Migration Museum

Migration Museum We're creating a Migration Museum for Britain, exploring how the movement of people to and from the UK across the ages has shaped us - as individuals and as a nation.
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The Migration Museum at The Workshop is now closed. Opening in Lewisham in Feb 2020 The Migration Museum Project is a charitable company registered in England and Wales No. 8544993 and a registered charity No. 1153774.

The Migration Museum at The Workshop is now closed. Opening in Lewisham in Feb 2020 The Migration Museum Project is a charitable company registered in England and Wales No. 8544993 and a registered charity No. 1153774.

Operating as usual

Today's #medicalmigrant is responsible for a not too glamorous invention - a nit-comb! John Sacker was born to a Jewish ...
04/12/2020

Today's #medicalmigrant is responsible for a not too glamorous invention - a nit-comb! John Sacker was born to a Jewish family in Russia in 1873. He came to England in the early 1900s, working as a hairdresser. Whilst in England he set up his own company, and patented an innovative nit-comb made of a non-flexible material. #HeartoftheNation

Photo credit: Bethlem Museum of the Mind

'The Native American population at the time of first contact was around 60 million, roughly equal to the population of E...
03/12/2020
Departures – our new podcast exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain

'The Native American population at the time of first contact was around 60 million, roughly equal to the population of Europe. So it wasn't the case at all that they were coming to an empty landscape begging to be developed and to have civilisation brought to it.' In Episode 1 of our Departures podcast, Professor Linford Fisher of Brown University explores the Native American response to English settler colonialism.

Listen and subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts or visit www.migrationmuseum.org/departurespodcast.

#DeparturesMM

Departures is a new podcast from the Migration Museum exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain. We are releasing new episodes fortnightly from Thursday 26 November. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Ethel Corduff is one of the thousands of ‘Irish Angels’ that migrated to the UK to work in the NHS:"I left school at fif...
03/12/2020

Ethel Corduff is one of the thousands of ‘Irish Angels’ that migrated to the UK to work in the NHS:

"I left school at fifteen…After a few years of working at low wages in Dublin and Killarney, I felt there was no future for me in Ireland at the time. I was so excited on departure day; I just did not feel sad. It was my first time ever to leave Ireland, even for a holiday. The three years ahead would be very difficult, but I knew I would have to endure it and I did: I grew to love it, becoming a ward sister and years later an acting ward manager and I nursed until I reached retirement and five years beyond."

Ethel's full story is featured in our digital exhibition - Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS www.heartofthenation.co.uk
#HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of the NHS and its reliance on people from all over the world. Toda...
02/12/2020

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of the NHS and its reliance on people from all over the world.

Today, the NHS workforce is made up of people from almost 200 different nationalities (NHS Digital, 2020).

Find out more in our digital exhibition – Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS www.heartofthenation.co.uk #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories"

The Migration Museum is reopening to the public four days a week from 3 December: Thursdays–Sundays, from 11am–5pm.Come ...
01/12/2020

The Migration Museum is reopening to the public four days a week from 3 December: Thursdays–Sundays, from 11am–5pm.

Come and visit our new critically-acclaimed exhibition Departures: 400 Years of Emigration from Britain, our temporary exhibitions Humanae and Wall, and our shop selling a wide range of migration-related books and gifts.

Admission is free and advance booking is not required. In line with tier-2 restrictions, please only visit with people in your own household or bubble, up to a maximum of 6. We regret that we are not able to accommodate in-person group or education visits at this time.

We’ve worked hard to adapt our museum to meet Covid-secure guidelines and ensure social distancing. To find out more about the measures we’ve taken to keep you safe, visit: https://www.migrationmuseum.org/reopening/

We look forward to welcoming you back safely soon.

#DeparturesMM #AllOurStories

"Dad was brought up in Sindh, which is now a part of Pakistan. Soon after Partition, most Hindus left, including my fath...
01/12/2020

"Dad was brought up in Sindh, which is now a part of Pakistan. Soon after Partition, most Hindus left, including my father’s family.

His family were quite poor farmers so they couldn’t afford to educate him. He managed to win a scholarship to go to Grant Medical College in Bombay. After he qualified in 1951, he had a good practice in Bombay but he wanted to get a post-grad qualification. If you’ve got to be seen as a physician, you’ve got to have the MRCP, and you can only get it in England. So he came here in 1954.

