National Gallery

National Gallery The story of European art, masterpiece by masterpiece. We collect and care for the nation’s paintings and we share them with the world. Exhibitions: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/

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24/06/2021
One painting, many voices: Matejko's 'Copernicus'

Jan Matejko was born #OnThisDay in 1838. He was Poland’s most celebrated painter of the 19th century, famous for his depictions of important moments in Polish history. Find out why his painting, 'The Astronomer Copernicus. Conversations with God', is described as Poland's national icon.
For the first time in the UK, you can now see this painting in Room 46. Book your free Gallery entry ticket here: https://bit.ly/3yZKavc

Sebastiano del Piombo died #OnThisDay in 1547. His work, 'The Raising of Lazarus', was one of the first paintings to ent...
21/06/2021

Sebastiano del Piombo died #OnThisDay in 1547. His work, 'The Raising of Lazarus', was one of the first paintings to enter our collection and is actually listed as NG1 in our inventory. At the request of Martha and Mary, Jesus visited the grave of their brother Lazarus and raised him from the dead (John 11:1–44). Sebastiano shows Christ standing with one hand raised to invoke the power of God and the other pointing to Lazarus, who is seated on the edge of his stone tomb. Christ speaks the life-giving words, ‘Lazarus come forth’. A kneeling man helps Lazarus remove the shroud and bindings in which he had been buried. Mary kneels at Christ’s feet in awe while Martha raises her hands and turns her head away, unable to look. Saint Peter at bottom left falls to his knees while other disciples turn to one another in amazement.

You can see the painting in Room 9 on Routes B and C: https://bit.ly/2CKHq6w

Sebastiano del Piombo died #OnThisDay in 1547. His work, 'The Raising of Lazarus', was one of the first paintings to enter our collection and is actually listed as NG1 in our inventory. At the request of Martha and Mary, Jesus visited the grave of their brother Lazarus and raised him from the dead (John 11:1–44). Sebastiano shows Christ standing with one hand raised to invoke the power of God and the other pointing to Lazarus, who is seated on the edge of his stone tomb. Christ speaks the life-giving words, ‘Lazarus come forth’. A kneeling man helps Lazarus remove the shroud and bindings in which he had been buried. Mary kneels at Christ’s feet in awe while Martha raises her hands and turns her head away, unable to look. Saint Peter at bottom left falls to his knees while other disciples turn to one another in amazement.

You can see the painting in Room 9 on Routes B and C: https://bit.ly/2CKHq6w

This painting was almost certainly exhibited with the title 'The Lake in the Bois de Boulogne' at the Fifth Impressionis...
20/06/2021

This painting was almost certainly exhibited with the title 'The Lake in the Bois de Boulogne' at the Fifth Impressionist exhibition in 1880 together with another picture by Berthe Morisot, In the Bois de Boulogne. The two paintings show the same two women (possibly professional models) who wear identical clothes in both pictures. Morisot lived near the Bois de Boulogne in the west of Paris. During the 1850s, Napoleon III and the landscape architect Adolphe Alphand had transformed the Bois from a formal park into a ‘natural’ woodland designed to appeal to the city’s inhabitants. As a scene of middle-class leisure set within domesticated nature, this picture is typical of imagery that has come to characterise Impressionism. But Morisot brings a boldness and vigour to her painting technique. Her distinctive zig-zag brushstrokes energise the entire picture surface and are particularly suited for capturing the play of light on the water: https://bit.ly/39EMtH5

This painting was almost certainly exhibited with the title 'The Lake in the Bois de Boulogne' at the Fifth Impressionist exhibition in 1880 together with another picture by Berthe Morisot, In the Bois de Boulogne. The two paintings show the same two women (possibly professional models) who wear identical clothes in both pictures. Morisot lived near the Bois de Boulogne in the west of Paris. During the 1850s, Napoleon III and the landscape architect Adolphe Alphand had transformed the Bois from a formal park into a ‘natural’ woodland designed to appeal to the city’s inhabitants. As a scene of middle-class leisure set within domesticated nature, this picture is typical of imagery that has come to characterise Impressionism. But Morisot brings a boldness and vigour to her painting technique. Her distinctive zig-zag brushstrokes energise the entire picture surface and are particularly suited for capturing the play of light on the water: https://bit.ly/39EMtH5

A quite literally petrifying severed gorgon's head with magical powers is a lifesaver in Luca Giordano's mythical drama....
18/06/2021

A quite literally petrifying severed gorgon's head with magical powers is a lifesaver in Luca Giordano's mythical drama. Letizia Treves explains more in our latest 10 minute talk: https://bit.ly/2T7MP5b

This video is with thanks to Nikon, our Digital Content Partner.

