The Household Cavalry Museum and Shop

The Household Cavalry Museum and Shop The home of Household Cavalry heritage. Dive into 360 years of service to the Sovereign, see our working stables and visit the shop. Go to our website for opening times and our online shop.

Operating as usual

Since the 1700s it has been a tradition in the Officers’ Messes of the Household Cavalry to gift something silver to the...
18/10/2021

Since the 1700s it has been a tradition in the Officers’ Messes of the Household Cavalry to gift something silver to the Mess upon leaving it. This is a story about one of the most extraordinary objects in our collection.

Lawrence Dundas, the Marquess Zetland, purchased a commission in The Blues in 1866. By all accounts, although much given to wearing his regiment’s uniform around town, Dundas didn’t spend a lot of time with the regiment and wasn’t a particularly popular character.

He resigned his commission in 1872 - some say under a bit of a cloud - and left without presenting a gift to the Mess. But following the death of his uncle in 1873, he became the Earl of Zetland, and a very rich man. The Blues rather opportunistically took this moment to remind Dundas that he hadn’t presented a memento of his service to the Mess. Quite the faux pas.

Zetland decided to rectify this by saying offhand: “Oh, buy a piece of silver and send me the bill.” The Blues took him at his word and commissioned a massive solid silver centrepiece so large that it takes four men to lift it. The Blues dining table had to be specially reinforced to bear the weight!

And what was the bill for this enormous piece known as the Zetland Trophy? Well, in 1874 it was £1,000, which equates to £116,000 in today’s money. Crickey!

While his former comrades no doubt laughed at their good fortune - even the well-heeled Lord Zetland drew breath at this eye-wateringly large bill. Today you can see the incredible artistry of the Zetland Trophy up close in the Museum.

16/10/2021

Book your Half Term Open Day tickets now!

16/10/2021

Half term is almost upon us. And with it comes an opportunity for you and your family to meet our soldiers and horses in person!

On Thursday 28 October we’ll be hosting a Families Day extravaganza at the museum with 5 bookable sessions throughout the day - 10am, 11.30, 1pm, 2.30 and 4pm.

Come along and meet the soldiers who guard the Queen and those who work behind the scenes to get the Regiment parade ready. From farriers, tailors, vets and saddlers, you’ll get a special glimpse into life in the Household Cavalry. What’s more, you can meet the horses too!

Book now by heading to https://householdcavalry.co.uk/museum/whats-on/

On 31st January 2010, Trooper Corie Mapp of The Life Guards was driving his armoured vehicle on combat operations in Afg...
14/10/2021

On 31st January 2010, Trooper Corie Mapp of The Life Guards was driving his armoured vehicle on combat operations in Afghanistan when it ran over an IED. The explosion that followed caused him massive injuries. But this was not the end of his active life but rather the beginning.

The next thing Corie remembers was waking in the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Selly Oak, Birmingham, not realising that he was a double amputee. Two months later, and having made an almost miraculous against-the-odds recovery, Corie was back with his regiment in Windsor standing on parade to receive his campaign medal. He continued to serve until 2013.

Sport was an important part of Corie’s life before the explosion and a vital one after. In rehabilitation, he rediscovered his sporting skills, and competed successfully in disabled cricket at a national level, and was a member of Team GB for sitting volley ball and athletics at the Warrior and the Invictus Games. However, when he was offered the chance to bobsleigh, his horizons widened considerably.

After just one year of training, in 2014 Corie won gold in the inaugural Para Bobsleigh World Cup competition in St Moritz, was second overall in the World Cup 2014/15 season and became the overall World Cup champion in 2018. In the 2021-22 season, he will continue to train and compete at the highest levels in North America and Europe.

On the international bobsleigh circuit he is affectionately known ‘Black Ice’. This book is Corie Mapp’s remarkable story of triumph over adversity and it will be on sale at Nine Elms Books. Use code ‘Blparty2021’ to get free UK postage and packaging.

Ni sa bula vinaka.  Vakanuinuivinaka ena kena marautaki na nona mai tu vakataki koya o Viti! Happy Fiji Day! 🇫🇯 Like man...
10/10/2021

Ni sa bula vinaka. Vakanuinuivinaka ena kena marautaki na nona mai tu vakataki koya o Viti!

Happy Fiji Day! 🇫🇯 Like many Regiments in the British Army we are proud to have many Fijian brothers and sisters serving shoulder to shoulder with us. Fijian soldiers have fought in the Household Cavalry with distinction over the last few decades, sometimes at great cost.

We want to celebrate their contribution and remember their sacrifice today.

