The Wallace Collection

The Wallace Collection Explore one of the most significant collections of European fine and decorative arts in the world by visiting our website today. The Wallace Collection is a national museum in an historic London town house.

In 25 galleries are unsurpassed displays of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain with superb Old Master paintings and a world class armoury.

Operating as usual

This work is entitled 'Calm: Dutch Ships coming to Anchor' by Willem van de Velde the Younger, who died #onthisday in 17...
06/04/2021

This work is entitled 'Calm: Dutch Ships coming to Anchor' by Willem van de Velde the Younger, who died #onthisday in 1707.

Born in 1633 in Leiden, Willem van de Velde the Younger was the son of the marine artist Willem van de Velde the elder (1611-93). This work is one of the most important works produced by the Van de Velde workshop during its Dutch period, before the family moved to England in 1671 – 2.

The ship in the left foreground flies the flag and pendant of the Commander-in-Chief of the Dutch fleet. It has been identified as the Liefde, commanded by Cornelis Tromp who was briefly Commander of the Fleet in 1665. On the far right sails the Leeuwarden, and in the distance the tower of Brandaris on the island of Terschelling can just be discerned.

The painting commemorates the seafaring prowess of the Dutch in the seventeenth century.

French artist Jean-Honoré Fragonard was born on this day in 1732. Le chiffre d'amour (The Souvenir) shows a young girl c...
05/04/2021

French artist Jean-Honoré Fragonard was born on this day in 1732. Le chiffre d'amour (The Souvenir) shows a young girl carving the initial of her lover on the bark of a tree, while observed by her pet spaniel, the symbol of her fidelity.

The painting is remarkable for his play with the idea of the artist's signature. It is signed at the lower right in a traditional way, but the girl also carves the letter 'F' into the tree, so signing the painting from within the scene.

Its scale and careful technique show Fragonard varying his style to echo the contemporary taste for Dutch seventeenth-century cabinet paintings, while continuing to animate these stylistic references with his own theatrical lighting, delicate draughtsmanship and traceries of hair and foliage resembling beautiful penmanship.

Join us TONIGHT at 6pm for the latest concert in our new series, in partnership with Orpheus Sinfonia, filmed within the...
04/04/2021

Join us TONIGHT at 6pm for the latest concert in our new series, in partnership with Orpheus Sinfonia, filmed within the splendour of Hertford House. Tonight's concert will focus on Rococo.

Some of the most exquisite masterpieces housed in the Wallace Collection epitomise Rococo’s refined frivolity. Tonight’s performance traces this ornamentation through iconic objects such as Fragonard’s The Swing and spectacular Meissen vases, alongside the spellbinding music of Rameau, Couperin and Gluck.

Each premier broadcast features Orpheus Sinfonia musicians performing a specially-selected repertoire that brings the synergy of art and music into focus - inviting you to explore the styles, forms and compositions that unite music with paintings, decorative arts, and arms and armour.

Book now: https://www.wallacecollection.org/whats-on/synergy-series-rococo/

Spanish artist Bartolomé-Esteban Murillo died #onthisday in Seville in 1682. This painting, widely acknowledged as one o...
03/04/2021

Spanish artist Bartolomé-Esteban Murillo died #onthisday in Seville in 1682. This painting, widely acknowledged as one of Murillo’s masterpieces and once part the Spanish Royal Collection at the Prado, is one of the gems of the Wallace Collection.

It shows the Marriage of the Virgin, which has no Biblical source but is found rather in the Golden Legend and the Apocryphal New Testament. Murillo depicts the moment when the Virgin takes the hand of Joseph, as their marriage is blessed by the high priest of the temple of Jerusalem, Zacharias, and the Holy Spirit descends on the couple. Murillo shows a group of unsuccessful suitors to the right, one of whom breaks his rod in anger.

#Murillo #SpanishPainting

#HappyEaster from everyone at the Wallace Collection! Have you seen the Easter Bunny today?The Easter Bunny, otherwise k...
02/04/2021

#HappyEaster from everyone at the Wallace Collection! Have you seen the Easter Bunny today?

