Rockwatch

Rockwatch Rockwatch is the nationwide, junior club of the Geologists Association. Posting to inspire young fossil fans and earth scientists.

Operating as usual

Exciting news Rockwatchers - tickets are now available for this year's vFestival of Geology and it's completely FREE so ...
21/10/2021
Geologists' Association & Rockwatch VFestival of Geology 2021

Exciting news Rockwatchers - tickets are now available for this year's vFestival of Geology and it's completely FREE so hurry to the site to get your tickets to some fantastic talks, discussions, exhibitions and or course the interactive Discovery Room where you can take part in the Rockwatch festival challenge!

Come along to the FREE Virtual Festival of Geology 2021 taking place on the 6th November 2021.

This week’s fabulous find was discovered by young geology enthusiast Michele from iconic Lulworth Cove in Dorset on the ...
15/10/2021

This week’s fabulous find was discovered by young geology enthusiast Michele from iconic Lulworth Cove in Dorset on the Jurassic Coastline. Sending in details about her specimen for further investigation, Michele wondered if her rock might be fossilised wood, grass or plant matter.

Rockwatch Ambassador Michael explains that clues to its form lie in its fibrous appearance as well as its location. Resembling the fibrous texture of beef, Michael says the rock is almost certainly part of the Upper Purbeck formation of the area. And whilst Michele’s rock looks a bit like the texture of fossilised wood, it is in fact a mass of Calcite crystals which meshed together when they were formed millions of years ago.

You can find out about how the rock formed and the geology of the area by reading Michael’s synopsis of the find at.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossils-found-by-rockwatchers/

Why not submit your own fossil or rock for identification at
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossil-identification-form/

This week’s fabulous find was discovered by young geology enthusiast Michele from iconic Lulworth Cove in Dorset on the Jurassic Coastline. Sending in details about her specimen for further investigation, Michele wondered if her rock might be fossilised wood, grass or plant matter.

Rockwatch Ambassador Michael explains that clues to its form lie in its fibrous appearance as well as its location. Resembling the fibrous texture of beef, Michael says the rock is almost certainly part of the Upper Purbeck formation of the area. And whilst Michele’s rock looks a bit like the texture of fossilised wood, it is in fact a mass of Calcite crystals which meshed together when they were formed millions of years ago.

You can find out about how the rock formed and the geology of the area by reading Michael’s synopsis of the find at.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossils-found-by-rockwatchers/

Why not submit your own fossil or rock for identification at
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossil-identification-form/

On a recent walk in Dorset, Lana stumbled across an unusually hard and heavier than normal stone and wanted to find out ...
06/10/2021

On a recent walk in Dorset, Lana stumbled across an unusually hard and heavier than normal stone and wanted to find out more about it.

Sometimes mistakenly thought to be meteorites, Rockwatch Ambassador Mick is confident that Lana has found a nodule of marcasite.

Learn more about Lana’s fabulous find at www.rockwatch.org.uk/lanas-nodule-of-marcasite/
#rockwatch #fabulousfind #marcasite #mineral

On a recent walk in Dorset, Lana stumbled across an unusually hard and heavier than normal stone and wanted to find out more about it.

Sometimes mistakenly thought to be meteorites, Rockwatch Ambassador Mick is confident that Lana has found a nodule of marcasite.

Learn more about Lana’s fabulous find at www.rockwatch.org.uk/lanas-nodule-of-marcasite/
#rockwatch #fabulousfind #marcasite #mineral

Often found digging in the gravel at home, Rockwatcher Katie has discovered that her fabulous find is a Belemnite, a bul...
01/10/2021

Often found digging in the gravel at home, Rockwatcher Katie has discovered that her fabulous find is a Belemnite, a bullet-shaped part of an extinct squid that thrived in our ancient seas.
Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael, confirms that Katie’s fossil, “is a piece of fairly large Jurassic Belemnite”.

So, what’s a Belemnite? You can find out more on the Rockwatch website at https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/katies-belemnite-bullet/

Often found digging in the gravel at home, Rockwatcher Katie has discovered that her fabulous find is a Belemnite, a bullet-shaped part of an extinct squid that thrived in our ancient seas.
Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael, confirms that Katie’s fossil, “is a piece of fairly large Jurassic Belemnite”.

So, what’s a Belemnite? You can find out more on the Rockwatch website at https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/katies-belemnite-bullet/

Rockwatchers there’s a FREE outdoor planetary science exhibition taking place this Saturday 2 October between 12pm-3pm a...
30/09/2021

Rockwatchers there’s a FREE outdoor planetary science exhibition taking place this Saturday 2 October between 12pm-3pm at the Geological Society’s HQ at Burlington House Courtyard, Piccadilly, London.

