The Charles Dickens Museum

The Charles Dickens Museum The Charles Dickens Museum is the only surviving London residence of the great Victorian novelist and social commentator. It houses the world's most important collection of his writing and material related to his life.
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Operating as usual

Any guesses what this is? 🔍
14/06/2021

Any guesses what this is? 🔍

Any guesses what this is? 🔍

If you were lucky enough to be a rich Victorian, you could expect a much nicer variety of foods, especially meats. The V...
13/06/2021

If you were lucky enough to be a rich Victorian, you could expect a much nicer variety of foods, especially meats. The Victorian Era gave rise to the Great British Roast Dinner, the Full English Breakfast and Afternoon Tea.

This was a lot more filling and nutritious than the poor, and Dickens himself often indicates how wealthy his characters are by depicting their meals. In fact, in the Victorian Era, your social class would dictate your physical appearance. Middle class and wealthy Victorian men were among the tallest in the world at 5ft 9. Poor men would generally only reach about 5ft 1.

Although the wealthy ate much better than the poor, their diet was still far healthier than ours is today. Victorians were a staggering 90% less likely to develop cancer, dementia, heart disease or other wasting illnesses. Of course the poor were far more likely to die of exhaustion.

If you were lucky enough to be a rich Victorian, you could expect a much nicer variety of foods, especially meats. The Victorian Era gave rise to the Great British Roast Dinner, the Full English Breakfast and Afternoon Tea.

This was a lot more filling and nutritious than the poor, and Dickens himself often indicates how wealthy his characters are by depicting their meals. In fact, in the Victorian Era, your social class would dictate your physical appearance. Middle class and wealthy Victorian men were among the tallest in the world at 5ft 9. Poor men would generally only reach about 5ft 1.

Although the wealthy ate much better than the poor, their diet was still far healthier than ours is today. Victorians were a staggering 90% less likely to develop cancer, dementia, heart disease or other wasting illnesses. Of course the poor were far more likely to die of exhaustion.

Food plays a huge part in Dickens's novels, and he often invokes the look and smell of a meal to indicate the wealth - o...
13/06/2021

Food plays a huge part in Dickens's novels, and he often invokes the look and smell of a meal to indicate the wealth - or lack thereof - of the character eating.

Poor folk were likely to eat cheap foods like watercress, oysters, eels and plenty of nuts. They ate a lot more calories than we do per day, with their main staple being bread, beer and potatoes, however they were also far more active than we are today, so this wasn't always a bad thing.

One common dish of the poor was Peas Pudding, a thick stew made out of peas, which people generally just kept adding too as more scraps or leftovers became available. This gave rise to the popular nursery rhyme;

"Pease Pudding Hot, Pease Pudding Cold, Pease Pudding in the Pot Nine Days Old."

Food plays a huge part in Dickens's novels, and he often invokes the look and smell of a meal to indicate the wealth - or lack thereof - of the character eating.

Poor folk were likely to eat cheap foods like watercress, oysters, eels and plenty of nuts. They ate a lot more calories than we do per day, with their main staple being bread, beer and potatoes, however they were also far more active than we are today, so this wasn't always a bad thing.

One common dish of the poor was Peas Pudding, a thick stew made out of peas, which people generally just kept adding too as more scraps or leftovers became available. This gave rise to the popular nursery rhyme;

"Pease Pudding Hot, Pease Pudding Cold, Pease Pudding in the Pot Nine Days Old."

Just a few more days left of our Technicolor Dickens Exhibition. 😱📸 Our curator Frankie installing Dickens's waistcoat a...
12/06/2021

Just a few more days left of our Technicolor Dickens Exhibition. 😱

📸 Our curator Frankie installing Dickens's waistcoat and other personal artefacts.

https://buff.ly/3pL0ifv

Just a few more days left of our Technicolor Dickens Exhibition. 😱

📸 Our curator Frankie installing Dickens's waistcoat and other personal artefacts.

https://buff.ly/3pL0ifv

If you absolutely have to choose, which #Dickens novel is your favorite? 🤔Comment your answers below! ⬇️
10/06/2021

If you absolutely have to choose, which #Dickens novel is your favorite? 🤔

Comment your answers below! ⬇️

If you absolutely have to choose, which #Dickens novel is your favorite? 🤔

Comment your answers below! ⬇️

There's still time to see our Technicolour Dickens Exhibition. We're exploring the celebrity of Dickens as seen by the V...
10/06/2021

There's still time to see our Technicolour Dickens Exhibition.