The Easter Bunny, otherwise known as the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare, is a figure from folklore and symbol of Easter. This particularly delightful pendant depicts a rabbit or hare, the flecked white enamel points suggesting the animal’s fur, and it's body being made from a large pearl.

One of the hallmarks of the Renaissance princely cabinet (Wunderkammer) was the juxtaposition of marvels from the natural world with masterpieces of human ingenuity. This duality can be seen in the small sculptures or items of jewellery created from large misshapen ‘baroque’ pearls, which became especially popular at princely courts from the late sixteenth century.

In this idyllic Arcadian landscape, a group of shepherdesses sit as they watch their dancing colleague. While on the rig...
31/03/2021

In this idyllic Arcadian landscape, a group of shepherdesses sit as they watch their dancing colleague. While on the right, the vista stretches into the hazy distance across plains and mountains.

Painted in 1658 by the Dutch artist Nicolaes Berchem, The Musical Shepherdess is one of the most charming pictures by the artist in the Wallace Collection.

The picture’s exquisite surface is partly explained by the artist’s use of copper as a support, which enabled him to obtain a much higher degree of finish than would have been possible on canvas.

This portrait of a boy with his falcon was painted by Dutch Golden Age painter, Joan van Noordt.Dated c.1665, the boy’s ...
30/03/2021

This portrait of a boy with his falcon was painted by Dutch Golden Age painter, Joan van Noordt.

Dated c.1665, the boy’s rich costume instils an aura of refinement to the portrait, evoking the elegance of Van Dyck and of Van Noordt’s Flemish contemporaries such as Gonzales Coques, while the sitter’s occupation suggests the privileged status of the huntsman.

The picture reflects the taste for a more aristocratic treatment in Dutch portraiture in the second half of the seventeenth century, and represents a refined variation on the tradition of falconer portraits painted by Rembrandt and Bol in the 1640s.

To celebrate #WorldTheatreDay today, we’re sharing this vibrant picture by the studio of Canaletto depicting the Giovedi...
27/03/2021

To celebrate #WorldTheatreDay today, we’re sharing this vibrant picture by the studio of Canaletto depicting the Giovedi Grasso, or 'Fat Thursday' festival - the the last opportunity for feasting before Ash Wednesday as Lent is a time for fasting.

The colourful festivals were one of the principal tourist attractions in eighteenth-century Venice, and provided some of Canaletto’s most popular subject matter. This particular work is dated c. 1741 – 1760.

During this festival, an elaborate stage was built in the Piazzetta, here shown bearing the arms of the Pisani family and of Pietro Grimani (Doge 1741-52). Rival teams of acrobats execute a human pyramid, while the ropes, stretching diagonally across the picture, enabled another acrobat to ‘fly’ from the Campanile to the Doge’s loggia. There he would recite verses in the Doge’s honour and present him with flowers.

In the foreground, figures in commedia dell’ arte costume are seen mingling with onlookers and revellers wearing the carnival dress of the bauta, or white mask and black cape. Ten of Canaletto’s drawings for this series survive, but no original painted prototype by Canaletto is known.

It's #DanteDay and this year it's particularly special as Dante Alighieri died 700 years ago this year!This painting, 'F...
25/03/2021

It's #DanteDay and this year it's particularly special as Dante Alighieri died 700 years ago this year!

This painting, 'Francesca da Rimini' was inspired by Dante’s Inferno, the first part of The Divine Comedy, which has been long considered one of the greatest works of Italian literature. As one of Ary Scheffer's most admired works, it shows Dante and his guide, the Roman poet Virgil, during their passage through Hell. They look on the tragic figures of Paolo Malatesta and Francesca da Rimini, real contemporaries of Dante, who portrayed them as characters in his work.

Francesca had been forced to marry the hideous Gianciotto da Rimini as part of a political alliance, but had fallen in love with his handsome younger brother, Paolo. In 1285, Paolo and Francesca were murdered by Gianciotto when he caught them kissing while reading an account of the love of Sir Lancelot for Queen Guinevere together.

