National Gallery

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Create a stylish casual look with our unisex teal sweatshirt featuring a print of Vincent van Gogh’s magnificent landsca...
07/05/2021

Create a stylish casual look with our unisex teal sweatshirt featuring a print of Vincent van Gogh’s magnificent landscape, ‘A Wheatfield with Cypresses’. He considered this painting to be one of his best summer landscapes. With the artist's name embroidered in bright yellow on the front, add a pop of colour and a touch of art to your outfit. Shop online while stock lasts: https://bit.ly/3ujcx4o
Every purchase supports the National Gallery.

This painting shows Lake Keitele in central Finland, painted by Akseli Gallen-Kallela. The zigzag pattern on the water’s...
06/05/2021

This painting shows Lake Keitele in central Finland, painted by Akseli Gallen-Kallela. The zigzag pattern on the water’s surface is a natural occurrence caused by the interaction of the wind with the lake’s currents, but it is also intended to evoke the wake created by Väinämöinen, the poet-hero of the Finnish saga Kalevala, as he rows across the lake. This epic poem was seen as a founding myth by Finnish nationalists who were seeking autonomy for their country in the late nineteenth century, and reference to it gave Lake Keitele an added political dimension. Despite the relatively small size of the canvas, Gallen-Kallela creates a feeling of expansive space that brings together meditative stillness and the dynamism of the natural world: https://bit.ly/2RwVUzU

This painting shows Lake Keitele in central Finland, painted by Akseli Gallen-Kallela. The zigzag pattern on the water’s surface is a natural occurrence caused by the interaction of the wind with the lake’s currents, but it is also intended to evoke the wake created by Väinämöinen, the poet-hero of the Finnish saga Kalevala, as he rows across the lake. This epic poem was seen as a founding myth by Finnish nationalists who were seeking autonomy for their country in the late nineteenth century, and reference to it gave Lake Keitele an added political dimension. Despite the relatively small size of the canvas, Gallen-Kallela creates a feeling of expansive space that brings together meditative stillness and the dynamism of the natural world: https://bit.ly/2RwVUzU

Lizards, fancy feathered hats and trickeryWhile we're closed, you can now visit a virtual space showing a selection of p...
05/05/2021

Lizards, fancy feathered hats and trickery

While we're closed, you can now visit a virtual space showing a selection of paintings chosen and narrated by our Director, Dr Gabriele Finaldi. Explore the virtual exhibition here: https://bit.ly/3nm4n97

04/05/2021
The Duc d'Orléans | National Gallery

#MayThe4thBeWithYou today...Does this hairstyle remind you of anyone?

This head and shoulders portrait is based upon a three-quarter length portrait of the Duc d’Orléans, the eldest son of King Louis Philippe, which Ingres completed in 1842: https://bit.ly/2NjmdcF

A gentleman and a lady sit in an open carriage. Both are fashionably but not ostentatiously dressed for a drive in the c...
03/05/2021

A gentleman and a lady sit in an open carriage. Both are fashionably but not ostentatiously dressed for a drive in the country on what appears to be a summer’s day. Although the lady’s wide-brimmed hat may not be the most practical choice for an open carriage, her legs are covered by a blanket and both their jackets are buttoned up tight. The driver leans forward slightly, perhaps bringing the carriage to a halt to greet us. Both look directly at us, their open faces framed by their hats, as if inviting us to share their experience or to admire their new carriage and its fine pair of horses. This type of high-built, four-wheel carriage was known as a ‘phaeton’ after the son of the Greek god Helios, who attempted to ride the chariot of the sun and almost set the earth on fire. With a minimal, lightly sprung body mounted on large wheels, the phaeton was particularly used for recreational driving and racing. A valuable status symbol like a modern luxury car, the phaeton is very much the centrepiece of this painting. George Stubbs pays great attention to the buff-coloured undercarriage, as the crane-neck construction of this model, clearly visible above the front wheels, enhanced its manoeuvrability: https://bit.ly/3ryUQMp

