The Fusilier Museum London

The Fusilier Museum London Telling the story of a British army Regiment, from our historic home at the Tower of London. Museum

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Yesterday, a service of remembrance was held at the Regimental Chapel of the Royal Fusiliers to honour all Fusiliers who...
23/07/2021

Yesterday, a service of remembrance was held at the Regimental Chapel of the Royal Fusiliers to honour all Fusiliers who served in the Korean War (1950-53). Attendance included 8 veterans from the conflict and the South Korean Defence Attaché.

Following the Second World War, Korea was divided at the 38th Parallel with Soviet influence in the north and American influence in the south. On 25 June 1950, North Korean forces crossed the 38th Parallel to which the UN called for a ceasefire and their immediate withdrawal. Failing to comply led the US and other nations under the flag of the UN to aid South Korea.

By September 1950, Allied forces had been driven south with their backs to the sea. However, General MacArthur’s landing behind enemy lines at Inchon on the west coast allowed the Allies to advance north as far as the Yalu River by the Manchurian border. This prompted China to aid North Korea in November 1950 where the Allies were driven south again.

Finally, the 150 mile frontline was stabilised around the 38th Parallel by the Spring of 1951. In spite of much bitter fighting, it remained there until the armistice in July 1953.

The 1st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers served in North Korea from 1952 to 1953. We will remember them.

Happy Albuhera Day to all Fusiliers on the 210th anniversary of the battle!Image: The Albuhera Cross, a regimental decor...
16/05/2021

Happy Albuhera Day to all Fusiliers on the 210th anniversary of the battle!

Image: The Albuhera Cross, a regimental decoration awarded to the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 7th Royal Fusiliers. The two battalions were amalgamated after the battle owing to heavy losses.

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Happy Albuhera Day to all Fusiliers on the 210th anniversary of the battle!

Image: The Albuhera Cross, a regimental decoration awarded to the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 7th Royal Fusiliers. The two battalions were amalgamated after the battle owing to heavy losses.

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Ahead of the Battle of Albuhera’s 210th anniversary tomorrow, a rededication ceremony of Field Marshal Sir Edward Blaken...
15/05/2021

Ahead of the Battle of Albuhera’s 210th anniversary tomorrow, a rededication ceremony of Field Marshal Sir Edward Blakeney’s tomb took place at Oak Lane Cemetery in Twickenham. The event was organised by the Fusiliers Association which was attended by members of the Chelsea Pensioners, Fusilier Cadets and Friends of Oak Lane Cemetery.

During the Peninsula War, Blakeney commanded the 2nd Battalion, 7th Royal Fusiliers at the battles of Bussaco (September 1810) and Albuhera (May 1811). He sustained a wound to the thigh at Albuhera and was also severely wounded in the arm during the Siege of Badajoz (January 1812). Other battles he took part in were at Aldea da Ponte, Ciudad Rodrigo, Pampelona, the Pyrenees, Nivelle, and Vitoria.

Blakeney received many promotions throughout his career. Some include Colonel of the Regiment from 1832, Commander-in-Chief of Ireland from 1836, and Field Marshal from 1862.

Lt Col Sir William Myers commanded the Fusilier Brigade at the Battle of Albuhera in 1811. Initially, he was appointed C...
14/05/2021

Lt Col Sir William Myers commanded the Fusilier Brigade at the Battle of Albuhera in 1811. Initially, he was appointed Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion, 7th Royal Fusiliers in 1804 where they first served in Portugal during the early years of the Peninsula War from April to July 1809.

On the day of battle [Albuhera], Marshal Jean-de-Dieu Soult, the French Commander in Southern Spain, made the first attack which threw the Allied Spanish force in disarray. Despite British troops remaining steadfast, the outnumbered force was in dire straits.

“This will be a proud day for Fusiliers” said Myers and a proud day it became. The Fusilier Brigade, the only British reserve at 1,500 troops, fought with such ferocity and determination that the French waivered and hesitated. However, Myers was mortally wounded by a musket ball whilst encouraging his men to advance on the French. He died the next day in Valverde.