A quite literally petrifying severed gorgon's head with magical powers is a lifesaver in Luca Giordano's mythical drama. Letizia Treves explains more in our latest 10 minute talk: https://bit.ly/2T7MP5b

This video is with thanks to Nikon, our Digital Content Partner.

Our 'Take One Picture' exhibition is now open in the Sunley Room! From armoured beasts and shining shields to plumed hel...
17/06/2021

Our 'Take One Picture' exhibition is now open in the Sunley Room! From armoured beasts and shining shields to plumed helmets and printed flowers, primary schools from across the UK have responded creatively to 'The Battle of San Romano' by Paolo Uc***lo. Book your free ticket to come and explore the richness of children's creative responses: https://bit.ly/3toAfep
Thanks to our sponsors Columbia Threadneedle and to Columbia Threadneedle Foundation for their support of the programme.

Our 'Take One Picture' exhibition is now open in the Sunley Room! From armoured beasts and shining shields to plumed helmets and printed flowers, primary schools from across the UK have responded creatively to 'The Battle of San Romano' by Paolo Uc***lo. Book your free ticket to come and explore the richness of children's creative responses: https://bit.ly/3toAfep
Thanks to our sponsors Columbia Threadneedle and to Columbia Threadneedle Foundation for their support of the programme.

Do you recognise Van Gogh, Vermeer and Klimt? How quirky, unusual, and cute these collectable figurines are! They all co...
16/06/2021

Do you recognise Van Gogh, Vermeer and Klimt? How quirky, unusual, and cute these collectable figurines are! They all come in a box with ten interesting facts about the artist.

Yellow clogs, sunflower lapel pin and fiery red hair, Van Gogh is immediately recognisable! In the middle, clutching his famous pearl earring in one hand, with palette and paintbrush in the other, Vermeer comes accessorised with a miniature easel and a portfolio of paintings. And finally, we have Klimt, holding his feline friend Katze!

You can order these artist figurines online, while stock lasts: https://bit.ly/3gCPvQC

Do you recognise Van Gogh, Vermeer and Klimt? How quirky, unusual, and cute these collectable figurines are! They all come in a box with ten interesting facts about the artist.

Yellow clogs, sunflower lapel pin and fiery red hair, Van Gogh is immediately recognisable! In the middle, clutching his famous pearl earring in one hand, with palette and paintbrush in the other, Vermeer comes accessorised with a miniature easel and a portfolio of paintings. And finally, we have Klimt, holding his feline friend Katze!

You can order these artist figurines online, while stock lasts: https://bit.ly/3gCPvQC

Sitting on a bench watching the world go by...The sitter in this work by Claude Monet was once thought to be his first w...
15/06/2021

Sitting on a bench watching the world go by...The sitter in this work by Claude Monet was once thought to be his first wife Camille, whom he married in 1870, but it is in fact a professional model who also posed for other artists, including Degas. This work was probably painted in the summer at Argenteuil. The very free handling of the paint may reflect the influence of Edouard Manet, who was working alongside Monet at the time: https://bit.ly/3vZUHnT

Sitting on a bench watching the world go by...The sitter in this work by Claude Monet was once thought to be his first wife Camille, whom he married in 1870, but it is in fact a professional model who also posed for other artists, including Degas. This work was probably painted in the summer at Argenteuil. The very free handling of the paint may reflect the influence of Edouard Manet, who was working alongside Monet at the time: https://bit.ly/3vZUHnT

The summer temperatures look set to stay for several more weeks as warm air continues to sweep across the UK. It's defin...
13/06/2021

The summer temperatures look set to stay for several more weeks as warm air continues to sweep across the UK. It's definitely the right time to make the most of the outdoors and our deck chairs could be just the thing. Great for relaxing in the garden, they are all printed with images from our paintings and assembled in the UK. Monet, Constable, Van Gogh...There are so many artists from our collection to choose from. Take a look at our entire collection and get your favourite delivered to your home: https://bit.ly/34NVWe6
Every purchase supports the National Gallery.

The summer temperatures look set to stay for several more weeks as warm air continues to sweep across the UK. It's definitely the right time to make the most of the outdoors and our deck chairs could be just the thing. Great for relaxing in the garden, they are all printed with images from our paintings and assembled in the UK. Monet, Constable, Van Gogh...There are so many artists from our collection to choose from. Take a look at our entire collection and get your favourite delivered to your home: https://bit.ly/34NVWe6
Every purchase supports the National Gallery.

