The Wallace Collection

The Wallace Collection Although we are temporarily closed, our world class galleries of paintings, furniture, porcelain, arms and armour are always open to everyone online.

The Wallace Collection is a national museum in an historic London town house. In 25 galleries are unsurpassed displays of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain with superb Old Master paintings and a world class armoury.

Operating as usual

Richard Cosway, the most fashionable English miniature painter of the late eighteenth century, was born #onthisday 1742 ...
05/11/2020

Richard Cosway, the most fashionable English miniature painter of the late eighteenth century, was born #onthisday 1742 in Devonshire, England.

Cosway’s miniatures had a distinctive sense of style, and would choose attitudes for his sitters according to contemporary ideas of elegance and sensibility. His artistic hallmark became the way in which he used the surface of ivory as part of the miniatures colour scheme, mainly for the fashionably pale skin of the sitters.

Dated c.1785-90, this portrait miniature of his wife, Maria Cosway, and is regarded as one of Cosway’s greatest masterpieces. In 1781 Cosway married Maria Hadfield, who had moved to London after growing up in an English expatriate family in Florence. She was an important painter, an accomplished musician and, together with her husband, the centre of a highly fashionable circle. Their marriage contributed to their carefully organised joint social and business success. The Cosways were celebrities of their day, famous both as artists and as social figures. Their stormy relationship and affairs added to the public interest in them.

The French painter #PaulDelaroche died #onthisday 1856. A regular exhibitor of the Paris Salon between 1822 and 1837, De...
04/11/2020

The French painter #PaulDelaroche died #onthisday 1856. A regular exhibitor of the Paris Salon between 1822 and 1837, Delaroche firmly established a European reputation of meticulously painted historical scenes.

Dated 1825, this replica of a much larger picture exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1824, depicts Joan of Arc in prison. The subject of Joan of Arc had strong royalist and nationalist associations in France after the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy in 1815.

Although Delaroche shows Henry Beaufort, Cardinal of Winchester, threatening Joan with eternal damnation, she was actually interrogated by Pierre Cauchon, Bishop of Beauvais, and there is no evidence that an encounter with Beaufort ever took place.

By showing Beaufort pointing down to Hell, Delaroche no doubt recalled the terrible irony that on the Cardinal’s own deathbed he refused to lift his hand to acknowledge his hope of ‘Heaven’s bliss’.

Following the recent announcement from the UK government, the Wallace Collection will be temporarily closing to the publ...
03/11/2020

Following the recent announcement from the UK government, the Wallace Collection will be temporarily closing to the public from 5pm Wednesday 4 November 2020.

During closure we will continue to share inspiring stories about the Collection on our social media channels and our website, with our online talks and events programme continuing without interruption.

If you have booked free tickets to visit the Collection between 5 November - 2 December inclusive, your tickets will be automatically cancelled. There is no need to contact us, and you will receive an email confirmation of your cancellation. Find more information here: https://bit.ly/3ekSWtw

Please stay safe and we hope to welcome you back soon.

Marie-Antoinette, the last Queen of France, was born #onthisday 1755 in Vienna, Austria. She was the youngest daughter o...
02/11/2020

Marie-Antoinette, the last Queen of France, was born #onthisday 1755 in Vienna, Austria. She was the youngest daughter of Empress Maria Teresa and Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor.

Dated 1840-70, this detailed miniature is by the French painter Louis Cournerie, who painted pastiches of eighteenth-century portraits. The Collection holds a number of the artist’s miniatures, including works depicting Madame de Pompadour, after Boucher and Henriette, duchesse d'Orléans, as Hebe, after Nattier.

Marie-Antoinette became queen when her husband ascended the throne as Louis XVI, and was known for her taste for fine things. Her commissions from famous craftsmen, such as Jean-Henri Riesener, suggest more about her enduring legacy as a woman of taste and patronage. Today you can find many works by Riesener in the Wallace Collection, revealing much of Marie-Antoinette’s eye for quality, sparing no expense.

This precisely observed portrait is by the Flemish Renaissance painter, Frans Pourbus the Elder.Painted in 1574, the unk...
01/11/2020

This precisely observed portrait is by the Flemish Renaissance painter, Frans Pourbus the Elder.

Painted in 1574, the unknown sitter is shown in Spanish dress, fashionable with the nobility in the southern Netherlands during the turbulent period of Spanish rule and Protestant revolt.

