Neja's Art Walks

Neja's Art Walks We are a London-based educational art project with a passion for storytelling Art and History walks in London, Online Art Talks

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Titus Kaphar’s paintings illustrate the profound pain experienced by Black mothers around the fear they'll lose their ch...
31/08/2021

Titus Kaphar’s paintings illustrate the profound pain experienced by Black mothers around the fear they'll lose their children.

At first glance, Kaphar’s paintings look like a beautiful suburban family dwelling, but at a closer look, you see the intense message of the exhibit, which is the fear Black mothers have that they’ll lose their children through various systems that have suppressed and tortured minorities in this country for centuries.

Powerful. @titus_kaphar

Art Crime Dispatches.Italian criminal and fugitive Raffaele Imperiale was arrested on August 4 in connection to a theft ...
29/08/2021

Art Crime Dispatches.

Italian criminal and fugitive Raffaele Imperiale was arrested on August 4 in connection to a theft from Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum. Imperiale, who’s been at large for years, is one of Italy’s most wanted criminals and has a long history of affiliation with money laundering and drug trafficking; he’s also allegedly a boss within the organized crime syndicate Camorra, which is based in Naples.

After being stolen in 2002, the Van Gogh paintings View of the Sea at Scheveningen (1882) and Congregation leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen (1884-1885) eventually turned up in 2016 in a farmhouse on property Imperiale owned.

The paintings were discovered swaddled in cotton sheets and hidden behind a wall by the Guardia di Financa. Earlier this year, Imperiale asserted in an interview with Il Mattino that he had nothing to do with the robbery of the paintings. “I bought them directly from the thief because the price was attractive… But most of all because I love art,” he said. The Italian Ministry of the Interior highlighted the frequent arrests and kidnappings that have been affiliated with the Camorra organization.

Dubai police said Imperiale had been living under a false identity in the of name Antonio Rocco, and had used multiple cars to conceal his movements. "Imperiale chose to live in an isolated home with an overlooking spot to monitor those who approach him," the statement cited Jamal Salem Al Jallaf, director of the Criminal Investigation Department, as saying. "He intentionally had avoided registering a precise address to mislead authorities."

Imperiale – part of the Amato-Pagana clan within Naples' Camorra organized crime syndicate – left Italy for Amsterdam in the 1990s to manage a coffee shop, and began allying himself with Dutch traffickers, according to Italian daily La Repubblica.

After first dealing in Ecstasy tablets, he set his sights on the more lucrative co***ne trade, moving tons of drugs into Holland for the European market with the help of South American traffickers. Italian police said a close cohort of Imperiale, Vincenzo Aprea – a well-known Camorra boss now in prison – had been able to buy the paintings on the black market using drug money.

Last chance to see!These breathtaking outdoor art installations across the Canary Wharf estate is a colourful celebratio...
28/08/2021

Last chance to see!

These breathtaking outdoor art installations across the Canary Wharf estate is a colourful celebration of natural light. Launched on Midsummer (the longest day of the year), the unique exhibition consists of 11 new pieces of art which all shimmer, shine and sparkle in the sun’s rays. As such, Summer Lights is best admired between sunrise and sunset. Open daily, the installation is free to enjoy.

Casts of the faces of 850 trans people are to be arranged around the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, central London, ...
27/08/2021

Casts of the faces of 850 trans people are to be arranged around the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, central London, for one of the world’s highest-profile contemporary art commissions.

The work, by the Mexican artist Teresa Margolles, will appear in 2024.

It will be preceded by a sculpture by Samson Kambalu who plans a work based on a 1914 photograph of the preacher John Chilembwe, a hero of African independence, and the European missionary John Chorley.

Kambalu’s work will appear in 2022. It will follow the current sculpture of a giant dollop of whipped cream with a fly and cherry on top, the work of Heather Phillipson, which will remain until September 2022.

For her work 850 Improntas (850 Imprints), Margolles will take casts of the faces of trans people from London and around the world. These “life masks” will be arranged around the plinth in the form of a tzompantli, a skull rack from Mesoamerican civilisations that was often used to display the remains of sacrifice victims or prisoners of war.

Malawi-born Kambalu lives and works in Oxford where he is an associate professor at the Ruskin School of Art and a fellow of Magdalen College. His work will restage a photograph taken in 1914 at the opening of Chilembwe’s new church in Nyasaland, now Malawi. Chilembwe has a hat on in defiance of the colonial rule that forbade Africans from wearing hats in front of white people.

