The Courtauld

The Courtauld World-famous Gallery and international centre for the teaching, research and enjoyment of art history. The Courtauld Gallery will reopen in late 2021.
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Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne.

Operating as usual

Our founder Samuel Courtauld, English industrialist, pioneering philanthropist and one of the first fine art collectors ...
07/05/2021

Our founder Samuel Courtauld, English industrialist, pioneering philanthropist and one of the first fine art collectors of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, was born #OnThisDay in 1876.

He founded The Courtauld Institute of Art in 1932 and played a fundamental role in the recognition of Paul Cézanne in the UK, by building up one of the greatest collections of the painter’s work, including Montagne Sainte-Victoire with a Large Pine (around 1887).

You can find out more about his life in this film, Samuel Courtauld: A Vision for Impressionism 📽️ bit.ly/2yAcjhU

And check out these essays by Ernst Vegelin (Head of the Courtauld Gallery) and Karen Serres (Curator of Paintings at The Courtauld Gallery.) https://courtauld.ac.uk/gallery/about/who-was-samuel-courtauld

Our founder Samuel Courtauld, English industrialist, pioneering philanthropist and one of the first fine art collectors of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, was born #OnThisDay in 1876.

He founded The Courtauld Institute of Art in 1932 and played a fundamental role in the recognition of Paul Cézanne in the UK, by building up one of the greatest collections of the painter’s work, including Montagne Sainte-Victoire with a Large Pine (around 1887).

You can find out more about his life in this film, Samuel Courtauld: A Vision for Impressionism 📽️ bit.ly/2yAcjhU

And check out these essays by Ernst Vegelin (Head of the Courtauld Gallery) and Karen Serres (Curator of Paintings at The Courtauld Gallery.) https://courtauld.ac.uk/gallery/about/who-was-samuel-courtauld

"It is no exaggerated praise to call a tree the grandest, and most beautiful of all the productions of the earth." 🌲 Art...
06/05/2021

"It is no exaggerated praise to call a tree the grandest, and most beautiful of all the productions of the earth." 🌲

Artist and theoriest William Gilpin wrote extensively about this ancient, gnarled chestnut tree, and these words opened his influential treatise 'Remarks on Forest Scenery and other Woodland Views' (1791).

For as long as artists have created landscapes, the tree has been a central figure in art. Do you have a favourite depiction? 🌳

Thomas Hearne, The Chestnut Tree at Little Wymondley, Hertfordshire, 1789, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

"It is no exaggerated praise to call a tree the grandest, and most beautiful of all the productions of the earth." 🌲

Artist and theoriest William Gilpin wrote extensively about this ancient, gnarled chestnut tree, and these words opened his influential treatise 'Remarks on Forest Scenery and other Woodland Views' (1791).

For as long as artists have created landscapes, the tree has been a central figure in art. Do you have a favourite depiction? 🌳

Thomas Hearne, The Chestnut Tree at Little Wymondley, Hertfordshire, 1789, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Take some time this summer to deepen your knowledge of a favourite period in art history – or venture into new territory...
06/05/2021

Take some time this summer to deepen your knowledge of a favourite period in art history – or venture into new territory!

Join us for our online Summer School to engage with a wide and global range of subjects, from medieval to contemporary art. We have over 30 courses running in June and July, taught by Courtauld staff, alumni and associates, and offer the deep enjoyment that comes from stretching your mind in the company of fellow enthusiasts.

Find out more: https://courtauld.ac.uk/learn/short-courses-2021/summer-school-online

(Image: a crop of Vincent Van Gogh’s Irises, 1890, The Metropolitan Museum, New York)

Take some time this summer to deepen your knowledge of a favourite period in art history – or venture into new territory!

Join us for our online Summer School to engage with a wide and global range of subjects, from medieval to contemporary art. We have over 30 courses running in June and July, taught by Courtauld staff, alumni and associates, and offer the deep enjoyment that comes from stretching your mind in the company of fellow enthusiasts.

Find out more: https://courtauld.ac.uk/learn/short-courses-2021/summer-school-online

(Image: a crop of Vincent Van Gogh’s Irises, 1890, The Metropolitan Museum, New York)

Join us next Thursday 13 May (8 – 9pm BST) for Open Courtauld Hour – Musical Interludes! 🎼🎸🥁From defining subject matter...
06/05/2021

Join us next Thursday 13 May (8 – 9pm BST) for Open Courtauld Hour – Musical Interludes! 🎼🎸🥁

From defining subject matter to influencing style, harmony, melody, rhythm, and colour in arts physical manifestation, music also promotes mindfulness in the gallery sphere. A melodic crescendo to truly heighten our appreciation of art, music can allow a deeper immersion and interpretation of The Courtauld Gallery's collection.