Although the painting’s inscription identifies the sitter as the duc d’Alençon (1554-84), younger brother of Charles IX and Henri III of France, there is no evidence to support this claim and no other clues of the sitter’s identity are present.

You can find this work on display in the Sixteenth Century Gallery.

This dramatic depiction of The Last Judgement resonates with the Christian origin of Halloween in All Hallows’ Eve, when...
31/10/2020

This dramatic depiction of The Last Judgement resonates with the Christian origin of Halloween in All Hallows’ Eve, when traditionally the dead are commemorated prior to All Saints Day itself, on which the saints are honoured.

Sixteenth-century Limoges was renowned for painted enamels on copper and Pierre Reymond’s workshop was one of the most prolific. In depicting the scene in grisaille (monochrome) the enameller has been faithful to his source, the final print in Dürer’s Small Passion woodcut series, but enriched it with gilding.

Discover more in this week’s blog theme of #Halloween: https://bit.ly/37zyFPz

This week, for our #WallaceConnections series as part of #BlackHistoryMonth, we are exploring one of the Collection’s mo...
30/10/2020

This week, for our #WallaceConnections series as part of #BlackHistoryMonth, we are exploring one of the Collection’s most iconic works by Titian, dated c.1554–56.

Those who know their Greek mythology may recognise the damsel-in-distress shown here. Andromeda’s plight has already triggered the epic battle between the hero Perseus and the ferocious sea-monster. Ultimately love will win out: Perseus rescues Andromeda and carries her off to Greece to reign as his queen.

But should we see Andromeda in the body that Titian has given her? After all, she was the daughter of Ethiopian rulers. And the famous poet Ovid clearly described the “dark Andromeda.” Instances of ‘white-washing’ — of figures such as the Queen of Sheba and Cleopatra — are all too common in European painting and texts. In the Old Testament, the Queen of Sheba, speaking in the original Hebrew, declares proudly: “I am black and beautiful.” But by the 4th century Latin Vulgate, her statement has been diminished: “I am black but beautiful.”

As for Andromeda, viewers can meet the true princess of Ovidian mythology in Bernard Picart’s etching of 1731, housed at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. With her skin colour in contrast to the whiteness of the rock behind her and the gulls around her, this Andromeda is clearly a black woman. With her flowing hair and sensuous pose, she is also unmistakably the beautiful princess of legend.

Painted by the French artist Paul Delaroche in 1831, this dramatic work depicts Edward V and the Duke of York in the Tow...
29/10/2020

Painted by the French artist Paul Delaroche in 1831, this dramatic work depicts Edward V and the Duke of York in the Tower, the subject of which was inspired by Shakespeare’s Richard III.

In Shakespeare’s play, the murder of the brothers in the Tower of London is described by a henchman, rather than shown on stage. However, their deaths are dramatically visualised in this painting, a version of a much larger picture now in the Louvre, Paris.

Edward and Richard were locked up in the Tower of London, reading the Bible, which Richard holds open on Edward’s lap. Their dog, possibly a King Charles Spaniel, has noticed the arrival of the murderers and stands looking alert towards the door to the bedchamber.

Beneath the door appears an ominous shadow. The young king looks away, unaware of the approaching threat. Yet, his brother seems to listen intently, having perhaps noticed the impending danger. The drama and tension of the scene are almost theatrical and convey to the onlooker the horrible events that are about to unfold…

Discover more in this week’s blog theme of #Halloween: https://bit.ly/37zyFPz

Giovanni Antonio Canal, also known as Canaletto, was born in 1697 in Venice, and was the son of the scene-painter, Berna...
28/10/2020

Giovanni Antonio Canal, also known as Canaletto, was born in 1697 in Venice, and was the son of the scene-painter, Bernardo Canal.

Canaletto’s earliest dateable views of Venice are from 1723. In the 1730s his work was in the greatest demand from English patrons, and many pieces from this period are of impeccable, mechanical quality.

Although Canaletto’s views were essentially topographically accurate, he used some artistic licence to make his compositions more appealing to tourists. Canaletto would thus idealise his native city to create prospects which sometimes surpassed reality and included as many tourist sites as possible.

A good example is found in this painting, dated c. 1735 – 1744, where the artist squeezed the Dogana in the left foreground and changed the Library’s actual position in order to include both in the same composition.

