Ben Uri Gallery & Museum

Ben Uri Gallery & Museum The most comprehensive and important collection of works by late 19th, 20th and 21st Century immigrant artists in the United Kingdom and the international museum sector. Addressing the universal issues of identity and migration through the visual arts.
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Ben Uri Gallery and Museum, founded in July 1915 in Whitechapel, East London, is dedicated to positive engagement with the widest public at large. We actively partner museums and community groups to engage and partner audiences, both young and old - near and far, in exploring contemporary issues through art. The Ben Uri Collection is internationally recognised and encompasses over 1300 works, principally from the start of the 20th century, by some 385 artists originating from 35 different countries including Chagall, Liebermann, Pissarro, Soutine, Ury alongside Auerbach, Bomberg, Epstein, Gertler, Kitaj, Kossoff, Solomon and Wolmark. Access to the collection is provided through exhibitions including touring, collection loans, publications, academic and public presentations, nationwide learning programmes, social health and extensively through the internet. Ben Uri present 4 major exhibitions a year - see web for details.

📣Reminder: Our Instagram Live Series continues Wednesdays at 5:00pm. If you're interested in the curatorial, operational...
19/04/2020

📣Reminder: Our Instagram Live Series continues Wednesdays at 5:00pm. If you're interested in the curatorial, operational, and digital functions of a gallery, tune in and catch our staff sharing the behind-the-scenes of Ben Uri Gallery. If you've missed an episode, no need to fret! Each episode is recorded and uploaded onto our page and IGTV channel afterwards so you don't miss a thing. Visit us on Wednesdays over at https://www.instagram.com/benurigallery/ and you can meet us face to face! We look forward to sharing our time with you as we #MuseumFromHome these next few weeks.

You can find several works by the wonderful Clara Klinghoffer in the online Ben Uri collection here: www.benuricollectio...
18/04/2020
Art UK

You can find several works by the wonderful Clara Klinghoffer in the online Ben Uri collection here: www.benuricollection.org.uk

Clara Klinghoffer died #onthisday 50 years ago. Discover the artist who was heralded in her time as drawing like Raphael and Leonardo and whose works are part of public collections across the UK, including Ben Uri Gallery & Museum, Manchester Art Gallery, National Portrait Gallery and The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

'Mother and Child – After the Bath (Fanny and Hilda)' by Clara Klinghoffer (1900–1970), private collection © the artist's estate, photo credit: the artist's family

What day is it? We can’t keep up, but we’re sure it’s #Caturday somewhere. Here’s Polish sculptor Nina Grey’s (b. 1907) ...
18/04/2020

What day is it? We can’t keep up, but we’re sure it’s #Caturday somewhere.

Here’s Polish sculptor Nina Grey’s (b. 1907) ‘Woman With Cat’ - a little terracotta bundle of joy to celebrate how much we love our companions.

Image: ‘Woman With Cat’ (undated) © Nina Grey.

#BenUri #NinaGrey #Sculpture

As nostalgia during lockdown creeps up on us a little more each day, here’s a familiar image for our #FridayMotivation t...
17/04/2020

As nostalgia during lockdown creeps up on us a little more each day, here’s a familiar image for our #FridayMotivation this week.

Presenting Halina Korn’s painting, ‘Bus Stop’ (c. 1950’s). The artwork is an invitation to seek out the best in our routines, to change our perspective on how we view the minutiae of everyday life to better embrace the mundane as wonderful. As someone who learnt after migrating to England that her entire family had perished in Auschwitz, Korn’s artistic process was a concentrated effort on relishing in the everyday. ‘A bunch of human beings at Lyons Corner House is as beautiful as a bunch of flowers. The landscape of Kilburn High Road gives me the same kick as the most picturesque Italian scene. I am not looking for beauty or ugliness’ - a poignant reminder for us this Friday.

Image: ‘Bus Stop’ (c. 1950’s), by Halina Korn © Maryla Zulawski.

