British Museum

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‘When I first saw the brooch I wasn’t exactly sure what it was but I knew it was something special and stopped detecting...
14/09/2021

‘When I first saw the brooch I wasn’t exactly sure what it was but I knew it was something special and stopped detecting immediately. It’s a very rare find and the fact that the last person to handle it was probably someone of extreme importance and high status over 1,000 years ago is just incredible. It really does make one wonder!’ – Detectorist Iain Sansome

This rare early medieval silver brooch was made around AD 800–900, and was found by Mr Sansome on farmland near Cheddar in Somerset, south west England in October 2020.

It’s an elaborate object and would have been owned by a high-status person, but the circumstances of its discovery – found with no other significant objects – suggest the brooch was lost rather than buried for safekeeping.

It was reported to the Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) – a partnership project to record archaeological finds made by the public in England and Wales.

Find out more about the object and PAS here: http://ow.ly/2Afe30rTPzs

🔎 Disc brooch decorated with animal forms. Silver and copper alloy, AD 800–900.

‘When I first saw the brooch I wasn’t exactly sure what it was but I knew it was something special and stopped detecting immediately. It’s a very rare find and the fact that the last person to handle it was probably someone of extreme importance and high status over 1,000 years ago is just incredible. It really does make one wonder!’ – Detectorist Iain Sansome

This rare early medieval silver brooch was made around AD 800–900, and was found by Mr Sansome on farmland near Cheddar in Somerset, south west England in October 2020.

It’s an elaborate object and would have been owned by a high-status person, but the circumstances of its discovery – found with no other significant objects – suggest the brooch was lost rather than buried for safekeeping.

It was reported to the Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) – a partnership project to record archaeological finds made by the public in England and Wales.

Find out more about the object and PAS here: http://ow.ly/2Afe30rTPzs

🔎 Disc brooch decorated with animal forms. Silver and copper alloy, AD 800–900.

This Korean painting depicts a crowd of men enthusiastically watching two ssireum wrestlers 💪 Ssireum is a type of Korea...
13/09/2021

This Korean painting depicts a crowd of men enthusiastically watching two ssireum wrestlers 💪

Ssireum is a type of Korean wrestling that is now a traditional national sport. The contestants loop their hands in their opponent’s belt and try to force their opponent to the ground – shown in the centre here.

This leaf forms part of an album of 22 paintings, which are copies of works by 18th-century Korean artist Kim Hong-do, currently housed in the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, whose genre paintings show ordinary life with a dash of humour.

Ssireum continues to be a popular activity held on holidays like Chuseok, the harvest moon festival taking place next week.

Find out about our day of performances, workshops, talks, demonstrations and games to celebrate Chuseok, and discover how you can take part on Saturday 18 September: http://ow.ly/snnX30rSMab

🔎 Copy of Kim Hong-do (1745-after 1806), 20th century. Read more: http://ow.ly/raN030rSQcZ

This Korean painting depicts a crowd of men enthusiastically watching two ssireum wrestlers 💪

Ssireum is a type of Korean wrestling that is now a traditional national sport. The contestants loop their hands in their opponent’s belt and try to force their opponent to the ground – shown in the centre here.

This leaf forms part of an album of 22 paintings, which are copies of works by 18th-century Korean artist Kim Hong-do, currently housed in the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, whose genre paintings show ordinary life with a dash of humour.

Ssireum continues to be a popular activity held on holidays like Chuseok, the harvest moon festival taking place next week.

Find out about our day of performances, workshops, talks, demonstrations and games to celebrate Chuseok, and discover how you can take part on Saturday 18 September: http://ow.ly/snnX30rSMab

🔎 Copy of Kim Hong-do (1745-after 1806), 20th century. Read more: http://ow.ly/raN030rSQcZ

The Battle of Marathon was fought #OnThisDay in 490 BC.Although it was never part of the ancient Olympic games, the mode...
12/09/2021

The Battle of Marathon was fought #OnThisDay in 490 BC.

Although it was never part of the ancient Olympic games, the modern marathon gets its name from this battle and the story attached to it.

According to Greek historian Herodotus, when the Athenians learned that the Persians had landed at Marathon, a messenger ran to Sparta with a plea for help. This original ‘marathon runner’ is said to have covered 260 kilometres of rugged terrain in less than two days! 🏃‍♂‍

‘Marathon’ is the Greek word for fennel, which grew in the area and gave the battlefield its name.

Read all about the ancient origins of this long-distance race in our blog: http://ow.ly/j71u30rSf9s

🔎 Panathenaic amphora showing long-distance runners. Greece, 333 BC.

The Battle of Marathon was fought #OnThisDay in 490 BC.

