Migration Museum

Migration Museum We're creating a Migration Museum for Britain, exploring how the movement of people to and from the UK across the ages has shaped us - as individuals and as a nation.
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The Migration Museum at The Workshop is now closed. Opening in Lewisham in Feb 2020 The Migration Museum Project is a charitable company registered in England and Wales No. 8544993 and a registered charity No. 1153774.

The Migration Museum at The Workshop is now closed. Opening in Lewisham in Feb 2020 The Migration Museum Project is a charitable company registered in England and Wales No. 8544993 and a registered charity No. 1153774.

Operating as usual

Many people migrate for love. But the reasons people cross borders to be with the ones they love are often complex and r...
19/02/2021
11 famous faces who migrated for love | Blog

Many people migrate for love. But the reasons people cross borders to be with the ones they love are often complex and reveal historical inequalities - many of which are still present today. We explore 11 stories of love and migration in guest blog for Findmypast

#DeparturesMM #love #LGBTQlove #AllOurStories

It's a well-known fact: love can drive people to the ends of the earth. Our friends at The Migration Museum take a closer look at the love stories that crossed countries and continents.

'From the middle of the 19th century until the First World War, Liverpool was the most important emigration port in the ...
19/02/2021

'From the middle of the 19th century until the First World War, Liverpool was the most important emigration port in the British Isles. Over 12 million people emigrated from the city… But the impact of that emigration through Liverpool around the world isn’t necessarily appreciated.’

Ian Murphy, director of Merseyside Maritime Museum, features in the latest episode of our Departures podcast, exploring how Liverpool became the gateway to new lives for millions of British emigrants and the impact of this mass movement of people on the city, Britain and the world.

Listen wherever you get your podcasts or at: http://ow.ly/CccO50DDs9m

#DeparturesMM #historypodcast #podcast #Liverpool #emigration #migration

From the early 19th century to the beginning of the First World War, over 10 million Britons emigrated. Most went to set...
18/02/2021
Departures podcast episode 5 – The Leaving of Liverpool

From the early 19th century to the beginning of the First World War, over 10 million Britons emigrated. Most went to settle in the United States and around Britain’s growing empire. Over half left from the port of Liverpool.

How did Liverpool become the gateway to millions of new lives? And what role did printed propaganda play in fuelling this mass movement?

Find out in episode 5 of our Departures podcast, featuring Ian Murphy, Director of Merseyside Maritime Museum and Dr Fariha Shaikh, author and Lecturer in Victorian Literature at University of Birmingham . Presented and produced by Mukti Jain Campion.

http://ow.ly/CccO50DDs9m

#DeparturesMM #historypodcast #podcast #Liverpool #emigration #migration

From the early 19th century to the beginning of the First World War, over 10 million British people migrated. Over half of these emigrants left from the port of Liverpool. Mukti Jain Campion talks to Ian Murphy, Director of the Merseyside Maritime Museum, to discover how the port of Liverpool became...

Gulzar Waljee arrived to the UK in 1959 from a small village in Tanzania, then Tanganyika, to train as a midwife. Gulzar...
12/02/2021

Gulzar Waljee arrived to the UK in 1959 from a small village in Tanzania, then Tanganyika, to train as a midwife. Gulzar worked in the #NHS for 18 years before retirement. She shares her story from homesickness to gruelling work schedules, and of course delivering many, many babies in our digital exhibition #HeartoftheNation

https://bit.ly/3d0hhWP

Do you have a story about migration and the NHS? We want to hear from you. Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making o...
11/02/2021

Do you have a story about migration and the NHS? We want to hear from you. Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS is a constantly evolving exhibition. We're sharing the stories of the people behind the face masks, and we want to hear from you. Submit your story at heartofthenation.co.uk/share-your-story

✍️Illustration by Tribambuka #HeartoftheNation #AllOurStories

Johannah arrived in the UK in 1955 and worked in mental health nursing in the #NHS. She remembers the days when "No Blac...
10/02/2021

Johannah arrived in the UK in 1955 and worked in mental health nursing in the #NHS. She remembers the days when "No Blacks, No Irish, No dogs" adorned windows of houses with rooms to let, and reflects "there is no freedom that can ever be taken for granted". Johannah celebrated her 90th birthday last year, her daughter Geraldine Walsh shared her story with us. You can read Johannah's story, and others in #HeartoftheNation https://bit.ly/36VmZpl

In the 17th and 18th centuries, the majority of people on board British transatlantic ships weren’t from Britain, but we...
28/01/2021
Departures podcast episode 4 – Emigration and Enslavement

In the 17th and 18th centuries, the majority of people on board British transatlantic ships weren’t from Britain, but were enslaved Africans kidnapped and transported in their millions to British colonies in the Caribbean and North America.