For his actions, the Duke of Wellington wrote to his mother Lady Myers, “It will be some satisfaction to you to know that your son fell in the action, in which, if possible, the British troops surpassed all their former deeds; and, at the head of the Fusilier Brigade, to which a greater part of the final success of the day was to be attributed. As an officer he had already been highly distinguished, and, if Providence had prolonged his life, he promised to become one of the brightest ornaments to his profession, and an honour to his country.”

Image: Portrait of Lt Col Sir William Myers.

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Lt Col Sir William Myers commanded the Fusilier Brigade at the Battle of Albuhera in 1811. Initially, he was appointed Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion, 7th Royal Fusiliers in 1804 where they first served in Portugal during the early years of the Peninsula War from April to July 1809.

On the day of battle [Albuhera], Marshal Jean-de-Dieu Soult, the French Commander in Southern Spain, made the first attack which threw the Allied Spanish force in disarray. Despite British troops remaining steadfast, the outnumbered force was in dire straits.

“This will be a proud day for Fusiliers” said Myers and a proud day it became. The Fusilier Brigade, the only British reserve at 1,500 troops, fought with such ferocity and determination that the French waivered and hesitated. However, Myers was mortally wounded by a musket ball whilst encouraging his men to advance on the French. He died the next day in Valverde.

For his actions, the Duke of Wellington wrote to his mother Lady Myers, “It will be some satisfaction to you to know that your son fell in the action, in which, if possible, the British troops surpassed all their former deeds; and, at the head of the Fusilier Brigade, to which a greater part of the final success of the day was to be attributed. As an officer he had already been highly distinguished, and, if Providence had prolonged his life, he promised to become one of the brightest ornaments to his profession, and an honour to his country.”

Image: Portrait of Lt Col Sir William Myers.

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This Sunday 16 May marks the 210th anniversary of the Peninsula War’s bloodiest battle: The Battle of Albuhera. Over the...
13/05/2021

This Sunday 16 May marks the 210th anniversary of the Peninsula War’s bloodiest battle: The Battle of Albuhera. Over the next few days we will be sharing objects from our collection and stories that make Albuhera a battle to remember on the regimental calendar.

The Fusilier Brigade, which consisted of two battalions from the Royal Fusiliers and the 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, engaged a French Infantry Brigade commanded by General François Jean Werlé. Around 5,600 French troops made up nine battalions from the 12th Légère, 55th Ligne and 58th Ligne which outnumbered the Fusiliers two to one.

Despite his superior numbers, Werlé formed his nine battalions into three columns of regiments. This tactical error meant he could not bring as many muskets to fire altogether. For the Fusiliers, each battalion took on one column and eventually defeated Werlé after half an hour of battle. Whilst the Fusiliers lost half their number, Werlé’s Brigade suffered 1,800 casualties.

Image: A wooden box containing hallowed soil and musket balls from the battlefield at Albuhera which was presented by the villagers of La Albuhera to the Fusilier Museum in 2011.

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#OTD in 1945, the German unconditional surrender took effect which brought hostilities in the European Theatre of the Se...
08/05/2021

#OTD in 1945, the German unconditional surrender took effect which brought hostilities in the European Theatre of the Second World War to an end.

Image: The Prime Minister on the balcony of the Ministry of Health who declared to the crowds, “This is your victory.”

IWM H 41849

#OTD in 1945, the German unconditional surrender took effect which brought hostilities in the European Theatre of the Second World War to an end.

Image: The Prime Minister on the balcony of the Ministry of Health who declared to the crowds, “This is your victory.”

IWM H 41849

Today marks the 200th anniversary of Napoleon Bonaparte’s death on St. Helena.The Royal Fusiliers, then known as the 7th...
05/05/2021

Today marks the 200th anniversary of Napoleon Bonaparte’s death on St. Helena.