#BenUri #HalinaKorn #Painting #London

16/04/2020
Ben Uri Gallery & Museum

If you didn’t manage to catch Emma Hollamby’s talk on the Ben Uri Arts & Dementia institute on our Instagram Live segment last week, you can watch the full episode below:

Ben Uri Gallery & Museum has launched a new series across their social media platforms to showcase the operational aspect of the gallery, introducing its members of staff to the public through a variety of episodes that touch on the different roles and values upon which the gallery is built. The first episode is hosted by Emma Hollamby, the Ben Uri Arts & Dementia Programme Manager, who harnesses the power of art and art making my using the Ben Uri collection as a means of interacting and engaging with those who are affected by, or at the risk of living with dementia.

As weekly segments, you can watch these live-streams take place on Wednesdays through our instagram (https://www.instagram.com/benurigallery/) for the duration of half an hour, where you can ask staff questions and see how the gallery functions behind closed doors. Our next segment will be hosted today, at 5:00pm, by gallery manager Jayanna Watts, speaking on the topic of gallery management and Ben Uri's new digital focus.

15/04/2020
Ben Uri Live-Streams Episode One: Arts & Dementia

Ben Uri Gallery & Museum has launched a new series across their social media platforms to showcase the operational aspect of the gallery, introducing its members of staff to the public through a variety of episodes that touch on the different roles and values upon which the gallery is built. The first episode is hosted by Emma Hollamby, the Ben Uri Arts & Dementia Programme Manager, who harnesses the power of art and art making my using the Ben Uri collection as a means of interacting and engaging with those who are affected by, or at the risk of living with dementia.

As weekly segments, you can watch these live-streams take place on Wednesdays through our instagram (https://www.instagram.com/benurigallery/) for the duration of half an hour, where you can ask staff questions and see how the gallery functions behind closed doors. Our next segment will be hosted today, at 5:00pm, by gallery manager Jayanna Watts, speaking on the topic of gallery management and Ben Uri's new digital focus.

If you could do anything this #BankHoliday what would it be?Given the recent spurt of welcome sunshine, we’d be taking a...
13/04/2020

If you could do anything this #BankHoliday what would it be?

Given the recent spurt of welcome sunshine, we’d be taking a leaf out of Alfred Lomnitz’s book and sprawl outside absorbing nature at its finest - sheep and all. Best to stay in however, and appreciate it from our windows.

Image: ‘Pastorale’ (1923) © Alfred Lomnitz Estate.

#BenUri #AlfredLomnitz #Art #MuseumFromHome

Happy #Easter everyone!For all those participating, we hope you’re having a safe and wonderful time celebrating. Here’s ...
12/04/2020

Happy #Easter everyone!

For all those participating, we hope you’re having a safe and wonderful time celebrating. Here’s a painting titled ‘The Almighty’ (1994) as painted by Hans Feibusch, a prolific muralist who was commissioned by the Church of England to paint a variety of churches across the country.

Image: ‘The Almighty’ (1994) © Hans Feibusch Estate.

#BenUri #HansFeibusch #Art

10/04/2020

#Portraiture is our focus today. It is not only a study of the sitter, but a direct window into the artistic and personal process associated with the artist and how they come to interpret human life through the physical and psychological act of creating portraits. In his portrait of friends, Frank Auerbach (b. 1931-) is graphic, visceral almost in his application of ink, with the darkened lines across the composition singed with energy. The portraits not only reflect the personalities of Auerbach’s studies, but they seem to tap into automatism, where the hand movements and directional force of the lines are encouraged by Auerbach’s subconscious. ⁠

Find more of Auerbach’s series and works on our online collection. ⁠

Image: ‘Series: Part of Seven Portraits’ (c.1989) © Frank Auerbach, courtesy of Marlborough Fine Art.

#BenUri #FrankAuerbach #Artist #Collection

Chag Pesach kasher vesame’ach everyone!Today starts #Passover, so we’re wishing all of those who are participating in th...
09/04/2020

Chag Pesach kasher vesame’ach everyone!

Today starts #Passover, so we’re wishing all of those who are participating in this wonderful holiday, a joyous celebration for the next eight days. Passover commemorates the Israelites’ freedom from slavery at the hands of the Egyptians. In this silkscreen print, artist Shlomo Katz (1937-1992) depicts the 10 plagues of Egypt, as described in the Book of Exodus.

