The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS

The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS One of most important society with interest on History of Science and History of Scientific Instruments with more than 500 experts around the globe
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The Scientific Instrument Society (SIS) was formed in April 1983 to bring together people with a specialist interest in scientific instruments, ranging from precious antiques to electronic devices only recently out of production. Collectors, the antiques trade, museum staff, professional historians and amateur enthusiasts will all find the varied activities of the Society suited to their tastes. We have a truly international membership offering those who join the chance to link up with instrument devotees across the world.

Mission: The Scientific Instrument Society (SIS) was formed to bring together people with a specialist interest in scientific instruments

be ready for spring 2021 auction at Auction_Team_Breker
26/11/2020

be ready for spring 2021 auction at Auction_Team_Breker

Watches, Technologies and Curiosities, on line auction at Dorotheum - Dec 3, 2020  Dorotheum
26/11/2020

Watches, Technologies and Curiosities, on line auction at Dorotheum - Dec 3, 2020

Dorotheum

Lecture by Frank James on November, 6 - 2020 http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/9/29/sis-lecture-by-fr...
26/11/2020
SIS lecture by Frank James, 6 November 2020 — Scientific Instrument Society

Lecture by Frank James on November, 6 - 2020
http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/9/29/sis-lecture-by-frank-james-6-november-2020

8th Gerard Turner Memorial Lecture 2020 To be held online via Zoom at 6pm GMT on Friday 6th November 2020 Instruments from Scratch? Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday and the Construction of Knowledge Professor Frank James, Professor of History of Science, Science and Technology Studies Department,

Message of the Chairman regarding coronavirushttp://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/3/20/chairmans-message...
26/11/2020
Chairman's message regarding coronavirus — Scientific Instrument Society

Message of the Chairman regarding coronavirus

http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2020/3/20/chairmans-message-regarding-coronavirus

From the Chairman to all our Members In the present extraordinary situation it will not surprise you to know that Society activity has had to be greatly curtailed. I regret that the study tours to Armagh on the 27th–29th March and Northern Italy 17th–23rd May have now been postponed. Our 13th Ju...

26/11/2020
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BULLETIN 143 – December 2019 - the editoral for you
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/5e0614ef5dd2d75ad3b252c0/1577456879416/Editorial_143.pdf

26/11/2020
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take a look to our article - " Willem F.J. Mörzer Bruyns on the scientific and other instruments used in Arctic regions on the Dutch schooner Willem Barents, in 1878."

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/5e0614cf50b5bb79cee8434c/1577456851253/Mo%CC%88rzer_Bruyns_143.pdf

26/11/2020
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take a look to our article - "John Davis with a beautifully illustrated and very detailed study of dragons on mediaeval astrolabes"

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54ec9b40e4b02904f4e09b74/t/5e0614ab001e365d5e783fea/1577456818557/Davis_143.pdf

04/09/2019
http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2018/8/6/highlights-of-the-bulletin-part-i-the-mensing-case
04/09/2019
Highlights of the Bulletin Part I: The Mensing Case — Scientific Instrument Society

http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2018/8/6/highlights-of-the-bulletin-part-i-the-mensing-case

Since 1983 the Bulletin of the SIS has published countless essays on the history of scientific instrumentation – the archive of the Bulletin is a treasure trove of information on all sorts of devices, makers, historical episodes and instrument resources. But as you'll have found if you click o

The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS's cover photo
20/09/2017

The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS's cover photo

Here the 133 SIS Bulletin, June 2017.  The table of contents presents an interesting issue that I strongly suggest you.
20/09/2017

Here the 133 SIS Bulletin, June 2017. The table of contents presents an interesting issue that I strongly suggest you.

http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2017/2/7/from-pharmaceutical-innovation-to-public-engagement-stephen-car...
23/02/2017
From Pharmaceutical Innovation to Public Engagement: Stephen Carter and the Micrarium in Buxton

http://www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org/news/2017/2/7/from-pharmaceutical-innovation-to-public-engagement-stephen-carter-and-the-micrarium-in-buxton