We're exploring the celebrity of Dickens as seen by the Victorians. Through letters, sketches, photos and collectible items, we're looking at the Charles Dickens who was presented to the world at the height of his fame - and seeing what he really thought of it!

Including eight colourised portraits of Charles Dickens, we're bringing Dickens to technicolour life! You won't look at him the same way again!

Exhibition ends 16th June 2021

There's still time to see our Technicolour Dickens Exhibition.

We're exploring the celebrity of Dickens as seen by the Victorians. Through letters, sketches, photos and collectible items, we're looking at the Charles Dickens who was presented to the world at the height of his fame - and seeing what he really thought of it!

Including eight colourised portraits of Charles Dickens, we're bringing Dickens to technicolour life! You won't look at him the same way again!

Exhibition ends 16th June 2021

#OTD in 1870, Charles Dickens died. His last words were as witty as any of his writings. When his sister-in-law, Georgin...
09/06/2021

#OTD in 1870, Charles Dickens died.

His last words were as witty as any of his writings. When his sister-in-law, Georgina requested that he lay down, he simply looked back at her and replied, "On the Ground."

📸 The Mary Hogarth Room with items relating to Dickens's death, including some sketches and even the remains of a rose, cast onto Dickens's coffin at his funeral.

#OTD in 1870, Charles Dickens died.

His last words were as witty as any of his writings. When his sister-in-law, Georgina requested that he lay down, he simply looked back at her and replied, "On the Ground."

📸 The Mary Hogarth Room with items relating to Dickens's death, including some sketches and even the remains of a rose, cast onto Dickens's coffin at his funeral.

A tallow candle holder, a desk and a Victorian toilet?These are all items from our collection here at the Charles Dicken...
08/06/2021

A tallow candle holder, a desk and a Victorian toilet?

These are all items from our collection here at the Charles Dickens Museum. In fact we have about 100,000 items! Despite this, we keep the museum looking homely and it is presented as it may have looked when the Dickens's lived here.

https://buff.ly/3vR2STu

A tallow candle holder, a desk and a Victorian toilet?

These are all items from our collection here at the Charles Dickens Museum. In fact we have about 100,000 items! Despite this, we keep the museum looking homely and it is presented as it may have looked when the Dickens's lived here.

https://buff.ly/3vR2STu

In 1837, Dickens moved here, to 48 Doughty Street and it was while living in this house that he wrote perhaps his most f...
08/06/2021

In 1837, Dickens moved here, to 48 Doughty Street and it was while living in this house that he wrote perhaps his most famous work of all, Oliver Twist!

Dickens spent many hours wandering the streets of London, observing all he saw and experienced while drawing inspiration from the colourful places and people he encountered.

Join us on our 'Twists and Turns!' guided tour around London, as we follow in the footsteps of Dickens, discovering the places and events which helped shape his literary works. A world of pickpockets and prostitutes, murders and executions; a world which drove Dickens to champion social reform.

https://buff.ly/3vPysRN

In 1837, Dickens moved here, to 48 Doughty Street and it was while living in this house that he wrote perhaps his most famous work of all, Oliver Twist!

Dickens spent many hours wandering the streets of London, observing all he saw and experienced while drawing inspiration from the colourful places and people he encountered.

Join us on our 'Twists and Turns!' guided tour around London, as we follow in the footsteps of Dickens, discovering the places and events which helped shape his literary works. A world of pickpockets and prostitutes, murders and executions; a world which drove Dickens to champion social reform.

https://buff.ly/3vPysRN

Today a wreath will be laid upon the grave of Charles Dickens at @westminsterabbeylondon to commemorate the anniversary ...
07/06/2021

Today a wreath will be laid upon the grave of Charles Dickens at @westminsterabbeylondon to commemorate the anniversary of his death.

This ceremony is undertaken every year as a way of remembering the remarkable legacy of Dickens.