Hear from Katherine Schofield (Senior Lecturer in South Asian Music and History, Department of Music at King's College London), Charlotte De Mille (Associate Lecturer and previous Curator of Music at The Courtauld) and August McGregor, Jessica Smith and Stephanie Edwards of Future Ferens (Ferens Art Gallery, Hull). The musical duo GAIA will also perform a one-off interpretation of Monet’s painting, Antibes.

The event is free and open to all, but prior booking is required.
courtauld.ac.uk/event/online-open-courtauld-hour-musical-interludes

Open Courtauld Hour is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies

Join us next Thursday 13 May (8 – 9pm BST) for Open Courtauld Hour – Musical Interludes! 🎼🎸🥁

From defining subject matter to influencing style, harmony, melody, rhythm, and colour in arts physical manifestation, music also promotes mindfulness in the gallery sphere. A melodic crescendo to truly heighten our appreciation of art, music can allow a deeper immersion and interpretation of The Courtauld Gallery's collection.

Hear from Katherine Schofield (Senior Lecturer in South Asian Music and History, Department of Music at King's College London), Charlotte De Mille (Associate Lecturer and previous Curator of Music at The Courtauld) and August McGregor, Jessica Smith and Stephanie Edwards of Future Ferens (Ferens Art Gallery, Hull). The musical duo GAIA will also perform a one-off interpretation of Monet’s painting, Antibes.

The event is free and open to all, but prior booking is required.
courtauld.ac.uk/event/online-open-courtauld-hour-musical-interludes

Open Courtauld Hour is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies

The Courtauld has launched a channel on Chinese micro-blogging site Weibo, to help us reach Chinese audiences with an in...
05/05/2021

The Courtauld has launched a channel on Chinese micro-blogging site Weibo, to help us reach Chinese audiences with an interest in our collection, research and teaching!

Follow us here: https://weibo.com/courtauld

The Courtauld has launched a channel on Chinese micro-blogging site Weibo, to help us reach Chinese audiences with an interest in our collection, research and teaching!

Follow us here: https://weibo.com/courtauld

Exciting news from our neighbours Somerset House!We hope to see you there!✨
05/05/2021

Exciting news from our neighbours Somerset House!

We hope to see you there!✨

Dodgems, DJs, delicious food & drink - buckle up because we've got your summer plans sorted 👀

Find out more and book now: https://bit.ly/ArtfulDodgems

Join us this July & August for DODGE, a thrilling new courtyard experience created by Somerset House Studios artist Anna Meredith & designer Yinka Ilori, with bumper feasts and street food from Jimmy's Pop-up Restaurants.

#HereForCulture

With support from drinks partners Moët & Chandon, San Miguel and Hennessy.

Start your weekend with a view over the Thames 🌊In 1746 Canaletto travelled to England from Venice, and over the followi...
30/04/2021

Start your weekend with a view over the Thames 🌊

In 1746 Canaletto travelled to England from Venice, and over the following decasde produced a rich record of mid-Georgian London. In this elaborately finished work, the city of London is seen from above the terrace of Old Somerset House, designed by Inigo Jones in the 1630s.

#InOurCollection Canaletto, View from Somerset Gardens looking towards London Bridge, c.1746-1755, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Start your weekend with a view over the Thames 🌊

In 1746 Canaletto travelled to England from Venice, and over the following decasde produced a rich record of mid-Georgian London. In this elaborately finished work, the city of London is seen from above the terrace of Old Somerset House, designed by Inigo Jones in the 1630s.

#InOurCollection Canaletto, View from Somerset Gardens looking towards London Bridge, c.1746-1755, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Celebrate #InternationalDanceDay with Edgar Degas' famous ballet dancers 💃 Degas was fascinated by ballet dancers, wanti...
29/04/2021

Celebrate #InternationalDanceDay with Edgar Degas' famous ballet dancers 💃

Degas was fascinated by ballet dancers, wanting to portray their grace and power through his impressionist works. The side-on angle of this painting immediately involves the viewer in the scene, indicating it is real rather than a carefully staged scene.