A year later Chilembwe led an uprising against colonial rule. He was killed and his church, which had taken years to build, was destroyed by military police.

#FourthPlinth

The feminist tapestries of Erin M Riley.“My work is the culmination of research into addiction, sexual experimentation, ...
25/08/2021

The feminist tapestries of Erin M Riley.

“My work is the culmination of research into addiction, sexual experimentation, popular internet culture, the effects of single parent households, socio-economic status… I know my work is shocking but I don’t intend for it to be, I intend for it to be more like, this is what’s going on. My work is not pornographic, I think it’s more representational. The medium takes away from it being pornographic and, I have softened it and it’s not specific. It’s all about the person, it’s not about the action.

I am a Weaver visual artist. I work with found photographs from the Internet as well as images that I take myself. My work involves a lot of collecting of images so I spend time on Tumblr, Instagram, Facebook or just Google. Finding images, collecting images, and then those images sit for a while until it comes time for me to weave them. I work from the image and translate that into a tracing which is then pinned to the back of the warp on the loom. I also dye most of my yarn so I have to make sure that I have the colors available for an upcoming piece and then I get to weaving."

"When I look at the bright, busy paintings of 41-year-old American artist Hilary Pecis, I think: if Matisse had an Insta...
23/08/2021

"When I look at the bright, busy paintings of 41-year-old American artist Hilary Pecis, I think: if Matisse had an Instagram account, his feed would probably look a lot like this.

With an influencer’s eye for framing and a fauvist’s love of color, Pecis memorializes the beauty in the banal—a yawning bouquet of flowers in a mason jar, a cup of coffee atop a freshly completed crossword puzzle. Many artists make work about quotidian pleasures, but few revel in them like she does.

It is fitting, then, that after a year in which we were all stuck at home, Pecis’s portraits of domestic life have found a hungry new audience. Her solo show, on view now at Timothy Taylor in London, sold out shortly after the opening. (Prices for the work range from $20,000 to $60,000.)"

Text by @tddafoe for @artnet, art by @hilary_pecis

Alma Berrow (b. 1992) is a British artist who creates intricate ceramic sculptures. Her playful sculpture practice playf...
21/08/2021

Alma Berrow (b. 1992) is a British artist who creates intricate ceramic sculptures. Her playful sculpture practice playfully subverts the still life genre, depicting overflowing ashtrays or elaborate plates of food that act as physical talismans for lost moments of togetherness among friends.

She has taken up ceramics for the first time over lock down part 1 and is now making and creating everyday. Fascinating stuff, don't you think?

Sophie Taeuber-Arp was one of the foremost abstract artists and designers of the 1920s and 30s. Her multidisciplinary wo...
18/08/2021

Sophie Taeuber-Arp was one of the foremost abstract artists and designers of the 1920s and 30s. Her multidisciplinary work has enduring influence, inspiring innovative artists and designers around the world.

Taeuber-Arp’s creative output was extraordinarily diverse and at times controversial. She made embroideries and paintings, carved sculptures and edited magazines, created puppets and mysterious Dada objects. She combined traditional crafts with the vocabulary of modernist abstraction, challenging the boundaries separating art and design.

This is the first retrospective of her work ever held in the UK. It brings together her principal works from major collections in Europe and the US, most of which have never been seen in this country before.

@tate #sophietaeuberarp

Town House is having an Open exhibition again this summer! Until September 12, 2021Townhouse, 5 Fournier Street, Spitalf...
16/08/2021

Town House is having an Open exhibition again this summer!

Until September 12, 2021

Townhouse, 5 Fournier Street,
Spitalfields, London, E1 6QE.

Francis Campbell Boileau Cadell (1883 –1937) was a Scottish Colourist painter associated with the Scottish Colourists.Fr...
16/08/2021

Francis Campbell Boileau Cadell (1883 –1937) was a Scottish Colourist painter associated with the Scottish Colourists.

Francis Cadell was born in Edinburgh and, from the age of 16, studied in Paris at the Academie Julian, where he was in contact with the French avant-garde of the day. While in France, his exposure to work by the early Fauvists, and in particular Matisse, proved to be his most lasting influence. After his return to Scotland, he was a regular exhibitor in Edinburgh and Glasgow, as well as in London. He painted landscapes, interiors, still life and figures in both oil and watercolour, but he is particularly noted for his portraits, depicting his subject with vibrant waves of colour. He enjoyed the landscape of Iona enormously, which he first visited in 1912 and features prominently in his work. During the 1920s he spent several summers with Samuel Peploe, another Scottish Colourist, on painting trips to Iona.

