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The U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum with its inspiring accessibility solutions has opened its doors to public. The muse...
23/04/2021

The U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum with its inspiring accessibility solutions has opened its doors to public. The museum is located in Olympic City USA, which is where the national teams train.
The proximity of the location to Colorado Springs, the natural setting that attracts millions of tourists each year, is considered as having an impact on the number of visitors.

The oldest door still in use in Rome at the Pantheon. Cast in bronze for emperor Hadrian's rebuilding, the doors date fr...
20/04/2021

The oldest door still in use in Rome at the Pantheon. Cast in bronze for emperor Hadrian's rebuilding, the doors date from about 115 AD. Each door is solid bronze, 4.45m wide by 7.53m high, yet so well balanced they can be pushed or pulled open easily by one person.

The History of Interior Design.The designers at HomeAdvisor recently showcased how interior design trends changed over t...
18/04/2021

The History of Interior Design.
The designers at HomeAdvisor recently showcased how interior design trends changed over the past 600 years - from the wooden panels in Renaissance apartments to the abstract furniture in Postmodern homes.

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18/04/2021

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ArtHistory 101⚡😾⚡
17/04/2021

ArtHistory 101

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ArtHistory 101

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13/04/2021

In honour of a storied legacy of cultural enrichment for New Yorkers and international communities alike, today’s Google Doodle celebrates the 151st Anniversary of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens—businessmen and financiers as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day—who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. On this day in 1870, the museum was officially incorporated and soon after acquired its first work of art: a Roman sarcophagus.

The Met has come quite a long way from that first showing to become New York’s largest art museum, with a permanent collection of over 1.5 million objects, spanning over 5,000 years from nearly every corner of the globe.

Visit the below link for a closer look at the artworks featured in today’s Doodle:
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/object-package?pkgids=685

'The Fall of the Rebel Angels', sculpted by Agostino Fasolato, is a pyramid of 60 figures, carved from a two-meter high ...
10/04/2021

'The Fall of the Rebel Angels', sculpted by Agostino Fasolato, is a pyramid of 60 figures, carved from a two-meter high single piece of marble. It is exhibited at Gallerie d'Italia's Palazzo Leoni Montanari.

'The Fall of the Rebel Angels', sculpted by Agostino Fasolato, is a pyramid of 60 figures, carved from a two-meter high single piece of marble. It is exhibited at Gallerie d'Italia's Palazzo Leoni Montanari.

04/04/2021

A graffiti artwork by US street art legend JonOne that was on display in South Korea has been damaged by a couple who thought brushes and paint laid in front of the piece were for visitors' use.
The piece was painted in front of a live audience in Seoul in 2016 and the materials had since been left at the front of the artwork forming part of the exhibit.

"They thought they were allowed to do that as participatory art and made a mistake," the head of the exhibition in Seoul told Reuters news agency.

After staff spotted fresh brushstrokes CCTV footage identified the accidental vandals, a man and woman in their 20s.

The untitled piece is estimated to be worth about $500,000 (£360,000).

Stairs designed by Leonardo Da Vinci in 1516 for the Château de Chambord in France. The building is one of the most reco...
03/04/2021

Stairs designed by Leonardo Da Vinci in 1516 for the Château de Chambord in France. The building is one of the most recognisable châteaux in the world because of its very distinctive French Renaissance architecture which blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Renaissance structures. The building, which was never completed, was constructed by Francis I, who was King of France from 1515 until 1547.
It was built to serve as a hunting lodge for Francis I. The original design is attributed to Italian architect Domenico da Cortona; Leonardo da Vinci may also have been involved or influenced the design.