Pictured is (then) Corporal of Horse Qio, Guard Commander of the Queen’s Life Guard. Stunning 📸 @patchphotos_

Ni sa bula vinaka. Vakanuinuivinaka ena kena marautaki na nona mai tu vakataki koya o Viti!

Happy Fiji Day! 🇫🇯 Like many Regiments in the British Army we are proud to have many Fijian brothers and sisters serving shoulder to shoulder with us. Fijian soldiers have fought in the Household Cavalry with distinction over the last few decades, sometimes at great cost.

We want to celebrate their contribution and remember their sacrifice today.

Pictured is (then) Corporal of Horse Qio, Guard Commander of the Queen’s Life Guard. Stunning 📸 @patchphotos_

It’s 20 years since British troops first deployed to Afghanistan. Around 150,000 servicemen and women served there, 457 ...
07/10/2021

It’s 20 years since British troops first deployed to Afghanistan.

Around 150,000 servicemen and women served there, 457 made the ultimate sacrifice and over 2,000 were wounded.

This photo shows D Squadron operating in the desert of Helmand Province on Operation HERRICK 4 in 2008.

It’s 20 years since British troops first deployed to Afghanistan.

Around 150,000 servicemen and women served there, 457 made the ultimate sacrifice and over 2,000 were wounded.

This photo shows D Squadron operating in the desert of Helmand Province on Operation HERRICK 4 in 2008.

🥁 🥁 🥁 PIN YOUR EARS BACK! ANNOUNCEMENT 📣 Got your attention troops? Good! Starting today the museum will now be open fro...
06/10/2021

🥁 🥁 🥁 PIN YOUR EARS BACK! ANNOUNCEMENT 📣

Got your attention troops? Good! Starting today the museum will now be open from Wednesday to Sunday each week between the hours of 11 am (as the guard change takes place outside) to 4 pm* (when the 4 o’clock inspection happens in the courtyard).

In addition - and hold onto your panic straps for this one friends - we will be holding a Families Day during half term on 28 October. You and your progeny will have a chance to meet some of our soldiers and their horses in person, as well as try on uniforms, tackle activity trails and much more. Head over to our website to book (link in bio).

*last entry at 3pm to ensure you get the best experience.

🥁 🥁 🥁 PIN YOUR EARS BACK! ANNOUNCEMENT 📣

Got your attention troops? Good! Starting today the museum will now be open from Wednesday to Sunday each week between the hours of 11 am (as the guard change takes place outside) to 4 pm* (when the 4 o’clock inspection happens in the courtyard).

In addition - and hold onto your panic straps for this one friends - we will be holding a Families Day during half term on 28 October. You and your progeny will have a chance to meet some of our soldiers and their horses in person, as well as try on uniforms, tackle activity trails and much more. Head over to our website to book (link in bio).

*last entry at 3pm to ensure you get the best experience.

In 1820 two former Household Cavalrymen were involved in a plot to commit murder most foul. They planned to kill the Pri...
05/10/2021

In 1820 two former Household Cavalrymen were involved in a plot to commit murder most foul. They planned to kill the Prime Minister, Lord Liverpool, and his Cabinet while they were dining.

The Cato Street Conspiracy was hatched by men of all walks of life angry about a country in the grips of post-war unrest and policy-induced starvation. But two of them had served the crown.

John Harrison had ridden with the Life Guards under Wellington throughout the Peninsula War. After years of fighting he left the army in 1814 and found that the lot of a former soldier at home was one of hunger and homelessness. It wasn’t long before he fell in with the Cato Street Conspirators and their aim for a revolution in Britain.

Robert Adams had been a Blue, serving with the Royal Horse Guards until 1803. This soldier turned cordwainer (posh boot maker) followed the regiment on the continent making new boots for the Army until Napoleon was defeated and the Blues returned home. Again, he came home to hunger and privation.

Both men were accustomed to using heavy cavalry sabres and fi****ms and became the de facto muscle men of the gang. On 23 February 1820, the conspirators under the instruction of radical Arthur Thistlewood gathered in a cowshed on Cato Street to wait for darkness and the Cabinet dinner to commence. Despite their confidence, all along there had been a traitor among them. The spy George Edwards relayed information to the authorities.

By the time the conspirators descended on Cato Street, Bow Street Runners had already received a warrant for their arrest and were lying in wait with a detachment of Coldstream Guards. The Bow Street Runners ambushed the conspirators in the upper floor of the building where candles were snuffed and a cacophony of shouting, smoke, and gunfire ensued. In the chaos, Thistlewood fatally stabbed a Bow Street Runner before attempting to escape with Harrison and Adams from a second-floor window using a rope ladder. All three were caught.

Of the 27 conspirators most were rounded up eventually. Four were hanged and beheaded for treason while many of those who gave King’s Evidence (including Harrison) were transported to Australia.