Although it was never part of the ancient Olympic games, the modern marathon gets its name from this battle and the story attached to it.

According to Greek historian Herodotus, when the Athenians learned that the Persians had landed at Marathon, a messenger ran to Sparta with a plea for help. This original ‘marathon runner’ is said to have covered 260 kilometres of rugged terrain in less than two days! 🏃‍♂‍

‘Marathon’ is the Greek word for fennel, which grew in the area and gave the battlefield its name.

Read all about the ancient origins of this long-distance race in our blog: http://ow.ly/j71u30rSf9s

🔎 Panathenaic amphora showing long-distance runners. Greece, 333 BC.

This Mesoamerican stucco figure has traces of ‘Maya blue’, a unique clay-dye made in Mesoamerica. 🎨 The pigment was made...
10/09/2021

This Mesoamerican stucco figure has traces of ‘Maya blue’, a unique clay-dye made in Mesoamerica.

🎨 The pigment was made as early as the 3rd century AD to paint codices, pottery, wall paintings and sculptures. Although the colour was used until the 16th century to decorate churches in Yucatan, in the south east of modern-day Mexico, it ceased to be produced shortly afterwards and no studies have been published on the Indigenous process of making Maya Blue.

Today, Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists in south Mexico are reproducing this colour using Indigenous methodologies and artistic sensibilities.

Read more about their work, which is supported by the Santo Domingo Centre of Excellence for Latin American Research (SDCELAR), here: http://ow.ly/RX9W30rSe0V

🔎 Stucco figure. Tulum, Mexico. Read more: http://ow.ly/9PFE30rSdR3

This Mesoamerican stucco figure has traces of ‘Maya blue’, a unique clay-dye made in Mesoamerica.

🎨 The pigment was made as early as the 3rd century AD to paint codices, pottery, wall paintings and sculptures. Although the colour was used until the 16th century to decorate churches in Yucatan, in the south east of modern-day Mexico, it ceased to be produced shortly afterwards and no studies have been published on the Indigenous process of making Maya Blue.

Today, Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists in south Mexico are reproducing this colour using Indigenous methodologies and artistic sensibilities.

Read more about their work, which is supported by the Santo Domingo Centre of Excellence for Latin American Research (SDCELAR), here: http://ow.ly/RX9W30rSe0V

🔎 Stucco figure. Tulum, Mexico. Read more: http://ow.ly/9PFE30rSdR3

#DidYouKnow the first Pride took place in New York City in July 1970, and London hosted the first UK Pride just under 50...
10/09/2021

#DidYouKnow the first Pride took place in New York City in July 1970, and London hosted the first UK Pride just under 50 years ago in 1972.

#PrideInLondon might be cancelled this year, but on your next visit to the Museum you can follow a trail looking at objects that have a connection with LGBTQ history – including these marble busts of the emperor Hadrian and his lover Antinous.

Explore at your own pace with audio commentaries by Simon Russell Beale and Fiona Shaw, and choose either a three-object trail if you only have 30 minutes to spare, or take in all 15 objects on our 60-minute route.

Find out more and plan your next visit: http://ow.ly/MKhc30rSFLa

🔎 (Left) Bust of the emperor Hadrian. Marble sculpture. Rome, AD 125–130. (Right) Bust of Antinous. Marble portrait head. Rome, AD 130–140.

#DidYouKnow the first Pride took place in New York City in July 1970, and London hosted the first UK Pride just under 50 years ago in 1972.

#PrideInLondon might be cancelled this year, but on your next visit to the Museum you can follow a trail looking at objects that have a connection with LGBTQ history – including these marble busts of the emperor Hadrian and his lover Antinous.

Explore at your own pace with audio commentaries by Simon Russell Beale and Fiona Shaw, and choose either a three-object trail if you only have 30 minutes to spare, or take in all 15 objects on our 60-minute route.

Find out more and plan your next visit: http://ow.ly/MKhc30rSFLa

🔎 (Left) Bust of the emperor Hadrian. Marble sculpture. Rome, AD 125–130. (Right) Bust of Antinous. Marble portrait head. Rome, AD 130–140.

🦈This is a Kaygas mask (in the shape of a shovel nosed shark), which was made in 2015 by Alick Tipoti, an artist from th...
09/09/2021

🦈This is a Kaygas mask (in the shape of a shovel nosed shark), which was made in 2015 by Alick Tipoti, an artist from the island of Erub in the Torres Strait, Australia.

It was inspired in part by a turtle-shell mask in the collection which the artist says is his favourite out of all the ancient Torres Strait Island masks he has seen.

Tipoti notes that this mask is associated with the Kaygasiw Usul (milky way star constellation) which is linked to the zugubal (spiritual ancestors). The artist has also choreographed a dance in which a performer wears this mask – the songs describe how the Milky Way was created and how the zugubal travel from the spiritual to the human world.