The Royal Fusiliers, then known as the 7th Regiment of Foot, served with distinction during the Napoleonic Wars. In early 1809, they took part in the Invasion of Martinique, a French colony in the Caribbean. The besieged French surrendered after four days to which three Eagle Standards were captured by the British. For their accomplishments during the battle, the Royal Fusiliers were awarded the Eagle Standard belonging to the 82nd Regiment of the French Line.

They later saw service during the Peninsula War serving at Badajoz, Salamanca, the Pyrenees and more. During the Battle of Albuhera 1811, the Royal Fusiliers carried their captured Eagle Standard into battle.

Eagle Standards were not dissimilar to British Colours which were used to identify a unit in battle and for respective troops to rally to. Both are regarded as the spirit of their units and were ferociously defended to the death.

Image: The Eagle Standard of the 82nd Regiment of the French Line.

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Today marks the 200th anniversary of Napoleon Bonaparte’s death on St. Helena.

The Royal Fusiliers, then known as the 7th Regiment of Foot, served with distinction during the Napoleonic Wars. In early 1809, they took part in the Invasion of Martinique, a French colony in the Caribbean. The besieged French surrendered after four days to which three Eagle Standards were captured by the British. For their accomplishments during the battle, the Royal Fusiliers were awarded the Eagle Standard belonging to the 82nd Regiment of the French Line.

They later saw service during the Peninsula War serving at Badajoz, Salamanca, the Pyrenees and more. During the Battle of Albuhera 1811, the Royal Fusiliers carried their captured Eagle Standard into battle.

Eagle Standards were not dissimilar to British Colours which were used to identify a unit in battle and for respective troops to rally to. Both are regarded as the spirit of their units and were ferociously defended to the death.

Image: The Eagle Standard of the 82nd Regiment of the French Line.

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Fusiliers and ANZAC Day.The Lancashire Fusiliers famously won ‘6 VCs before breakfast’ #otd in 1915 at Gallipoli:Capt Ri...
25/04/2021

Fusiliers and ANZAC Day.

The Lancashire Fusiliers famously won ‘6 VCs before breakfast’ #otd in 1915 at Gallipoli:

Capt Richard Willis.
Cpl John Grimshaw.
Cpl William Kenealy.
Maj Cuthbert Bromley.
Sgt Alfred Richards.
Sgt Frank Stubbs.

Image: Map of Gallipoli.

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Fusiliers and ANZAC Day.

The Lancashire Fusiliers famously won ‘6 VCs before breakfast’ #otd in 1915 at Gallipoli:

Capt Richard Willis.
Cpl John Grimshaw.
Cpl William Kenealy.
Maj Cuthbert Bromley.
Sgt Alfred Richards.
Sgt Frank Stubbs.

Image: Map of Gallipoli.

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Happy St. George’s Day! Not only do we celebrate the Feast of St. George, but also the formation of the Royal Regiment o...
23/04/2021

Happy St. George’s Day! Not only do we celebrate the Feast of St. George, but also the formation of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in 1968.

Image: Cap badge and hackle worn by a Pte Carpenter, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

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#England #FusilierFamily

Happy St. George’s Day! Not only do we celebrate the Feast of St. George, but also the formation of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in 1968.

Image: Cap badge and hackle worn by a Pte Carpenter, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

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#England #FusilierFamily

#Onthisday in 1951, the Battle of the Imjin River takes place (22-25 April). The battle was part of the Chinese Spring O...
22/04/2021

#Onthisday in 1951, the Battle of the Imjin River takes place (22-25 April).

The battle was part of the Chinese Spring Offensive in the Korean War where 750 members of the 1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment defended against over 10,000 Chinese troops. The regiment was eventually surrounded atop Hill 235 or ‘Gloster Hill,’ but managed to suppress enemy attacks for those four days. This allowed UN forces to regroup which prevented a Chinese breakthrough towards the South Korean capital of Seoul. When ordered to withdraw, only 40 of the 750 reached safety.