🎨Two Dancers on a Stage, 1874, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Celebrate #InternationalDanceDay with Edgar Degas' famous ballet dancers 💃

Degas was fascinated by ballet dancers, wanting to portray their grace and power through his impressionist works. The side-on angle of this painting immediately involves the viewer in the scene, indicating it is real rather than a carefully staged scene.

🎨Two Dancers on a Stage, 1874, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Happy Birthday to Frank Auerbach, born #onthisday in 1931 🎈This work is one of thirteen major building-site paintings of...
29/04/2021

Happy Birthday to Frank Auerbach, born #onthisday in 1931 🎈

This work is one of thirteen major building-site paintings of bomb-scarred London that Auerbach made between 1951 and 1962, and proved to be the last of the series.

Auerbach recalled passing the outside of the Empire Cinema, Leicester Square and looking in to discover a scene of frenetic activity, which he sketched immediately. The sketch resulted in this dramatic painting, with the red throughout giving a fiery intensity.

Do you have a favourite work by the artist?

🎨 Frank Auerbach (born 1931), Rebuilding the Empire Cinema, Leicester Square, 1962 © Frank Auerbach, courtesy Marlborough Fine Art, London

Happy Birthday to Frank Auerbach, born #onthisday in 1931 🎈

This work is one of thirteen major building-site paintings of bomb-scarred London that Auerbach made between 1951 and 1962, and proved to be the last of the series.

Auerbach recalled passing the outside of the Empire Cinema, Leicester Square and looking in to discover a scene of frenetic activity, which he sketched immediately. The sketch resulted in this dramatic painting, with the red throughout giving a fiery intensity.

Do you have a favourite work by the artist?

🎨 Frank Auerbach (born 1931), Rebuilding the Empire Cinema, Leicester Square, 1962 © Frank Auerbach, courtesy Marlborough Fine Art, London

We are delighted to have been awarded £2.2 million in grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to upgrade cr...
27/04/2021
The Courtauld awarded £2.2 million in grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Council Capabilities for Collections Funds - The Courtauld Institute of Art

We are delighted to have been awarded £2.2 million in grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to upgrade critical art conservation instruments, and support five key areas of collections care and our world-renowned art conservation department.

Find out more: https://courtauld.ac.uk/grants-ahrc

The Courtauld Institute of Art, commonly referred to as The Courtauld, is a self-governing college of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art and conservation.

The artist Robert Campin died #OnThisDay in 1444.This three-panel work #InOurCollection, known as ‘The Seilern Triptych’...
26/04/2021

The artist Robert Campin died #OnThisDay in 1444.

This three-panel work #InOurCollection, known as ‘The Seilern Triptych’, is one of the finest examples of Northern Renaissance painting. In addition to its careful design and meticulous execution, it is particularly remarkable for its exquisite details, drawing viewers into the scenes.

This work is an early instance of the use of oil in painting. In contrast with the traditional egg-based paint (called ‘tempera’), oil paint enabled artists to create translucent effects and precise modelling, making figures and objects more lifelike and immediate.

A leading painter in Tournai (present-day Belgium), Campin was one of the first artists to adopt it, with stunning results. The triptych has been attributed to him on stylistic grounds.

It is also often called ‘The Seilern Triptych’ after Count Antoine Seilern, the Anglo-Austrian collector who bequeathed it to The Courtauld.

Robert Campin (1378/9–1444), The Entombment, known as ‘The Seilern Triptych’, around 1425 The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

The artist Robert Campin died #OnThisDay in 1444.

This three-panel work #InOurCollection, known as ‘The Seilern Triptych’, is one of the finest examples of Northern Renaissance painting. In addition to its careful design and meticulous execution, it is particularly remarkable for its exquisite details, drawing viewers into the scenes.

This work is an early instance of the use of oil in painting. In contrast with the traditional egg-based paint (called ‘tempera’), oil paint enabled artists to create translucent effects and precise modelling, making figures and objects more lifelike and immediate.

A leading painter in Tournai (present-day Belgium), Campin was one of the first artists to adopt it, with stunning results. The triptych has been attributed to him on stylistic grounds.

It is also often called ‘The Seilern Triptych’ after Count Antoine Seilern, the Anglo-Austrian collector who bequeathed it to The Courtauld.