Dante's tale condemned them to the stormy darkness of Hell’s second circle, with the souls of the lustful, perpetually swept away by an eternal whirlwind as they allowed themselves to be swept away by their passions.

It's #NationalPuppyDay!This portrait of Miss Jane Bowles was painted around 1775, when Jane was probably about three or ...
23/03/2021

It's #NationalPuppyDay!

This portrait of Miss Jane Bowles was painted around 1775, when Jane was probably about three or four years old. It is by Sir Joshua Reynolds, considered one of the leading portrait painters of his day and President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

She is portrayed in a fanciful theatrical costume, kneeling and embracing her pet spaniel.

The lively and spontaneous composition recalls Reynolds's ‘fancy pictures.’ The beam of sunlight, which shines through the foliage on the right hand side of the picture, is boldly painted in a few decisive strokes of paint.

This magnificent chest of drawers was made between 1735 and 1740 by Antoine-Robert Gaudreaus, a cabinetmaker who supplie...
23/03/2021

This magnificent chest of drawers was made between 1735 and 1740 by Antoine-Robert Gaudreaus, a cabinetmaker who supplied furniture to Louis XV and the French royal family.

It is one of the most exuberant pieces of rococo furniture in the Wallace Collection, having sinuous outlines and elaborate ‘rocaille’ mounts from which emerge palms and dragons. The female mask in the centre of the piece may have been influenced by engravings of costumed heads after Antoine Watteau.

Its lavish curved forms and incredibly splendid gilt-bronze decoration simply make the piece a riot of rococo to look at and truly encapsulates the artistic spirit of the time.

#SirAnthonyvanDyck, the Flemish Baroque portraitist, was born #onthisday 1599 in Antwerp.Van Dyck became the leading cou...
22/03/2021

#SirAnthonyvanDyck, the Flemish Baroque portraitist, was born #onthisday 1599 in Antwerp.

Van Dyck became the leading court painter in England after success in the Southern Netherlands and Italy. In 1632 he was knighted by Charles I, being described as 'principalle paynter in Ordinary to their Majesties at St James’. ⁠

This painting depicting The Judgement of Paris was certainly not an unusual subject, but van Dyck’s choice to paint Paris alone breaks with the conventional rendering of the mythological story. ⁠

With the absence of the goddesses, their beauty is only apparent by Paris' rapt gaze, while his twisted pose emphasises his dilemma. By modelling Paris closely on his own looks, Van Dyck may be identifying himself with Paris - both of whom were reputably attractive. ⁠

To mark #WorldPoetryDay, we wanted to share this atmospheric masterpiece of one of the best-known actresses, writers, an...
21/03/2021

To mark #WorldPoetryDay, we wanted to share this atmospheric masterpiece of one of the best-known actresses, writers, and poets of the 18th century, Perdita, Mrs Mary Robinson.

Painted in 1781 by Thomas Gainsborough, Perdita is shown sat with her loyal dog and miniature portrait of her lover in hand. Her silk dress and powdered face are immaculate, and the folds of her dress merge with the soft green foliage of the dark woodland shadows.

Although the painting was commissioned by the Prince of Wales (later George IV) after their brief but notorious affair, it seems it was Mrs Robinson who determined its pose. Perdita is in a pastoral retreat, exiled to an autumnal landscape where the hues are brown and muted, and the tone is rich and reflective. Gainsborough’s fluid brushwork and loose composition are particularly noteworthy, with Perdita appearing to melt into the landscape, imparting a poetic weight to the picture.

#WorldPoetryDay2021

This atmospheric landscape, by Italian Baroque painter Salvator Rosa, depicts the god Apollo granting Sibyl the gift of ...
20/03/2021

This atmospheric landscape, by Italian Baroque painter Salvator Rosa, depicts the god Apollo granting Sibyl the gift of long life.