See this stunning mask on display in Room 24 of the Museum – The Wellcome Trust Gallery. Book your free tickets: http://ow.ly/Z6jj30rQsPj

Read more about this object and explore our Oceania virtual gallery on our website: http://ow.ly/pmMT30rTu34

🔎 Alick Tipoti (b. 1975), ‘Kaygasiw Usul’. Torres Strait Islands, Queensland, Australia 2015. © Alick Tipoti, reproduced by permission of the artist. Read more: http://ow.ly/BAYm30rQvI4

🦈This is a Kaygas mask (in the shape of a shovel nosed shark), which was made in 2015 by Alick Tipoti, an artist from the island of Erub in the Torres Strait, Australia.

It was inspired in part by a turtle-shell mask in the collection which the artist says is his favourite out of all the ancient Torres Strait Island masks he has seen.

Tipoti notes that this mask is associated with the Kaygasiw Usul (milky way star constellation) which is linked to the zugubal (spiritual ancestors). The artist has also choreographed a dance in which a performer wears this mask – the songs describe how the Milky Way was created and how the zugubal travel from the spiritual to the human world.

See this stunning mask on display in Room 24 of the Museum – The Wellcome Trust Gallery. Book your free tickets: http://ow.ly/Z6jj30rQsPj

Read more about this object and explore our Oceania virtual gallery on our website: http://ow.ly/pmMT30rTu34

🔎 Alick Tipoti (b. 1975), ‘Kaygasiw Usul’. Torres Strait Islands, Queensland, Australia 2015. © Alick Tipoti, reproduced by permission of the artist. Read more: http://ow.ly/BAYm30rQvI4

🌈🏛 Although #PrideInLondon is cancelled this year, we’re still celebrating with our ‘Desire, love identity’ tours, which...
08/09/2021

🌈🏛 Although #PrideInLondon is cancelled this year, we’re still celebrating with our ‘Desire, love identity’ tours, which are restarting this week to mark the occasion!

Discover LGBTQ histories and stories through objects in the collection on your next visit with a free 70-minute guided tour with one of our brilliant volunteers.

The tour ranges from the ancient world to the present day, and includes some of the most famous objects on display in the Museum, and some you might not have noticed before.

Find out more and book: http://ow.ly/A6a830rSFwn

📸 A ‘Desire, love, identity’ tour taking place in the galleries. © Benedict Johnson, 2019.

#BritishMuseum #Pride #LGBTQ

🌈🏛 Although #PrideInLondon is cancelled this year, we’re still celebrating with our ‘Desire, love identity’ tours, which are restarting this week to mark the occasion!

Discover LGBTQ histories and stories through objects in the collection on your next visit with a free 70-minute guided tour with one of our brilliant volunteers.

The tour ranges from the ancient world to the present day, and includes some of the most famous objects on display in the Museum, and some you might not have noticed before.

Find out more and book: http://ow.ly/A6a830rSFwn

📸 A ‘Desire, love, identity’ tour taking place in the galleries. © Benedict Johnson, 2019.

#BritishMuseum #Pride #LGBTQ

🦙 We’re excited to announce our next special exhibition on the remarkable history of Peru. Our #PeruExhibition will expl...
07/09/2021

🦙 We’re excited to announce our next special exhibition on the remarkable history of Peru.

Our #PeruExhibition will explore how people have thrived for millennia at some of the highest altitudes and in the driest deserts on earth.

The show marks 200 years of Peruvian independence, and will highlight the history, beliefs and cultures of the different peoples who have lived in Peru from 2500 BC to the arrival of Europeans in the 1500s, and their legacy in the centuries that followed.

Find out how past cultures were shaped by the diverse landscapes of the central Andes – some of the most complex, challenging and beautiful environments on the planet. Stunning photography and film will immerse you in these environments.

The exhibition will showcase a huge range of objects, as well as extraordinary loans from MALI - Museo de Arte de Lima in Peru. Throughout the show, Peruvian voices offer contemporary reflections and share how ancient Andean traditions endure today.

Curator Cecilia Pardo Grau looks at the landscapes and cultures of Peru, from early indigenous peoples to the Inca, and examines how unique approaches to time, agriculture, economy and power were developed – some of which continue today: http://ow.ly/t6oU30rTgLy

‘Peru: a journey in time’ opens 11 November 2021. Find out more about the show and book tickets here: http://ow.ly/H5Rh30rTgMd

Subscribe to our emails to get 20% off #PeruExhibition tickets for a limited time. Sign up via the link above.