He had two young sons and a wife whom he left behind clearly thinking, ‘I’ll go there for a year or two, pass my exam, and come back home.’ But unfortunately he never passed the exam and I think he didn’t want to come back empty-handed.

In Luton at the time, there were a few hundred immigrants from India and Pakistan. And all of them were patients of my father. They all joined his practice because he could speak Urdu and Hindi. He was known as Dr Khan so the Muslims also took him to their heart. They knew he wasn’t a Muslim but they all liked him.

My parents were separated for seven years when my Dad went to Britain. I don’t ever remember speaking to my father on the telephone during the time he was away. He wrote my mum letters twice a week. I don’t know how he managed all that time, to be honest. He didn’t drink. He didn’t eat meat. Try living seven years in Britain in the 50s on vegetarian food! He learned to knit and crochet. He sent me two pullovers in India, which I used to wear all the time, even in hot weather. But eventually he got mum and us kids to join him.

To finally be together was a big deal. These are people who had gone through Partition and left their lands behind and then left their families behind in India. So family was really important. We spent a lot of time together at home doing DIY and gardening. Life in those days was mainly around work. Leisure was less of a priority.” - Dr Raj khanchandani on his father, arrived from India in 1954 to work in the #NHS

#HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

Our medical migrant this week may be familiar to many of you, by name at least. Henry Wellcome moved to the UK in 1880 f...
27/11/2020
Medical Migrants: A brief history

Our medical migrant this week may be familiar to many of you, by name at least. Henry Wellcome moved to the UK in 1880 from the United States and co-founded a pharmaceutical company, Burroughs Wellcome & Co. He became a well-known entrepreneur and collected medical artefacts. Upon his death, the Wellcome Trust was created as a legacy. #HeartoftheNation #HoTN

Migrants have made contributions to healthcare in Britain long before the birth of the NHS. Here are some of the many medical migrants who have had a lasting impact on healthcare and medicine in this country over hundreds of years...

An estimated 400,000 people left England to cross the Atlantic during the 17th century – around 8% of the entire populat...
27/11/2020

An estimated 400,000 people left England to cross the Atlantic during the 17th century – around 8% of the entire population. Episode 1 of our Departures podcast explores this mass migration – and its profound consequences.

Listen and subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts or visit www.migrationmuseum.org/departurespodcast

#DeparturesMM

Image: 17th century woodcut depicting Pilgrims, from the Migration Museum’s Departures exhibition © Bridgeman Images

Episode 1 of our Departures podcast is out now:Mass emigration from England first took off in the 17th century with the ...
26/11/2020
Departures – our new podcast exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain

Episode 1 of our Departures podcast is out now:

Mass emigration from England first took off in the 17th century with the colonisation of America and the Caribbean. The number of people leaving the shores of England was huge and unprecedented. Mukti Jain Campion speaks to historian James Evans, author of 'Emigrants: Why the English Sailed to the New World' and to American historian Professor Linford Fisher to find out how those early English settlers fared – and how Native Americans responded to the incursion of their lands.

Listen and subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts or visit: www.migrationmuseum.org/departurespodcast

#DeparturesMM #Thanksgiving

Departures, our new podcast exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain is coming soon. Episodes released fortnightly from 26 November. Listen to the trailer and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

"I was going to be a nun nurse, because my mother wanted me to be one. But I went dancing in the holidays and enjoyed it...
26/11/2020

"I was going to be a nun nurse, because my mother wanted me to be one. But I went dancing in the holidays and enjoyed it so much I no longer wanted to be a nun, so I went nursing instead. I applied to a hospital in Enniscorthy, but because my mother would have to give me £25 a month for my keep, I applied to England instead." - Margaret arrived from Ireland in the 1960s.

#HeartoftheNation #HoTN

At the time of the founding of the NHS, medicine in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and elsewhere had been shaped by imperia...
25/11/2020

At the time of the founding of the NHS, medicine in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and elsewhere had been shaped by imperial history. Dozens of medical colleges and schools were set up by the British in India starting in the 1830s, followed by similar institutions over the next century. This means that well before the creation of the NHS (in 1948) healthcare workers came to train and practice in Britain. A few are pictured here...

