British Museum

British Museum A museum of the world, for the world. Discover over two million years of human history and culture. The collections from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas and the ancient world include world-famous objects such as the Rosetta Stone, the Parthenon sculptures, and Egyptian mummies.
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Operating as usual

We’ve created a new one-way route around the Ground floor galleries that lets you enjoy two million years of human histo...
14/09/2020

We’ve created a new one-way route around the Ground floor galleries that lets you enjoy two million years of human history 🏛

One of the highlights along the new route is this colossal bust is of the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II, who reigned from 1279–1213 BC. Weighing an incredible 7.5 tonnes, the bust is one of the largest and heaviest objects in the collection and can be seen in Room 4.

Discover the full list of 14 things that you won’t want to miss in this blog: http://ow.ly/OPHB30r86hC

🔎 Bust of Rameses the Great on display in Room 4. Granite statue. Egypt, 19th Dynasty (1292–1189 BC). Read more: http://ow.ly/saJy30r8PnA

As we settle into September, we’ve been thinking about some seasonal specialities. This little mulberry brooch – complet...
14/09/2020

As we settle into September, we’ve been thinking about some seasonal specialities. This little mulberry brooch – complete with ladybird – was made in England around 1840 🐞

The main picking season for mulberries is around now in the northern hemisphere – what’s your favourite fruit at this time of year?

Our online shop has a wonderful range of jewellery inspired by the collection – pick out a new favourite piece here: http://ow.ly/iMg530r8PqH

🔎 A gold brooch set with carved amethysts in the form of a fruiting mulberry with an enamelled gold ladybird on one leaf. England, c. 1840. Read more: http://ow.ly/DWap30r7ZAm

Our #TantraExhibition opens in less than two weeks! 🎉The radical philosophy of Tantra has been linked to successive wave...
13/09/2020

Our #TantraExhibition opens in less than two weeks! 🎉

The radical philosophy of Tantra has been linked to successive waves of revolutionary thought from 6th-century India to the rise of 1960s counterculture. Our handy timeline helps break down important moments linked to Tantra over 1,500 years: http://ow.ly/bhgJ30r5lms

Book your tickets here: http://ow.ly/IIeP30r5loq

🔎 Temple sculpture of the Tantric goddess Chamunda, 9th century, Madhya Pradesh, Central India. Read more: http://ow.ly/WqGF30r5lsY

The Battle of Marathon was fought #onthisday in 490 BC.Although it was never part of the ancient Olympic games, the mode...
12/09/2020

The Battle of Marathon was fought #onthisday in 490 BC.

Although it was never part of the ancient Olympic games, the modern marathon gets its name from this battle and the story attached to it. The story goes that a messenger called Pheidippides ran from Athens to Sparta to ask for help against the Persian forces, covering 260 kilometres of rugged terrain in less than two days! 🏃‍♂‍

‘Marathon’ is the Greek word for fennel, which grew in the area and gave the battlefield its name.

Read all about the ancient origins of this long-distance race in our blog: http://ow.ly/BVLz30r5kFe

🔎 Panathenaic amphora showing long-distance runners. Greece, 333 BC.

Do you have a favourite work by Grayson Perry?  ‘The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman’ is a richly decorated cast-iron coff...
11/09/2020

Do you have a favourite work by Grayson Perry?

‘The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman’ is a richly decorated cast-iron coffin-ship which is now on display in Room 17 on the Museum, next to the Nereid monument 🏛

The work is a memorial to forgotten artists who – through the ages – had made many of the objects in the Museum’s collection.

Find out more about the work and hear from Grayson in this blog: http://ow.ly/7KGW30r7Lpb

🔎 Grayson Perry with The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman. Grayson Perry (b. 1960), 'The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman', 2011. Cast iron, oil paint, glass, rope, wood, flint hand axe. © Grayson Perry. Courtesy Victoria Miro.

Have you ever visited Sir John Soane's Museum, just around the corner from the Museum? This print shows the front of arc...
10/09/2020

Have you ever visited Sir John Soane's Museum, just around the corner from the Museum?