Dated c.1657-8, Rosa’s expressive brushwork, dark tones and dramatic treatment of light, together with his characterisation of the wild landscape of rocks and splintered trees, create a sense of foreboding and mystery in-keeping with the melancholy story.

Ovid’s Metamorphoses (XIV, 129-53) tells of how the amorous Apollo offered the Cumaean Sibyl anything she desired. She is shown in the painting asking for as many years of life as there are grains of dust in her hands. Although Apollo granted her wish, she still refused him her favours. In retribution, he denied her perpetual youth and she lived for over seven hundred years in increasing misery.

Henriette Sontag was one of the leading operatic and concert sopranos of her time. Renowned from an early age, her admir...
18/03/2021

Henriette Sontag was one of the leading operatic and concert sopranos of her time. Renowned from an early age, her admirers included that of Goethe and Beethoven.

Owing to her incredible raw talent, Sontag was only eighteen when she sang solo soprano parts in the first performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and ‘Missa Solemnis’.

This beautiful miniature, dated 1852, is by the French artist Alexandre Fiocchi. His miniatures are exceedingly rare, and it is perhaps even more surprising that there are as many as four in the Wallace Collection - suggesting that the artist may have been known personally to Lord Hertford or Richard Wallace.
#WomensHistoryMonth

The period from the later fifteenth to the mid-seventeenth centuries is often described as the ‘Golden Age’ of Venetian ...
17/03/2021

The period from the later fifteenth to the mid-seventeenth centuries is often described as the ‘Golden Age’ of Venetian glass. Such was the awe in which Venetian glass was held that it was reputed to have magical qualities, breaking or changing colour on contact with poison.

Several of the qualities that made Venetian glass so successful are also true of magic: elements of surprise, secrecy, audacity, meticulous timing, imagination, entrepreneurship, showmanship, and the beholder’s bafflement as to how the finished product was achieved.

Discover the stories behind the magical and awe-inspiring properties held within the Venetian glass of the Wallace Collection in tomorrow's free talk on the 'Golden Age' of Venetian glassmaking.

Tune in at 13.00 GMT here: https://youtu.be/PRAbaydfxnw

Pioneering French artist, Rosa Bonheur was born #onthisday 1822.Largely self-taught, Bonheur owed much to her study of t...
16/03/2021

Pioneering French artist, Rosa Bonheur was born #onthisday 1822.

Largely self-taught, Bonheur owed much to her study of the Dutch animal paintings in the Louvre. Her naturalist style of painting, derived from the close observation of her subjects, established Bonheur as the leading French animal painter of her time.

Greatly admired in Britain and America, Bonheur enjoyed considerable social success, her paintings fetching high prices at auction. She was the first woman to receive the Legion of Honour.

This elegant study is titled A Waggon and a Team of Horses, and was painted in 1852.

#WomensHistoryMonth

The Flemish Baroque painter Joannes Fyt, was born #onthisday 1611.This monumental composition set in a grand architectur...
15/03/2021

The Flemish Baroque painter Joannes Fyt, was born #onthisday 1611.

This monumental composition set in a grand architectural interior is typical of Fyt’s work and is characteristic of mid-seventeenth century Flemish still-life painting in general.

Painted in 1644, the composition’s dramatic tone is emphasised with the presence of a blood-stained cloth and the contrast of the dead game with the live monkey, dog and parrot.

Fyt had a successful and prolific career and often collaborated with other artists, the boy in this particular painting appears to have been added by another artist: possibly attributed to the Flemish painter, Erasmus Quellinus.

Happy #MothersDay from everyone here at the Wallace Collection.This joyously sulky painting of a mother teaching her chi...
14/03/2021

Happy #MothersDay from everyone here at the Wallace Collection.

This joyously sulky painting of a mother teaching her child to read is by the French artist Hippolyte (Paul) Delaroche, painted in 1848.

Paired with another work in the Collection by Delaroche titled ‘Mother and Children’, the two pictures contrast mood, social status as well as leisure and activity, but are united by their themes of parenthood and nurturing, subjects which were of great concern to Delaroche.