📷: Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata (formerly Calcutta), India, was founded in 1835 by Lord William Bentinck. It was the first medical college founded by the British in India. Credit: V&A

📷 The Lady Hardinge Medical College and Hospital was a college for women in Delhi, founded by Lady Winifred Baroness Hardinge of Penshurst (1868-1914), wife of the Viceroy and Governor General of India. Photograph, 1921 Credit: Wellcome Collection

📷1The Kitchener School of Medicine opened in 1924. The idea for a medical school in Khartoum, Sudan, was put forward by Lord Kitchener, former governor general of Sudan, in 1914, it opened 10 years later. Process print, 1924. Credit: Wellcome Collection

That's 103, 27 and 25 years before the creation of the NHS.

Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS www.heartofthenation.co.uk #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

"In 1938 with the situation deteriorating for Jewish people in Europe, my aunt Lotte was sent by her family from what wa...
24/11/2020

"In 1938 with the situation deteriorating for Jewish people in Europe, my aunt Lotte was sent by her family from what was then Czechoslovakia to study as a nurse at Booth Hall Children’s Hospital in Manchester. She was 17 and came here on her own. She lived in a nurses home. She had only been in Britain a few months when she found out that her brother (my father) was in the Sachsenhausen-Oranienburg concentration camp. She went and knocked on doors in Manchester to find someone who would agree to sponsor him so that she could get him out. She managed to find someone to be a “guarantor” for her brother, and in my father’s words, "got me a visa and saved my life”. Her father (my grandfather) unfortunately died in a concentration camp. Later when Britain entered the war, suspicion fell on immigrants and she was forced to leave her job and interrupt her training. She became a children’s nanny for a time. Eventually she was allowed to work again and she became a nurse for the NHS and then a psychiatric social worker. She later migrated to Canada and in the end became a professor of social work at McGill University." – Nick Fox

Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS https://heartofthenation.migrationmuseum.org/ #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

(Image © Simon Fuchs)

If you've been following us then you'll know that over 75 million people self-identify as having British ancestry. Which...
24/11/2020
What was life like on board an emigrant ship generations ago? | Blog

If you've been following us then you'll know that over 75 million people self-identify as having British ancestry. Which means that throughout history many have made the voyage from these shores. How did they travel, and what were their journeys like?

We've been finding out with @findmypast https://bit.ly/2UxQmri #DeparturesMM

So, you've found a globetrotting ancestor on a passenger list, or arriving in a new country. But what did they actually experience during their journey?

Today's #medicalmigrant spotlight is Wu Lien-teh, who came to the UK from Malaysia (formerly Malaya) in 1896. Wu became ...
20/11/2020

Today's #medicalmigrant spotlight is Wu Lien-teh, who came to the UK from Malaysia (formerly Malaya) in 1896. Wu became the 1st medical student of Chinese ethnicity to study at Cambridge University. Wu's story is particularly topical to the #covid19 pandemic. In 1907 he moved to China, where he pioneered modern anti-plague techniques, including wearing masks to contain the spread of airborne epidemics. Discover more #medicalmigrants in www.heartofthenation.co.uk #HoTN #HeartoftheNation

“In March, when the pandemic hit us, my husband was one of the first doctors to speak up about the need for appropriate ...
19/11/2020

“In March, when the pandemic hit us, my husband was one of the first doctors to speak up about the need for appropriate PPE for doctors. And then, doctors started to die because they weren’t given the right protection. For some time I kept quiet because I was worried about my pregnancy and my maternity pay. Nurse Mary Agyapong was in the same hospital as my husband. Eight months pregnant, she caught Covid at work and had to deliver her baby via emergency c-section and died in ITU. That’s when I decided to take my protest to Downing Street. To remind all the politicians about the rights of our healthcare workers.” - Dr Meenal Viz (@meenals_world) arrived from Gibraltar via Czech Republic in 2018.

Find out more: Heart of the Nation: Migration & the Making of the NHS - link in bio #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

19/11/2020

"Dear Radika, in just 63 days this is going to be your new home. I hope I get to show it to you. You see you're arriving at a very difficult time. People are dying. The world is at war, and the people on the frontlines aren't soldiers..."

This week we've been sharing Dr Meenal's story in her own words. In this film she talks to her unborn daughter Radika, about the current situation facing NHS workers today. You can keep following our #HoTN campaign over on our Instagram. #AllOurStories

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of the NHS and its reliance on people from all over the world, but ...
18/11/2020

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of the NHS and its reliance on people from all over the world, but this is not a new story.