This print shows the front of architect Sir John Soane’s house, now the home of the museum holding his collection and work – he was born #onthisday in 1753.

Find out more about Soane and the museum here: http://ow.ly/ksxL30r5jMB

🔎 James Asperne (1757–1820), ‘A View of the front of the House of John Soane Esqr. Lincolns Inn Fields’. Etching, 1812. Read more: http://ow.ly/gsHg30r94PD

Our #ArcticExhibition is opening on 22 October and tickets are now available. The Arctic has been home to rich cultures ...
09/09/2020

Our #ArcticExhibition is opening on 22 October and tickets are now available.

The Arctic has been home to rich cultures for nearly 30,000 years, and is far from the inhospitable hinterland it's often imagined to be.

Developed in collaboration with Arctic communities, this exhibition celebrates the ingenuity and resilience of Arctic Peoples throughout history.

Book tickets and find out more about the show here: http://ow.ly/zIZb30r8TpC

Become a Member to see all our special exhibitions for free as many times as you like, and you can enjoy a range of other benefits while supporting the Museum. Find out more here: http://ow.ly/vhwa30r8Tqa

🔎 Kiliii Yuyan (b. 1979), 'Umiaq and north wind during spring whaling'. Inkjet print, 2019. © Kiliii Yuyan.

Our #TantraExhibition opens on 24 September and tickets are now available.Explore the radical force that transformed the...
09/09/2020

Our #TantraExhibition opens on 24 September and tickets are now available.

Explore the radical force that transformed the religious, cultural and political landscape of India and beyond in this landmark exhibition.

A philosophy originating in medieval India, Tantra has been linked to successive waves of revolutionary thought, from the 7th century AD to Indian independence and 1960s counterculture.

Book tickets and find out more about the show here: http://ow.ly/6Lw330r8Tkt

Become a Member to see all our special exhibitions for free as many times as you like, and you can enjoy a range of other benefits while supporting the Museum. Find out more here: http://ow.ly/Faaf30r8Tky

🔎 Painted and gilded clay figure of Kali striding over Shiva, Bengal, Eastern India, late 19th century.

08/09/2020
Ming Porcelain

Take a closer look at the wonderful imagery and narratives contained within the famous blue-and-white designs of Ming porcelain with Curator of Chinese Ceramics Jessica Harrison-Hall.

Read more about Chinese ceramics, the Sir Percival David collection and take a tour of Room 95 here: http://ow.ly/mgMb30r8Bf0

Room 95 is The Sir Joseph Hotung Centre for Ceramic Studies

Queen Elizabeth I was born #onthisday in 1533, and is shown in this stunning gold pendant made around 1570–1580.Take a t...
07/09/2020

Queen Elizabeth I was born #onthisday in 1533, and is shown in this stunning gold pendant made around 1570–1580.

Take a time-travelling trip back to the Tudor period with our historical travel guide for Elizabethan London – discover when best to visit to catch a glimpse of the monarch and enjoy the festivities at court: http://ow.ly/uOJF30r5ddd

🔎 Gold pendant with a bust of Queen Elizabeth I. Around 1570–1580

‘One can’t help but be impressed at the skill at being able to emboss such intricate designs on such a massive object’ –...
06/09/2020

‘One can’t help but be impressed at the skill at being able to emboss such intricate designs on such a massive object’ – Ashley Almeida, Greengross Family Young People’s Programme Manager.

Staff member Ashley chose the door fittings from the Balawat Gates, made 858–824 BC, as the object he is most looking forward to seeing when back in the galleries. The towering gates stood over 6 metres tall, and were made for buildings in the ancient Assyrian city of Balawat (Imgur-Enlil). You can see door-fittings for the Gates and a replica on display in Room 6.

Find out which other objects our staff, Trustees and volunteers are most excited to see again in this blog: http://ow.ly/ns1E30r7xXA

Book visit tickets here: http://ow.ly/RPZS30r3ZCO

🔎 Bronze band from the Balawat Gates of Shalmaneser III. Assyria, 858–824BC.