There have been growing efforts to investigate the many ways in which Britain benefited from this brutal trade in enslaved Africans. But what if those investigations lead to your own front door and start to shatter your family myths?

Find out in episode 4 of our Departures podcast, presented by Mukti Jain Campion. Featuring Professor Matthew Smith, Director of the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership at UCL; Madge Dresser, Honorary Professor of History at University of Bristol; Sally Hadden, Associate Professor of History at Western Michigan University and Stephen Colegrave, co-founder of Byline Times and his son Oliver Colegrave. Presented and produced by Mukti Jain Campion.

ow.ly/BUgl50DkyiP

#DeparturesMM #historypodcast #podcast #slavery #legaciesofslaveryandfreedom

The 17th century colonisation of North America and the Caribbean by emigrants from the British Isles was, almost from its beginning, dependent on the brutal forced transatlantic migration of millions of enslaved African people. Their labour made possible the industrial-scale production of lucrative....

The #NHS employs people from over 200 countries, spanning six continents. As of March 2020, at the start of the pandemic...
26/01/2021

The #NHS employs people from over 200 countries, spanning six continents. As of March 2020, at the start of the pandemic, 31% of Hospital and Community Health Service Doctors were non-UK nationals.You can explore the proportion of UK nationals and non-UK nationals across different job roles, as well as exploring the different nationalities held by NHS workers in our online exhibition #HeartoftheNation: Migration & the Making of the NHS.

https://bit.ly/2Yesvys

"I am a refugee from Rwanda. I came here in 2002. I didn’t know anything about the UK or anyone here. I felt completely ...
23/01/2021

"I am a refugee from Rwanda. I came here in 2002. I didn’t know anything about the UK or anyone here. I felt completely isolated. After six months, I was granted my indefinite leave to remain. Before that I wasn’t allowed to work. They moved me around the country without any notice. That’s the refugee system in this country. I couldn’t communicate. I used to spend hours at the market, because I couldn’t understand the labels and what I had to buy. I knew I had to adapt myself. I wanted to learn English. I used to spend eight hours a day in the library, going through books and listening to DVDs. I was married to Birmingham Library! Everyone knew me there and were so helpful. I came to London, and I got married and we had two kids. I worked as a forklift driver and then I thought this wasn’t me so I went back to university. I did my BA in international and development studies and then I got my Masters degree but I was struggling to find a job. Meanwhile my wife had a back problem and she went through many operations. I decided to help her recover and raise my kids. I started as a carer. After six months, I was promoted. I became a registered manager. I just kept going. I wouldn’t change anything about my career. You make a difference for those people who can’t help themselves. As a refugee, I think that’s a contribution to a country that has accepted me. I hope to start my own business in the care sector. I’ve got the experience that’s given me a chance to learn and understand the nature of the business. I feel settled here. I’m married and I have two kids. They mean a lot to me. I have good friends. You still miss your country. You still feel like you are a refugee and the people who want to look down at you will do it. The other day, I was told to go back home. I’m still here and I feel this is my home." - Mathias Banzi arrived from Rwanda in 2002

Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS. #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

"I’m originally from South Korea, which is the world’s largest exporter of babies and I’m one of them. I was placed in a...
15/01/2021

"I’m originally from South Korea, which is the world’s largest exporter of babies and I’m one of them. I was placed in an orphanage until I was adopted by a family on the west coast of the US. As one of six children, we didn’t have lots of money and relied on elements of social services to help, and I always knew I would try a job in the public sector for some length of time when I got older.

Initially I worked in finance and then moved to the UK after my brother died from muscular dystrophy – so I’m no stranger to healthcare settings. It was time to rethink what I wanted to do, and so I switched to healthcare IT before being approached to work in the NHS. I embrace and feel a cultural identity with being Korean, and deliberately chose to work in north east London because of the high ethnic diversity there, which I find comforting.

When I was asked to support IT for the NHS Nightingale Hospital London, I didn’t hesitate because I instantly knew my team could do it. We had a meeting at 8am that morning, and by 10pm the team had an articulated lorry dropping off all the network kit. We were about to replace the network in two of our hospitals, so we emptied our warehouse of that kit and asked all our suppliers to send teams to help. Within five days, we had set up a new secure network and connected devices from scratch to support the first group of patients – over 26km of cable, 500 switches, hundreds of PCs and more.