“My father came from the slums of Delhi to Gibraltar. He didn’t have anyone to help or support him. If he was being racially abused, no one spoke up for him. This is what I’ve seen with migrant doctors and nurses here – they feel afraid of speaking up. A lot of them have left everything behind in their home countries. Maybe their job depends on a visa and they’re afraid of losing their job. It doesn’t feel right with me that they have to suffer in silence. My parents went through that.” - Dr meenalviz arrived from Gibraltar via Czech Republic in 2018.

Find out more www.heartofthenation.co.uk #HeartoftheNation #HoTN #AllOurStories

We've had an incredible response to our digital exhibition Heart of the Nation: Migration and the Making of the NHS. Whi...
17/11/2020

We've had an incredible response to our digital exhibition Heart of the Nation: Migration and the Making of the NHS. Which is why we're excited to launch our #HoTN social campaign giving you behind-the-scenes access to delve deeper into the lives of the doctors, nurses and carers who feature in our digital exhibition through Q&As, IG Lives, unseen content and more.

Follow us on Instagram to make sure you don't miss out www.instagram.com/migrationmuseumuk

Coming soon: Departures, our new podcast exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain.What would it take for you to le...
12/11/2020

Coming soon: Departures, our new podcast exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain.

What would it take for you to leave your home? To leave everything and everyone you know to move to another country and start again. Over the past 400 years, that’s exactly what millions of British people have been doing. Today, the news headlines are full of stories of migrants trying to come to Britain. But for most of this country’s history, it’s actually been the other way round. And Britain’s emigration rate remains one of the highest in the world. Why has such a small island nation produced so many migrants and how have they shaped the world we live in today?

In a new podcast series Mukti Jain Campion speaks to people who are shedding new light on this often hidden history.

Episodes released fortnightly from 26 November. Listen to the trailer and subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts: http://ow.ly/k7zF50Cirya

#DeparturesMM

Join an online conversation tomorrow exploring Petticoat Lane’s relationship with textiles past and present. The East En...
09/11/2020
Community Banners: Fabrics of Society

Join an online conversation tomorrow exploring Petticoat Lane’s relationship with textiles past and present. The East End of London is steeped in migration history. In this conversation you can join local experts from a range of contexts will share their knowledge, experience and passion about fabrics and community in the East End. Participants include Brick Lane Circle, Huguenots of Spitalfields, London Metropolitan University's Textiles department, Leyden Gallery and Lady Lane Market traders, amongst others. Register below for this free event.

Join an online conversation exploring Petticoat Lane’s relationship with textiles past and present

We may have closed our doors for the time being, but you can still enjoy our digital exhibition #HeartoftheNation Migrat...
06/11/2020
Home | Heart of the Nation | Migration Museum

We may have closed our doors for the time being, but you can still enjoy our digital exhibition #HeartoftheNation Migration & the Making of the #NHS. We have some exciting online activities coming up so keep an eye on our channels!

#HoTN #allourstories

Heart of the Nation shines a light on the stories and experiences of people who have come to Britain to work in the NHS over the past 72 years. A digital exhibition by the Migration Museum.

As #BlackHistoryMonth has come to a close, friend of the museum Professor Benjamin Zephaniah shares why he feels Black H...
04/11/2020
Black people will not be respected until our history is respected | Benjamin Zephaniah

As #BlackHistoryMonth has come to a close, friend of the museum Professor Benjamin Zephaniah shares why he feels Black History Month is still very much needed, but warns against treating it as a holiday - "'Happy Black History Month' as if it's Christmas, or Easter...". - We must learn from our past, not simply mark it. Read the full article below.

My teachers, and the police who beat me up, all thought our past had no value. But now there’s hope things might change, says poet Benjamin Zephaniah

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The Migration Museum Project is shining a light on the many ways that the movement of people to and from Britain across the ages has shaped who we are – as individuals, as communities, and as a nation. We are doing this through the creation of an inspiring national Migration Museum, a far-reaching nationwide education programme, and a knowledge-sharing network of museums and galleries across the UK.

We have staged an acclaimed series of events, exhibitions and education workshops at venues across the UK since 2013, exploring the central role that migration has played in making us who we are today – as individuals, as communities and as a nation – and helping us to hone our strategy and receive input and feedback from individuals and communities as we work towards our goals. Our exhibitions and events have been attended by over 170,000 visitors, while more than 7,500 school and university students have participated in our education workshops.