Commander Bond visiting the Queen’s Life Guard. 🍸#notimetodie
30/09/2021

Commander Bond visiting the Queen’s Life Guard. 🍸#notimetodie

Commander Bond visiting the Queen’s Life Guard. 🍸#notimetodie

This weekend is your last chance to see the 105th Regiment’s Eagle alongside the medal of the man who captured it. Next ...
24/09/2021

This weekend is your last chance to see the 105th Regiment’s Eagle alongside the medal of the man who captured it. Next week it flies back to the National Army Museum to take pride of place in their Waterloo collection once more.

At 2pm at Waterloo some 2,500 men mounted on large horses moved forward to the trumpet calls of a 16 year old Blue, first in walk, then trot as they passed their infantry and finally surged forward in canter, a wall of horseflesh, thundering hooves and sharpened steel.

To the left of the farm of La Haye Sainte the 1st Dragoons, or Royals, crashed into the 105e Regiment d’Infanterie de Ligne. It was a brutal stabbing, slashing melee. An infantryman recounts: “Horses’ hoofs sinking into men’s breasts, breaking bones and pressing out their bowels. Riders’ swords streaming in blood, waving over their heads and descending in deadly vengeance. Stroke follows stroke, like the turning of a flail…”

Captain Kennedy Clark, a Royals Squadron Leader, takes up the story: “I did not see the eagle…until we had been probably five or six minutes engaged…I gave the order to my squadron ‘Right shoulders forward, attack the colour’, leading direct on the point myself. On reaching it, I ran my sword into the officer's right side a little above his hip joint…I tried to catch it [the colour] with my left hand, but could only touch the fringe of the flag, and it is probable it would have fallen to the ground, had it not been prevented by the neck of Corporal Styles’ horse, who came up close to my left at the instant, and against which it fell.”

Corporal Styles was then ordered to take the Eagle to the rear. Since that day the 105th’s Eagle has become part of the legend of The Royals, now the Blues and Royals. It was worn in battle as a cap badge, has been tattooed onto skin, and continues to be displayed on the sleeves of Blues and Royals to this day.

Please do pop in and learn more about Francis Styles, the Eagle and the Battle of Waterloo. We are open Friday to Sunday. Check the website for times and tickets.

This weekend is your last chance to see the 105th Regiment’s Eagle alongside the medal of the man who captured it. Next week it flies back to the National Army Museum to take pride of place in their Waterloo collection once more.

At 2pm at Waterloo some 2,500 men mounted on large horses moved forward to the trumpet calls of a 16 year old Blue, first in walk, then trot as they passed their infantry and finally surged forward in canter, a wall of horseflesh, thundering hooves and sharpened steel.

To the left of the farm of La Haye Sainte the 1st Dragoons, or Royals, crashed into the 105e Regiment d’Infanterie de Ligne. It was a brutal stabbing, slashing melee. An infantryman recounts: “Horses’ hoofs sinking into men’s breasts, breaking bones and pressing out their bowels. Riders’ swords streaming in blood, waving over their heads and descending in deadly vengeance. Stroke follows stroke, like the turning of a flail…”

Captain Kennedy Clark, a Royals Squadron Leader, takes up the story: “I did not see the eagle…until we had been probably five or six minutes engaged…I gave the order to my squadron ‘Right shoulders forward, attack the colour’, leading direct on the point myself. On reaching it, I ran my sword into the officer's right side a little above his hip joint…I tried to catch it [the colour] with my left hand, but could only touch the fringe of the flag, and it is probable it would have fallen to the ground, had it not been prevented by the neck of Corporal Styles’ horse, who came up close to my left at the instant, and against which it fell.”

Corporal Styles was then ordered to take the Eagle to the rear. Since that day the 105th’s Eagle has become part of the legend of The Royals, now the Blues and Royals. It was worn in battle as a cap badge, has been tattooed onto skin, and continues to be displayed on the sleeves of Blues and Royals to this day.

Please do pop in and learn more about Francis Styles, the Eagle and the Battle of Waterloo. We are open Friday to Sunday. Check the website for times and tickets.

Who can name the event and location here? Another gleaming masterpiece by our Artist in Residence, Rob Pointon. What’s s...
23/09/2021

Who can name the event and location here?

Another gleaming masterpiece by our Artist in Residence, Rob Pointon. What’s special about this is that it’s a rare view of a rare occasion. He’s captured the Sovereign’s Es**rt, Massed Bands, Foot Guards and Red Arrows all in one beautiful capture.

From this week you can see his works in person at the museum where they’ll be on rotation for the next 12 months. Check our website for opening hours.

Who can name the event and location here?