Robert Campin (1378/9–1444), The Entombment, known as ‘The Seilern Triptych’, around 1425 The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

#onthisday in 1874, at a former photographer’s studio in Paris, the first Impressionist exhibition was in full swing 🎨 A...
23/04/2021

#onthisday in 1874, at a former photographer’s studio in Paris, the first Impressionist exhibition was in full swing 🎨

Among the works shown was Renoir’s La Loge (The Theatre Box), #InOurCollection 🎭

Led by French artists Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Berthe Morisot, the radical show by the “Anonymous Society of Painters, Sculptors, Printmakers, etc.” earnt the group their title of Impressionists by the critic Louis Leroy, who called his discrediting, satirical review of the event “Exhibition of Impressionists”, which ended up having the opposite effect.

Explore #LaLoge in more detail in the Ulster Museum, Belfast SMARTIFY tour - http://ow.ly/KzU450EwePj

Who is your favourite Impressionist artist? 🤔

Pierre Auguste Renoir, La Loge (The Theatre Box), 1874, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

#onthisday in 1874, at a former photographer’s studio in Paris, the first Impressionist exhibition was in full swing 🎨

Among the works shown was Renoir’s La Loge (The Theatre Box), #InOurCollection 🎭

Led by French artists Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Berthe Morisot, the radical show by the “Anonymous Society of Painters, Sculptors, Printmakers, etc.” earnt the group their title of Impressionists by the critic Louis Leroy, who called his discrediting, satirical review of the event “Exhibition of Impressionists”, which ended up having the opposite effect.

Explore #LaLoge in more detail in the Ulster Museum, Belfast SMARTIFY tour - http://ow.ly/KzU450EwePj

Who is your favourite Impressionist artist? 🤔

Pierre Auguste Renoir, La Loge (The Theatre Box), 1874, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

A HUGE thank you to everyone who donated to The Courtauld Fund #ChallengeWeek2021. Together, we raised an incredible £46...
23/04/2021

A HUGE thank you to everyone who donated to The Courtauld Fund #ChallengeWeek2021. Together, we raised an incredible £46,768.00 in just one week! Your donations will go towards increasing our student support services from providing financial grants and essential equipment to developing wellbeing programmes to support mental health.�

A HUGE thank you to everyone who donated to The Courtauld Fund #ChallengeWeek2021. Together, we raised an incredible £46,768.00 in just one week! Your donations will go towards increasing our student support services from providing financial grants and essential equipment to developing wellbeing programmes to support mental health.�

Happy #EarthDay! We’re celebrating the natural world with this stunning moonlit scene by Peter Paul Rubens 🌙 In the fina...
22/04/2021

Happy #EarthDay! We’re celebrating the natural world with this stunning moonlit scene by Peter Paul Rubens 🌙

In the final years of his life, Rubens purchased a country estate outside Antwerp called Het Steen. He spent long periods there, painting landscapes for his own pleasure rather than on commission; this is one of the finest examples.

While Rubens was very interested in astronomy, the stars here seem more like joyous flecks of paint than a carefully observed night sky. Rubens had initially included biblical figures in the foreground but painted them out to make this work a pure landscape. A grazing horse in the foreground is the only living creature to remain 🍃

In the 18th century, Landscape by Moonlight belonged to Joshua Reynolds, first president of the Royal Academy, who used it as an example in his lectures on art. The painting also had a powerful influence on British landscape painters such as John Constable.

🎨#InOurCollection Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640), Landscape by Moonlight, 1635-40, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

Happy #EarthDay! We’re celebrating the natural world with this stunning moonlit scene by Peter Paul Rubens 🌙

In the final years of his life, Rubens purchased a country estate outside Antwerp called Het Steen. He spent long periods there, painting landscapes for his own pleasure rather than on commission; this is one of the finest examples.

While Rubens was very interested in astronomy, the stars here seem more like joyous flecks of paint than a carefully observed night sky. Rubens had initially included biblical figures in the foreground but painted them out to make this work a pure landscape. A grazing horse in the foreground is the only living creature to remain 🍃

In the 18th century, Landscape by Moonlight belonged to Joshua Reynolds, first president of the Royal Academy, who used it as an example in his lectures on art. The painting also had a powerful influence on British landscape painters such as John Constable.