Image: ‘Ten Plagues’ (undated) by Shlomo Katz (1937-1992) © Shlomo Katz Estate.

#BenUri #ShlomoKatz #Art

“If people really want to know me, let them look at my sculpture, because words are not my medium at all. It is sculptur...
08/04/2020

“If people really want to know me, let them look at my sculpture, because words are not my medium at all. It is sculpture that is my medium”.

Dora Gordine (1895-1991), our #WCW artist, was born into a middle-class Jewish family in Latvia. With the rise of Nazism and subsequent persecution of Jews, the artist travelled across Western Europe searching refuge, changing her birth name of ‘Gorin’ to ‘Gordine’, proclaiming herself a ‘full-blown Russian’, in an attempt to conceal her Jewish heritage. After settling in England, her second marriage to the Hon. Richard Hare, opened up a new social world with many commissions. In 1936 she designed Dorich House (now part of Kingston University), housing her studios, a gallery and the couple’s more modest apartment above.

In 1938 she was hailed as ‘possibly the finest woman sculptor in the world’ and remained a major presence in European sculpture until the late 1960s.

Image: ‘Awakening’ (1944-45) by Dora Gordine (1938-2010) © Dora Gordine

#BenUri #DoraGordine #WomenArtists

“I had only to open my bedroom window, and blue air, love, and flowers entered with her”, said Chagall. While we’re indo...
06/04/2020

“I had only to open my bedroom window, and blue air, love, and flowers entered with her”, said Chagall. While we’re indoors, what can you see outside your window? Maybe it isn’t so much the world that is removed from us in these times, but our limiting perception of what is available and tangible that encroaches. Let Chagall inspire you to find goodness in the scene that lives beyond your window.

Image: ‘View Through A Window’ (1964) by Ben Levene (1938-2010) © Ben Levene Estate.

#BenUri #BenLevene #Chagall #QuoteOfTheDay

05/04/2020

Sonia Delaunay, a proponent of the artistic movement #Orphism, is one of the many incredible artists featured in our collection. Orphism bridges music and art, whereby art appropriates lyricism and melodic movement transferring it into visual abstraction - an inherent stylistic quality of Sonia Delaunay. The artist, who since birth was exposed to music and art, moved to Paris in 1905 where she immersed herself in the modernist spirit of the 20th century artistic scene. She married her second husband Robert Delaunay in 1910, and together they pursued the use of abstract colour in painting and textile design.

The Delaunays were ardent promoters of abstract art, became members of the Abstraction-Création group in 1931 and organized the first Salon des Réalités Nouvelles in 1939. In 1953 the Galerie Bing mounted a solo show, of which some of Sonia Delaunay’s promotional work and posters are part of the Ben Uri Collection. In 1964, Delaunay became the first living female artist to have a retrospective at the Louvre. She died in Paris in 1979, a visionary whose vocation to the vivacity of colour in art elevated abstraction to spiritual heights.

You can find more of Sonia Delaunay’s creations in Ben Uri Gallery’s online collection.

#BenUri #SoniaDelaunay #Abstract #Art

It’s no mean feat to pick up those brushes, dust off the paints you have lying around, prop up your materials, and tap i...
03/04/2020

It’s no mean feat to pick up those brushes, dust off the paints you have lying around, prop up your materials, and tap into whatever creativity resides within you. #Art emerges from all aspects of our lives, whether it lives framed by what sits outside our windows from day to day, or in the crevices of our own homes, there’s no better time like now to harness that creative spirit. Send us what you’re making from home and we’ll share it however we can! Tag us, or send us your creations via direct message!

Image: ‘Artist’s Palette’ (undated) by Maurice Blond (1899-1974) © Maurice Blond estate.

