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Images of Flo Brook’s beautiful exhibition at Tramway, Glasgow, closing 3 October 2021. Flo Brooks’ practice encompasses...
11/09/2021

Images of Flo Brook’s beautiful exhibition at Tramway, Glasgow, closing 3 October 2021.

Flo Brooks’ practice encompasses painting, sculpture, collage, publishing and social engagement. The title of the show, Angletwich, takes its name from a Devonshire dialect term for a worm used in fishing bait, but has evolved to describe a fast moving creature or child. It speaks to the frenetic layering of people and activity within the works as well as recurrent motifs of migration and the makeshift.

In weaving together this semi autobiographical narrative of q***r and trans experience, Brooks has turned to the rural South West England where he grew up and in particular its marginalised spaces and communities. These new works centre on a series of rural archetypes; from the livestock fair and the post office, to a lonely bus stop, generating a simultaneous sense of familiarity and isolation. Each work in the exhibition is part of a wider whole; depicting characters, scenes and places which together develop a critical narrative of place and q***r experience in Britain. The installation mirrors the environments found within the work, creating a dramatic context to more closely connect the world of Brooks’ painting with the experience of encountering them.

#flobrooks #tramwayglasgow #glasgowlife #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporaryartist #painting #contemporarypainting #glasgow

Kenneth Bergfeld’s second solo exhibition at the gallery “Fast Day Menu” is now open! Come by and see these amazing new ...
09/09/2021

Kenneth Bergfeld’s second solo exhibition at the gallery “Fast Day Menu” is now open! Come by and see these amazing new paintings!

The exhibition consists of seven new paintings of varying size that all feature the artist Svenja Wichmann. Alongside the paintings, the artist has made site-specific wall drawings which include Wichmann’s hand gestures and objects such as an empty plastic bottle.

Image:
Kenneth Bergfeld
Self-knowledge, 2021
Oil on canvas
130 x 100 x 2 cm
51 1/8 x 39 3/8 x 3/4 in

#kennethbergfeld #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporarypainting #painting #art #artist #artistsoninstagram

DIS participates in One Escape at a Time curated by Yung Ma at the Seoul MediaCity Biennale, opening tomorrow till the 2...
07/09/2021

DIS participates in One Escape at a Time curated by Yung Ma at the Seoul MediaCity Biennale, opening tomorrow till the 21 November 2021.

Escapism often carries with it a negative connotation, as if those who partake in it are dreamers, lost and afloat. But what if we were to embrace it, turn it around, and reimagine our relationship with escapism?

One Escape at a Time is inspired by ideas of escapism, especially in the context of the current popular media landscape.

The US sitcom One Day at a Time (2017–20), first produced and made available for streaming worldwide by Netflix, is a contemporary update of the 1970s sitcom of the same name. It charts the life of a three-generation Cuban American family sharing the same roof in Los Angeles. Despite its seemingly conventional format, the sitcom flips the norms of media representation and disguises its central concerns with laughter while tackling some of the most urgent and human questions today: racism, gender, class, sexuality, identity, migration, gentrification, and violence, among others.

Programs and other media like One Day at a Time that utilize escapism as a conduit for engaging or confronting sociopolitical subject matter are a key starting point for the Biennale. Their tactics make it possible for us to reconsider our perceptions of escapism, which in turn may enable us to better reflect on and navigate our fractured and troubling world.

In light of the current global Covid-19 pandemic and widespread lockdown measures, escapism has become all the more symbolic and relevant. It is still too soon for any of us to fully understand the pandemic’s lasting impact, but we all feel its immediate effects. Even as the isolation of millions in their own homes has brought about a mass appetite for forms of micro-escape, many people have mobilized on the streets to take a stand against racial and social injustices over the past year. In this new and confusing reality, perhaps we need to go beyond the proposition of simply embracing escapism. Rather, we can utilize it as a critical mechanism for confronting and connecting with the world we live in.