We are moving to an exciting new venue in Lewisham in 2020. Opening in February 2020, the Migration Museum in Lewisham will stage a varied programme of exhibitions, events and education workshops from the heart of Lewisham Shopping Centre – more details to follow.

Between April 2017 and November 2019, we were based at the Migration Museum at The Workshop in London, a temporary venue, now closed to the public, in which we staged a dynamic series of exhibitions, events and education workshops. Being based at a central London venue for two and a half years enabled us to provide a showcase for the permanent Migration Museum for Britain that we are creating, raise our profile, expand audience reach, deepen links with community groups and schools, and test ideas for our permanent museum.


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The documentary THE PATAGONIAN BONES, about the 1865 migration of Welsh settlers to Patagonia, and the work to identify the remains of the first Welsh woman who died there, is available for free on You Tube:
Wonderful museum. Very creative exhibition which had adults and children in our party very absorbed. And the hanging kindness boxes were beautiful!
The space is great, the exhibition moving and the people there wonderful - if your in London: go see it!
How many refugees do you know?
An amazing venue near Vauxhall on Lambeth High Street with an exciting & topical workshop & exhibition programme I was there yesterday for a workshop.
Call for papers on Kurdish Migration Call for papers on Kurdish Migration to be presented at the 3rd International Kurdish Studies Conference, Middlesex University, London, 25-26 June 2019 As part of the 3rd International Kurdish Studies Conference, we aim to organise several sessions on Kurdish Migration. Therefore we invite papers which are empirically and theoretically drawing on quantitative or qualitative data and examining all aspects of migration from, through and into Kurdistan Sessions on the Kurdish migration at the 3rd International Kurdish Studies aims to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines working on Kurdish migration to exchange their views and findings about all aspects of migration from, through and into Kurdistan, as well as about the experiences of diasporic Kurdish communities and second generations. Researchers are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts. We would welcome abstracts related to Kurdish migration and Diaspora. Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to: • Migration, ethnicity, citizenship, belonging and identity politics • Migration, labour market, entrepreneurship and economic integration • Migration, gendered experiences, and sexuality • Family dynamics and intergenerational relationships • Migrants, media and translocal cultural politics and representations • Migration, Arts, Media and Culture • Migration, Digital Age and Technology • Migration, Education and Childhood • Political participation, (digital) networks and organisations • Transnational ties and/or remittances • Migration, law, legal status, rights, and undocumented migration • Internal and international migration, borders and borderlands • Civil rights, racism and anti-racism, discrimination and xenophobia and diasporic narratives of Kurdish resistance • Refugee and internal displacement issues • Refugee camps in Kurdistan, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan • Migration theories and frameworks • Research methodology and Kurdish migration • Statelessness and internally displaced persons • Migration and refugee policies in the Middle East, Europe, North America and elsewhere Please submit your abstract of maximum 350 words to [email protected] . Please suggest up to 5 keywords, indicate your institutional affiliation and the stage of your fieldwork, if it is relevant. The deadline for submission is 15th March 2019. Please include: • A title for your abstract • An abstract (max 350 words) • Your name, affiliation and contact details (email address) We look forward to receiving your abstracts. The Conference Organising Committee 3rd INTERNATIONAL KURDISH STUDIES CONFERENCE Shifting Dynamics of the Kurdistan Question in a Changing Middle East Over 35 million Kurds live under the national jurisdictions of Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria where the Kurdish identity, culture, linguistic rights, homeland and own political representation are contested and contained in most cases by the force of arms. Consequently, the combination of authoritarian state ideologies, the systematic and recurrent use of state violence in these countries has led to the rise of Kurdish opposition. In turn, the ruling states have further used the Kurdish resistance as a pretext to reinforce draconian policies of negation, assimilation and elimination of Kurdish national aspirations. The 20th century has marked the most repressive state policies against the Kurdish quest for self-determination. At the turn of the 21st century, however, various political developments suggest a shift for the Kurds. The regime change in Iraq in 2003, the ongoing civil war in Syria and the emergence of ISIS were among the watershed events that have not only changed the balance of power in the Middle East but also the perception and position of the Kurds in the global political system. The establishment of the Kurdistan Regional Government in Kurdistan-Iraq, the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria and the rise of pro-Kurdish political parties in Kurdistan-Turkey have given rise to the political visibility of the Kurds in international politics. The old borders and boundaries that separated the Kurds are becoming increasingly ineffective. These crucial developments have deepened the sovereignty crisis of the oppressive regional states. Simultaneously with this emerging new political geography and visibility of the Kurds, the number of scholarly studies on the “Kurdish Question” and “Kurdistan Question” has rapidly increased in recent years. The “Kurdistan Question” is growing into an international political issue that needs a global response to find a peaceful settlement in the region. Keynote Speaker Prof Abbas Vali, Emeritus Professor of Sociology Call for Abstracts This interdisciplinary conference aims to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines working on Kurdish history, politics, culture, gender, minority rights and diaspora to examine the ongoing political, social and cultural developments in the lives of the Kurds and Kurdistan. In this context, we seek a broad range of contributions from disciplines of sociology, politics, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, gender studies, cultural studies, history, economics, law, international relations and migration studies. Researchers are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts. We also welcome proposals for sessions and are open to suggestions as to what format these take, including panel discussions, roundtables and workshops or book launches. The conference will provide an excellent venue for academics, researchers, students, professionals and policymakers. How to submit Please submit your abstract of maximum 350 words to [email protected]. Please suggest up to 5 keywords, indicate your institutional affiliation and the stage of your fieldwork, if it’s relevant. The Conference Organising Committee Dr Janroj Yilmaz Keles, Middlesex University Prof Joshua Castellino, Middlesex University and Minority Rights Group International Dr Naif Bezwan, University of Innsbruck, Austria, and UCL Ibrahim Dogus, Centre for Kurdish Progress Ass.Prof Mehmet Ali Dikerdem, Middlesex University Dr Tunc Aybak, Middlesex University Dr Edel Huges, Middlesex University Prof. Dr. Abdurrahman Gülbeyaz Nagasaki University Dr Arzu Yilmaz Dr Selim Temo, Associate professor Dr Umut Erel, Open University Dr Necla Acik, University of Manchester Dr Kamal Soleimani, The College of Mexico, Mexico Dr Mohammed Shareef, University of Exeter Conference Details Location: Middlesex University, London, UK Dates Abstract submission deadline March 15th , 2019 Notification of acceptance April 1st , 2019 Conference Date June 25-26, 2019 Conference Fee Registration fee: £ 100 Discount fee for students (postgraduate and doctoral): £ 50 All delegates will be expected to make and pay for their own travel and accommodation arrangements. Abstract Submission Guidelines The maximum word limit for the abstract is 350 words. The abstract must contain a brief statement of the objectives, methodology, essential results and the conclusion of the study. The abstract must also contain the authors’ names, institutional affiliations, contact number, email and postal address. Please submit your abstract to [email protected] email address. This conference is organised by the Department of Politics and Law, Middlesex University, Minority Rights Group International and Centre for Kurdish Progress. Contact: For more information, please contact Dr Janroj Yilmaz Keles at [email protected]
Hi! Does the museum have a phone number? Thank you!
SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITY Hi there, A friend and I have recently launched an online and print publication called shado which promotes the engagement between arts, activism and academia, and their joint role in spotlighting misrepresented and marginalised global issues. shado is an exciting new grassroots collective which functions to both reflect and support the voices and work of those at the frontline of movements for political and social change. Each issue of the publication will explore a different topic and, within this, showcase the unique responses by an expansive network of artists, activists and academics around the world. These topics cover a wide range of current political and social issues, including universal womanhood in 2019, the conflict in Yemen, gender-based violence in conflict and climate change. As much as possible we are wanting to support and promote the work of emerging academics alongside our artists, musicians and activists to make the link between research and on the ground creatives and organisations. To achieve this, we are looking to include a range of different perspectives and research pieces and would have submissions open to anyone wishing to publish a piece of their writing. Our first issue is centred on the European refugee experience and we would like to welcome any research pieces along this theme. This can be broad theoretical discussions regarding representation, migration, securitisation, identity etc. or can be more specific case study pieces. If this of interest to anyone of you would like to find out more about ways to get involved in any area of the project (not limited to academia) then please get in touch at: [email protected] We also have an Instagram page @shado.mag – give us a follow to find out more about what we’re up to!