The exhibition, called Spacescapes: Postcards from our Solar System, explores the mysteries of space and why geologists make such great space explorers.

Why not pop along and discover some of these mysteries for yourself.

Visit the Geology Society’s Spacescapes website for more details at https://spacescapes.geolsoc.org.uk/

Rockwatchers there’s a FREE outdoor planetary science exhibition taking place this Saturday 2 October between 12pm-3pm at the Geological Society’s HQ at Burlington House Courtyard, Piccadilly, London.

The exhibition, called Spacescapes: Postcards from our Solar System, explores the mysteries of space and why geologists make such great space explorers.

Why not pop along and discover some of these mysteries for yourself.

Visit the Geology Society’s Spacescapes website for more details at https://spacescapes.geolsoc.org.uk/

Rockwatcher Piotr was intrigued to learn more about the mixed-looking rock he found at Herne Bay East Cliff Beach in Ken...
22/09/2021

Rockwatcher Piotr was intrigued to learn more about the mixed-looking rock he found at Herne Bay East Cliff Beach in Kent, England. Describing the rock itself as ‘unusual’ and the location of the find as a bit of a ‘mystery’, Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael pieces together a number of clues to help identify the rock and its possible origins to help solve the mystery.

You can read the full ‘case file’ on the Fossils Found by Rockwatchers page at

https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossils-found-by-rockwatchers/

Rockwatcher Piotr was intrigued to learn more about the mixed-looking rock he found at Herne Bay East Cliff Beach in Kent, England. Describing the rock itself as ‘unusual’ and the location of the find as a bit of a ‘mystery’, Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael pieces together a number of clues to help identify the rock and its possible origins to help solve the mystery.

You can read the full ‘case file’ on the Fossils Found by Rockwatchers page at

https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossils-found-by-rockwatchers/

A brand new ancient sea predator which had a giant head once ruled the bottom of the oceans more than half a billion yea...
15/09/2021
Ancient sea predator had giant head | Rockwatch

A brand new ancient sea predator which had a giant head once ruled the bottom of the oceans more than half a billion years ago!

Read more about it here
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/ancient-sea-predator-had-giant-head/

It’s not every day that scientists are lucky enough to discover a brand new species let alone new genus – or category of living things which share common characteristics. So when they do, there’s understandably a bit of a buzz around the story. Science writer, Rachel Fritts reports that findin...

Rockwatcher Miriam’s two flint fragment finds are the focus of the latest Fabulous Find feature.The first fragment, foun...
15/09/2021

Rockwatcher Miriam’s two flint fragment finds are the focus of the latest Fabulous Find feature.

The first fragment, found in Bedford near Pavenham looks rather like fossilised fish scales, but Rockwatch Ambassador Michael has different ideas based on his knowledge of the geology of Bedfordshire.

The second flint fragment, however, found on Selsey beach in West Sussex is more identifiable as a fossil.

You can read more about Miriam’s flint objects on the Rockwatch website.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/miriams-fascinating-flint-finds/

Rockwatcher Miriam’s two flint fragment finds are the focus of the latest Fabulous Find feature.

The first fragment, found in Bedford near Pavenham looks rather like fossilised fish scales, but Rockwatch Ambassador Michael has different ideas based on his knowledge of the geology of Bedfordshire.

The second flint fragment, however, found on Selsey beach in West Sussex is more identifiable as a fossil.

You can read more about Miriam’s flint objects on the Rockwatch website.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/miriams-fascinating-flint-finds/

JOSHUA’S SEA SNAIL ON THE SEA SHOREFossil finder Joshua found this wonderful shell on a recent trip to the Barton Beds a...
08/09/2021

JOSHUA’S SEA SNAIL ON THE SEA SHORE

Fossil finder Joshua found this wonderful shell on a recent trip to the Barton Beds at Barton on Sea, in the south of England and sent in his find for identification.

It turns out that the Barton Beds – as they are known – are home to more than 600 species of shells! Fossil hunters flock to the Barton Beds because it’s known to be a rich source of Gastopods, molluscs and sharks’ teeth so visitors are likely to go home with a fossil find or two.

The geology of Barton Bay is from the Bartonian age of the Upper Eocene. This was around 40 million years ago when the area was covered with an inland sea and temperatures higher than they are today. It forms part of the Hampshire Basin and is made up from grey and brownish clay sands that are prone to slippages so fossils regularly surface following rainfall, particularly at the base of the cliffs.

Find out what Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael thinks Joshua has found.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossils-found-by-rockwatchers/

JOSHUA’S SEA SNAIL ON THE SEA SHORE

Fossil finder Joshua found this wonderful shell on a recent trip to the Barton Beds at Barton on Sea, in the south of England and sent in his find for identification.