#dis #dismagazine #yungma #seoulmediacity #oneescapeatatime

DIS participates in One Escape at a Time curated by Yung Ma at the Seoul MediaCity Biennale, opening tomorrow till the 21 November 2021.

Escapism often carries with it a negative connotation, as if those who partake in it are dreamers, lost and afloat. But what if we were to embrace it, turn it around, and reimagine our relationship with escapism?

One Escape at a Time is inspired by ideas of escapism, especially in the context of the current popular media landscape.

The US sitcom One Day at a Time (2017–20), first produced and made available for streaming worldwide by Netflix, is a contemporary update of the 1970s sitcom of the same name. It charts the life of a three-generation Cuban American family sharing the same roof in Los Angeles. Despite its seemingly conventional format, the sitcom flips the norms of media representation and disguises its central concerns with laughter while tackling some of the most urgent and human questions today: racism, gender, class, sexuality, identity, migration, gentrification, and violence, among others.

Programs and other media like One Day at a Time that utilize escapism as a conduit for engaging or confronting sociopolitical subject matter are a key starting point for the Biennale. Their tactics make it possible for us to reconsider our perceptions of escapism, which in turn may enable us to better reflect on and navigate our fractured and troubling world.

In light of the current global Covid-19 pandemic and widespread lockdown measures, escapism has become all the more symbolic and relevant. It is still too soon for any of us to fully understand the pandemic’s lasting impact, but we all feel its immediate effects. Even as the isolation of millions in their own homes has brought about a mass appetite for forms of micro-escape, many people have mobilized on the streets to take a stand against racial and social injustices over the past year. In this new and confusing reality, perhaps we need to go beyond the proposition of simply embracing escapism. Rather, we can utilize it as a critical mechanism for confronting and connecting with the world we live in.

#dis #dismagazine #yungma #seoulmediacity #oneescapeatatime

Kenneth Bergfeld’s second solo exhibition at the gallery titled “Fast Day Menu” opens Wednesday 8 September 2021. The ex...
02/09/2021

Kenneth Bergfeld’s second solo exhibition at the gallery titled “Fast Day Menu” opens Wednesday 8 September 2021. The exhibition will showcase a new series of paintings, all of a female figure.

"I let Svenja take a seat on the long sofa in the studio. While we begin each session by talking about everything that is happening in the world and with us I wait. Like someone who fishes, I wait for the wild terrain of the moment. A gesture, a word, a gaze. I ask her if she’d feel comfortable holding a certain pose. I ask her what the pose makes her feel both physically and psychologically and we move on from there. Other times Svenja brings up suggestions and I listen. She suggests a certain T-shirt or a pose, because she wishes to co-construct her own image."

Detail view:
Kenneth Bergfeld
Procrastination, 2021
Oil on canvas
90 x 70 x 2 cm (35 3/8 x 27 1/2 x 3/4 in)

#kennethbergfeld #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporarypainting #painting #artist #artistsoninstagram

Kenneth Bergfeld’s second solo exhibition at the gallery titled “Fast Day Menu” opens Wednesday 8 September 2021. The exhibition will showcase a new series of paintings, all of a female figure.

"I let Svenja take a seat on the long sofa in the studio. While we begin each session by talking about everything that is happening in the world and with us I wait. Like someone who fishes, I wait for the wild terrain of the moment. A gesture, a word, a gaze. I ask her if she’d feel comfortable holding a certain pose. I ask her what the pose makes her feel both physically and psychologically and we move on from there. Other times Svenja brings up suggestions and I listen. She suggests a certain T-shirt or a pose, because she wishes to co-construct her own image."

Detail view:
Kenneth Bergfeld
Procrastination, 2021
Oil on canvas
90 x 70 x 2 cm (35 3/8 x 27 1/2 x 3/4 in)

#kennethbergfeld #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporarypainting #painting #artist #artistsoninstagram

Sophia Al-Maria and Simone Fattal in conversation in the current issue of Spike magazine. “In terms of our art, I feel l...
01/09/2021

Sophia Al-Maria and Simone Fattal in conversation in the current issue of Spike magazine.