What are you most excited to see when you visit the Museum? We’ve picked out 14 highlights from our new one-way route ar...
05/09/2020

What are you most excited to see when you visit the Museum?

We’ve picked out 14 highlights from our new one-way route around the Ground floor galleries, including the amazing Sophilos Vase.

Made around 580BC, this bowl and stand were used to hold wine mixed with water for a feast. It’s decorated with scenes from ancient Greek mythology. The vessel takes its name from the artist who made it – it is inscribed with the words ‘Sophilos made me’.

Find out what else you can see in the Museum in this blog: http://ow.ly/aRPh30r7znB

🔎 The Sophilos Vase. Black-figured dinos (wine bowl). Athens, around 580–570 BC.

These exquisite drawings were made by #Hokusai in 1829 for an unpublished book called ‘Great Picture Book of Everything’...
05/09/2020

These exquisite drawings were made by #Hokusai in 1829 for an unpublished book called ‘Great Picture Book of Everything’.
They had been forgotten by scholars for the past 70 years, but were recently rediscovered – read more in The Art Newspaper: http://ow.ly/QSC730r87VQ

The works have recently been acquired by the Museum, made possible thanks to a grant from Art Fund, and you can take a closer look at all 103 drawings on our Collection online.

Look out for the 🔎 to zoom in and see the incredible details: http://ow.ly/VXcX30r7T9U

A #tbt to this time last week – it was a pleasure to have our newest Trustee Mary Beard in the Museum as one of our Gall...
03/09/2020

A #tbt to this time last week – it was a pleasure to have our newest Trustee Mary Beard in the Museum as one of our Gallery Assistants on reopening day, welcoming back our first visitors 🏛

Did you spot Mary in the galleries?

You can find everything you need to know about visiting and book your free ticket here: http://ow.ly/muG330r7w96

The Roman emperor Caligula was born #onthisday in AD 12. Caligula was a nickname meaning ‘little boot’, which comes from...
31/08/2020

The Roman emperor Caligula was born #onthisday in AD 12.

Caligula was a nickname meaning ‘little boot’, which comes from ‘caligae’ – the heavy hobnailed boots worn by the Roman army. The emperor was given the name as a child, although his real name was Gaius Julius Caesar Germanicus.

This print shows Caligula on horseback, in full armour, wearing the winged hat of Mercury, holding the thunderbolts of Zeus and the trident of Poseidon.

🔎 After Jan van der Straet (1523–1605), ‘Caligula’. Engraving on paper, before 1600. Read more: http://ow.ly/qKRB30r3PsA

We’re so happy to see you back at the Museum again! 🏛✨ Curious about what you can find on our new one-way route around t...
30/08/2020

We’re so happy to see you back at the Museum again! 🏛✨

Curious about what you can find on our new one-way route around the Ground floor galleries?

Our blog post picks out 14 objects not to miss when you visit: http://ow.ly/OXaO30r6Qnd

These four beautiful watercolours were made by Edward Burne-Jones, and featured in ‘The Flower Book’ – an album of 42 dr...
28/08/2020

These four beautiful watercolours were made by Edward Burne-Jones, and featured in ‘The Flower Book’ – an album of 42 drawings each inspired by a flower’s name. The artist was born #otd in 1833.

What’s your favourite flower?

27/08/2020

Welcome back to the British Museum!

Set your alarms! ⏰🏛Join us right here on Facebook tomorrow morning (Thursday 27 August) at 09.00 BST for a private ‘welc...
26/08/2020

Set your alarms! ⏰🏛

Join us right here on Facebook tomorrow morning (Thursday 27 August) at 09.00 BST for a private ‘welcome back’ tour of the galleries before they open to the public.

Director Hartwig Fischer will be joined by special guests Trustee Mary Beard and former Deputy Chair Bonnie Greer – they’ll be sharing some of their favourite objects from our new one-way route and looking at what’s new on display.

Tag a friend to watch with!