Discover more about the work here: https://bit.ly/2HrYjv4

“Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.” This work, by the French painter Alexandre-Gabriel De...
27/10/2020

“Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.” This work, by the French painter Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps, depicts the three witches from Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

The three witches have gathered around a cauldron, hanging over a blazing fire in the middle of a dark room, with the light of a ghostly white moon slipping through the window behind them. Their terrifying figures are illuminated by the flames, revealing their contorted faces.

Subjects such as this one provided powerful and inspiring alternatives to the traditions of French classicism and offered young artists new dramatic subject matter. Decamps’s interpretation conveys a strong sense of otherworldliness, while his depiction of the three women gives them a sense of evil.

Discover more in this week’s blog theme of #Halloween: https://bit.ly/37zyFPz

This atmospheric forest scene, by the Dutch painter Jan Hackaert, draws the viewer’s gaze along an avenue of trees to a ...
26/10/2020

This atmospheric forest scene, by the Dutch painter Jan Hackaert, draws the viewer’s gaze along an avenue of trees to a patch of sunlight filtering through a leafy canopy above.

Painted c.1675, the use of light, tall slender birch trees and open view to water give an impressive sense of space. Hackaert specialised in Italianate views, influenced by the work of the Dutch Italianates including Jan Both, and woodland scenes, characterised by graceful trees and subtle lighting.

You can find this work on display in our East Galleries.

English Romantic painter, Richard Parkes Bonington, was born #onthisday 1802 in Nottingham, England. Originally trained ...
25/10/2020

English Romantic painter, Richard Parkes Bonington, was born #onthisday 1802 in Nottingham, England. Originally trained as a painter in watercolour, it was around late 1823 he also took up oil painting.

Though unfinished, this work by Bonington is still recognisable as the Piazza San Marco in Venice. Painted towards the end of his life, this is one of several views of Venice created on a much grander scale than Bonington had attempted before.

It is clear that Bonington was inspired by Canaletto's 'vedute' of Venice, with his use of intense colours and focus on architectural details. Bonington was a pioneer in reviving interest in Venice as a subject for painting.

At first glance this charming Venetian glass cruet appears intact, but closer inspection reveals that all is not as it s...
25/10/2020

At first glance this charming Venetian glass cruet appears intact, but closer inspection reveals that all is not as it seems…

The abundance of decorative features distract the eye from several later interventions, undoubtedly introduced together and intended to salvage the damaged vessel for the robust later nineteenth century market in historic Venetian glass.

Discover the details of this fascinating piece in our latest blog #HiddenSecrets: https://bit.ly/31BZCyn

With the clocks going back here in the UK, we wanted to share this musical timepiece dating from the early 1760s, a glor...
24/10/2020

With the clocks going back here in the UK, we wanted to share this musical timepiece dating from the early 1760s, a glorious confection of exuberant gilt bronze and rose pink silk.

The case is flanked by sprays of flowers and leaves and, at the top, perched on a rocky outcrop, a beautifully modelled spaniel peers down as he uses his paws to retrieve a pheasant from beneath an oak branch.

The design of the case is attributed to Jean-Claude Chambellan Duplessis the Elder, one of the most exciting and talented designers of decorative art of his age.

Discover more about the piece here: https://bit.ly/31EESG6

To the museum! We are excited to share that we have a new display now open. From today, you will be able to see one of t...
24/10/2020

To the museum! We are excited to share that we have a new display now open.

From today, you will be able to see one of the Collection’s exceptionally rare armours in a dazzling, new light. Our fifteenth-century equestrian armour now takes pride-of-place in the heart of our central courtyard, coinciding with the reopening of the Wallace Restaurant and Café.

Only three full equestrian armours made before the sixteenth century survive in the world today, and this is the only one preserved complete, as originally made. Rediscover this medieval masterpiece by booking your free visit today.

Find out more: https://bit.ly/35smlxV

Continuing our #WallaceConnections series as part of #BlackHistoryMonth, today we are looking at this work by the French...
23/10/2020

Continuing our #WallaceConnections series as part of #BlackHistoryMonth, today we are looking at this work by the French painter, Antoine Watteau.

