The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS

The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS One of most important society with interest on History of Science and History of Scientific Instruments with more than 500 experts around the globe

The Scientific Instrument Society (SIS) was formed in April 1983 to bring together people with a specialist interest in scientific instruments, ranging from precious antiques to electronic devices only recently out of production. Collectors, the antiques trade, museum staff, professional historians and amateur enthusiasts will all find the varied activities of the Society suited to their tastes. W

The Scientific Instrument Society (SIS) was formed in April 1983 to bring together people with a specialist interest in scientific instruments, ranging from precious antiques to electronic devices only recently out of production. Collectors, the antiques trade, museum staff, professional historians and amateur enthusiasts will all find the varied activities of the Society suited to their tastes. W

ECHOS 3 - Notiziario della SISFA, Equinozio di Primavera 2021, 9.37 UTC - esce ogni equinozio e solstizio
21/03/2021

ECHOS 3 - Notiziario della SISFA, Equinozio di Primavera 2021, 9.37 UTC - esce ogni equinozio e solstizio

Paper Instruments in the History of Ottoman Astronomy, by Gaye DanışanThis project was born from an idea that several sp...
19/03/2021

Paper Instruments in the History of Ottoman Astronomy, by Gaye Danışan

This project was born from an idea that several specimens of Ottoman astronomical calendars could also be a subject of paper instrument research. Therefore, the primary purpose was to provide an overview of paper instruments in Ottoman astronomy, a neglected topic up to date. Thus, the study first focuses on identifying Ottoman paper instruments without period limitation, then the classification and analysis based on their variety, usages and periods.

continue to read on http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/blog

Paper Instruments in the History of Ottoman Astronomy, by Gaye Danışan

This project was born from an idea that several specimens of Ottoman astronomical calendars could also be a subject of paper instrument research. Therefore, the primary purpose was to provide an overview of paper instruments in Ottoman astronomy, a neglected topic up to date. Thus, the study first focuses on identifying Ottoman paper instruments without period limitation, then the classification and analysis based on their variety, usages and periods.

continue to read on http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/blog

19/03/2021
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December 2020 Editorial of the Bulletin!https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/600861b15a52cd7123b5ab93/1611162034265/SIS+Bulletin+147_editorial.pdf

19/03/2021
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September 2020 Editorial of the Bulletin!https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/600860f1bd9c804785776e4f/1611161841345/SIS+Bulletin+146_editorial.pdf

Did you see this issue?  A lot of fantastic articles are waiting for you, you can see some ones in the web site free to ...
19/03/2021
BULLETINS 146/147 – September/December 2020 — Scientific Instrument Society

Did you see this issue? A lot of fantastic articles are waiting for you, you can see some ones in the web site free to download. http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2019/8/5/bulletin-141-june-2019-8m548-b2e83-dmfmk-hdd6m

Members of the SIS receive print copies of all Bulletins , as well as access to the complete Bulletin archive. In order to give website visitors a taste of the Bulletin, and to tempt you to join the SIS, here are selected articles from the September and December 2020 issues: September and

be ready for spring 2021 auction at Auction_Team_Breker
26/11/2020

be ready for spring 2021 auction at Auction_Team_Breker

Watches, Technologies and Curiosities, on line auction at Dorotheum - Dec 3, 2020  Dorotheum
26/11/2020

Watches, Technologies and Curiosities, on line auction at Dorotheum - Dec 3, 2020

Dorotheum

Lecture by Frank James on November, 6 - 2020 http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/9/29/sis-lecture-by-fr...
26/11/2020
SIS lecture by Frank James, 6 November 2020 — Scientific Instrument Society

Lecture by Frank James on November, 6 - 2020
http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/9/29/sis-lecture-by-frank-james-6-november-2020

8th Gerard Turner Memorial Lecture 2020 To be held online via Zoom at 6pm GMT on Friday 6th November 2020 Instruments from Scratch? Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday and the Construction of Knowledge Professor Frank James, Professor of History of Science, Science and Technology Studies Department,

Message of the Chairman regarding coronavirushttp://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/3/20/chairmans-message...
26/11/2020
Chairman's message regarding coronavirus — Scientific Instrument Society

Message of the Chairman regarding coronavirus

http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/3/20/chairmans-message-regarding-coronavirus

From the Chairman to all our Members In the present extraordinary situation it will not surprise you to know that Society activity has had to be greatly curtailed. I regret that the study tours to Armagh on the 27th–29th March and Northern Italy 17th–23rd May have now been postponed. Our 13th Ju...

26/11/2020
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BULLETIN 143 – December 2019 - the editoral for you
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/5e0614ef5dd2d75ad3b252c0/1577456879416/Editorial_143.pdf

26/11/2020
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take a look to our article - " Willem F.J. Mörzer Bruyns on the scientific and other instruments used in Arctic regions on the Dutch schooner Willem Barents, in 1878."