It doesn’t feel like we ever stood back and truly reflected on what we had done; we were just going flat out for several weeks – no weekends, no breaks and no leave. The NHS is the best thing about the UK, hands down. Everyone pulls together in times like this and it’s the one place people know they can rely on for help, no matter what their status or background, because that’s what is was created for and that’s what we do." - Sarah Jensen, South Korea via USA

📷: ©Rankin

#HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories #NHS

On 20 December 2020, Irishwoman Margaret Keenan became the first person in the world to be vaccinated against Covid-19. ...
14/01/2021

On 20 December 2020, Irishwoman Margaret Keenan became the first person in the world to be vaccinated against Covid-19. The vaccine was given to her in Coventry by Philippines-born May Parsons, who has been a nurse with the NHS for nearly 25 years. The vaccine was developed by BioNTech, founded by a German-Turkish couple. Is there a better example of migration as part of all our stories? We don't think so!

#AllOurStories #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #NHS

"I honestly couldn’t tell you how many miles I must have walked around my hospital helping patients, transferring medici...
13/01/2021

"I honestly couldn’t tell you how many miles I must have walked around my hospital helping patients, transferring medicines or carrying specialist equipment. As a porter, it’s my job to make sure the right people get to the right place at the right time. Every day is different, and you are never in one place for long.

All the excitement and adrenaline mean it’s hard to switch off. Even at the weekends I like to keep active and ride my bike - but in the back of my head I’m always thinking ‘when can I get back to work and help the team?’

My wife is a carer and my daughter is a nurse, so you could definitely say looking after people runs in the family! They are the most important people in my life. We are fortunate to have and to be able to understand each other. Having someone to talk to at the end of the day can be great motivation to carry on.

Even though I work 12-hour shifts the day goes so fast. My favourite part is talking to patients and helping them feel at home. It’s even more important at the moment in this new world we live in. All our jobs have become more difficult and we have to take extra special care to look after our patients, ourselves and each other. Hospitals can be an intimidating place to come to even in calmer times, so having someone to navigate it alongside you can bring a lot of comfort.
Sometimes it can feel like everything has changed and gotten much harder. It’s a difficult time but we are pulling together as a team. Everyone is pushing themselves and doing an amazing job. I couldn’t be prouder of them all.

That’s probably why, even after 15 years I still love and would recommend my job. The NHS has a way of attracting so many different people from all walks of life – and make them all feel they belong." - Ali Abdi - arrived from Somalia via The Netherlands in 2005

📷: ©Rankin

Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS. #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

We are pleased to announce that our next #MigrationNetwork regional event for the North-East and Yorkshire is now live: ...
11/01/2021

We are pleased to announce that our next #MigrationNetwork regional event for the North-East and Yorkshire is now live: Tuesday January 26th, free online event with
Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums. We have a great range of content to share with you from across those regions. We hope to see you there. Please tag and share. The Eventbrite link can be found here: https://migrationmuseum.org/network/

How did a private trading company come to govern the richest country on earth and have a standing army twice the size of...
08/01/2021

How did a private trading company come to govern the richest country on earth and have a standing army twice the size of the British army? Who were the tens of thousands of British men sent to oversee the world’s most powerful multinational corporation? And what were the profound impacts of their actions on both Britain and India?

Find out in episode 3 of our #DeparturesMM podcast: http://ow.ly/OaD650D2927

#DeparturesMM #Podcast #historypodcast

From the early 17th century onwards, tens of thousands of British men joined the East India Company and ventured out to ...
07/01/2021
Departures podcast episode 3 – The Company Men in India

From the early 17th century onwards, tens of thousands of British men joined the East India Company and ventured out to live in a country that was different to anything they had previously known. Most never returned.

Find out more about these Company men and how their actions brought profound change for both Britain and India in episode 3 of our Departures podcast, presented by Mukti Jain Campion and featuring historians William Dalrymple, Professor Rudrangshu Mukherjee, Dr Kate Teltscher, and Gurminder Bhambra, Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies at the University of Sussex.

http://ow.ly/OaD650D2927

#DeparturesMM #Podcast #historypodcast

From the beginning of the 17th century when the first ships of the English East India Company set sail from London, tens of thousands of men from Britain ventured out to live an expat life in a country that was completely different to anything they had previously known. Most never returned. Mukti Ja...