Dressed in the French fashions of the late 1710s, the majority of people shown in Les Charmes de la Vie converse, flirt, and listen to music without a care in the world. Paintings like this one, showing well-dressed individuals enjoying themselves, were known as fêtes galantes. They were made after the death of the dictatorial Louis XIV left the French nobility free to break away from a regimented existence at Versailles. They glorify not just leisure but the freedom of choice — over where, how, and with whom free time is spent.

There is a more sinister side to the story. Such paintings celebrate the nobility’s liberation from the very monarch who, in 1685, enacted the Code Noir, the decree that defined the conditions of slavery in the French colonial empire. This brutal policy was reinforced in 1718, the year in which this work was made, by a colonial mandate that compared the status of enslaved people to that of pieces of furniture.

Was the artist, Watteau, aware of any of this? The figure of the young black attendant who kneels, watchful and isolated, on the right-hand side of the painting suggests that the harsh realities of slavery and servitude were not far from his mind.

Audiences looking at Diego Velázquez's portrait of Prince Baltasar Carlos before 1937 would have seen a very different i...
22/10/2020

Audiences looking at Diego Velázquez's portrait of Prince Baltasar Carlos before 1937 would have seen a very different image to what you see today…

Before undergoing extensive cleaning, the curtains and drapery surrounding the Prince were a deep green, with golden fringes and a golden tassel hanging on the right edge. Scholars have previously noted that the curtains and tassels were coarsely painted and were likely later additions that did not resemble Velázquez’s style.

The cleaning in 1937 uncovered the deep red velvet curtains and cushion without tassels that you can now see. The simple composition and austere backdrop recall other portraits by Velázquez, such as the Portrait of Philip IV in Brown and Silver now in the National Gallery, London.

The painting's background may convey something of the lost tonality of Prince Baltasar’s portrait, which after having been hidden under the extensive green overpaint, has now lost much of its vibrancy. Fortunately, the figure of the Prince always remained untouched, and Velázquez’s masterful brushstrokes on the silver and brown dress still shimmer under the lights of the Great Gallery.

Discover more about this work in our latest blog, #HiddenSecrets: https://bit.ly/2HoFZmv

Italian painter, Domenichino, was born #onthisday 1581 in Bologna.This painting, titled A Sibyl, is one of three known S...
21/10/2020

Italian painter, Domenichino, was born #onthisday 1581 in Bologna.

This painting, titled A Sibyl, is one of three known Sibyls by the artist. Pictures of Sibyls enjoyed enormous favour in Italian baroque art, since they provided artists with a legitimate excuse to depict richly-attired women with elaborate headdresses.

This particular example of Domenichino’s work demonstrates great freedom of touch and is generally considered to date from around 1620. You can find it on display in the Great Gallery.

This majestic seascape is by the Dutch painter, Aelbert Cuyp, who was born #onthisday 1620.In this work, Cuyp depicts th...
20/10/2020

This majestic seascape is by the Dutch painter, Aelbert Cuyp, who was born #onthisday 1620.

In this work, Cuyp depicts the Maas, the busy inland waterway that connected his native Dordrect (visible on the right) to Rotterdam. Of the numerous vessels that ply its waters, from a merchant vessel in the distance to a small rowing boat in the left foreground, it is the large passenger ferry or ‘wijdschip’ that dominates the composition. This ferry ran a regular service between Dordrecht and Rotterdam and was one of Cuyp’s favourite subjects.

Cuyp displays here his great skill in depicting light and atmosphere. It is dated to the early 1650s, when Cuyp infused his paintings with the soft, warm light favoured by the Dutch Italianate painters of Utrecht, such as Jan Both. The light falls on the sail of the ferry, and picks up white highlights on the water. The low horizon allows him to devote much of the composition to the swirling pattern of the clouds, which give a sense that they are scudding across in the sky in a strong wind.

The artist adds a touch of humour and human interest to the painting with the actions of his characteristically comic little figures. On the left, the figures heave the oars of the little rowing boat, while the ferry’s passengers pass the time with conversation and drinking beer.

Discover this work on display in our East Galleries.

This banquet scene, dated c.1547, is by the Flemish Renaissance painter Pieter Pourbus, and is one of his greatest maste...
19/10/2020

This banquet scene, dated c.1547, is by the Flemish Renaissance painter Pieter Pourbus, and is one of his greatest masterpieces.

At first glance, the composition appears to be a group of men and women gathered around a table in a wooded landscape. Yet, it is also a complex allegory testament to the intellectual environment of Bruges in the mid-sixteenth century.