Supported by PROMPERÚ

Organised with the Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru

🔎 Miniature gold figure of a llama, Peru, Inca, about 1500. Read more: http://ow.ly/P2WQ30rSY7F

🦙 We’re excited to announce our next special exhibition on the remarkable history of Peru.

Our #PeruExhibition will explore how people have thrived for millennia at some of the highest altitudes and in the driest deserts on earth.

The show marks 200 years of Peruvian independence, and will highlight the history, beliefs and cultures of the different peoples who have lived in Peru from 2500 BC to the arrival of Europeans in the 1500s, and their legacy in the centuries that followed.

Find out how past cultures were shaped by the diverse landscapes of the central Andes – some of the most complex, challenging and beautiful environments on the planet. Stunning photography and film will immerse you in these environments.

The exhibition will showcase a huge range of objects, as well as extraordinary loans from MALI - Museo de Arte de Lima in Peru. Throughout the show, Peruvian voices offer contemporary reflections and share how ancient Andean traditions endure today.

Curator Cecilia Pardo Grau looks at the landscapes and cultures of Peru, from early indigenous peoples to the Inca, and examines how unique approaches to time, agriculture, economy and power were developed – some of which continue today: http://ow.ly/t6oU30rTgLy

‘Peru: a journey in time’ opens 11 November 2021. Find out more about the show and book tickets here: http://ow.ly/H5Rh30rTgMd

Subscribe to our emails to get 20% off #PeruExhibition tickets for a limited time. Sign up via the link above.

Supported by PROMPERÚ

Organised with the Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru

🔎 Miniature gold figure of a llama, Peru, Inca, about 1500. Read more: http://ow.ly/P2WQ30rSY7F

Measuring just 11cm across, this 300-year-old netsuke realistically represents a dried salmon by using actual fish skin ...
06/09/2021

Measuring just 11cm across, this 300-year-old netsuke realistically represents a dried salmon by using actual fish skin for the surface – zoom in to see the detail 🐟

Gold lacquer highlights the fin, tail and the rope coming out of the salmon’s mouth, and the cut portion of the body is covered with a thin strip of mother-of-pearl to reveal the dried flesh transparently.

Dried salted salmon are still given as a traditional end-of-year gift in Japan today – known as 'aramaki'.

Animal netsuke were popular in Japan in the 18th and 19th centuries, and would have been worn by men. As well as being beautiful objects, they also had a functional purpose.

Because kimonos didn’t have pockets, a sash (obi) would be tied around the waist, and netsuke would be used as a toggle from which possessions could be suspended.

🏛 See a selection of netsuke on display in the Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese Galleries, showcasing Japanese culture from 5000 BC to the present. Find out more and book your free visit: http://ow.ly/97x130rQAUm

🔎 Ogawa Haritsu (1663–1747) Netsuke of a dried salmon. Made of lacquered wood, with fish skin and mother-of-pearl. Japan, early 18th century. Read more: http://ow.ly/VpbO30rQAUj

Measuring just 11cm across, this 300-year-old netsuke realistically represents a dried salmon by using actual fish skin for the surface – zoom in to see the detail 🐟

Gold lacquer highlights the fin, tail and the rope coming out of the salmon’s mouth, and the cut portion of the body is covered with a thin strip of mother-of-pearl to reveal the dried flesh transparently.

Dried salted salmon are still given as a traditional end-of-year gift in Japan today – known as 'aramaki'.

Animal netsuke were popular in Japan in the 18th and 19th centuries, and would have been worn by men. As well as being beautiful objects, they also had a functional purpose.

Because kimonos didn’t have pockets, a sash (obi) would be tied around the waist, and netsuke would be used as a toggle from which possessions could be suspended.

🏛 See a selection of netsuke on display in the Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese Galleries, showcasing Japanese culture from 5000 BC to the present. Find out more and book your free visit: http://ow.ly/97x130rQAUm

🔎 Ogawa Haritsu (1663–1747) Netsuke of a dried salmon. Made of lacquered wood, with fish skin and mother-of-pearl. Japan, early 18th century. Read more: http://ow.ly/VpbO30rQAUj

Address

London
WC1B 3DG

Tube: Five minutes from Holborn, Russell Square, Tottenham Court Road, and Goodge Street stations. Bus stops on New Oxford Street, Tottenham Court Road, Gower Street and Southampton Row are a short walk away. Plan your journey on the Transport for London website www.tfl.gov.uk

General information

Find all our important visiting information and book tickets here: https://www.britishmuseum.org/visit You can contact us here: https://www.britishmuseum.org/about-us/contact-us See our full code of conduct for social media here: https://www.britishmuseum.org/terms-use/social-media-code-conduct

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 10am - 5pm

Telephone

+442073238000

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