Colourised photograph of the discovery of the statue of Antinous in Delphi, Greece in 1894. The statue was sculpted from...
03/04/2021

Colourised photograph of the discovery of the statue of Antinous in Delphi, Greece in 1894. The statue was sculpted from Parian marble between 117-138 AD and it was discovered upright on its pedestal, next to the wall of a brick chamber, alongside the holy Temple of Apollo, protector of the Oracle of Delphi. Its height is 180 cm and it is on display at the Archaeological Museum of Delphi

Antinous was a young Greek of extraordinary beauty from Bithynia, who became the beloved companion of the Roman emperor Hadrian, but later died in Nile under mysterious circumstances. Stricken by the death of Antinous, Emperor Hadrian ordered that statues of the young man be erected in all sanctuaries and cities of his vast empire. Furthermore, he ordered the institution and establishment of Games in honor of Antinous, who since then was honored and worshiped as a god.

UK police are prohibited from searching the Queen’s home for looted goods. Queen Elizabeth II is exempt from a law prote...
02/04/2021

UK police are prohibited from searching the Queen’s home for looted goods. Queen Elizabeth II is exempt from a law protecting cultural artifacts, reveals a report released on Thursday by the Guardian. Police have been barred from searching her private estates for looted or stolen artifacts since 2017, when the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Act was signed into law.

Though the legislation primarily concerns the protection of cultural heritage during wartime, it also made the buying and selling of looted items a criminal offense punishable by up to seven years in prison. It likewise gave police the power to search areas where they suspect such artifacts may be held. In a letter to Buckingham Palace in February 2016, an official for the former culture secretary John Whittingdale said the law contained “measures that established new powers of entry upon land and thereby affects the interests of the crown.”

“We wish to ensure that the powers of part four of the bill are not exercisable in relation to Her Majesty’s private estates,” the official wrote.

The immunity was granted by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). Documents obtained by the Guardian under the Freedom of Information Act suggest the department concealed the reasons for the exemption from the public by deliberately using obscure language. However, the DCMS denied the claims and said it is “common for legislation to include an exception for Her Majesty the Queen in her private capacity.”

The disclosure comes at a tumultuous time for the royal family, embroiled in controversy since an Oprah interview with Meghan Markle and Prince Harry exposed systemic racism in an institution many see as increasingly outdated. Calls to dismantle the monarchic system are growing louder, and over 60,000 people have signed a petition demanding investigations into the ability of the Queen — an unelected individual — to influence lawmaking.

A spokesperson for the Queen dismissed suggestions that there might be looted goods on her properties, the Guardian said.

The British Museum will finally return the 2,500 year-old Parthenon Marbles to their homeland.Link: tinyurl.com/Partheno...
01/04/2021

The British Museum will finally return the 2,500 year-old Parthenon Marbles to their homeland.
Link: tinyurl.com/ParthenonMarblesReturn

The Musée du Louvre in Paris has announced that it has put nearly half a million items from its collection online for th...
27/03/2021
Louvre site des collections

The Musée du Louvre in Paris has announced that it has put nearly half a million items from its collection online for the public to visit free of charge. As part of a major revamp of its online presence, the world's most-visited museum has created a new database of 482,000 items at https://collections.louvre.fr with more than three-quarters already labelled with information and pictures.

It comes after a year of pandemic-related shutdowns that has seen an explosion in visits to its main website, louvre.fr, which has also been given a major makeover.

"It's a step that has been in preparation for several years with the aim of serving the general public as well as researchers. Accessibility is at the heart of our mission," said president-director Jean-Luc Martinez.

The new database includes not only items on public display in the museum but also those in storage, including at its new state-of-the-art facility at Lievin in northern France.

Visit the collection here:
https://collections.louvre.fr

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Authorities recover intricate Renaissance armor stolen from the Musée du Louvre in 1983.An appraiser’s quick thinking he...
27/03/2021

Authorities recover intricate Renaissance armor stolen from the Musée du Louvre in 1983.
An appraiser’s quick thinking helped recover the treasures, which vanished from the Paris museum 38 years ago. On May 31, 1983, two pieces of Renaissance-era metalwork vanished from the Louvre’s collections overnight.