The old man in the centre is Wisdom, who embraces Fidelity. She is modestly dressed and holds a crucifix that symbolises spiritual love and Christian Matrimony. Their modesty is in strong contrast with the other group of younger men and women.

Discover more about this work in our latest blog, Hidden Secrets: https://bit.ly/35d0NVR

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Visiting by Bus Numbers 2, 10, 12, 13, 30, 74, 82, 94, 113, 137, 274 all stop nearby. Visiting by Rail Marylebone BR Station is approximately a 10-15 minute walk. Visiting by Tube The nearest tubes are Bond Street (Central & Jubilee Lines) and Baker Street (Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Jubilee and Metropolitan Lines). Oxford Circus (Bakerloo, Central, Victoria Lines) is a 10-15 minute walk. For visitors arriving with an Assistance Dog, Marble Arch is the nearest tube with stairs. Parking Parking on nearby streets metered until 6.30pm. A selection of car parks can be found nearb. Disabled visitors can pre-book a parking space, see website for information: http://www.wallacecollection.org/visiting/howtoreachus

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I was registered for online Wallace Collection talk about collectors via Zoom on 26 October. I tried to log in with details taken from Wallace's confirmation email but got message that passcode was incorrect. Very disappointed to miss this talk. Did anyone else have same problem?
Please check messages as I have not had a response. Thank you
I was registered for Last night’s Wallace online talk via Zoom - I could not log in with the details supplied on confirmation email so missed the seminar. Did anyone else have a problem?
The Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a Due Mani) - Anonimo Bolognese (ca. 1500 - 1550) - 11th action The third in a new series on the use of the Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a due Mani), this is from the Manuscripts attributed to the ‘Anonimo Bolognese’ (ca. 1500 - 1550). Performed with a synthetic blade due to public access, this is the 11th action. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Initiating action a.) Begin the action in cinghiara porta di ferro alta, with your false edge in contact with that of your opponent. b.) Cross your arms to bring your blade to the opposite side of your opponents weapon, catching the weak between your blade and crossguard. c.) Throw the opponents weapon across your body with a sweeping action, passing obliquely to the right when their tip has moved safely out of presence. d.) Continue the sweeping motion into a circular cut, drawing your left foot behind your right as you cut a mandritto fendente to your opponents head. Counter action a.) Await your opponents action in the same guard position. b.) Do not react to your opponent as they cross their arms. Watch their feet peripherally - if you are keeping correct distance, then they should not be close enough to land a blow without advancing a foot. c.) Your opportunity presents itself when your opponent passes forwards, throwing your weapon aside and uncrossing to cut at you. d.) As your opponent releases your blade, cut a mezzo mandritto to their flank. e.) Immediately lift into guardia di intrare, catching the opponents cut on your cross while threatening the face. The great plague of 2020 has finally waned enough for me to get out and about a bit more; now to do something about this newly developed spare tire 😅🥺🍺 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
The Two Handed Greatsword - Anonimo Bolognese (ca. 1500 - 1550) - 10th action The second in a series on the use of the Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a due Mani), this is from the Manuscripts attributed to the ‘Anonimo Bolognese’ (ca. 1500 - 1550). Performed with a synthetic blade due to public access, this is the 10th action. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- 10th action a.) Start in porta di ferro alta, with your false edge against that of your opponent. b.) If your opponent thrusts along your blade, catch it on your Crossguard by lifting into guardia di testa. c.) Use your weapon to forcefully displace your opponents blade down and to the right. d.) Passing to the left, continue with a wheeling cut into a riverso fendente to the head and draw your right foot behind your left. Counter action a.) Starting in porta di ferro alta, pass forwards thrusting along your opponents blade, keeping your false edge in contact with theirs. b.) When your opponent catches and displaces your blade, use the force of that displacement to turn a mandritto to their head. For more on this subject, or if you would like to purchase your own training weapons to practice the content of these videos, please visit our website: www.tempus-fugitives.co.uk I’m starting to look a bit scruffy again, I guess I’ll have to briefly head back towards civilisation soon 😕 If you want to support the channel, and a haircut, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
What life could have been!!