From 1890-1960 millions of people from all walks of life emigrated from ports across Britain and Ireland. The most commo...
06/01/2021
The fascinating history of long haul travel from Britain & Ireland | Blog

From 1890-1960 millions of people from all walks of life emigrated from ports across Britain and Ireland. The most common occupations noted in passenger lists were 'housewife' & 'labourer', but included 'gentlemen', 'miners' & 'spinsters'. We're partnering with Findmypast on a series of blogs alongside our exhibition and podcast Departures: 400 years of emigration from Britain. Whilst the exhibition is temporarily closed due to lockdown, you can still explore online...

#DeparturesMM #AllOurStories

The busiest ports. The most popular destinations. Who went where? We've delved into our travel records to bring you all the answers.

05/01/2021

Our friends at East End Women's Museum are recruiting for two new roles to help them create their new museum building in Barking, East London. They put women's stories in the spotlight and local communities at the heart of their work.

1. Community Engagement Lead - to connect with residents and community groups in Barking and Dagenham and Newham, ensuring the new building is welcoming, exciting and relevant to local audiences
Salary: £30,000 p.a. pro rata
Hours: part-time, 30 hours per week (worked over 4 or 5 days)
Contract: 15 months, with possibility of extension

2. Capital Project Manager - to deliver the building project, from design to completion
Salary: £33,000 p.a.
Hours: full-time, 37.5 hours per week
Contract: 15 months

For more info see: https://t.co/fXtqUYcAeX?amp=1
Deadline for applications is 19th January.
Please tag and share. Thank you!

Nowadays, the news headlines are full of stories about migrants trying to come to Britain. But for most of this country’...
24/12/2020
Departures – our new podcast exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain

Nowadays, the news headlines are full of stories about migrants trying to come to Britain. But for most of this country’s history, it’s actually been the other way round. And Britain’s emigration rate remains one of the highest in the world.

Why has such a small island nation produced so many migrants and how have they shaped the world we live in today?

Our Departures podcast sheds light on 400 years of British emigration. Episode 3 is coming 7 Jan 2020. Catch up with episodes 1 and 2 over the holidays: http://ow.ly/xgRQ50CS7ay

#DeparturesMM #Podcast #historypodcast

Departures is a new podcast from the Migration Museum exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain. We are releasing new episodes fortnightly from Thursday 26 November. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

When you think of places to spend Christmas Day, a hospital wouldn’t be high on most people’s list. But for Dr Nitha Naq...
22/12/2020
#HeartoftheNation IG Live 1: Christmas magic

When you think of places to spend Christmas Day, a hospital wouldn’t be high on most people’s list. But for Dr Nitha Naqvi, who grew up in a hospital until the age of 9, hospital Christmases were magical. She chatted to Sunday Times best-selling author and GP @doctoramirkhan about what made Christmas in hospitals so special growing up.

This was the first in our new series of IG Lives, conversations where we get to dig a little deeper into the stories in our #HeartoftheNation exhibition. A big thank you to Dr Nitha and Dr Amir, both practising doctors, who gave up their time to talk to us.

Heart of the Nation: Migration and the Making of the NHS. #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories #merrychristmas

When you think of places to spend Christmas Day, a hospital wouldn’t be high on most people’s list. But for Dr Nitha Naqvi, who grew up in a hospital until t...

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The Migration Museum Project is shining a light on the many ways that the movement of people to and from Britain across the ages has shaped who we are – as individuals, as communities, and as a nation. We are doing this through the creation of an inspiring national Migration Museum, a far-reaching nationwide education programme, and a knowledge-sharing network of museums and galleries across the UK.

We have staged an acclaimed series of events, exhibitions and education workshops at venues across the UK since 2013, exploring the central role that migration has played in making us who we are today – as individuals, as communities and as a nation – and helping us to hone our strategy and receive input and feedback from individuals and communities as we work towards our goals. Our exhibitions and events have been attended by over 170,000 visitors, while more than 7,500 school and university students have participated in our education workshops.

We are moving to an exciting new venue in Lewisham in 2020. Opening in February 2020, the Migration Museum in Lewisham will stage a varied programme of exhibitions, events and education workshops from the heart of Lewisham Shopping Centre – more details to follow.

Between April 2017 and November 2019, we were based at the Migration Museum at The Workshop in London, a temporary venue, now closed to the public, in which we staged a dynamic series of exhibitions, events and education workshops. Being based at a central London venue for two and a half years enabled us to provide a showcase for the permanent Migration Museum for Britain that we are creating, raise our profile, expand audience reach, deepen links with community groups and schools, and test ideas for our permanent museum.