In 1981, a new kind of museum opened in Buxton’s old Pump Room. It was the ‘Micrarium’, created by Dr Stephen Carter, who had previously been involved in cancer research at ICI’s Pharmaceutical Research Centre in Cheshire. The Micrarium’s ambition was to make the microscopical world, which Car

The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS's cover photo
31/01/2017

The Scientific Instrument Society - SIS's cover photo

Here the 131 Bulletin -  Dec 2016 with a lot of articles touching different topics.1 - Marcus Cavalier: Editorial [FREE ...
31/01/2017
Home

Here the 131 Bulletin - Dec 2016 with a lot of articles touching different topics.
1 - Marcus Cavalier: Editorial [FREE TO DOWNLOAD]
2 -Dawn Correia: The Scientific Nature of the Kaleidoscope [FREE TO DOWNLOAD]
7 - Current and Future Events
8 -Willem Hackmann: Brief Note on the Lantern or Projecting Kaleidoscope
11 - Matteo Realdi: The Double-Image Micrometer of Giovanni Battista Amici
17 -Mike Cowham: Sundial Making in England Part 2: Before 1700
20 -Francisco Saez de Adana: The Maritime Navigation Radars in Spain at the Beginning of the Francoist Regime
24 -Neil Brown: ###Vth Scientific Instrument Symposium
29 -Mystery Objects Answers and Objects 3 and 4
30 - Paolo Brenni: Mystery Object 1:The Dust Counter of John Aitken
32 -Patrick Mill: Sir Robert Kotzé and the Koniometer: A Little-Known Instrument of Major Significance to Health
35 - Tacye Phillipson: Surviving Apparatus Showing the Early Development of the Cloud Chamber [FREE TO DOWNLOAD]
38 - T.N. Sear and P.A. Martin: Taylors’ Acetometer

Get the FREE articles directly from www.scientificinstrumentsociety.org

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About Scientific Instrument Society - SIS

The Society was formally constituted on 20 April 1983 in the course of a lively meeting at the Science Museum, South Kensington, when Gerard Turner was appointed Chairman, Brian Brass Treasurer (he would serve in that role for the next eleven years) and the late Jon Darius the first editor of the Bulletin. Amongst the ordinary committee members was Jeremy Collins the scientific instrument specialist at Christies.

The name of the Society was chosen carefully. It was not to refer to 'Antiquarian' or 'Historical'. It's remit was to embrace gas chromatographs or Geiger counters as much as the aesthetically pleasing instruments beloved of the 'Brass brigade'. In the words of our first press release, the Society aimed to contribute to historical knowledge and understanding through the collection, conservation and study of scientific artefacts. When the Microscopical Society of London (later the Royal Microscopical Society) was launched in 1839, its professed purpose was to afford 'encouragement to microscopical investigations, by promoting that ready intercourse between those engaged in such pursuits, by which not only are great advantages mutually gained, but also information of the most valuable kind disseminated and perpetuated'.

That, mutatis mutandis, is just what we hoped would transpire when collectors, curators, dealers, restorers and other interested parties were brought together on the common ground of our new Society. The establishment of a new society always occasions trepidation enough: Would it attract enough members? (We already numbered over 100.) If so, would they be sleepers or participators? Would the avowed aims be fulfilled, or would the whole enterprise lumber along expending most of its energy in unproductive meetings and minutes, minutes and meetings? These thoughts, articulated by Jon Darius on the first page of the first Bulletin proved to be unnecessarily cautious.

Throughout its history the Bulletin has had only three editors and has grown into a respected publication, essential reading for serious scholars of the history of science and the material culture of scientific enquiry, experimentation, instruction and its industrial, medical or military applications. It has always been A4 format, was professionally typeset from issue no 2 and advertising has been carried since the beginning.

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Comments

Can anyone supply information on the instrument maker J. Short? Not James Short of Edinburgh (1710-1768), but John Short who practiced in London around the 1880’s. He was born in Lambeth in 1839 and had trade premises at 2 Gladstone Street, Southwark.
I have a spencer 1900 microscope
I'm researching the career of Theodore Ernest Gennert, who, in the firm of Gennert & Holzke of New York, produced scientific instruments in 1852 and 1853. Does anybody here know of any of their instruments or can point me to any information about Genert?
It was great meeting you!