#BenUri #Art #CreativityFromHome #CreateToConnect

Found in our archives, here’s a #throwback to Jacob Epstein (1880-1959), dwarfed by his enormous stone creation. On one ...
02/04/2020

Found in our archives, here’s a #throwback to Jacob Epstein (1880-1959), dwarfed by his enormous stone creation. On one side presides the ‘Sun God’, first created in 1910. What we see standing in this photograph is the second face of the sculpture, ‘Primeval Gods’, carved into the reverse of the same stone work almost twenty years later in 1931. Jewish émigré artist, Jacob Epstein was raised in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, settling in London in 1905. His work challenged the prevailing notions of sexuality and beauty, favouring non-European ideals for his art as demonstrated in this piece - an echo of Epstein’s personal African art collection.

This sculpture is currently on long-term loan to the @Tate. You can find more of Epstein’s work featured in Ben Uri’s online collection, which include several busts of key figures and life studies.

Image: Photograph titled ‘Sir Jacob Epstein with 'Primeval Gods', dated 1933.

#BenUri #Epstein #JacobEpstein #Sculpture #Sculptor #EmigreArtist #Art #Artist

Pinch-punch, first day of the month! Keep an eye out for jokesters today, there’s danger lurking even in lockdown. Happy...
01/04/2020

Pinch-punch, first day of the month! Keep an eye out for jokesters today, there’s danger lurking even in lockdown.

Happy #AprilFoolsDay everyone! We hope you’ve got a smile on your face, whether you’re the butt of the joke or otherwise!

Image: ‘Sliding On The Round Pond’ (undated), by Gilbert Solomon (1890-1955).

#BenUri #GilbertSolomon #Art #Artist #Gallery #Collection

The last on our series for Women’s History Month, we’re looking at artist Meital Covo (b. 1976-) and her artwork titled ...
31/03/2020

The last on our series for Women’s History Month, we’re looking at artist Meital Covo (b. 1976-) and her artwork titled ‘Hers’ (2003). This photograph of Covo’s constructed skirt, a digital print on synthetic fabric, is part of a series of work. Described as a ‘conceptual art clothesline’, the series consists of skirts, vests, bags, and bracelets, onto which an image of women’s hair is printed.

An object of equal parts repulsion and attraction, the skirt remarks on both consumerism and gender performance. In one regard, the skirt asks us to question how we as a society fetishize objects and our ownership of them through the medium of clothing. On the other hand, the skirt is representative of the conventions that define the female body socially and culturally, by commenting on whether female hair on the body is acceptable. What makes the skirt typically attractive is made repellent in the usage of hair as the embellishment.

Image: ‘Hers’ (2003), by Meital Covo © Meital Covo

#BenUri #Gallery #MeitalCovo #Photography #WomensHistoryMonth

Even though we’re all cooped up in lockdown, this doesn’t mean we’re removed from the world around us. We’re helping our...
30/03/2020

Even though we’re all cooped up in lockdown, this doesn’t mean we’re removed from the world around us. We’re helping our emergency workers by self-isolating to the benefit of our communities, but we can all stay connected through other small initiatives that embolden the positivity we need to surround ourselves with. Keep in touch with your loved ones, help your neighbours where possible, and take care of yourselves. But if you can find the time, there are some ways you can help wider efforts: the NHS are looking are recruiting volunteers, or if you can, donate to the closest food bank near you.

To volunteer: https://www.goodsamapp.org/NHSvolunteerresponders

To support a nationwide network of food banks helping our most vulnerable: https://www.trusselltrust.org/

Selfless acts of kindness at a time like this, ensures our inner humanity is kept alive.

Image: ‘Farm Scene with Couple Delivering Goods’ (1925) by Barnett Freedman © Barnett Freedman Estate.

#BarnettFreedman #COVID19 #Community

28/03/2020

Marc Chagall, described by critic Robert Hughes as the ‘quintessential Jewish artist of the 20th century', died #OnThisDay. Chagall was born in 1887 in the town of Vitebsk, Russia (now in Belarus). Later known for his use of folkloric imagery and dream-like creations that echoed his traditional Jewish upbringing, Chagall first studied in Russia and move to Paris in 1910.