It turns out that the Barton Beds – as they are known – are home to more than 600 species of shells! Fossil hunters flock to the Barton Beds because it’s known to be a rich source of Gastopods, molluscs and sharks’ teeth so visitors are likely to go home with a fossil find or two.

The geology of Barton Bay is from the Bartonian age of the Upper Eocene. This was around 40 million years ago when the area was covered with an inland sea and temperatures higher than they are today. It forms part of the Hampshire Basin and is made up from grey and brownish clay sands that are prone to slippages so fossils regularly surface following rainfall, particularly at the base of the cliffs.

Find out what Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael thinks Joshua has found.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossils-found-by-rockwatchers/

Remember it’s the Rockstars Competition 2021 deadline for sending in your entries by close of play tomorrow – the 8th Se...
07/09/2021

Remember it’s the Rockstars Competition 2021 deadline for sending in your entries by close of play tomorrow – the 8th September 2021. So, dot those ‘i’s’ and cross those ‘t’s’ – save and click send!

We’re looking forward to receiving your hard work and enjoying reading and seeing what geology topics you’ve brought to life. We absolutely love receiving every single project and to say thank you for taking part every one who enters will receive a small gift to acknowledge their efforts.

Thanks to everyone who has taken part. We’ll be in touch with winners by the end of September!

Find out more in the Rockstars Competition section of the website.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/rockstars-and-rockwriter-competitions/

Remember it’s the Rockstars Competition 2021 deadline for sending in your entries by close of play tomorrow – the 8th September 2021. So, dot those ‘i’s’ and cross those ‘t’s’ – save and click send!

We’re looking forward to receiving your hard work and enjoying reading and seeing what geology topics you’ve brought to life. We absolutely love receiving every single project and to say thank you for taking part every one who enters will receive a small gift to acknowledge their efforts.

Thanks to everyone who has taken part. We’ll be in touch with winners by the end of September!

Find out more in the Rockstars Competition section of the website.
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/rockstars-and-rockwriter-competitions/

On a recent family fossil hunt to Berwick-Upon-Tweed in Northumberland, Rockwatcher Ben unearthed not one but two fossil...
01/09/2021

On a recent family fossil hunt to Berwick-Upon-Tweed in Northumberland, Rockwatcher Ben unearthed not one but two fossil finds from the same boulder.

But it was Ben’s second fossil find that pricked the interest of Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael Oates and Curator Dr Neil Clark because it doesn’t fit with the typical fossil species found from this period or location.

Michael says that, “the exciting aspect of this is that while it could just be a bit of prawn caught up in some concrete, it could also turn out to be a really ground-breaking new discovery”.

Dr Neil Clark affirms, “whatever the case, it is a fascinating find that would benefit from being looked at in more detail”.

Find out more about Ben’s discovery at https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/could-ben-have-discovered-a-new-carboniferous-crustacean-species

On a recent family fossil hunt to Berwick-Upon-Tweed in Northumberland, Rockwatcher Ben unearthed not one but two fossil finds from the same boulder.

But it was Ben’s second fossil find that pricked the interest of Rockwatch Ambassador, Michael Oates and Curator Dr Neil Clark because it doesn’t fit with the typical fossil species found from this period or location.

Michael says that, “the exciting aspect of this is that while it could just be a bit of prawn caught up in some concrete, it could also turn out to be a really ground-breaking new discovery”.

Dr Neil Clark affirms, “whatever the case, it is a fascinating find that would benefit from being looked at in more detail”.

Find out more about Ben’s discovery at https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/could-ben-have-discovered-a-new-carboniferous-crustacean-species

Get your Rockstar Competition Entries in!With more than a week left before the competition deadline, there’s still plent...
31/08/2021

Get your Rockstar Competition Entries in!

With more than a week left before the competition deadline, there’s still plenty of time for you to send us your geology inspired projects.

Perhaps you’ve visited the Jurassic Coastline or one of the UK’s mountains ranges, or you’ve enjoyed a trip to a museum or visitor centre and found out about an area of interest. Maybe you’ve added some interesting rocks or fossils to your collection and have found out more about them. Whatever you’ve discovered over the holidays, we’d love to hear about it!

There are lots of ways you can take part and bring your topic to life – through writing, drawing, painting, modelling, stitching, video-making and more. The choice is yours.

We're looking forward to receiving your projects!
Find out more at:
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/get-your-rockstar-2021-competition-entries-in/

Get your Rockstar Competition Entries in!

With more than a week left before the competition deadline, there’s still plenty of time for you to send us your geology inspired projects.