A gentleman and a lady sit in an open carriage. Both are fashionably but not ostentatiously dressed for a drive in the country on what appears to be a summer’s day. Although the lady’s wide-brimmed hat may not be the most practical choice for an open carriage, her legs are covered by a blanket and both their jackets are buttoned up tight. The driver leans forward slightly, perhaps bringing the carriage to a halt to greet us. Both look directly at us, their open faces framed by their hats, as if inviting us to share their experience or to admire their new carriage and its fine pair of horses. This type of high-built, four-wheel carriage was known as a ‘phaeton’ after the son of the Greek god Helios, who attempted to ride the chariot of the sun and almost set the earth on fire. With a minimal, lightly sprung body mounted on large wheels, the phaeton was particularly used for recreational driving and racing. A valuable status symbol like a modern luxury car, the phaeton is very much the centrepiece of this painting. George Stubbs pays great attention to the buff-coloured undercarriage, as the crane-neck construction of this model, clearly visible above the front wheels, enhanced its manoeuvrability: https://bit.ly/3ryUQMp

Leonardo da Vinci died #OnThisDay in 1519. This is a cartoon, a large drawing made in preparation for a painting. Often ...
02/05/2021

Leonardo da Vinci died #OnThisDay in 1519. This is a cartoon, a large drawing made in preparation for a painting. Often known as ‘The Burlington House Cartoon’, it is the only surviving large-scale drawing by Leonardo. The Virgin Mary sits on her mother’s lap, her attention focused on the wriggling Christ Child. Her mother, Saint Anne, looks intently at her through deep-set eyes and points upwards to the heavens, indicating the child’s divinity. Christ’s cousin, Saint John the Baptist, leans against Anne’s lap as the baby Christ tickles his chin. Parts of the drawing are densely shaded and contrasted with lighter areas to give a three-dimensional effect, for example the figures' faces and elements of the draperies such as sections of the Virgin’s sleeve and the folds of fabric which cover Saint Anne’s knees. Other areas, such as the women’s headdresses and feet, and Saint Anne’s pointing hand, are simply indicated with outlines: https://bit.ly/3bDcA1a

Leonardo da Vinci died #OnThisDay in 1519. This is a cartoon, a large drawing made in preparation for a painting. Often known as ‘The Burlington House Cartoon’, it is the only surviving large-scale drawing by Leonardo. The Virgin Mary sits on her mother’s lap, her attention focused on the wriggling Christ Child. Her mother, Saint Anne, looks intently at her through deep-set eyes and points upwards to the heavens, indicating the child’s divinity. Christ’s cousin, Saint John the Baptist, leans against Anne’s lap as the baby Christ tickles his chin. Parts of the drawing are densely shaded and contrasted with lighter areas to give a three-dimensional effect, for example the figures' faces and elements of the draperies such as sections of the Virgin’s sleeve and the folds of fabric which cover Saint Anne’s knees. Other areas, such as the women’s headdresses and feet, and Saint Anne’s pointing hand, are simply indicated with outlines: https://bit.ly/3bDcA1a

We are thrilled to show you our selection of products that are made in the UK, as we constantly seek to improve our carb...
30/04/2021

We are thrilled to show you our selection of products that are made in the UK, as we constantly seek to improve our carbon footprint. From reusable tote bags, clothes, accessories to our art prints, all the products from this selection are made in the United Kingdom, ensuring these items have minimal impact on the environment and that we maintain a high degree of ethical sourcing and trading. Discover the full selection online: https://bit.ly/3tC0n6m
Every purchase supports the National Gallery.

We are thrilled to show you our selection of products that are made in the UK, as we constantly seek to improve our carbon footprint. From reusable tote bags, clothes, accessories to our art prints, all the products from this selection are made in the United Kingdom, ensuring these items have minimal impact on the environment and that we maintain a high degree of ethical sourcing and trading. Discover the full selection online: https://bit.ly/3tC0n6m
Every purchase supports the National Gallery.

28/04/2021
James Mayhew - The Katie Collection

James Mayhew, the creator of the ‘Katie’ book series, first had the idea about Katie when he was an art student. In his first book, ‘Katie’s Picture Show’ Katie climbs into our paintings and goes on exciting adventures. Since then, she has continued her adventures with art and has even inspired an entire children’s gift range, filled with books, school accessories, mugs, and much more to see online. Discover the range here: https://bit.ly/3tDPD7Q
Every purchase supports the National Gallery.