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This post of mine has had about a thousand views and many comments on various pages... The Great Smog of London - 68 years ago this week - in December 1952 was the main reason my father decided to emigrate from England, where he had been stationed with the RAF since 1947 (after volunteering for service in his native Malta in 1940). I was a baby in 1952 and developed a bronchial condition as a result of the smog. My dad told me he couldn't bear to see me in my cot, coughing badly. Babies and the elderly were the main victims of the smog. He told my mother, a Londoner, that he was going to Melbourne, where his brother Joe worked on the wharves, and would take me, aged three, with him. My mum had little choice but never regretted the decision. In oral history interviews I recorded, both my parents talk about the nature and extent of the Great Smog that killed so many Londoners that funeral businesses ran out of coffins. It was nicknamed the 'pea-souper' and was very toxic. I am grateful for my parents' decision to emigrate. Sadly, though, my dad never really felt at home in Australia. One of life's many ironies - my mother who didn't want to leave England fell in love with Australia overnight, yet my dad, who was so keen to migrate, never really adjusted. Anyway, the smog problem was largely solved by legislative measures - the Clean Air Act of 1956 which began the introduction of smokeless fuels for home heating.
The documentary THE PATAGONIAN BONES, about the 1865 migration of Welsh settlers to Patagonia, and the work to identify the remains of the first Welsh woman who died there, is available for free on You Tube:
Wonderful museum. Very creative exhibition which had adults and children in our party very absorbed. And the hanging kindness boxes were beautiful!
The space is great, the exhibition moving and the people there wonderful - if your in London: go see it!
How many refugees do you know?
An amazing venue near Vauxhall on Lambeth High Street with an exciting & topical workshop & exhibition programme I was there yesterday for a workshop.
Call for papers on Kurdish Migration Call for papers on Kurdish Migration to be presented at the 3rd International Kurdish Studies Conference, Middlesex University, London, 25-26 June 2019 As part of the 3rd International Kurdish Studies Conference, we aim to organise several sessions on Kurdish Migration. Therefore we invite papers which are empirically and theoretically drawing on quantitative or qualitative data and examining all aspects of migration from, through and into Kurdistan Sessions on the Kurdish migration at the 3rd International Kurdish Studies aims to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines working on Kurdish migration to exchange their views and findings about all aspects of migration from, through and into Kurdistan, as well as about the experiences of diasporic Kurdish communities and second generations. Researchers are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts. We would welcome abstracts related to Kurdish migration and Diaspora. Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to: • Migration, ethnicity, citizenship, belonging and identity politics • Migration, labour market, entrepreneurship and economic integration • Migration, gendered experiences, and sexuality • Family dynamics and intergenerational relationships • Migrants, media and translocal cultural politics and representations • Migration, Arts, Media and Culture • Migration, Digital Age and Technology • Migration, Education and Childhood • Political participation, (digital) networks and organisations • Transnational ties and/or remittances • Migration, law, legal status, rights, and undocumented migration • Internal and international migration, borders and borderlands • Civil rights, racism and anti-racism, discrimination and xenophobia and diasporic narratives of Kurdish resistance • Refugee and internal displacement issues • Refugee camps in Kurdistan, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan • Migration theories and frameworks • Research methodology and Kurdish migration • Statelessness and internally displaced persons • Migration and refugee policies in the Middle East, Europe, North America and elsewhere Please submit your abstract of maximum 350 words to [email protected] . Please suggest up to 5 keywords, indicate your institutional affiliation and the stage of your fieldwork, if it is relevant. The deadline for submission is 15th March 2019. Please include: • A title for your abstract • An abstract (max 350 words) • Your name, affiliation and contact details (email address) We look forward to receiving your abstracts. The Conference Organising Committee 3rd INTERNATIONAL KURDISH STUDIES CONFERENCE Shifting Dynamics of the Kurdistan Question in a Changing Middle East Over 35 million Kurds live under the national jurisdictions of Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria where the Kurdish identity, culture, linguistic rights, homeland and own political representation are contested and contained in most cases by the force of arms. Consequently, the combination of authoritarian state ideologies, the systematic and recurrent use of state violence in these countries has led to the rise of Kurdish opposition. In turn, the ruling states have further used the Kurdish resistance as a pretext to reinforce draconian policies of negation, assimilation and elimination of Kurdish national aspirations. The 20th century has marked the most repressive state policies against the Kurdish quest for self-determination. At the turn of the 21st century, however, various political developments suggest a shift for the Kurds. The regime change in Iraq in 2003, the ongoing civil war in Syria and