“In terms of our art, I feel like we share a niche interest: ancient poetry but also cre- ation myths, gods, and the like. When I look at some of your sculptures, archaeological artefacts jump out at me that have meant so much to me in my own explorations, trying to find different worlds.”

#sophiaalmaria #simonefattal #spikemagazine

Sophia Al-Maria and Simone Fattal in conversation in the current issue of Spike magazine.

“In terms of our art, I feel like we share a niche interest: ancient poetry but also cre- ation myths, gods, and the like. When I look at some of your sculptures, archaeological artefacts jump out at me that have meant so much to me in my own explorations, trying to find different worlds.”

#sophiaalmaria #simonefattal #spikemagazine

Kenneth Bergfeld will present his second solo exhibition with the gallery opening 8 September 2021. We can’t wait! Image...
01/09/2021

Kenneth Bergfeld will present his second solo exhibition with the gallery opening 8 September 2021. We can’t wait!

Image:
Kenneth Bergfeld
You came to fetch me from work tonight II, 2020
Oil on canvas
40 x 30 x 3 cm (15 3/4 x 11 3/4 x 1 1/8 in)

#kennethbergfeld #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporarypainting #paintingoftheday

Opening tomorrow 26 August 2021, Hal Fischer’s solo exhibition “Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics...
25/08/2021

Opening tomorrow 26 August 2021, Hal Fischer’s solo exhibition “Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics” at the Krannert Art Museum. It will run till 22 December 2021.

The exhibition includes a generous selection from Fischer’s earlier work (some of it produced in Urbana), which has not been publicly displayed in decades. This earlier work contextualizes Fischer’s development as an artist, from his student days at the University of Illinois to his creative maturity in San Francisco.

In the thick of San Francisco’s conceptual photography ferment during the late 1970s, Fischer pursued his image making in three compelling directions simultaneously. Finding himself “at the center of the gay universe,” he began creating more frankly sexual photographs. Second, he focused intensively on the potential of photographic series, wherein visual meaning derives as much from the relationships between and among photographs as from within any single frame. Third, his heady encounter with the linguistic and philosophical concepts of structuralism during this period encouraged Fischer to experiment with the connections between photography and language.

Together these developments led to his iconic photographic series Gay Semiotics, in which the subterranean codes and insignia of gay cruising are elevated, not without irony, to a comprehensive sign system. Tongue in cheek, Fischer presents the photographer as an ethnographic explorer, cataloguing and decoding the mating rituals of a distinct urban tribe. His photographs of 1970s gay male life capture a pre-internet era, before online dating profiles, hook-up sites, or Grindr. Fischer’s photographs preserve a unique era of sexual experimentation—and, retrospectively, sexual innocence—that ended tragically with the onset of the AIDS epidemic in 1981. This exhibition provides an opportunity to witness and appreciate the full scope of his photographic career.

Guest Curator: Tim Dean, James M. Benson Professor in English

#halfischer #gaysemiotics #krannertartmuseum #timdean #photography #conceptualphotography #blackandwhitephotography

Opening tomorrow 26 August 2021, Hal Fischer’s solo exhibition “Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics” at the Krannert Art Museum. It will run till 22 December 2021.

The exhibition includes a generous selection from Fischer’s earlier work (some of it produced in Urbana), which has not been publicly displayed in decades. This earlier work contextualizes Fischer’s development as an artist, from his student days at the University of Illinois to his creative maturity in San Francisco.

In the thick of San Francisco’s conceptual photography ferment during the late 1970s, Fischer pursued his image making in three compelling directions simultaneously. Finding himself “at the center of the gay universe,” he began creating more frankly sexual photographs. Second, he focused intensively on the potential of photographic series, wherein visual meaning derives as much from the relationships between and among photographs as from within any single frame. Third, his heady encounter with the linguistic and philosophical concepts of structuralism during this period encouraged Fischer to experiment with the connections between photography and language.