#MothersDay #MotheringSunday

This restful landscape is by the Italian-born painter Gaspard Dughet. Titled The Falls at Tivoli, the work expertly demo...
13/03/2021

This restful landscape is by the Italian-born painter Gaspard Dughet. Titled The Falls at Tivoli, the work expertly demonstrates Dughet’s skill as a painter, whose reputation was rivalled during his lifetime only by those of Claude and Salvator Rosa.

Sounds of the waterfall, the distant conversation of the people in the river, and the gentle breeze through the trees, all help to imbue this depiction of the picturesque town of Tivoli with a natural calm.

Situated eighteen miles north-east of Rome, Tivoli sits on the edge of the Sabine Mountains. Dughet’s picture appears to show the first of the waterfalls on the river Teverone (now Aniene) on the north-east side. It is one of the finest of several views of Tivoli painted by the artist and probably dates from late in his career, c.1661 – 63.

As a closed art collection built in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Wallace Collection does not possess ext...
12/03/2021

As a closed art collection built in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Wallace Collection does not possess extensive holdings by artists who were women.

This is a reflection of the fact that women artists are few and far between in the history of European art. Because of their gender, they were denied access to the training required of professional artists and discouraged from participating in public exhibitions.

It comes therefore as a refreshing surprise that one of our most popular paintings — the affectionate representation of the sheepdog Brizo — was made by a woman.

Rosa Bonheur was one of the most celebrated painters of her time, thanks to her natural talent and astonishing work ethic. Her most famous work, ‘The Horse Fair’, now at The Met, New York, received a private viewing at Buckingham Palace before it was sold to an American collector.

She was the first woman artist to become ‘chevalier’ of the Legion of Honour. Thirty years later, she cemented her reputation as a true breaker of glass ceilings by becoming the first woman ever to be honoured as an ‘officier’ by the same institution.

#WallaceConnections #WomensHistoryMonth

Mary Robinson was one of the best-known actresses and writers of the 18th century. She was also one of the most painted ...
11/03/2021

Mary Robinson was one of the best-known actresses and writers of the 18th century. She was also one of the most painted and caricatured women of the period.

Dated 1780-81, this portrait by George Romney depicts ‘Perdita’ in fashionable costume. Her facial expression is knowing and defiant as she raises one eyebrow, as if tempting the viewer to challenge her.

Having first appeared on stage in 1776, it was a later performance in ‘The Winter’s Tale’ for which the actress became particularly famous; a part which earned her the nickname ‘Perdita’. It was in this role that Robinson first caught the attention of the Prince of Wales (later George IV), with whom she went on to have a brief but notorious affair.

#WomensHistoryMonth

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Visiting by Bus Numbers 2, 10, 12, 13, 30, 74, 82, 94, 113, 137, 274 all stop nearby. Visiting by Rail Marylebone BR Station is approximately a 10-15 minute walk. Visiting by Tube The nearest tubes are Bond Street (Central & Jubilee Lines) and Baker Street (Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Jubilee and Metropolitan Lines). Oxford Circus (Bakerloo, Central, Victoria Lines) is a 10-15 minute walk. For visitors arriving with an Assistance Dog, Marble Arch is the nearest tube with stairs. Parking Parking on nearby streets metered until 6.30pm. A selection of car parks can be found nearb. Disabled visitors can pre-book a parking space, see website for information: http://www.wallacecollection.org/visiting/howtoreachus