Our #SensingTheUnseen exhibition might be closed but you can now immerse yourself in the world of Gossaert's painting in...
27/04/2021

Our #SensingTheUnseen exhibition might be closed but you can now immerse yourself in the world of Gossaert's painting in the comfort of your own home with our new online experimental experience.

Explore 'Sensing the Unseen: At Home' here: https://bit.ly/3wtpDxD

Robert Campin died #OnThisDay in 1444. He was, with Jan van Eyck, the founder of the realistic style of oil painting in ...
26/04/2021

Robert Campin died #OnThisDay in 1444. He was, with Jan van Eyck, the founder of the realistic style of oil painting in the Netherlands in the early 15th century. In this pair of paintings a man and a woman, clearly husband and wife, gaze towards each other. We don‘t know who they were, but their clothes, which are not excessively rich, suggest that they were relatively prosperous townspeople. The clarity and credibility of these portraits, which were designed as a pair, is astonishing – but they do more than reflect how the sitters looked. Campin’s ability to convey textures of skin, fur and fabric means that we are not immediately aware of the skill with which he arranged the sitters’ clothes and even their features. These are highly ordered geometric compositions devised to show us what the couple were like: an older, world-weary man and a bright, optimistic young woman. The man slouches and the drooping lines of his face are echoed by his clothes; the woman’s skin is smooth, her eyes are bright and her features and clothes form rising lines: https://bit.ly/2PZYwtT

A pencil description on the reverse of this painting identifies it as a landscape near Annecy, a medieval town adjacent ...
25/04/2021

A pencil description on the reverse of this painting identifies it as a landscape near Annecy, a medieval town adjacent to a large lake in the Haute-Savoie region of France. The exact location has not been identified, however. As was usual in his landscapes, Renoir has used strong colour combinations, offsetting the bright greens with contrasting shades of red (pinks, ochre and rusts) to increase the vibrancy and intensity of the pigments. Here he also seems to be mirroring the optical effects we experience when we look into the distance. Things that are close to us or in our peripheral vision – in this case, those grasses and the foliage on either side of the foreground – go out of focus as our eyes see beyond them. Instead of painting what is closer to the viewer in more detail, Renoir has used broad dabs of the brush to create an impression of blurring, tricking the eye into looking deeper into the picture: https://bit.ly/2Jkon8x

A pencil description on the reverse of this painting identifies it as a landscape near Annecy, a medieval town adjacent to a large lake in the Haute-Savoie region of France. The exact location has not been identified, however. As was usual in his landscapes, Renoir has used strong colour combinations, offsetting the bright greens with contrasting shades of red (pinks, ochre and rusts) to increase the vibrancy and intensity of the pigments. Here he also seems to be mirroring the optical effects we experience when we look into the distance. Things that are close to us or in our peripheral vision – in this case, those grasses and the foliage on either side of the foreground – go out of focus as our eyes see beyond them. Instead of painting what is closer to the viewer in more detail, Renoir has used broad dabs of the brush to create an impression of blurring, tricking the eye into looking deeper into the picture: https://bit.ly/2Jkon8x

Discover our new collection based on the Renaissance era. Featuring books, catalogues and prints, explore this historica...
24/04/2021

Discover our new collection based on the Renaissance era. Featuring books, catalogues and prints, explore this historical period of cultural revival through our selection of gifts.

Take the time to browse online: https://bit.ly/3mwTjoR

With the Gallery temporarily closed, we are relying on the generosity of your support more than ever. Thank you.

Discover our new collection based on the Renaissance era. Featuring books, catalogues and prints, explore this historical period of cultural revival through our selection of gifts.

Take the time to browse online: https://bit.ly/3mwTjoR

With the Gallery temporarily closed, we are relying on the generosity of your support more than ever. Thank you.