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/5e0614cf50b5bb79cee8434c/1577456851253/Mo%CC%88rzer_Bruyns_143.pdf

26/11/2020
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take a look to our article - "John Davis with a beautifully illustrated and very detailed study of dragons on mediaeval astrolabes"

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/5e0614ab001e365d5e783fea/1577456818557/Davis_143.pdf

04/09/2019
http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2018/8/6/highlights-of-the-bulletin-part-i-the-mensing-case
04/09/2019
Highlights of the Bulletin Part I: The Mensing Case — Scientific Instrument Society

http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2018/8/6/highlights-of-the-bulletin-part-i-the-mensing-case

Since 1983 the Bulletin of the SIS has published countless essays on the history of scientific instrumentation – the archive of the Bulletin is a treasure trove of information on all sorts of devices, makers, historical episodes and instrument resources. But as you'll have found if you click o

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Publications:
In addition to its own publications, primarily the Bulletin, the Society has helped sponsor the publication of several important works in the field.

- Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society. 1983-Present
- McConnell, A., 1993, R.B. Bate of the Poultry 1782-1847: The Life and Times of a Scientific Instrument-Maker, Scientific Instrument Society Monograph 1
- Clifton, G.C., 1994, Directory of British Scientific Instrument Makers c.1550-1851, Zwemmer
- Millburn, J., 2000, Adams of Fleet Street - Instrument Makers to King George III, Ashgate
- McConnell, A., 2007, Jesse Ramsden: London's Leading Scientific Instrument Maker
- Morrison-Low, A., 2007, Making Scientific Instruments in the Industrial Revolution

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About Scientific Instrument Society - SIS

The Society was formally constituted on 20 April 1983 in the course of a lively meeting at the Science Museum, South Kensington, when Gerard Turner was appointed Chairman, Brian Brass Treasurer (he would serve in that role for the next eleven years) and the late Jon Darius the first editor of the Bulletin. Amongst the ordinary committee members was Jeremy Collins the scientific instrument specialist at Christies.

The name of the Society was chosen carefully. It was not to refer to 'Antiquarian' or 'Historical'. It's remit was to embrace gas chromatographs or Geiger counters as much as the aesthetically pleasing instruments beloved of the 'Brass brigade'. In the words of our first press release, the Society aimed to contribute to historical knowledge and understanding through the collection, conservation and study of scientific artefacts. When the Microscopical Society of London (later the Royal Microscopical Society) was launched in 1839, its professed purpose was to afford 'encouragement to microscopical investigations, by promoting that ready in*******se between those engaged in such pursuits, by which not only are great advantages mutually gained, but also information of the most valuable kind disseminated and perpetuated'.

That, mutatis mutandis, is just what we hoped would transpire when collectors, curators, dealers, restorers and other interested parties were brought together on the common ground of our new Society. The establishment of a new society always occasions trepidation enough: Would it attract enough members? (We already numbered over 100.) If so, would they be sleepers or participators? Would the avowed aims be fulfilled, or would the whole enterprise lumber along expending most of its energy in unproductive meetings and minutes, minutes and meetings? These thoughts, articulated by Jon Darius on the first page of the first Bulletin proved to be unnecessarily cautious.

Throughout its history the Bulletin has had only three editors and has grown into a respected publication, essential reading for serious scholars of the history of science and the material culture of scientific enquiry, experimentation, instruction and its industrial, medical or military applications. It has always been A4 format, was professionally typeset from issue no 2 and advertising has been carried since the beginning.

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Comments

Greetings. I am a teacher of architecture---and specifically of traditional "hand drafting". That is to say: the sort of architectural drafting that is done with compasses, lead-holders, and T-squares [Not CAD]. I am trying to locate for purchase a Centrolinead---that Y-shaped aid for making perspective drawing. [As this will be for actual use, it needn't be of museum quality or collector's condition!] I've checked the usual on-line markets: Ebay and Esty, and see none there. So-- Can anyone advise me as to where to find one in usable condition? Thank you. Respectfully yours, Seth Joseph Weine [email protected]
Importante site sobre a História da Instrumentação Científica.
Can anyone supply information on the instrument maker J. Short? Not James Short of Edinburgh (1710-1768), but John Short who practiced in London around the 1880’s. He was born in Lambeth in 1839 and had trade premises at 2 Gladstone Street, Southwark.
I have a spencer 1900 microscope
I'm researching the career of Theodore Ernest Gennert, who, in the firm of Gennert & Holzke of New York, produced scientific instruments in 1852 and 1853. Does anybody here know of any of their instruments or can point me to any information about Genert?
It was great meeting you!