Following the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917, Chagall was appointed Fine Arts Commissar for the province of Vitebsk, but returned to Paris in 1923 until he was forced to find refuge in New York during the Second World War, almost losing all of his work in the process of fleeing Nazi persecution. During his time in the United States, a major retrospective of his work was held at The Museum of Modern Art in 1946. He later returned to France, settling in the south-eastern town of Saint-Paul-de-Vence until his death in 1985. Chagall embodies the spirit of the migratory artist who ingrained his heritage at the core of his artistic practice, marrying his Jewish identity with his unquenchable creativity.

Featured are his illustrations of Shakespeare’s ‘The Tempest’ created in 1975, of which 52 illustrated pieces exist in the Ben Uri collection alongside several other drawings by the artist.

#BenUri #MarcChagall #Shakespeare #Illustration

It’s Friday! We’re ecstatic and feeling all jumpy inside like this abstract crayon and gouache creation by Sandra Blow (...
27/03/2020

It’s Friday! We’re ecstatic and feeling all jumpy inside like this abstract crayon and gouache creation by Sandra Blow (1925-2006). Blow studied at St. Martin’s School of Art and the Royal Academy later working alongside Roger Hilton, Patricia Heron and other artists associated with St. Ives. This work, ‘gestural and impulsive in form’ as described by the artist, bursts with dynamism and directional energy, sweeping across the canvas in a thunder of colour. Exactly our #FridayMood - you know?

Image: ‘Drawing No. 21’ (c. 1961) by Sandra Blow © Sandra Blow Estate.

#BenUri #SandraBlow #Art #Gouache #Abstract

“Men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at.” Taken from the seminal work ‘Ways...
25/03/2020

“Men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at.” Taken from the seminal work ‘Ways of Seeing’ (1972), John Berger’s quote is the framework for the next segment in our Women’s History Month series.

This nude of two figures as painted by German-born Pamina Liebert-Mahrenholz (1904-2004), is a simplified study of the female body rendered into fragmented colour blocking. From the perspective of Liebert-Mahrenholz, a woman painting and observing other women, there seems to be no overtones of objectification or the sexualisation of the body. The female nude in art is almost always fetishised beyond its physicality. In this painting, do the figures seem naturalistic because a woman has conjured this image, or are we desensitised as a public to nudity in art? Are the figures here stylised to suit the needs of the male gaze or has the artist perhaps subverted the cultural significance of the exposed female body to create something purely anatomical?

Image: ‘Two Female Nudes’ (undated), by Pamina Liebert-Mahrenholz © Pamina Liebert-Mahrenholz Estate.

#BenUri #Pamina #LiebertMahrenholz #Art #Artist #Painting #WomensHistoryMonth

Address

108A Boundary Road
London
NW8 0RH

Tube - St Johns Wood, Kilburn Park. Overground - Kilburn High Road, South Hampstead.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:30
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:30
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:30
Thursday 10:00 - 17:30
Friday 10:00 - 17:30
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