Pictured is a flag taken by C/Sgt Finch of the 1st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers from the Guard Room in Iserluhn, Germany to give to the Gloucestershire Regiment in Hong Kong before embarking for Korea.

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#Onthisday in 1951, the Battle of the Imjin River takes place (22-25 April).

The battle was part of the Chinese Spring Offensive in the Korean War where 750 members of the 1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment defended against over 10,000 Chinese troops. The regiment was eventually surrounded atop Hill 235 or ‘Gloster Hill,’ but managed to suppress enemy attacks for those four days. This allowed UN forces to regroup which prevented a Chinese breakthrough towards the South Korean capital of Seoul. When ordered to withdraw, only 40 of the 750 reached safety.

Pictured is a flag taken by C/Sgt Finch of the 1st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers from the Guard Room in Iserluhn, Germany to give to the Gloucestershire Regiment in Hong Kong before embarking for Korea.

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Wishing Her Majesty The Queen a happy 95th birthday!Image: HM visiting the installation “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of R...
21/04/2021

Wishing Her Majesty The Queen a happy 95th birthday!

Image: HM visiting the installation “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” at the Tower of London in 2014 (Getty Images).

Wishing Her Majesty The Queen a happy 95th birthday!

Image: HM visiting the installation “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” at the Tower of London in 2014 (Getty Images).

#OTD in 1945, POWs imprisoned at Colditz Castle are liberated by Allied forces. The castle was used as a prison for Alli...
16/04/2021

#OTD in 1945, POWs imprisoned at Colditz Castle are liberated by Allied forces. The castle was used as a prison for Allied officers from 1940 to 1945 and designated as Oflag IV-C.

Read about J T Fincken-McKay’s story below (Ryan Hooper/PA Wire).

#OTD in 1945, POWs imprisoned at Colditz Castle are liberated by Allied forces. The castle was used as a prison for Allied officers from 1940 to 1945 and designated as Oflag IV-C.

Read about J T Fincken-McKay’s story below (Ryan Hooper/PA Wire).

#Onthisday in 1998, the Good Friday Agreement was signed which brought an end to the conflict in Northern Ireland.Image:...
10/04/2021

#Onthisday in 1998, the Good Friday Agreement was signed which brought an end to the conflict in Northern Ireland.

Image: Members of the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in Northern Ireland (Fusiliers Association).

#Onthisday in 1998, the Good Friday Agreement was signed which brought an end to the conflict in Northern Ireland.

Image: Members of the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in Northern Ireland (Fusiliers Association).

We are saddened to hear about the passing of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh. RIP Sir.Image: HRH meeting Royal Fusilier cadets...
09/04/2021

We are saddened to hear about the passing of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh. RIP Sir.

Image: HRH meeting Royal Fusilier cadets at the Tower of London in 1960.

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We are saddened to hear about the passing of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh. RIP Sir.

Image: HRH meeting Royal Fusilier cadets at the Tower of London in 1960.

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#ThrowbackThursday to when the 1st Battalion, Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was presented new Colours on 23 April 2016. HR...
08/04/2021

#ThrowbackThursday to when the 1st Battalion, Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was presented new Colours on 23 April 2016. HRH The Duke of Kent inspected the battalion at Tidworth Polo Ground that day.

Photo by Cpl D Wiepen RLC/MOD 2016.

#ThrowbackThursday to when the 1st Battalion, Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was presented new Colours on 23 April 2016. HRH The Duke of Kent inspected the battalion at Tidworth Polo Ground that day.

Photo by Cpl D Wiepen RLC/MOD 2016.

Easter Greetings from Doeberitz 1918.This postcard was sent from Döberitz, Germany by Pte Frank Godley to his niece Doll...
04/04/2021

Easter Greetings from Doeberitz 1918.

This postcard was sent from Döberitz, Germany by Pte Frank Godley to his niece Dolly Godley on 6 April 1918.

Godley was captured in August 1914 at Mons and became a POW at Delotz Camp. He remained there until the Armistice.