12/06/2021
Restoring Botticelli's 'Adoration of the Kings': Part three

It has long been suspected that Botticelli worked with Filippino on 'Adoration of the Kings', but how can we tell which elements of the painting were painted by Botticelli, and which were painted by Filippino? In this episode, Restorer Jill Dunkerton and Scientist Marta Melchiorre show the techniques they used to investigate this, and reveal some of their surprising discoveries: https://bit.ly/34lAtJ7

John Constable was born #OnThisDay in 1776. He is famous for his landscapes, which are mostly of the Suffolk countryside...
11/06/2021

John Constable was born #OnThisDay in 1776. He is famous for his landscapes, which are mostly of the Suffolk countryside, where he was born and lived. 'The Hay Wain' is the third of the large landscapes set around the River Stour that Constable exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1819 and 1825. 'The Hay Wain' was shown in 1821. His determination to capture the rural Suffolk landscape of his boyhood in these monumental paintings must in part have been due to a sense that this way of life was changing due to rapid industrialisation – the factories, steam power and locomotives that appear in works by his contemporaries, such as Turner, are absent from Constable’s paintings: https://bit.ly/2XocTqh
Celebrate John Constable’s birthday with our deck chair, handmade in the UK, and featuring a detail from 'The Hay Wain’: https://bit.ly/3wWCR5l

John Constable was born #OnThisDay in 1776. He is famous for his landscapes, which are mostly of the Suffolk countryside, where he was born and lived. 'The Hay Wain' is the third of the large landscapes set around the River Stour that Constable exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1819 and 1825. 'The Hay Wain' was shown in 1821. His determination to capture the rural Suffolk landscape of his boyhood in these monumental paintings must in part have been due to a sense that this way of life was changing due to rapid industrialisation – the factories, steam power and locomotives that appear in works by his contemporaries, such as Turner, are absent from Constable’s paintings: https://bit.ly/2XocTqh
Celebrate John Constable’s birthday with our deck chair, handmade in the UK, and featuring a detail from 'The Hay Wain’: https://bit.ly/3wWCR5l

Located just outside Copenhagen, the Citadel (Kastellet) was a former military fort where Christen Købke and his parents...
08/06/2021

Located just outside Copenhagen, the Citadel (Kastellet) was a former military fort where Christen Købke and his parents lived from 1819 to 1833, although Købke often returned there to paint. He painted this view in 1837, possibly for his mother as a souvenir of their former home. This picture shows a drawbridge (that no longer exists) outside the north gate of the Citadel, which crosses a moat to a guardhouse. Købke made a number of preliminary sketches and an oil study on location before working up the final painting in his studio. Bathed in an evening light, with a hint of pink in the sky, the view is suffused with tones of the complementary colours red and green: https://bit.ly/3nnx4SY

Located just outside Copenhagen, the Citadel (Kastellet) was a former military fort where Christen Købke and his parents lived from 1819 to 1833, although Købke often returned there to paint. He painted this view in 1837, possibly for his mother as a souvenir of their former home. This picture shows a drawbridge (that no longer exists) outside the north gate of the Citadel, which crosses a moat to a guardhouse. Købke made a number of preliminary sketches and an oil study on location before working up the final painting in his studio. Bathed in an evening light, with a hint of pink in the sky, the view is suffused with tones of the complementary colours red and green: https://bit.ly/3nnx4SY

Before there was MuseumWeek, we held our own 'Museums Week exhibition' in 1968! From treating damaged wood panels to rel...
07/06/2021

Before there was MuseumWeek, we held our own 'Museums Week exhibition' in 1968! From treating damaged wood panels to relining paintings, this exhibition highlighted the work that our Conservation and Scientific teams were doing at the time. Throughout this week, we'll be celebrating Museum Week by taking you behind the scenes and sharing some surprising finds in our archive so make sure you follow along: https://bit.ly/3fRQWvv

Gerrit Berckheyde was one of the earliest Dutch specialists in townscapes and he was born #OnThisDay in 1638.If you visi...
06/06/2021

Gerrit Berckheyde was one of the earliest Dutch specialists in townscapes and he was born #OnThisDay in 1638.

If you visited the market square of Haarlem today, you would find a view that is not much different to the one in Berckheyde’s 1674 painting. We are about to step onto a marketplace where a crowd of townspeople are going about their day-to-day business. He has placed us among the citizens and the most important buildings of his native Haarlem. A lavishly dressed couple walking their dog on the left side of the painting stand out: https://bit.ly/3nnyixy

Gerrit Berckheyde was one of the earliest Dutch specialists in townscapes and he was born #OnThisDay in 1638.

If you visited the market square of Haarlem today, you would find a view that is not much different to the one in Berckheyde’s 1674 painting. We are about to step onto a marketplace where a crowd of townspeople are going about their day-to-day business. He has placed us among the citizens and the most important buildings of his native Haarlem. A lavishly dressed couple walking their dog on the left side of the painting stand out: https://bit.ly/3nnyixy

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