‘The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman’ by Turner Prize-winning artist and Museum Trustee Grayson Perry is a memorial to the...
26/08/2020

‘The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman’ by Turner Prize-winning artist and Museum Trustee Grayson Perry is a memorial to the forgotten artists who made many of the objects in the Museum’s collection.

Created as part of an exhibition of the same name at the Museum in 2011, we’re excited that it’s now back in the galleries after nearly a decade. Find out more about this intriguing work and hear from the artist in our blog post: http://ow.ly/jiwW30r6eIc

You can see ‘The Tomb’ on free display in Room 17 when the Museum reopens from tomorrow. Book tickets and check available timeslots here: http://ow.ly/zEHk30r6eI4

This display has been generously supported by Christian and Florence Levett

🔎 Grayson Perry (b. 1960), ‘The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman’, 2011. Cast iron, oil paint, glass, rope, wood, flint hand axe. © Grayson Perry. Courtesy Victoria Miro.

Our new one-way route around the Ground floor galleries lets you journey through two million years of human history. We’...
24/08/2020

Our new one-way route around the Ground floor galleries lets you journey through two million years of human history.

We’ve picked out 14 must-see highlights from the route – including this crouching Venus sculpture on loan from Royal Collection Trust – in our latest blog: http://ow.ly/EQ4630r5ZKb

Book tickets and find all our visiting information here: http://ow.ly/YYYn30r5Zfk

Please note Thursday 27 – Sunday 30 August are currently fully booked. Tickets are available from Wednesday 2 September.

🔎 Crouching Venus on display in Room 23. Marble sculpture. Roman, second century AD. On long-term loan from Royal Collection Trust. Read more: http://ow.ly/yfCv30r5ZUT

🏞 Take a relaxing stroll down the Sumida River or be entertained by the stars of the Kabuki theatre – discover the city ...
24/08/2020

🏞 Take a relaxing stroll down the Sumida River or be entertained by the stars of the Kabuki theatre – discover the city of Edo (Tokyo) in the early 19th century in our blog post: http://ow.ly/iur230r5PZ0

Or head back further in time to other historical cities – read our selection of travel guides including 5th-century BC Athens, 6th-century Aksum and 16th-century London: http://ow.ly/oZBs30r5Q3P

Which places would you like to visit next? Let us know 👇

🔎 Attributed to Utagawa Hiroshige III (1842–1894), two women under flowering cherry tree by the Sumida River, Senso-ji on far bank and Mt. Fuji in the distance. Hanging scroll painting, 1865–1894.

Today is the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition. To mark the date, guests Olivet...
23/08/2020

Today is the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

To mark the date, guests Olivette Otele and Bonnie Greer join Director Hartwig Fischer and curator Sushma Jansari in a special podcast episode to discuss the legacies of slavery and how museums should respond.

The wide-ranging conversation touches on how the British Museum engages with its own history, how it was shaped by empire, questions who ‘writes’ history, and reflects on how museums and institutions can widen access, increase diversity and co-curate effectively.

Search for ‘British Museum podcast’ on any major podcast platform, or listen here: http://ow.ly/1Xg530r5Nws

The Museum is developing plans for new displays and programmes to address questions around collecting, empire and the transatlantic slave trade. This work will evolve over time and we will continue to engage in these crucial debates and discussions.

Olivette Otele is Professor of the History of Slavery at Bristol University and Vice-President of the Royal Historical Society and the Chair for Bristol’s Race Equality Commission.

Bonnie Greer is a writer, playwright, broadcaster, critic and political commentator, and former Deputy Chair of the British Museum.

Sir Hans Sloane bequeathed his collection to the nation in 1753 on the condition that a new, freely accessible public mu...
22/08/2020

Sir Hans Sloane bequeathed his collection to the nation in 1753 on the condition that a new, freely accessible public museum be created to house it. His collection of books, natural history specimens and objects became the foundation of the British Museum.

Like many collectors of his era, Sloane’s collecting is tied closely to empire and slavery – he and his family profited from sugar plantations in Jamaica worked by enslaved people, and some of the objects in his collection were also collected with assistance from both English planters and enslaved people. So how do we navigate Sloane’s story today?