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It’s #FusilierFriday and today we remember Pte Ectos Maffuniades DCM from the 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. You may r...
02/04/2021

It’s #FusilierFriday and today we remember Pte Ectos Maffuniades DCM from the 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. You may remember him from our Mother’s Day post!

Ectos was born on 9 March 1895 in Dalston, London Borough of Hackney to parents Alexander Maffuniades and Jane Esther Wright Maffuniades. He later enlisted with the army like many other men at the outbreak of the First World War.

He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for saving Captain Roberts who was wounded by a gr***de. The London Gazette announced this on 15 March 1916:

“For conspicuous gallantry in carrying a wounded comrade, at great personal risk, into a place of safety. On a previous occasion he remained alone with his Captain, who was wounded, dragged him a distance of 100 yards into a place of comparative safety, and remained with him till stretcher-bearers arrived.”

Ectos was tragically Killed-in-Action not long after saving Captain Roberts on 28 May 1916. He was only 21 years old. His burial place can be found at Berles-au-Bois Churchyard Cemetery.

The portrait above was donated by his mother to the Imperial War Museum in September 1917.

IWM HU 117805

It’s #FusilierFriday and today we remember Pte Ectos Maffuniades DCM from the 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. You may remember him from our Mother’s Day post!

Ectos was born on 9 March 1895 in Dalston, London Borough of Hackney to parents Alexander Maffuniades and Jane Esther Wright Maffuniades. He later enlisted with the army like many other men at the outbreak of the First World War.

He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for saving Captain Roberts who was wounded by a gr***de. The London Gazette announced this on 15 March 1916:

“For conspicuous gallantry in carrying a wounded comrade, at great personal risk, into a place of safety. On a previous occasion he remained alone with his Captain, who was wounded, dragged him a distance of 100 yards into a place of comparative safety, and remained with him till stretcher-bearers arrived.”

Ectos was tragically Killed-in-Action not long after saving Captain Roberts on 28 May 1916. He was only 21 years old. His burial place can be found at Berles-au-Bois Churchyard Cemetery.

The portrait above was donated by his mother to the Imperial War Museum in September 1917.

IWM HU 117805

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Comments

4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers. Gas training
I’m looking for anything to do with J432 Barnet Vigdor. 38th royal Fusilier. Served 1914- 1920. I know he is listed in the Jewry book of honours and received 2 medals. Long shot but how if possible in locating a photo. Thank you.
I'm searching for the artist Amies Milner. Can anyone help please
A large Mounted Photograph 1st Volunteer Battalion Royal Fusiliers, c1905, with very nice 1VBRF Cloth Shoulder Titles and an unusual combination of Hammers and Pincers with Cycle wheel. Given the presence of "military" bicycles and the badge combination I suspect they are the units bicycle mechanics. Superb detail on this one (scanned in at 1200 DPI), a wonderful image showing the details of the Bicycles. (With permission of Toby Brayley)
Spotted today at Eden Camp Museum
As a New Zealander who lost a great uncle from the 11th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, I remember 2nd Lt William Joseph Francis for ANZAC Day. His body was never identified. KIA defending the Crozat Canal, March 23rd 1918.
A hand-painted self-portrait from my nan to my grandfather, Fusilier Charles Albert Slater (26th Bankers'), fighting in France and Belgium 1916 to 1917. As soon as he had recovered sufficiently from his injuries they wed on St George's Day (of course!); he can be seen here, still proudly wearing his Royal Fusiliers' cap-badge.
Great War recruitment poster for the 3rd City of London Regt (Royal Fusiliers).
Guy Chapmans served as an Officer in the 13th (Service)Battalion RF during the Great War, As did my Grandad.
On the inside cover of my 1922 copy of H.C. O’Neills book of the Royal Fusiliers in the Great War.
H.C. O’Neills book published in 1922.
My Grandad , 13th Royal Fusiliers during the Great War, standing far right.