A military antiques expert was working to appraise an inheritance collection in Bordeaux when he spotted gold- and silver-encrusted body armor and a helmet that piqued his suspicion. He contacted police, who confirmed that the artifacts numbered among 100,000 stolen artworks listed on Treima, an online database of stolen fine art, according to Today24.

Local authorities are still investigating how the stolen works ended up in the Bordeaux family’s collections, reports Caroline Goldstein for Artnet News.

According to a Louvre statement quoted by CNN’s Jack Guy and Saskya Vandoorne, the theft “deeply troubled” museum officials, though the crime remained “little known to the general public.”

Baroness Salomon de Rothschild, a member of the famous banking family, bequeathed the armor to the French state in 1922. Milanese metalworkers likely created the intricate pieces, which are valued at an estimated $600,000, between 1560 and 1580, per Artnet News.

On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 AM, the atomic bomb Little Boy exploded in the city of Hiroshima. This clock, which was recov...
26/03/2021

On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 AM, the atomic bomb Little Boy exploded in the city of Hiroshima. This clock, which was recovered from the destroyed area, is on display at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. It stopped at the exact time of the tragedy, immortalizing a dark moment of the human history.

Tens of thousands of ice age paintings across a cliff face found in the depths of the Amazon in Colombia has shed light ...
26/03/2021

Tens of thousands of ice age paintings across a cliff face found in the depths of the Amazon in Colombia has shed light on people and animals from 12,500 years ago.

The discovery was made by a British-Colombian team, funded by the European Research Council . Its leader is José Iriarte, professor of archaeology at the University of Exeter and a leading expert on the Amazon and pre-Columbian history.

Hailed as “the Sistine Chapel of the ancients”, archaeologists have found tens of thousands of paintings of animals and humans created up to 12,500 years ago across cliff faces that stretch across nearly eight miles in Colombia.

Their date is based partly on their depictions of now-extinct ice age animals, such as the mastodon, a prehistoric relative of the elephant that hasn’t roamed South America for at least 12,000 years. There are also images of the palaeolama, an extinct camelid, as well as giant sloths and ice age horses.

These animals were all seen and painted by some of the very first humans ever to reach the Amazon. Their pictures give a glimpse into a lost, ancient civilisation.

A team of archaeologists and film-makers trekked on foot for around four hours. They somehow avoided the region’s most dangerous inhabitants. “Caimans are everywhere, and we did keep our wits about us with snakes,” Al-Shamahi said, recalling an enormous bushmaster – “the deadliest snake in the Americas with an 80% mortality rate” – that blocked their jungle path.

The discovery was made last year, but has been kept secret until now as it was filmed for a major Channel 4 series to be screened in December: Jungle Mystery: Lost Kingdoms of the Amazon.

The site is in the Serranía de la Lindosa where, along with the Chiribiquete national park, other rock art had been found. The documentary’s presenter, Ella Al-Shamahi, an archaeologist and explorer, told the Observer: “The new site is so new, they haven’t even given it a name yet.”

As the documentary notes, Colombia is a land torn apart after 50 years of civil war that raged between Farc guerrillas and the Colombian government, now with an uneasy truce in place. The territory where the paintings have been discovered was completely off limits until recently and still involves careful negotiation to enter safely.

Al-Shamahi said: “When we entered Farc territory, it was exactly as a few of us have been screaming about for a long time. Exploration is not over. Scientific discovery is not over but the big discoveries now are going to be found in places that are disputed or hostile.”