Another gleaming masterpiece by our Artist in Residence, Rob Pointon. What’s special about this is that it’s a rare view of a rare occasion. He’s captured the Sovereign’s Es**rt, Massed Bands, Foot Guards and Red Arrows all in one beautiful capture.

From this week you can see his works in person at the museum where they’ll be on rotation for the next 12 months. Check our website for opening hours.

This painting of a mounted Life Guard on Marquis could belong to any time in the last century. But it’s actually from th...
22/09/2021

This painting of a mounted Life Guard on Marquis could belong to any time in the last century. But it’s actually from this year.

Our dedicated followers will know that we’ve been joined this year by an incredibly talented Artist in Residence, Rob Pointon. His aim has been to document on canvas an extraordinary year in the history of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment.

In doing so he’s managed to capture life behind the scenes in barracks, guard mounts on empty streets, a Covid-sensitive inspection, a Queen’s Birthday Parade in Windsor and much more.

The works are now being displayed in the Household Cavalry Museum in a changing exhibition over the next 12 months. At the end of this period they’ll be sold and a percentage of profits will be given to the Museum and Household Cavalry Foundation.

Visit the museum now to see this wonderful art in person. Make sure you check our website for opening times.

This painting of a mounted Life Guard on Marquis could belong to any time in the last century. But it’s actually from this year.

Our dedicated followers will know that we’ve been joined this year by an incredibly talented Artist in Residence, Rob Pointon. His aim has been to document on canvas an extraordinary year in the history of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment.

In doing so he’s managed to capture life behind the scenes in barracks, guard mounts on empty streets, a Covid-sensitive inspection, a Queen’s Birthday Parade in Windsor and much more.

The works are now being displayed in the Household Cavalry Museum in a changing exhibition over the next 12 months. At the end of this period they’ll be sold and a percentage of profits will be given to the Museum and Household Cavalry Foundation.

Visit the museum now to see this wonderful art in person. Make sure you check our website for opening times.

Not your typical turn out for a Cavalry Black. During the ceremonial period our horses work hard. But when they get leav...
21/09/2021

Not your typical turn out for a Cavalry Black. During the ceremonial period our horses work hard. But when they get leave (or ‘grass leave’) they play hard too.

On return from the Defence Animal Centre, Melton Mowbray, our soldiers have their work cut out for them. Washing, clipping, washing some more, trimming, sponging, currying and brushing. The Troops soon have these big monsters looking parade ready again - and then, like any athlete at the start of the season, they start build up training.

Address

Horse Guards, Whitehall, London SW1A 2AX
London
SW1A 2AX

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 10am - 5pm

Telephone

0207 930 3070

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Comments

I took this photo at Horse Guards on Tuesday 27th July 2021. The young lady had just come on guard at 13-00.
John Southcott Southwood was the first commoner to rise through the ranks of the 1st Life Guards to retire as a Major. Attested 1st Life Guards January 8,1851 Promoted Corporal of Horse April 6, 1859 (Sergeant) Promoted Troop Corporal Major December 11, 1867 Promoted Lieutenant August 12, 1874 Promoted Captain October 29, 1879 Retired as Major November 24, 1882
Stupid question maybe ,are the troopers boots passed down or does each trooper get a new pair?
I vacationed in London at the beginning of October, enjoyed visiting the museum. With all of the people around, I was still able to capture this photo that I printed on canvas, wanted to share. He was kind enough to catch a moment to pose without the crowd so I could get the shot.
Me visite to london, its a beautyfull place to be.
Cant wait to come and see my grandson on parade in london after his full training in catterick, I have never seen a boy so keen has he his , he his really doing well so proud of him.And my father would of been so proud and my grandfather all milatary , dad in the bomb disposel
CAN YOU HELP? We are putting a shout out to try and help a little boy who lost a much-loved toy dog at the Dismount Parade at Horse Guards yesterday afternoon. If you found this and handed it in or see a toy dog, described by his Mum as brown and bit tatty, lying around the area please send us a message and lets see if we can reunite this little man with his lost friend.
Hey All! Dan and the team have worked very hard setting up a dedicated page for The Forgotten Army Dogtag Project- here is a link https://m.facebook.com/ForgottenArmyDogtagProject/ We will post updates here and other places but the main hub for all things dogtags will be there! Come give us a follow and share it around! About everyday we are uncovering new stories of soldiers behind the tags. Thanks!! Lots of local regiments and residents who knows possibly a family members tags are amongst them
Veterans For Britain Report: Chequers Sacrifices British Control Over Armed Forces In effect, the Withdrawal Agreement and proposed Defence Treaty would keep the UK under EU power permanently – even after the end of the ‘transition period’.