Peter Blake: Time Traveller, an exhibition dedicated to the groundbreaking exploration of collage by iconic British arti...
14/08/2021

Peter Blake: Time Traveller, an exhibition dedicated to the groundbreaking exploration of collage by iconic British artist Peter Blake.

This comprehensive survey show, which includes a number of important museum loans, investigates the fundamentals of Blake’s practice in collage over a career spanning seven decades, bringing together historic works and never-before-seen pieces. A new monograph, Peter Blake: Collage, which includes a foreword by Blake’s schoolfriend David Hockney, will be published by Thames & Hudson to coincide with the exhibition.

Until September 9
@waddingtoncustot

Tuesday Riddell’s work takes us down to the forest floor and a glorious insight into the world that captures her imagina...
11/08/2021

Tuesday Riddell’s work takes us down to the forest floor and a glorious insight into the world that captures her imagination, that ethereal nocturne where all cycles of life and death carry on with rarely a watchful eye.

Tuesday is one of very few artists who work with Japanning, a form of lacquer work brought to Britain in the 17th century having been developed in Europe to meet the rising demand for Asian lacquer wear. It is an extraordinarily laborious process, each panel has between 25 to 30 layers of lacquer, embedded with gold and silver leaf and mother of pearl.

Tuesday has recently learnt a new technique – coromandel; a technique that involves carving into layers of gesso like a relief, which we see here for the first time. Tuesday discovered Japanning as the Painter Stainer’s Decorative Surface fellow at City & Guilds Art School by which time it was only practiced in conservation. Yet in a centuries old practice Tuesday found a new visual language, breathing new life into an almost lost craft.

Until August 13
Messums Gallery, London

08/08/2021

The Angel of the North is as much a part of Gateshead's identity as the Statue of Liberty is to New York. Since it first spread its wings in February 1998, it has become one of the most talked about and recognisable pieces of public art ever produced.

It was in 1990 that the site, a former colliery pithead baths, was re-claimed and earmarked for a future sculpture. When sculptor Antony Gormley was selected as the winning artist in 1994, his designs originally caused uproar. The controversial material and site of the sculpture were frowned upon. However, once in place many people's original views on the piece changed completely. Local residents have fallen in love with the Angel and it has become synonymous with Gateshead.

Also in Edinburgh...Jack Morrocco's first solo show featuring over 40 new paintings from one of Scotland’s 'most collect...
07/08/2021

Also in Edinburgh...

Jack Morrocco's first solo show featuring over 40 new paintings from one of Scotland’s 'most collectable and respected artists.'

Morningside Gallery
Until 29 August, 2021

If you find yourself in Edinburgh...The Dovecot Studios celebrates the artist Jock McFadyen’s 70th birthday year with Lo...
06/08/2021

If you find yourself in Edinburgh...

The Dovecot Studios celebrates the artist Jock McFadyen’s 70th birthday year with Lost Boat Party an exhibition of paintings which describe the romance and grandeur of the Scottish landscape, alongside the urban dystopia for which the artist is known.

Born in Paisley, McFadyen (b.1950) has spent a lifetime exploring the sublime landscape tradition. His career connects the generation of abstract painters who taught him at Chelsea College of Art in the 1970s with an alternative strand of British realism.

Dovecot Studios
Until 25 September 2021

Joan Eardley (1921-1963) is one of Scotland's most popular twentieth century artists. Her powerful and expressive painti...
04/08/2021

Joan Eardley (1921-1963) is one of Scotland's most popular twentieth century artists. Her powerful and expressive paintings transformed her everyday surroundings, including the rugged Scottish coastline and Glasgow's street children. During her lifetime she was considered a member of the post war British avant-garde, who portrayed the realities of life in the mid-twentieth century.

Marking the centenary of Joan Eardley’s birth, The Scottish Gallery presents a major exhibition of Eardley’s paintings and drawings. Having promoted and celebrated her genius throughout her lifetime, this exhibition, which coincides with the Edinburgh International Festival, highlights her as one of Scotland’s greatest talents and allows us to speculate what she might have achieved internationally had she lived.