Together these developments led to his iconic photographic series Gay Semiotics, in which the subterranean codes and insignia of gay cruising are elevated, not without irony, to a comprehensive sign system. Tongue in cheek, Fischer presents the photographer as an ethnographic explorer, cataloguing and decoding the mating rituals of a distinct urban tribe. His photographs of 1970s gay male life capture a pre-internet era, before online dating profiles, hook-up sites, or Grindr. Fischer’s photographs preserve a unique era of sexual experimentation—and, retrospectively, sexual innocence—that ended tragically with the onset of the AIDS epidemic in 1981. This exhibition provides an opportunity to witness and appreciate the full scope of his photographic career.

Guest Curator: Tim Dean, James M. Benson Professor in English

#halfischer #gaysemiotics #krannertartmuseum #timdean #photography #conceptualphotography #blackandwhitephotography

Clémentine Bruno participates in the group exhibition Oceans of Milk @ Apsara Studio 27 Peters Street London, curated by...
14/08/2021

Clémentine Bruno participates in the group exhibition Oceans of Milk @ Apsara Studio 27 Peters Street London, curated by Jenn Ellis, Henry Hussey, Sophia Olver and James Ambrose. The exhibition runs till 3 September 2021.

#clementinebruno #apsara #apsarastudio #art #artist #paint #painting #contemporary #contemporaryart #gallery #artgallery

Tramway presents the first solo exhibition in Scotland by artist Flo Brooks, realised in partnership with Brighton CCA. ...
07/08/2021

Tramway presents the first solo exhibition in Scotland by artist Flo Brooks, realised in partnership with Brighton CCA. The exhibition is now open till 3 October 2021.

Flo Brooks’ practice encompasses painting, sculpture, collage, publishing and social engagement. The title of the show, Angletwich, takes its name from a Devonshire dialect term for a worm used in fishing bait, but has evolved to describe a fast moving creature or child. It speaks to the frenetic layering of people and activity within the works as well as recurrent motifs of migration and the makeshift.

In weaving together this semi autobiographical narrative of q***r and trans experience, Brooks has turned to the rural South West England where he grew up and in particular its marginalised spaces and communities. These new works centre on a series of rural archetypes; from the livestock fair and the post office, to a lonely bus stop, generating a simultaneous sense of familiarity and isolation. Each work in the exhibition is part of a wider whole; depicting characters, scenes and places which together develop a critical narrative of place and q***r experience in Britain. The installation mirrors the environments found within the work, creating a dramatic context to more closely connect the world of Brooks’ painting with the experience of encountering them.

#flobrooks #tramway #tramwayglasgow #glasgowlife #brightoncca #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporaryartist #contemporarypainting #artistofinstagram #artistoftheday #glasgow #art #installation

Tramway presents the first solo exhibition in Scotland by artist Flo Brooks, realised in partnership with Brighton CCA. The exhibition is now open till 3 October 2021.

Flo Brooks’ practice encompasses painting, sculpture, collage, publishing and social engagement. The title of the show, Angletwich, takes its name from a Devonshire dialect term for a worm used in fishing bait, but has evolved to describe a fast moving creature or child. It speaks to the frenetic layering of people and activity within the works as well as recurrent motifs of migration and the makeshift.

In weaving together this semi autobiographical narrative of q***r and trans experience, Brooks has turned to the rural South West England where he grew up and in particular its marginalised spaces and communities. These new works centre on a series of rural archetypes; from the livestock fair and the post office, to a lonely bus stop, generating a simultaneous sense of familiarity and isolation. Each work in the exhibition is part of a wider whole; depicting characters, scenes and places which together develop a critical narrative of place and q***r experience in Britain. The installation mirrors the environments found within the work, creating a dramatic context to more closely connect the world of Brooks’ painting with the experience of encountering them.

#flobrooks #tramway #tramwayglasgow #glasgowlife #brightoncca #projectnativeinformant #contemporaryart #contemporaryartist #contemporarypainting #artistofinstagram #artistoftheday #glasgow #art #installation

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