In fact he died on June 9th, however the ceremony has been brought forward by a few days so as to not clash with the Abbeys use as a temporary vaccination centre.

Today a wreath will be laid upon the grave of Charles Dickens at @westminsterabbeylondon to commemorate the anniversary of his death.

This ceremony is undertaken every year as a way of remembering the remarkable legacy of Dickens.

In fact he died on June 9th, however the ceremony has been brought forward by a few days so as to not clash with the Abbeys use as a temporary vaccination centre.

In 'The Cricket on the Hearth' Dickens wrote about Mrs Peerybingle's attempt at boiling the kettle. "she lost her temper...
06/06/2021

In 'The Cricket on the Hearth' Dickens wrote about Mrs Peerybingle's attempt at boiling the kettle. "she lost her temper, or mislaid it for an instant; for the water being uncomfortably cold, and in the slippery, slushy, sleety sort of state wherin it seems to pe*****te through every kind of substance... and even splashed her legs."

Who thinks Dickens may have been speaking about his own experiences of soaking himself from the kettle!? 😂

This teacup forms part of the collection here at the Museum, and was once owned by Charles Dickens himself - who knows, maybe it was this very cup of tea which caused Dickens to think of the 'Slippery, slushy, sleety sort of state.' 😊

In 'The Cricket on the Hearth' Dickens wrote about Mrs Peerybingle's attempt at boiling the kettle. "she lost her temper, or mislaid it for an instant; for the water being uncomfortably cold, and in the slippery, slushy, sleety sort of state wherin it seems to pe*****te through every kind of substance... and even splashed her legs."

Who thinks Dickens may have been speaking about his own experiences of soaking himself from the kettle!? 😂

This teacup forms part of the collection here at the Museum, and was once owned by Charles Dickens himself - who knows, maybe it was this very cup of tea which caused Dickens to think of the 'Slippery, slushy, sleety sort of state.' 😊

#DYK This rather grand suit, complete with decorative sword, is one of the only remaining items of clothing known to hav...
05/06/2021

#DYK This rather grand suit, complete with decorative sword, is one of the only remaining items of clothing known to have belonged to Charles Dickens.

If it looks a bit posh, its because it was worn when Dickens was invited to St James' Palace to be presented to The Prince of Wales in 1870. As you can imagine, the Victorian Royal Court had very strict codes of dress, and this outfit was made for Dickens to fit the specifications of the Royal Household. 👑

Today it is on display in the room used by Dickens as his dressing room.

#DYK This rather grand suit, complete with decorative sword, is one of the only remaining items of clothing known to have belonged to Charles Dickens.

If it looks a bit posh, its because it was worn when Dickens was invited to St James' Palace to be presented to The Prince of Wales in 1870. As you can imagine, the Victorian Royal Court had very strict codes of dress, and this outfit was made for Dickens to fit the specifications of the Royal Household. 👑

Today it is on display in the room used by Dickens as his dressing room.

We're Open!  👋We're taking part in The National Lottery Open Week to say a huge thanks to #nationallottery players for t...
04/06/2021

We're Open! 👋

We're taking part in The National Lottery Open Week to say a huge thanks to #nationallottery players for their support.

Between 9th and 11th June 2021 you can get free admission to the Charles Dickens museum when you present a National Lottery ticket or scratch card!

We're Open! 👋

We're taking part in The National Lottery Open Week to say a huge thanks to #nationallottery players for their support.

Between 9th and 11th June 2021 you can get free admission to the Charles Dickens museum when you present a National Lottery ticket or scratch card!

He's hard to recognize without his trademark beard! #DYK Charles Dickens was a very snazzy dresser, who often wore brigh...
04/06/2021

He's hard to recognize without his trademark beard!

#DYK Charles Dickens was a very snazzy dresser, who often wore bright colours and patterns. It's a world away from the traditional image of the dour, grey Victorian portraits.

To celebrate Dickens’s legacy, the Museum has commissioned eight colourised portraits from the Museum’s collection by artist and photographer @oclyde to bring Dickens to new, ‘technicolour’ life. Large scale, and in vivid colour, you will see Dickens like you have never seen him before.

You'll have to hurry though - the exhibition ends 16th June 2021.

https://buff.ly/3vR2STu

He's hard to recognize without his trademark beard!