The Scottish Gallery
Until 28 August 2021

If you find yourself in Edinburgh....Pop artist, weaver, and former Mr Scotland, Archie Brennan changed the course of mo...
02/08/2021

If you find yourself in Edinburgh....

Pop artist, weaver, and former Mr Scotland, Archie Brennan changed the course of modern weaving and is considered one of the greatest unrecognised pop artists of the twentieth century. Why unrecognised? Most likely because his medium of choice was tapestry.

Archie Brennan: Tapestry Goes Pop! tells the story of Edinburgh native Archie Brennan (1931-2019) in the first major retrosepctive exhibition of his work. Bringing together over 80 tapestries as well as archive material, this is a chance to delve into the world of a master of modern tapestry.

Sharp, witty, and immensely talented, Brennan began his 60-year weaving career at Dovecot Studios and was an innovator and iconoclast who inspired weavers all over the world from Papua New Guinea to Australia. A charismatic character, he dedicated his life to teaching and his influence on weaving can still be felt to this day. Brennan’s contribution to modern art has not been recognised, until now.

Dovecot Studio, Edinburgh
Until 30 August 2021

Art crime dispatches.Stolen paintings by Pablo Picasso and Piet Mondrian were recovered a few weeks ago, following a pol...
01/08/2021

Art crime dispatches.

Stolen paintings by Pablo Picasso and Piet Mondrian were recovered a few weeks ago, following a police search that lasted nine years after they were removed from the National Gallery in Athens. However, another work of art swiped at the same time, a pen and sepia wash drawing by the 16th-century Italian artist Guglielmo Caccia, was not found.

The 49-year-old man arrested for the 2012 heist claims that he destroyed it. During the preliminary inquiry he testified that he wiped his bloody hand with it while trying to escape from the gallery, hurriedly put it in his pocket and later threw it in a toilet to get rid if it. He also claimed that he never tried to sell his loot. In September 2019, however, an almost identical sketch appeared in the online catalogue of the Pandolfini auction house in Florence, raising reasonable questions about the mystery of the stolen Moncalvo, as Caccia is better known.

The work was to be auctioned off in October 2019, as lot number 96, without provenance and with the information that “it may be related to the production of drawings by the painter Guglielmo Caccia, known as Moncalvo (1568-1625).”

The National Gallery, which was responsible for verifying its authenticity, decided that it was not necessary at that time to send an expert to examine the work closely, because of “serious doubts” about its authenticity due to a small difference in size and some spots.

The art conservator Kalypso Kampani decided in March 2021 to conduct her own study. She digitally analyzed two images of the sketches, in collaboration with Dr Eric Postma, a professor of artificial intelligence at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and found that they were almost identical.

The sketch was withdrawn from the online auction in 2019 and nobody seems to know anything about its current whereabouts.

Art crime dispatches.

Stolen paintings by Pablo Picasso and Piet Mondrian were recovered a few weeks ago, following a police search that lasted nine years after they were removed from the National Gallery in Athens. However, another work of art swiped at the same time, a pen and sepia wash drawing by the 16th-century Italian artist Guglielmo Caccia, was not found.

The 49-year-old man arrested for the 2012 heist claims that he destroyed it. During the preliminary inquiry he testified that he wiped his bloody hand with it while trying to escape from the gallery, hurriedly put it in his pocket and later threw it in a toilet to get rid if it. He also claimed that he never tried to sell his loot. In September 2019, however, an almost identical sketch appeared in the online catalogue of the Pandolfini auction house in Florence, raising reasonable questions about the mystery of the stolen Moncalvo, as Caccia is better known.

The work was to be auctioned off in October 2019, as lot number 96, without provenance and with the information that “it may be related to the production of drawings by the painter Guglielmo Caccia, known as Moncalvo (1568-1625).”

The National Gallery, which was responsible for verifying its authenticity, decided that it was not necessary at that time to send an expert to examine the work closely, because of “serious doubts” about its authenticity due to a small difference in size and some spots.

The art conservator Kalypso Kampani decided in March 2021 to conduct her own study. She digitally analyzed two images of the sketches, in collaboration with Dr Eric Postma, a professor of artificial intelligence at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and found that they were almost identical.

The sketch was withdrawn from the online auction in 2019 and nobody seems to know anything about its current whereabouts.

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