Source: The Guardian/Observer

The University of Aberdeen is set to return a pillaged Benin bronze to Nigeria. The controversial Benin bronze will retu...
26/03/2021

The University of Aberdeen is set to return a pillaged Benin bronze to Nigeria. The controversial Benin bronze will return after a review found the item had been acquired in an “extremely immoral” manner, as the Nigerian government calls on other British museums to reassess their collections.
The bronze, which depicts the Oba, or king of Benin, was part of a haul of thousands of items taken when British forces looted Benin city in southeastern Nigeria in 1897, and will be sent back “within weeks”, according to the university.
In a statement, the institution, which has had the bronze since 1957, said the “punitive expedition” of 1897 was one of “the most notorious examples of the pillaging of cultural treasures associated with 19th-century European colonial expansion”.
Alhaji Lai Mohammed, Nigeria’s minister of information and culture, said the move was a step in the right direction. “Other holders of Nigerian antiquity ought to emulate this to bring fairness to the burning issue of repatriation,” he added.
The news comes in the same week as Germany confirmed it was negotiating to repatriate several bronzes that remain in its collections.
Berlin is negotiating the return of the 440 bronzes held at its Ethnological Museum, with the deal reportedly including the training of Nigerian museum staff, archaeological excavations and assisting with the construction of a new museum in Benin that has been designed by the Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye.

The British government has consistently refused to consider repatriation despite several decades of pressure.

The British Museum , which has the largest collection of Benin bronzes in the world, said it fully acknowledged the “devastation and plunder” by the British in Benin city, but will not repatriate the looted sculptures.

Greece, which just celebrated 200 years from the declaration of its independence, has also disputed for decades the British Museum's occupation of the Parthenon sculptures, which Lord Elgin removed illegally while the country was under despotic Turkish occupation.

Source: The Guardian

A new world record was set for Banksy at Christie's latest contemporary art auction as his oil-on-canvas 'Game Changer' ...
24/03/2021

A new world record was set for Banksy at Christie's latest contemporary art auction as his oil-on-canvas 'Game Changer' sold for £16.8 million ($23.2 million).
Months ago the work suddenly turned up on the steps of the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust and was donated by Banksy himself in order to benefit the staff and patients.
In appreciation for the service of frontline workers from the UK's National Health Service (NHS), the work arrived with a letter reading: "Thanks for all you're doing. I hope this brightens the place up a bit, even if it's only black and white."
David French, University Hospital Southhampton's chief executive officer said: "This incredible gift will be invaluable in helping us to focus on promoting and protecting the welfare of our staff as they heal and recover from the last year".
The work depicts a young child playing with its new hero, a toy Red Cross nurse wearing a cape and face mask. In a nearby basket, figurines of Batman and Spiderman lay forgotten.

In a surprise move, Berlin's Humboldt Forum  won't show its Benin Bronzes. In fact, the works may never be seen at the m...
23/03/2021

In a surprise move, Berlin's Humboldt Forum won't show its Benin Bronzes. In fact, the works may never be seen at the museum again, as the Humboldt Forum has begun to seek the return of the artifacts.

The Benin Bronzes are a group of one thousand 13th century metal plaques and sculptures that decorated the royal palace of the Kingdom of Benin (modern-day Nigeria).
They were looted by British troops in 1897 after the invasion of the Kingdom of Benin.
The cache of artifacts has been dispersed around European institutions, with many of the most famous plaques ending up at the British Museum in London. Also among the valuable objects taken were tusks, figurines, and more.

More and more museums across Europe are beginning to explore returning artifacts that have been subject to claims of looting and plundering. Since 2019, France has been undertaking the process of repatriating 27 objects to Benin and Senegal, and in 2021, the Netherlands said it would adopt a “radical” plan that would see numerous objects returned to various countries.
Source: ArtNews

Museums in the West are full of stolen treasures – by visiting them are we perpetuating colonial-era violence?In fact, i...
22/03/2021
In Britain, you’re never more than 150km away from a looted African object

Museums in the West are full of stolen treasures – by visiting them are we perpetuating colonial-era violence?
In fact, in Britain you're never more than 150km away from a looted African object.
Among the artefacts on display in some of the best-known museums are pieces that were taken violently from their rightful owners.
In his book 'The Brutish Museums', curator Dan Hicks lays out the arguments for restitution – and the ways tourists can help

Among the artefacts on display in the West’s best-known museums are pieces that were stolen during the colonial era. Curator Dan Hicks lays out the arguments for restitution, and the questions visitors should be asking of museums.

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