#DYK Charles Dickens was a very snazzy dresser, who often wore bright colours and patterns. It's a world away from the traditional image of the dour, grey Victorian portraits.

To celebrate Dickens’s legacy, the Museum has commissioned eight colourised portraits from the Museum’s collection by artist and photographer @oclyde to bring Dickens to new, ‘technicolour’ life. Large scale, and in vivid colour, you will see Dickens like you have never seen him before.

You'll have to hurry though - the exhibition ends 16th June 2021.

https://buff.ly/3vR2STu

Are you looking for a #family outing this half term? 🙋Our Education Team are inviting you to the Charles Dickens Museum ...
03/06/2021

Are you looking for a #family outing this half term? 🙋

Our Education Team are inviting you to the Charles Dickens Museum for a guided tour with you and your little ones! Try to identify some mystery Victorian objects, hear the fascinating story of the Dickens's London home and even play one or two Victorian parlor games! Fun for all the Family! 🤗

https://buff.ly/3yWHFtj

Are you looking for a #family outing this half term? 🙋

Our Education Team are inviting you to the Charles Dickens Museum for a guided tour with you and your little ones! Try to identify some mystery Victorian objects, hear the fascinating story of the Dickens's London home and even play one or two Victorian parlor games! Fun for all the Family! 🤗

https://buff.ly/3yWHFtj

This week it's #nationalvolunteerweek and we'd like to say a great big thank you to all of our volunteers! 👏This is Kath...
03/06/2021

This week it's #nationalvolunteerweek and we'd like to say a great big thank you to all of our volunteers! 👏

This is Kathy, one of our two garden volunteers, who helps maintain our beautiful outdoor space at 48 Doughty Street. 🌺

To Kathy and all of our volunteers, and to all of the people across the UK who generously give their time to support and promote heritage organizations, we say Thank You! 💛

This week it's #nationalvolunteerweek and we'd like to say a great big thank you to all of our volunteers! 👏

This is Kathy, one of our two garden volunteers, who helps maintain our beautiful outdoor space at 48 Doughty Street. 🌺

To Kathy and all of our volunteers, and to all of the people across the UK who generously give their time to support and promote heritage organizations, we say Thank You! 💛

“From the death of each day’s hope another hope sprung up to live to-morrow.” - The Old Curiosity Shop#ThoughtOfTheDay #...
31/05/2021

“From the death of each day’s hope another hope sprung up to live to-morrow.” - The Old Curiosity Shop

#ThoughtOfTheDay #QuoteOfTheDay #QOTD #MondayMotivation #OldCuriosityShop #Dickens #DickensMuseum 💛

“From the death of each day’s hope another hope sprung up to live to-morrow.” - The Old Curiosity Shop

#ThoughtOfTheDay #QuoteOfTheDay #QOTD #MondayMotivation #OldCuriosityShop #Dickens #DickensMuseum 💛

Feels like a good time to make the most of a fairly quiet #London so hop in your carriages and get thee to the Museum! O...
26/05/2021

Feels like a good time to make the most of a fairly quiet #London so hop in your carriages and get thee to the Museum!

Open 5 days a week Wednesday – Sundays, 10am-5pm. Book ahead: https://bit.ly/3hJgOLa

Illustration - Passengers squashed in a cab, original pencil drawing by FW Pailthorpe

Feels like a good time to make the most of a fairly quiet #London so hop in your carriages and get thee to the Museum!

Open 5 days a week Wednesday – Sundays, 10am-5pm. Book ahead: https://bit.ly/3hJgOLa

Illustration - Passengers squashed in a cab, original pencil drawing by FW Pailthorpe

“I have been bent and broken but - I hope - into a better shape” ~ Great Expectations#ThoughtOfTheDay #QuoteOfTheDay #Su...
23/05/2021

“I have been bent and broken but - I hope - into a better shape” ~ Great Expectations

#ThoughtOfTheDay #QuoteOfTheDay #SundayThoughts #GreatExpectations #Dickens #DickensMuseum ❤️

“I have been bent and broken but - I hope - into a better shape” ~ Great Expectations

#ThoughtOfTheDay #QuoteOfTheDay #SundayThoughts #GreatExpectations #Dickens #DickensMuseum ❤️