+442076043991

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Comments

Very good work😍 color and design bravo*Shalom Gustave Alhadeff
how about showing some of mine, in this day age it is a bit difficult showing something with a Jewish theme.
At the Ben Uri on Monday 8 April 6 p.m.
Remembering Cyprus Years 1963-64 The two lifeless bodies which we took out from under the bed the walls riddled with hundreds of bullets the hands of the one still clinging to the bedsprings bloog still bright... When I was in Angola I remembered Cyprus remembering Angola when I think of Cyprus Suffering has no motherland Separation In weary and dark nights my native land whom I defend for whom I shed my blood is now going away slipping from my hands I remember the moment when I wept as I embarked on that old Greek ship I watched from far, far away Limassol, my own, with minarets and bell-towers Immobility of my fingers on cold steel could possibly be something beyond love and humanity I pondered about the infinities whose streets are full of rancours I saw the tearful eyes of those we are conditioned to think as our enemies they looked like us, we looked like them How many times we embraced and waited our death together how many times cold steels turned into a problem why I speak always why don't you speak insensitive as the feelings of the cemetery why did they separate us, our loves though bitter, they were our sensitivity don't walk, I beseech with the tongue with hands with brains even the stones would talk till now if you were not stone DAWN OF AWARENESS 1 An evening when the sun waves to the world in the blindness of the silence people drifting as if attached to the clouds only the extinguished lights of empty ferries, unmanned, drawing nearer painted red and black battleship without moorings, without sails, without algae on the indigo sea only the thief like silence, silence, portals from this world to the next which I see undulating, formless all the way to the ports of Diyarbakır! The lanterns have long since been taken down carried off to far-away places around those necks which the empty noose will necklace The fishermen from yesterday remaining in my mind's eye no rod and hook in their hands the hook and rod have been forbidden it is illegal to carry a rod and hook. The charcoal grill are without fish the drinking houses without Rakı the joyous drunken longings hanging over from yesterday talking in my sleep all the way to Diyarbakır And so, like this, my mind strayed to the foot of Cudi mountain whistling to Ararat wrapping myself in my combat jacket. DAWN OF AWARENESS 2 At that moment that I have wrapped myself in my combat jacket you became a shaft of light in the blindness of the dark turning the night into dawn a blood-red cloud in the indigo sky behind the tears of the children of the murdered by unknown assassins the first warm two tears the women's scarves wet with weeping you became the hope of dead shoots You came to life became the destiny of our frozen love and the heat of our dead life a fire and a hope for our tomorrows, you became the reality the one we knew but to whom we could not shout pinned down helpless in our cowardice from a drop of water you became a wave in the ocean and the flowing from yesterday suddenly stopped You became yellow, yellow, Diyarbakır you became May time, turning green the call of spring ushering in the red poppies you towered before us straight and proud, your verdant shoot became foliage the dewdrop on the leaves yellow, red and green And, unconfined by clouds warning us as clouds as the sun into our silence you brought the morning news and woke Harran and its children DAWN OF AWARENESS 3 You are the thoughts which were repressed when sleep is sweetest you became the cry of joy of the children upon awakening possessing the morning together the silence becoming an ululation. The fresh winds of Newroz the price of freedom bullets and bloodshed We saw so much brutality so many riots, so many tears before Christ, and after Christ between the two rivers. But we were always silent and our friends the mountains were angry with us the Euphrates was angry too Haran too, We were vexed with one another and in the end we were defeated They came on horseback, loveless terrifying masks over their faces creatures of another faith speaking other tongues merciless and brutal their galloping hooves dividing our love their traditions overlaying ours consuming our fruits opposed to our tolerance coming as a groom into our midst. AFTER THE OCCUPATION- DAWN OF AWARENESS 4 WE were nothing thereafter we had never existed anyway! beholding Haran, Cudi and Ararat with delight, abducting our beloved to the mountains and for seven months dressed in white bridal clothes with the shepherds, with the farmers producing a culture those who said it wasn't ours between the two river also saying we had no language. It was not us who mixed the mud with the hay It was not us who planted the trees in trees in this landscape they counted our language as nothing our religion for much we were the root of the tree never to burst into bud a mountain people, a rough unpleasant type, an enemy to women We were not from the East according to us, our homeland was in the North. Our songs sprang from every part of Anatolia our sad songs and yet they considered us as less than nothing trying to deprive us of our richness. And, with you life is full and verdant in the times of Newroz and the children ran away to the mountains the mountains to Diyarbakır so that the Narcissus should not weep in the meadows. In the street, beneath the litter, the cries from the cemetery are toppling the stones and a fallen seed grows green we smile again no longer recognise the suffering from Botan to Haran as our joy ripples outwards. Poems from Yashar Ismailoglu for the Poetry competition