the emergence of ISIS were among the watershed events that have not only changed the balance of power in the Middle East but also the perception and position of the Kurds in the global political system. The establishment of the Kurdistan Regional Government in Kurdistan-Iraq, the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria and the rise of pro-Kurdish political parties in Kurdistan-Turkey have given rise to the political visibility of the Kurds in international politics. The old borders and boundaries that separated the Kurds are becoming increasingly ineffective. These crucial developments have deepened the sovereignty crisis of the oppressive regional states. Simultaneously with this emerging new political geography and visibility of the Kurds, the number of scholarly studies on the “Kurdish Question” and “Kurdistan Question” has rapidly increased in recent years. The “Kurdistan Question” is growing into an international political issue that needs a global response to find a peaceful settlement in the region. Keynote Speaker Prof Abbas Vali, Emeritus Professor of Sociology Call for Abstracts This interdisciplinary conference aims to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines working on Kurdish history, politics, culture, gender, minority rights and diaspora to examine the ongoing political, social and cultural developments in the lives of the Kurds and Kurdistan. In this context, we seek a broad range of contributions from disciplines of sociology, politics, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, gender studies, cultural studies, history, economics, law, international relations and migration studies. Researchers are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts. We also welcome proposals for sessions and are open to suggestions as to what format these take, including panel discussions, roundtables and workshops or book launches. The conference will provide an excellent venue for academics, researchers, students, professionals and policymakers. How to submit Please submit your abstract of maximum 350 words to [email protected]. Please suggest up to 5 keywords, indicate your institutional affiliation and the stage of your fieldwork, if it’s relevant. The Conference Organising Committee Dr Janroj Yilmaz Keles, Middlesex University Prof Joshua Castellino, Middlesex University and Minority Rights Group International Dr Naif Bezwan, University of Innsbruck, Austria, and UCL Ibrahim Dogus, Centre for Kurdish Progress Ass.Prof Mehmet Ali Dikerdem, Middlesex University Dr Tunc Aybak, Middlesex University Dr Edel Huges, Middlesex University Prof. Dr. Abdurrahman Gülbeyaz Nagasaki University Dr Arzu Yilmaz Dr Selim Temo, Associate professor Dr Umut Erel, Open University Dr Necla Acik, University of Manchester Dr Kamal Soleimani, The College of Mexico, Mexico Dr Mohammed Shareef, University of Exeter Conference Details Location: Middlesex University, London, UK Dates Abstract submission deadline March 15th , 2019 Notification of acceptance April 1st , 2019 Conference Date June 25-26, 2019 Conference Fee Registration fee: £ 100 Discount fee for students (postgraduate and doctoral): £ 50 All delegates will be expected to make and pay for their own travel and accommodation arrangements. Abstract Submission Guidelines The maximum word limit for the abstract is 350 words. The abstract must contain a brief statement of the objectives, methodology, essential results and the conclusion of the study. The abstract must also contain the authors’ names, institutional affiliations, contact number, email and postal address. Please submit your abstract to [email protected] email address. This conference is organised by the Department of Politics and Law, Middlesex University, Minority Rights Group International and Centre for Kurdish Progress. Contact: For more information, please contact Dr Janroj Yilmaz Keles at [email protected]
Hi! Does the museum have a phone number? Thank you!
SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITY Hi there, A friend and I have recently launched an online and print publication called shado which promotes the engagement between arts, activism and academia, and their joint role in spotlighting misrepresented and marginalised global issues. shado is an exciting new grassroots collective which functions to both reflect and support the voices and work of those at the frontline of movements for political and social change. Each issue of the publication will explore a different topic and, within this, showcase the unique responses by an expansive network of artists, activists and academics around the world. These topics cover a wide range of current political and social issues, including universal womanhood in 2019, the conflict in Yemen, gender-based violence in conflict and climate change. As much as possible we are wanting to support and promote the work of emerging academics alongside our artists, musicians and activists to make the link between research and on the ground creatives and organisations. To achieve this, we are looking to include a range of different perspectives and research pieces and would have submissions open to anyone wishing to publish a piece of their writing. Our first issue is centred on the European refugee experience and we would like to welcome any research pieces along this theme. This can be broad theoretical discussions regarding representation, migration, securitisation, identity etc. or can be more specific case study pieces. If this of interest to anyone of you would like to find out more about ways to get involved in any area of the project (not limited to academia) then please get in touch at: [email protected] We also have an Instagram page @shado.mag – give us a follow to find out more about what we’re up to!