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Comments

I just posted here about the potential closure of library and archive. Unless it is a technical hiccough my post seems to have been deleted. So how is the (short) consultation being carried out and where is the debate to take place?
I read with some concern about the current proposal to close the library and archive. Any quality gallery museum needs these, and I would expect any government controlled institution to offer public and scholarly access to the same.I didnt see an item in the board minutes about this. When was it decided or is it an officer level decision without public accountability?
I was registered for online Wallace Collection talk about collectors via Zoom on 26 October. I tried to log in with details taken from Wallace's confirmation email but got message that passcode was incorrect. Very disappointed to miss this talk. Did anyone else have same problem?
Please check messages as I have not had a response. Thank you
I was registered for Last night’s Wallace online talk via Zoom - I could not log in with the details supplied on confirmation email so missed the seminar. Did anyone else have a problem?
The Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a Due Mani) - Anonimo Bolognese (ca. 1500 - 1550) - 11th action The third in a new series on the use of the Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a due Mani), this is from the Manuscripts attributed to the ‘Anonimo Bolognese’ (ca. 1500 - 1550). Performed with a synthetic blade due to public access, this is the 11th action. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Initiating action a.) Begin the action in cinghiara porta di ferro alta, with your false edge in contact with that of your opponent. b.) Cross your arms to bring your blade to the opposite side of your opponents weapon, catching the weak between your blade and crossguard. c.) Throw the opponents weapon across your body with a sweeping action, passing obliquely to the right when their tip has moved safely out of presence. d.) Continue the sweeping motion into a circular cut, drawing your left foot behind your right as you cut a mandritto fendente to your opponents head. Counter action a.) Await your opponents action in the same guard position. b.) Do not react to your opponent as they cross their arms. Watch their feet peripherally - if you are keeping correct distance, then they should not be close enough to land a blow without advancing a foot. c.) Your opportunity presents itself when your opponent passes forwards, throwing your weapon aside and uncrossing to cut at you. d.) As your opponent releases your blade, cut a mezzo mandritto to their flank. e.) Immediately lift into guardia di intrare, catching the opponents cut on your cross while threatening the face. The great plague of 2020 has finally waned enough for me to get out and about a bit more; now to do something about this newly developed spare tire 😅🥺🍺 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
The Two Handed Greatsword - Anonimo Bolognese (ca. 1500 - 1550) - 10th action The second in a series on the use of the Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a due Mani), this is from the Manuscripts attributed to the ‘Anonimo Bolognese’ (ca. 1500 - 1550). Performed with a synthetic blade due to public access, this is the 10th action. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- 10th action a.) Start in porta di ferro alta, with your false edge against that of your opponent. b.) If your opponent thrusts along your blade, catch it on your Crossguard by lifting into guardia di testa. c.) Use your weapon to forcefully displace your opponents blade down and to the right. d.) Passing to the left, continue with a wheeling cut into a riverso fendente to the head and draw your right foot behind your left. Counter action a.) Starting in porta di ferro alta, pass forwards thrusting along your opponents blade, keeping your false edge in contact with theirs. b.) When your opponent catches and displaces your blade, use the force of that displacement to turn a mandritto to their head. For more on this subject, or if you would like to purchase your own training weapons to practice the content of these videos, please visit our website: www.tempus-fugitives.co.uk I’m starting to look a bit scruffy again, I guess I’ll have to briefly head back towards civilisation soon 😕 If you want to support the channel, and a haircut, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
What life could have been!!
The Military Billhook (Welsh or Forest Bill) - George Silver (1599) - paradoxes, ch. 13 pt. 6&8 George Silver was a controversial character, even in his time, for his vehement opposition to the popular Italian systems being taught in London during the 16th century. Claiming to be revealing the older English methods of combat, his ‘Paradoxes of Defense for the True Handling of all Manner of Weapons’ does give an excellent description of the principles upon which this systems is grounded. The bill was the primary infantry weapon of Tudor armies, and described by George Silver as having “advantage against all manner of weapons whatsoever”. Ironically, Di Grassi, the author of an earlier book on Italian methodology popular in London - including the use of the bill - agreed with this notion in stating that the bill was the final and most superior form of polearm. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Technique 1 a.) If the head of your opponents weapon lies lower than yours, place your fork over their haft, forcing it down. b.) Pass forwards, sliding the fork up the haft to your opponents hands. c.) Fall back into guard. Technique 2 a.) If the head of your opponents weapon lies higher than yours, place your fork under their haft and force their weapon aside. b.) Pass forwards, thrusting at your opponent one handed. c.) If your thrust misses, pull your opponent off balance as you lacerate them with the hook, stepping back into guard. For more on this subject, or if you would like to purchase your own training weapons to practice the content of these videos, please visit our website: www.tempus-fugitives.co.uk I finally managed to buzz those nasty, messy head-weeds off my scalp! Phew... The great plague of 2020 has certainly allowed me to cultivate my 16th c. beard, although I seem to be getting fatter every episode too 😅🥺🍺 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
The Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a Due Mani) - Anonimo Bolognese (ca. 1500 - 1550) - 9th action The first in a new series on the use of the Two-Handed Greatsword (Spada a due Mani), this is from the Manuscripts attributed to the ‘Anonimo Bolognese’ (ca. 1500 - 1550). Performed with a synthetic blade due to public access, this is the 9th action. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Initiating action a.) Begin the action in cinghiara porta di ferro alta, with your false edge in contact with that of your opponent. b.) Cut a mandritto into your opponents blade as you pass right. c.) Inflict a falso to your opponents face as you draw your left foot behind your right. Counter action a.) Stand in guardia di porta di ferro alta, and do not react as your opponent beats down your blade. b.) Raise your hands over your head to catch your opponents falso. c.) Pass left, turning your blade over your head and gripping it at halfsword, so that the blade slopes down and to your left. Force your opponents blade to the side. d.) Finish with a mandritto to your opponents head. I finally managed to buzz those nasty, messy head-weeds off my scalp! Phew... The great plague of 2020 has certainly allowed me to cultivate my 16th c. beard, and I seem to be looking somewhat trimmer again too 😃 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee
The Military Billhook (Welsh or Forest Bill) - George Silver (1599) - paradoxes, ch. 13 pt. 1&2 George Silver was a controversial character, even in his time, for his vehement opposition to the popular Italian systems being taught in London during the 16th century. Claiming to be revealing the older English methods of combat, his ‘Paradoxes of Defense for the True Handling of all Manner of Weapons’ does give an excellent description of the principles upon which this systems is grounded. The bill was the primary infantry weapon of Tudor armies, and described by George Silver as having “advantage against all manner of weapons whatsoever”. Ironically, Di Grassi, the author of an earlier book on Italian methodology popular in London - including the use of the bill - agreed with this notion in stating that the bill was the final and most superior form of polearm. -———————————————————————————- As many of you are probably aware, my moniker of ‘Wandering Swordsman’ used in these videos is based on the old European concept of a non guild affiliated instructor in swordsmanship being little better than a vagabond. This is particularly apt due to my lifestyle choice of living on a boat and travelling around the south of England, putting up posters and offering classes wherever I happen to stop. -———————————————————————————- Technique 1 a.) Catch your opponents weapon in the fork of yours and displace it down and to the side. b.) Run the fork up the haft of their weapon, and onto their hands as you start forward. c.) Continue to pass forward to catch your opponents neck or limbs with the hook of the bill. d.) Lacerate and unbalance your opponent by yanking sharply on the bill as you pass back. e.) Although not strictly speaking in the text, it seems impolite to just leave your opponent lying there, so finish them off. f.) Return back into guard. Technique 2 a.) Catch your opponents weapon in the fork of yours and displace it down and to the side, this time so forcefully that you cannot attack his hands. b.) Pass forwards into the opening you have created, placing your left hand near the head of your bill as you hook your opponents knee. c.) Pass forwards again, tearing your opponents knee out with the hook of your bill as you close in to grapple. For more on this subject, or if you would like to purchase your own training weapons to practice the content of these videos, please visit our website: www.tempus-fugitives.co.uk I finally managed to buzz those nasty, messy head-weeds off my scalp! Phew... The great plague of 2020 has certainly allowed me to cultivate my 16th c. beard, although I seem to be getting fatter every episode too 😅🥺🍺 If you want to support the channel, feel free to get me a coffee over at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JayMaxwell and don’t forget to like and subscribe ☕️ #diaryofawanderingswordsman #tempusfugitives #coffee