Remembering Cyprus Years 1963-64 The two lifeless bodies which we took out from under the bed the walls riddled with hundreds of bullets the hands of the one still clinging to the bedsprings bloog still bright... When I was in Angola I remembered Cyprus remembering Angola when I think of Cyprus Suffering has no motherland Separation In weary and dark nights my native land whom I defend for whom I shed my blood is now going away slipping from my hands I remember the moment when I wept as I embarked on that old Greek ship I watched from far, far away Limassol, my own, with minarets and bell-towers Immobility of my fingers on cold steel could possibly be something beyond love and humanity I pondered about the infinities whose streets are full of rancours I saw the tearful eyes of those we are conditioned to think as our enemies they looked like us, we looked like them How many times we embraced and waited our death together how many times cold steels turned into a problem why I speak always why don't you speak insensitive as the feelings of the cemetery why did they separate us, our loves though bitter, they were our sensitivity don't walk, I beseech with the tongue with hands with brains even the stones would talk till now if you were not stone DAWN OF AWARENESS 1 An evening when the sun waves to the world in the blindness of the silence people drifting as if attached to the clouds only the extinguished lights of empty ferries, unmanned, drawing nearer painted red and black battleship without moorings, without sails, without algae on the indigo sea only the thief like silence, silence, portals from this world to the next which I see undulating, formless all the way to the ports of Diyarbakır! The lanterns have long since been taken down carried off to far-away places around those necks which the empty noose will necklace The fishermen from yesterday remaining in my mind's eye no rod and hook in their hands the hook and rod have been forbidden it is illegal to carry a rod and hook. The charcoal grill are without fish the drinking houses without Rakı the joyous drunken longings hanging over from yesterday talking in my sleep all the way to Diyarbakır And so, like this, my mind strayed to the foot of Cudi mountain whistling to Ararat wrapping myself in my combat jacket. DAWN OF AWARENESS 2 At that moment that I have wrapped myself in my combat jacket you became a shaft of light in the blindness of the dark turning the night into dawn a blood-red cloud in the indigo sky behind the tears of the children of the murdered by unknown assassins the first warm two tears the women's scarves wet with weeping you became the hope of dead shoots You came to life became the destiny of our frozen love and the heat of our dead life a fire and a hope for our tomorrows, you became the reality the one we knew but to whom we could not shout pinned down helpless in our cowardice from a drop of water you became a wave in the ocean and the flowing from yesterday suddenly stopped You became yellow, yellow, Diyarbakır you became May time, turning green the call of spring ushering in the red poppies you towered before us straight and proud, your verdant shoot became foliage the dewdrop on the leaves yellow, red and green And, unconfined by clouds warning us as clouds as the sun into our silence you brought the morning news and woke Harran and its children DAWN OF AWARENESS 3 You are the thoughts which were repressed when sleep is sweetest you became the cry of joy of the children upon awakening possessing the morning together the silence becoming an ululation. The fresh winds of Newroz the price of freedom bullets and bloodshed We saw so much brutality so many riots, so many tears before Christ, and after Christ between the two rivers. But we were always silent and our friends the mountains were angry with us the Euphrates was angry too Haran too, We were vexed with one another and in the end we were defeated They came on horseback, loveless terrifying masks over their faces creatures of another faith speaking other tongues merciless and brutal their galloping hooves dividing our love their traditions overlaying ours consuming our fruits opposed to our tolerance coming as a groom into our midst. AFTER THE OCCUPATION- DAWN OF AWARENESS 4 WE were nothing thereafter we had never existed anyway! beholding Haran, Cudi and Ararat with delight, abducting our beloved to the mountains and for seven months dressed in white bridal clothes with the shepherds, with the farmers producing a culture those who said it wasn't ours between the two river also saying we had no language. It was not us who mixed the mud with the hay It was not us who planted the trees in trees in this landscape they counted our language as nothing our religion for much we were the root of the tree never to burst into bud a mountain people, a rough unpleasant type, an enemy to women We were not from the East according to us, our homeland was in the North. Our songs sprang from every part of Anatolia our sad songs and yet they considered us as less than nothing trying to deprive us of our richness. And, with you life is full and verdant in the times of Newroz and the children ran away to the mountains the mountains to Diyarbakır so that the Narcissus should not weep in the meadows. In the street, beneath the litter, the cries from the cemetery are toppling the stones and a fallen seed grows green we smile again no longer recognise the suffering from Botan to Haran as our joy ripples outwards. Yashar Ismailoglu 43 Nash Road London N9 0LA These 3 poems are for the Poetry Competition. Please submit them on my behalf Thank you