🎨#InOurCollection Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640), Landscape by Moonlight, 1635-40, The Courtauld, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld

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Tube stations: Temple, Charing Cross, Embankment, Covent Garden Train stations: Charing Cross, Waterloo

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Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masterpieces such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear.'


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A GIFT OF LOVE - ΕΝΑ ΔΩΡΟ ΑΓΑΠΗΣ Red Poppies - A wonderful time of the year! Κοκκινες Παπαρουνες - Μια υπέροχη εποχή του χρόνου! RED POPPIES 80 x 100 cm 05/2014 © The bright scarlet poppies are a fascinating species of spring flowers that sprout each year to dazzle the eyes - for a fleeting moment at least! Vibrant hues of red blooms cover the hillsides and a glimpse of that magical sight transports one into a world of beauty; to be there is a rare treat. Andreas C Chrysafis (Painting in a Private Collection-Monaco) Reproductions prints of this oil painting including coffee-cup prints are available exclusive from ArtPal: www.artpal.com/chrysafis https://www.amazon.com/Andreas-C-Chrysafis/e/B00478I90O…
World before Covid
UNTITLED IMAGE 1951- Iwakawa Yukihiro Web Exhibition Work 2020 10_03 http://rrsrrs.la.coocan.jp/ UNTITLED IMAGE 1951- Iwakawa Yukihiro Web Exhibition Work 2020 10_03 http://rrsrrs.la.coocan.jp/
Hey guys im new to the art world but fascinated by it. Looking to learn 🙂
Watch Open Courtauld Hour: British – Art, Immigration and Migration Live Online https://open-courtauld-hour.netlify.app/ https://open-courtauld-hour.netlify.app/
CONTEMPORARY ART ''ROCK QUEEN ELIZABETH II'' Artwork of the artist Raffaele Ciotola dedicated to Her Majesty Elizabeth ll of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of the other Commonwealth countries.
Can anybody tell me the correct term for veiled sculpture? I have seen it referred to as ‘wet drapery’, but wonder if their is another term. The following link shows this wonderful artistry: https://www.franceculture.fr/sculpture/a-fascinating-transparency-strazzas-veiled-virgin I would also like to know how this technique is achieved, just out of interest rather than attempting to carry it out 😉 Many thanks.
Are you a current or former museum and gallery professional working in the UK or internationally? We are inviting colleagues in the sector to complete a survey that aims to explore the perspectives and experiences of current and former museum and gallery professionals in relation to graduate employability in the sector. Our survey can be accessed at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdekeCXoKtluvSF-r1Y_JXOKTMVaTZ36UB8PKlpjhWyGI3QwQ/viewform (closing date: 18th of June). We would appreciate if you could take the time to complete our survey and circulate it amongst your colleagues. This survey is part of the project Curating Expertise: Towards a Museum Forum @ King’s, with which we aim to build an interdisciplinary Museum Studies teaching and research agenda at King’s College London. We are interested in colleagues’ thoughts about the knowledges, skills and experience that museum studies graduates should possess to be employable in the sector today. We are particularly keen to hear from those interested in contributing, in one form or another, to the delivery of a London-based but globally focused new Museum Studies teaching provision. Whilst we are interested in collaborating with London-based institutions / professionals, we would be delighted to also hear from colleagues across the UK and internationally. Whilst we appreciate this is a time of uncertainty for the sector, it seems a critical moment to reflect on how we can train future generations of resilient museum professionals. If you wish to get in touch, you can reach us at [email protected] and [email protected]. Best wishes, Dr Stuart Dunn (DDH) and Dr Serena Iervolino (CMCI)
Copyright Watercolours
Just watched a YouTube video that stated a 14th century cesspit had been discovered under the Courtauld Gallery that included tiles depicting a mythical beast with a mans head and a lions body. If this is correct information, could it actually depict William Wallace - as a lion was the flag/coat of arms for the Wallace family? (My grandfather, during the second world war, had a potty with Hitler's face inside so that you could urinate on him!)
Iwakawa Yukihiro Web Exhibition Dissolution(溶解) Work 2019 12_1 Dissolution(溶解) Arrows. Sounds. Various-3 (12 pieces of works) Canvas size F3 http://rrsrrs.la.coocan.jp
Iwakawa Yukihiro Web Exhibition Dissolution(溶解) Work 2019 12_1 Dissolution(溶解) Arrows. Sounds. Various 1~3 (12 pieces of works) Canvas size F3 http://rrsrrs.la.coocan.jp