So here’s the all-important question that we know has been on your mind this #InternationalTeaDay! Given the chance whic...
21/05/2021

So here’s the all-important question that we know has been on your mind this #InternationalTeaDay! Given the chance which fictional character would you love to have a cuppa with? We’ll go first – our pick is Mr Dick from #DavidCopperfield because who doesn’t love a little eccentricity?! ☕

Comment below with your choices 👇

#Dickens #LiteraryCharacters #TeaTime #DickensMuseum #FridayFeeling

So here’s the all-important question that we know has been on your mind this #InternationalTeaDay! Given the chance which fictional character would you love to have a cuppa with? We’ll go first – our pick is Mr Dick from #DavidCopperfield because who doesn’t love a little eccentricity?! ☕

Comment below with your choices 👇

#Dickens #LiteraryCharacters #TeaTime #DickensMuseum #FridayFeeling

Thank you to all of our lovely visitors today including the feline kind! You've made the house a home again and reopenin...
19/05/2021

Thank you to all of our lovely visitors today including the feline kind! You've made the house a home again and reopening all that more special 🥰 #BackToMuseums

Looking forward to welcoming you all in the coming weeks and months! #HereForYou #HereForCulture #LetsDoLondon

Thank you to all of our lovely visitors today including the feline kind! You've made the house a home again and reopening all that more special 🥰 #BackToMuseums

Looking forward to welcoming you all in the coming weeks and months! #HereForYou #HereForCulture #LetsDoLondon

Address

48 Doughty Street
London
WC1N 2LX

Nearest Tube Stations: Russell Square (Piccadilly Line) Chancery Lane (Central Line) By Bus: 7, 17, 19, 38, 45, 46, 55, 243.

General information

We are open Tuesday-Sunday, and bank holiday Monday's 10am - 5pm (Last admission is at 4pm) Admission: Adults £9 Concessions (Seniors / Students) £7 Children £4 (6 - 16 years) Children 5 years and under go free

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 10am - 5pm

Telephone

+442074052127

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Tricolore Theatre Company is delighted to announce our lockdown project, Grimaldi’s Last Act, an audio play based on Joseph Grimaldi’s biography by Charles Dickens. Click here to listen to the recording: https://soundcloud.com/tricolore_2008/grimaldis-whim You can listen FREE of charge. However, if you would like to support our (not-for-profit) work, please consider donating to Tricolore Theatre Company using the donate button on our website www.tricolore.org.uk #theatre #italian #regency #grimaldi #audioPlay #charlesdickens #clown #angloitalian #clerkenwell #islington #camdentown #arts Photo credit: Public domain. Possibly Piercy Roberts. PS: I have just become a member of the Charles Dickens Museum and look forward to visiting soon! ;-)
Charles Dickens.. 91cm x 91cm. An expressive portrait of a man who created many beloved literary works.
Could the name Trotwood have a literary meaning? Trot wood? Hinting at what happened to the character before the encounter with Dickens´ hero?
My husband bought all my Christmas presents from the Charles Dickens Museum this year to make us both happy!
Today's read.
A watercolour painting I've done of Scrooge.
A watercolour painting I've done of Scrooge & Marley's ghost.
I read the following letter which Dickens wrote to the Times in 1867 with interest. Was Dickens right or wrong and how much so? There are also 2 enjoyable letters about his views on social reform and trains. https://www.thetimes.co.uk/letterarchive/Charles_Dickens.html#collapse2 September 4, 1867 To the editor of The Times Sir, -A newspaper paragraph (originating, I have no doubt, in some innocent mistake), to the effect that I am much out of health, has become widely circulated, both in England and abroad, and has brought many inquiries upon me. Will you allow me to state in your columns that the statement is wholly destitute of foundation, and that I was never better in my life? Faithfully yours, CHARLES DICKENS.
I ordered some presents at the museum's shop and I am overwhelmed by the very fast shipment as well as the friendly note accompanying my parcel. THANK YOU VERY MUCH! Hoping to be able to visit the museum again in the near future. Lovely place!
A Watercolour painting I've done of Scrooge.
I recommend Dominic Gerrard's A Christmas Carol.