Joseph Mallord William Turner was born #OnThisDay in 1775. Turner is perhaps the best-loved English Romantic artist. He ...
23/04/2021

Joseph Mallord William Turner was born #OnThisDay in 1775. Turner is perhaps the best-loved English Romantic artist. He became known as 'the painter of light', because of his increasing interest in brilliant colours as the main constituent in his landscapes and seascapes. In 'Rain, Steam, and Speed', a steam engine comes towards us as it crosses the Maidenhead Railway Bridge in the rain. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the bridge was completed in 1838. We are looking east towards London as the train heads to the west. The exaggeratedly abrupt foreshortening of the viaduct, which our eye follows to the horizon, suggests the speed with which the train bursts into view through the rain. Turner frequently painted scenes of contemporary life and was particularly interested in industry and technology. As he often used new forms of transport, including steam trains, it is unlikely that the painting is a rejection of modernity. Instead, he saw both the train and the bridge as subjects worthy of being painted: https://bit.ly/2LC9LUj

Joseph Mallord William Turner was born #OnThisDay in 1775. Turner is perhaps the best-loved English Romantic artist. He became known as 'the painter of light', because of his increasing interest in brilliant colours as the main constituent in his landscapes and seascapes. In 'Rain, Steam, and Speed', a steam engine comes towards us as it crosses the Maidenhead Railway Bridge in the rain. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the bridge was completed in 1838. We are looking east towards London as the train heads to the west. The exaggeratedly abrupt foreshortening of the viaduct, which our eye follows to the horizon, suggests the speed with which the train bursts into view through the rain. Turner frequently painted scenes of contemporary life and was particularly interested in industry and technology. As he often used new forms of transport, including steam trains, it is unlikely that the painting is a rejection of modernity. Instead, he saw both the train and the bridge as subjects worthy of being painted: https://bit.ly/2LC9LUj

Joost Joustra, The Howard and Roberta Ahmanson Research Curator, tells us about Luca Signorelli's striking and unusual a...
22/04/2021

Joost Joustra, The Howard and Roberta Ahmanson Research Curator, tells us about Luca Signorelli's striking and unusual altarpiece in our latest 10 minute talk: https://bit.ly/3tgGLVt

This video is with thanks to Nikon, our Digital Content Partner.

Joost Joustra, The Howard and Roberta Ahmanson Research Curator, tells us about Luca Signorelli's striking and unusual altarpiece in our latest 10 minute talk: https://bit.ly/3tgGLVt

This video is with thanks to Nikon, our Digital Content Partner.

20/04/2021
Ophelia among the Flowers | National Gallery

Odilon Redon was born #OnThisDay in 1840. He frequently made reference to both classic and contemporary literature in his work, and the subject of the drowned Ophelia, taken from Shakespeare’s 'Hamlet' was one he often returned to between 1900 and 1908: https://bit.ly/2xg9DS4

Giovanni Antonio Canal, known as Canaletto, died #OnThisDay in 1768. He was very influential, famed for his precisely de...
19/04/2021

Giovanni Antonio Canal, known as Canaletto, died #OnThisDay in 1768. He was very influential, famed for his precisely depicted views of the city of Venice. Canaletto's early pictures for local patrons are his most accomplished: these carefully designed, individual, and atmospheric studies include 'The Stonemason's Yard'. In the early morning sun, workmen chisel away at pieces of stone. Everyday life continues around them: a mother rushes to comfort her crying child, watched by a woman on the balcony above. This square – the Campo San Vidal – was not usually a mason’s yard: it appears to have been temporarily transformed into a workshop while repairs are done to the nearby church of San Vidal. The church of Saint Maria della Carità and its campanile (bell tower) are visible on the far side of the Grand Canal: https://bit.ly/2T97jr1
Explore our collection of gifts featuring details from Canaletto's evocative paintings of Venice: https://bit.ly/34dgihi

Giovanni Antonio Canal, known as Canaletto, died #OnThisDay in 1768. He was very influential, famed for his precisely depicted views of the city of Venice. Canaletto's early pictures for local patrons are his most accomplished: these carefully designed, individual, and atmospheric studies include 'The Stonemason's Yard'. In the early morning sun, workmen chisel away at pieces of stone. Everyday life continues around them: a mother rushes to comfort her crying child, watched by a woman on the balcony above. This square – the Campo San Vidal – was not usually a mason’s yard: it appears to have been temporarily transformed into a workshop while repairs are done to the nearby church of San Vidal. The church of Saint Maria della Carità and its campanile (bell tower) are visible on the far side of the Grand Canal: https://bit.ly/2T97jr1
Explore our collection of gifts featuring details from Canaletto's evocative paintings of Venice: https://bit.ly/34dgihi

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