Perhaps you’ve visited the Jurassic Coastline or one of the UK’s mountains ranges, or you’ve enjoyed a trip to a museum or visitor centre and found out about an area of interest. Maybe you’ve added some interesting rocks or fossils to your collection and have found out more about them. Whatever you’ve discovered over the holidays, we’d love to hear about it!

There are lots of ways you can take part and bring your topic to life – through writing, drawing, painting, modelling, stitching, video-making and more. The choice is yours.

We're looking forward to receiving your projects!
Find out more at:
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/get-your-rockstar-2021-competition-entries-in/

Famed for its huge dinosaur footprints at low tide, Compton Beach on the Isle of Wight is something of a fossil hunter’s...
25/08/2021

Famed for its huge dinosaur footprints at low tide, Compton Beach on the Isle of Wight is something of a fossil hunter’s pilgrimage seeing thousands of amateur and professional geologists every year.

So, it’s perhaps not surprising that Rockwatcher Freya found a dinosaur bone fossil on her recent visit given that the Isle of Wight – or Dinosaur Island as it’s become affectionately known – is home to one of the richest sources of dinosaur remains in Europe.

Fossil hunters will tell you that it’s the biggest thrill to discover something so old and rare that links you to a by-gone era. And it has certainly captured Freya’s fascination and interest hearing more about her fabulous find.

If you’re lucky enough to find a dinosaur bone fossil why not get in touch and find out more about it? But remember to fossil hunt responsibly and follow the fieldwork code to stay safe and respect the environment.

You can find out more about Freya’s dinosaur bone discovery at Compton Bay here:

https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/freyas-dinosaur-bone-discovery-at-compton-bay

Or submit your own fossil for identification at
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossil-identification-form/

Famed for its huge dinosaur footprints at low tide, Compton Beach on the Isle of Wight is something of a fossil hunter’s pilgrimage seeing thousands of amateur and professional geologists every year.

So, it’s perhaps not surprising that Rockwatcher Freya found a dinosaur bone fossil on her recent visit given that the Isle of Wight – or Dinosaur Island as it’s become affectionately known – is home to one of the richest sources of dinosaur remains in Europe.

Fossil hunters will tell you that it’s the biggest thrill to discover something so old and rare that links you to a by-gone era. And it has certainly captured Freya’s fascination and interest hearing more about her fabulous find.

If you’re lucky enough to find a dinosaur bone fossil why not get in touch and find out more about it? But remember to fossil hunt responsibly and follow the fieldwork code to stay safe and respect the environment.

You can find out more about Freya’s dinosaur bone discovery at Compton Bay here:

https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/freyas-dinosaur-bone-discovery-at-compton-bay

Or submit your own fossil for identification at
https://www.rockwatch.org.uk/fabulous-finds/fossil-identification-form/

Address

London
W1J 0DU

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

0207 734 5398

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Rockwatch posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Rockwatch:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other Museums in London

Show All

Comments

Hi, can anybody recommended a microscope suitable for a beginner to examine both mineral and fossil finds please? I'd like to spend about £100-150 and would like a binocular type with the ability to link to phone for pics or laptop connection to save images. Thank you
Rockwatch member Lawrence found an awesome ammonite in one of the illminster arable fields in Somerset today!
For all geologists and collectors! A date for your diary: Essex Gem & Mineral Show – Saturday 23rd February 2019, 10am - 4pm at North Romford Community Centre, Clockhouse Lane, Collier Row RM5 3QJ. Gems, rocks, fossils, minerals, jewellery, books, meteorites. www.erms.org/show--events.
Tickets still available for Wednesday talk in Wisbech.
A few fossils found this morning by my 6 year old from Bishops Hill in south Warwickshire. Assuming Jurassic period as blue lias area, crinoid stems and Gryphaea?
https://www.facebook.com/VAR.CLUB/videos/495849900883648/ T. rex and Curatosaurus roberticus missing. If found please return to Wisbech & Fenland museum.
Former Rockwatch member Gareth Monger has an exhibition of artwork for sale at wisbech and Fenland museum’s Dinosaur! Exhibition of dinosaur skeletons from Sedgwick museum and palaeoart by a local artist. Children’s activities and virtual reality sessions. Free admission. See website or Facebook for details
Dinosaur! Exhibition at Wisbech and Fenland museum. Tuesdays -Saturdays 10 - 4pm August and September. Free admission. Children’s activities and VIRTUAL REALITY sessions on Fridays and Saturdays. See website for further details
A fab day at Much Wenlock!
We had such an AMAZING time at Much Wenlock today. I'm sure I carted home several kilograms of fossils for my sons! And after 38 years I finally found a trilobite. And then several more. Now for the T-rex bone ...
Some great finds at Bracklesham Bay!
Thank you for a nice (bit wet, hehe) and informative field trip to Lea Quarry.