Our special podcast episode explores Hans Sloane’s life, legacy and collection. Guests Miranda Lowe and James Delbourgo join Director Hartwig Fischer and curator Sushma Jansari to examine the role of slavery and enslaved people in Sloane’s collecting practices and consider how museums should respond to these histories. Listen here: http://ow.ly/jNAy30r5HTo

The Museum is developing plans for new displays and programmes to address questions around collecting, empire and the transatlantic slave trade. This work will evolve over time and we will continue to engage in these crucial debates and discussions.

You can visit a newly updated display about Sloane’s collecting and his relationship with empire and slavery in Case 14, Room 1. We’re reopening on 27 August – find out more about visiting here: http://ow.ly/ZR6N30r5rAj

Miranda Lowe is Principal Curator and museum scientist at the Natural History Museum.

James Delbourgo is the James Westfall Thompson Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers University, New Jersey.

🔎 Michael Rysbrack (1694–1770), portrait bust of Sir Hans Sloane (1660–1753). Terracotta, 1730s.

Our new ‘Collecting and empire’ trail explores how many objects in the Museum were acquired in the context of colonialis...
21/08/2020

Our new ‘Collecting and empire’ trail explores how many objects in the Museum were acquired in the context of colonialism, and came into the collection in complex, varied and sometimes controversial ways.

Our latest blog takes a closer look at six objects on the trail and how they entered the collection, including this 3,300-year-old lion statue of Amenhotep III – read more in our blog: http://ow.ly/GmHv30r5BCu

Further objects will be added to the trail as other galleries reopen to the public, and as collaborative work on 'Collecting and empire' interventions progresses.

All the objects will be on display when we reopen on 27 August: http://ow.ly/1JUj30r5wiM

🔎 Granite statue of Amenhotep III as a lion. Upper Nubia (present-day Sudan), 1390–1352 BC.

📸 It’s #WorldPhotographyDay 📸This early photo of the Museum was taken by Roger Fenton in 1857. Get a snapshot of photogr...
19/08/2020

📸 It’s #WorldPhotographyDay 📸

This early photo of the Museum was taken by Roger Fenton in 1857.

Get a snapshot of photography at the Museum through the centuries in our blog post: http://ow.ly/EJsa30r5a0l

Can’t wait to get snapping in the galleries again? Book visit tickets here: http://ow.ly/Ya3330r5aCD

#WorldPhotoDay

As we look forward to reopening next week, staff, Trustees and Volunteers share which objects they’re most looking forwa...
18/08/2020

As we look forward to reopening next week, staff, Trustees and Volunteers share which objects they’re most looking forward to seeing when we open our doors 🏛

Claudia da Lanca (Project Coordinator: Iraq Scheme) and Blandine Courel (Research Assistant: Molecular Analysis) are both excited to see the ancient Assyrian lamassu again. These monumental, human-headed winged bulls and lions were placed at entrances to cities, palaces and temples in the belief that their supernatural powers would ward off any threats.

Find more staff selections in this blog, including hats made from spider webs, ancient pottery and more ancient sculpture: http://ow.ly/a8NN30r4XKB

If you’ve been inspired to come and see any of these objects, you can book free tickets to the Museum and find out more about visiting here: http://ow.ly/lSH230r4r7K

🔎 Sculpture of a winged bull (lamassu) from the Assyrian city of Nimrud. 865–860 BC. Read more: http://ow.ly/zNt430r4KQT

Address

Great Russell St
London
WC1B 3DG

Tube: Five minutes from Holborn, Russell Square, Tottenham Court Road, and Goodge Street stations. Bus stops on New Oxford Street, Tottenham Court Road, Gower Street and Southampton Row are a short walk away. Plan your journey on the Transport for London website www.tfl.gov.uk

General information

Find all our important visiting information and book tickets here: https://www.britishmuseum.org/visit You can contact us here: https://www.britishmuseum.org/about-us/contact-us See our full code of conduct for social media here: https://www.britishmuseum.org/terms-use/social-media-code-conduct

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

+442073238000

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