The Myth of Prometheus, taken by the acclaimed 20th century photographer Lee Miller.

Watch our short film to discover more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=999ln91MuUk

The Courtauld Gallery will reopen in November 2021 following the most significant modernisation project in its history, providing a transformed home for one ...

It finally feels like Summer, ☀️ so let’s bask in the warm rays with this beautiful painting, Banks of the Seine at Arge...
11/08/2021

It finally feels like Summer, ☀️ so let’s bask in the warm rays with this beautiful painting, Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil, by Édouard Manet from our collection.

This work is probably Manet’s most serious exploration of plein-air Impressionism, and was partly painted outdoors during a summer visit to Claude Monet and his family. Monet lived in Argenteuil, a rapidly developing town on the outskirts of Paris. His wife, Camille, and son Jean posed for the figures on the riverbank. Bright colours and quick strokes of paint vividly convey the summer light and the ripples on the water.

Édouard Manet, Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil (1874) © Private Collection. On long-term loan to The Courtauld Gallery, London

It finally feels like Summer, ☀️ so let’s bask in the warm rays with this beautiful painting, Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil, by Édouard Manet from our collection.

This work is probably Manet’s most serious exploration of plein-air Impressionism, and was partly painted outdoors during a summer visit to Claude Monet and his family. Monet lived in Argenteuil, a rapidly developing town on the outskirts of Paris. His wife, Camille, and son Jean posed for the figures on the riverbank. Bright colours and quick strokes of paint vividly convey the summer light and the ripples on the water.

Édouard Manet, Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil (1874) © Private Collection. On long-term loan to The Courtauld Gallery, London

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Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masterpieces such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear.'

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Works of faith,hope and love www.faopal.hU
Works of faith,hope and love,www.faopal.hu
Is this talk now online? Thanks.
A GIFT OF LOVE - ΕΝΑ ΔΩΡΟ ΑΓΑΠΗΣ Red Poppies - A wonderful time of the year! Κοκκινες Παπαρουνες - Μια υπέροχη εποχή του χρόνου! RED POPPIES 80 x 100 cm 05/2014 © The bright scarlet poppies are a fascinating species of spring flowers that sprout each year to dazzle the eyes - for a fleeting moment at least! Vibrant hues of red blooms cover the hillsides and a glimpse of that magical sight transports one into a world of beauty; to be there is a rare treat. Andreas C Chrysafis (Painting in a Private Collection-Monaco) Reproductions prints of this oil painting including coffee-cup prints are available exclusive from ArtPal: www.artpal.com/chrysafis https://www.amazon.com/Andreas-C-Chrysafis/e/B00478I90O…
World before Covid
UNTITLED IMAGE 1951- Iwakawa Yukihiro Web Exhibition Work 2020 10_03 http://rrsrrs.la.coocan.jp/ UNTITLED IMAGE 1951- Iwakawa Yukihiro Web Exhibition Work 2020 10_03 http://rrsrrs.la.coocan.jp/
Hey guys im new to the art world but fascinated by it. Looking to learn 🙂
Watch Open Courtauld Hour: British – Art, Immigration and Migration Live Online https://open-courtauld-hour.netlify.app/ https://open-courtauld-hour.netlify.app/
CONTEMPORARY ART ''ROCK QUEEN ELIZABETH II'' Artwork of the artist Raffaele Ciotola dedicated to Her Majesty Elizabeth ll of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of the other Commonwealth countries.
Can anybody tell me the correct term for veiled sculpture? I have seen it referred to as ‘wet drapery’, but wonder if their is another term. The following link shows this wonderful artistry: https://www.franceculture.fr/sculpture/a-fascinating-transparency-strazzas-veiled-virgin I would also like to know how this technique is achieved, just out of interest rather than attempting to carry it out 😉 Many thanks.
Are you a current or former museum and gallery professional working in the UK or internationally? We are inviting colleagues in the sector to complete a survey that aims to explore the perspectives and experiences of current and former museum and gallery professionals in relation to graduate employability in the sector. Our survey can be accessed at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdekeCXoKtluvSF-r1Y_JXOKTMVaTZ36UB8PKlpjhWyGI3QwQ/viewform (closing date: 18th of June). We would appreciate if you could take the time to complete our survey and circulate it amongst your colleagues. This survey is part of the project Curating Expertise: Towards a Museum Forum @ King’s, with which we aim to build an interdisciplinary Museum Studies teaching and research agenda at King’s College London. We are interested in colleagues’ thoughts about the knowledges, skills and experience that museum studies graduates should possess to be employable in the sector today. We are particularly keen to hear from those interested in contributing, in one form or another, to the delivery of a London-based but globally focused new Museum Studies teaching provision. Whilst we are interested in collaborating with London-based institutions / professionals, we would be delighted to also hear from colleagues across the UK and internationally. Whilst we appreciate this is a time of uncertainty for the sector, it seems a critical moment to reflect on how we can train future generations of resilient museum professionals. If you wish to get in touch, you can reach us at [email protected] and [email protected]. Best wishes, Dr Stuart Dunn (DDH) and Dr Serena Iervolino (CMCI)