The Military Billhook (Welsh or Forest Bill) - George Silver (1599) - paradoxes, ch. 13 pt. 6&8 George Silver was a controversial character, even in his time, for his vehement opposition to the popular Italian systems being taught in London during the 16th century. Claiming to be revealing the older English methods of combat, his ‘Paradoxes of Defense for the True Handling of all Manner of Weapons’ does give an excellent description of the principles upon which this systems is grounded. The bill was the primary infantry weapon of Tudor armies, and described by George Silver as having “advantage against all manner of weapons whatsoever”. Ironically, Di Grassi, the author of an earlier book on Italian methodology popular in London - including the use of the bill - agreed with this notion in stating that the bill was the final and most superior form of polearm. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Technique 1 a.) If the head of your opponents weapon lies lower than yours, place your fork over their haft, forcing it down. b.) Pass forwards, sliding the fork up the haft to your opponents hands. c.) Fall back into guard. Technique 2 a.) If the head of your opponents weapon lies higher than yours, place your fork under their haft and force their weapon aside. b.) Pass forwards, thrusting at your opponent one handed. c.) If your thrust misses, pull your opponent off balance as you lacerate them with the hook, stepping back into guard. For more on this subject, or if you would like to purchase your own training weapons to practice the content of these videos, please visit our website: www.tempus-fugitives.co.uk I finally managed to buzz those nasty, messy head-weeds off my scalp! Phew... The great plague of 2020 has certainly allowed me to cultivate my 16th c. beard, although I seem to be getting fatter every episode too 😅🥺🍺 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
The Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a Due Mani) - Anonimo Bolognese (ca. 1500 - 1550) - 9th action The first in a new series on the use of the Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a due Mani), this is from the Manuscripts attributed to the ‘Anonimo Bolognese’ (ca. 1500 - 1550). Performed with a synthetic blade due to public access, this is the 9th action. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Initiating action a.) Begin the action in cinghiara porta di ferro alta, with your false edge in contact with that of your opponent. b.) Cut a mandritto into your opponents blade as you pass right. c.) Inflict a falso to your opponents face as you draw your left foot behind your right. Counter action a.) Stand in guardia di porta di ferro alta, and do not react as your opponent beats down your blade. b.) Raise your hands over your head to catch your opponents falso. c.) Pass left, turning your blade over your head and gripping it at halfsword, so that the blade slopes down and to your left. Force your opponents blade to the side. d.) Finish with a mandritto to your opponents head. I finally managed to buzz those nasty, messy head-weeds off my scalp! Phew... The great plague of 2020 has certainly allowed me to cultivate my 16th c. beard, and I seem to be looking somewhat trimmer again too 😃 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
The Military Billhook (Welsh or Forest Bill) - George Silver (1599) - paradoxes, ch. 13 pt. 1&2 George Silver was a controversial character, even in his time, for his vehement opposition to the popular Italian systems being taught in London during the 16th century. Claiming to be revealing the older English methods of combat, his ‘Paradoxes of Defense for the True Handling of all Manner of Weapons’ does give an excellent description of the principles upon which this systems is grounded. The bill was the primary infantry weapon of Tudor armies, and described by George Silver as having “advantage against all manner of weapons whatsoever”. Ironically, Di Grassi, the author of an earlier book on Italian methodology popular in London - including the use of the bill - agreed with this notion in stating that the bill was the final and most superior form of polearm. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Technique 1 a.) Catch your opponents weapon in the fork of yours and displace it down and to the side. b.) Run the fork up the haft of their weapon, and onto their hands as you start forward. c.) Continue to pass forward to catch your opponents neck or limbs with the hook of the bill. d.) Lacerate and unbalance your opponent by yanking sharply on the bill as you pass back. e.) Although not strictly speaking in the text, it seems impolite to just leave your opponent lying there, so finish them off. f.) Return back into guard. Technique 2 a.) Catch your opponents weapon in the fork of yours and displace it down and to the side, this time so forcefully that you cannot attack his hands. b.) Pass forwards into the opening you have created, placing your left hand near the head of your bill as you hook your opponents knee. c.) Pass forwards again, tearing your opponents knee out with the hook of your bill as you close in to grapple. For more on this subject, or if you would like to purchase your own training weapons to practice the content of these videos, please visit our website: www.tempus-fugitives.co.uk I finally managed to buzz those nasty, messy head-weeds off my scalp! Phew... The great plague of 2020 has certainly allowed me to cultivate my 16th c. beard, although I seem to be getting fatter every episode too 😅🥺🍺 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee