Iniva - Institute of International Visual Arts

Iniva - Institute of International Visual Arts Iniva is an evolving, radical visual arts organisation developing an artistic programme that reflects on the social and political impact of globalisation.

Iniva was established to address an imbalance in the representation of culturally diverse artists, curators and writers. We are a registered charity, funded by Arts Council England and governed by a Board of Trustees.

Operating as usual

Visiting the Stuart Hall Library soon? Don't forget to see our current exhibition Making History, open until the 1st of ...
09/09/2021
Making History

Visiting the Stuart Hall Library soon? Don't forget to see our current exhibition Making History, open until the 1st of October.

Making History is a collaborative project exploring notions of migration, displacement and self-love through storytelling, sewing and image making. The collection of tapestries, all made through community workshops held across London, weave together personal experiences, not as singular or objective, but as a shared condition. It is developed by Meera Shakti Osborne and created with participants at Art4Space, Girls Project, Boundary Women’s Project and Stuart Hall Library in the autumn and winter of 2019, and by Peckham Youth Platform, The Gap Arts Project Digital Tapestries and 1525 Collective between 2020-21. https://iniva.org/programme/events/making-history/

Making History is a collaborative project exploring notions of migration, displacement and self-love through storytelling, sewing and image making. The collection of tapestries, all made through community workshops held across London, weave together personal experiences, not as singular or objective...

25/08/2021

We are seeking an experienced and skilled communications professional to join the team at an exciting phase in the organisation’s development.
The Communications Manager provides communications’ direction and support across the organisation, working closely with the Artistic Director and Deputy Director and in liaison with library, participation, artistic programming and development teams.
Find out more: https://iniva.org/about/jobs/comms-manager/

We're very pleased to present "Me Myself and I // Home // My Grandmother’s House", a new exhibition by Shepherd Manyika ...
14/07/2021
Me Myself and I // Home // My Grandmother’s House

We're very pleased to present "Me Myself and I // Home // My Grandmother’s House", a new exhibition by Shepherd Manyika in the Stuart Hall Library, opening today!

The work presented in the show draws on notions of identity, family and heritage to reflect a playful approach which belies deep rooted questioning of who we are and what it means to belong.

Guided by Shepherd Manyika and over the course of ten weeks, a group of fifteen year four pupils have embarked on an exploration of these topics using a range of media through iniva’s schools programme ArtLab+. These include plaster and foil body castings, sculpture and protest signage: their bodies as their physical identity; sculptures of their initials reference the ways they are perceived by others; and protest signage references the social climate they are growing up in, contributing to who they are and how they think. They have also worked on a call and response piece with Shepherd using one of his prints as the base for the creation of their own works.

https://iniva.org/programme/events/me-myself-and-i-home-grandmothers-house/

Over the course of ten weeks, a group of fifteen year four pupils have embarked on an exploration of these topics using a range of media through iniva’s schools programme ArtLab+. These include plaster and foil body castings, sculpture and protest signage: their bodies as their physical identity; ...

Still time to book your tickets for Thursday's lunchtime reading group!Alongside the Research Associates, iniva embarks ...
13/07/2021
lower case b?

Still time to book your tickets for Thursday's lunchtime reading group!

Alongside the Research Associates, iniva embarks on its own research sparked from the writing of two of its previous curators, Melanie Keen and Eddie Chambers.

In Recordings, published by iniva and Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1996, the word ‘black’ – with a lower case b – was used to describe people of African, Afro-Caribbean, South East Asian and Asian descent while acknowledging it as a contentious issue.

Although much of iniva‘s work has been concerned with the legacy of radical practices of the Black Arts Movement in the UK and beyond. What are new internationalisms that define artistic research and practices today? How have iniva projects framed blackness and what are some of the issues of categorisation and indexing in relation to iniva‘s archive?

Through collective study, watching, listening, reading we explore beyond the limitations and boundaries of citing ‘blackness’ and the use of the lower-case b.

This reading group is open to all; it is a supportive and peer-led space for thinking and learning together. It is a space for constructive disagreements and critical engagement that is always based on mutual respect, interest, and care. If you have any access requirements, please email us in advance at [email protected] and we will do our best to accommodate them.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/lower-case-b-tickets-162046343977

Read along with us as we look at several texts and watch short clips that explore the limitations and boundaries of citing ‘blackness’

Still time to apply: we're looking for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British bor...
29/06/2021

Still time to apply: we're looking for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or based, to undertake a major new commission, in partnership with The Hepworth Wakefield.
Deadline: 12pm on Wednesday 30 June 2021. https://iniva.org/.../future-collect-open-call-for-year.../

Still time to apply: we're looking for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or based, to undertake a major new commission, in partnership with The Hepworth Wakefield.
Deadline: 12pm on Wednesday 30 June 2021. https://iniva.org/.../future-collect-open-call-for-year.../

25/06/2021

We can't wait to get into the first edition of STUART PAPERS! This special edition designed by Rose Nordin of OOMK Zine has been supported by Art Night. You can get your free copy from Stuart Hall Library too.

Open call alert! We're looking for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or...
25/06/2021

Open call alert! We're looking for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or based, to undertake a major new commission, in partnership with The Hepworth Wakefield.
Deadline: 12pm on Wednesday 30 June 2021. https://iniva.org/programme/events/future-collect-open-call-for-year-2-artist/

Open call alert! We're looking for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or based, to undertake a major new commission, in partnership with The Hepworth Wakefield.
Deadline: 12pm on Wednesday 30 June 2021. https://iniva.org/programme/events/future-collect-open-call-for-year-2-artist/

We are excited to announce an open call for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, Britis...
24/06/2021
Future Collect – Open Call for Year 2 Artist

We are excited to announce an open call for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or based, to undertake a major new commission.

The commission, in partnership with The Hepworth Wakefield, is offered through Future Collect, a partnership project initiated by iniva to reimagine the future of public collections at major art galleries and museums in the UK. https://iniva.org/programme/events/future-collect-open-call-for-year-2-artist/

iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts) and The Hepworth Wakefield are excited to announce an open call for expressions of interest from artists of African and/or Asian descent, British born or based, to undertake a major new commission.

Don't miss this event tonight: an artist talk with Gary Stewart, iniva's former Head of Multimedia, and Maybelle Peters,...
24/06/2021
- uncanny familiar - Explorations in X-Space

Don't miss this event tonight: an artist talk with Gary Stewart, iniva's former Head of Multimedia, and Maybelle Peters, current artist in residence in partnership with Decolonising Arts Institute at UAL: University of the Arts London.

Join us for this fruitful discussion that focuses on an analysis of black bodies in X-Space.

Still time to book your free tickets for tomorrow! Maybelle Peters' research focuses on the Uncannily Familiar which exa...
23/06/2021
- uncanny familiar - Explorations in X-Space

Still time to book your free tickets for tomorrow! Maybelle Peters' research focuses on the Uncannily Familiar which examines the digital spaces operating between the familiar and unfamiliar black body in an archive. How do black bodies move? How are they moved by blackness?
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/-uncanny-familiar-explorations-in-x-space-tickets-158903979079

Join us for this fruitful discussion that focuses on an analysis of black bodies in X-Space.

We are excited to welcome to the team, Tammi Bello our Programme Assistant placement student from Birkbeck, University o...
10/06/2021

We are excited to welcome to the team, Tammi Bello our Programme Assistant placement student from Birkbeck, University of London.

As a curator and art historian, Tammi has research interests in Black British postcolonial feminist and q***r narratives. Her work attempts to displace Eurocentricity, reimaging what artistic discourse could or should be.

Tammi recently curated a display of resources in Stuart Hall Library exploring black feminist artists, writers and collectives. Find out more by visiting the library or watching the Behind the Display presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1Dlg2ZqWKw

We are excited to welcome to the team, Tammi Bello our Programme Assistant placement student from Birkbeck, University of London.

As a curator and art historian, Tammi has research interests in Black British postcolonial feminist and q***r narratives. Her work attempts to displace Eurocentricity, reimaging what artistic discourse could or should be.

Tammi recently curated a display of resources in Stuart Hall Library exploring black feminist artists, writers and collectives. Find out more by visiting the library or watching the Behind the Display presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1Dlg2ZqWKw

iniva is excited to welcome you back into the Stuart Hall Library every Wednesday from 19th May 2021 by appointment only...
13/05/2021
Stuart Hall Library

iniva is excited to welcome you back into the Stuart Hall Library every Wednesday from 19th May 2021 by appointment only.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions we have limited spaces available, but all you need to do is fill in our study space booking request form and send it to our library team to schedule you in.

Don’t worry if we can’t book you in straight away as we will be adding more opening days every month. Furthermore, scanning requests fees will continue to be waived until September 2021.

https://iniva.org/library/

Stuart Hall Library, Iniva, contemporary art from Africa, Asia, Latin America and British artists from diverse backgrounds

22/04/2021
An introduction to STUART publishing: Bootlegging / blood letting

Artist and graphic designer Rose Nordin introduces the practical and conceptual role of STUART publishing platform and design studio at iniva, through mapping relationships to the gallery and the work of STUART Hall. The studio introduction will lead to more specific enquiry into access and distribution of published material.

The conversation with Priya Jay and Amrita Dhallu, co-editors of the first issue of STUART, explores modes of distribution, circulation and access to printed matter and the shifting potential of the publication after print. The vital and transformative roles of bootlegging/book piracy will be discussed in addition to the ongoing potential of annotation and footnoting.

Iniva is pleased to announce that it has selected The Hepworth Wakefield in West Yorkshire as its partner for the second...
16/04/2021
iniva announce Gallery Partner for Year 2 of Future Collect

Iniva is pleased to announce that it has selected The Hepworth Wakefield in West Yorkshire as its partner for the second year of Future Collect. Future Collect was established in 2020 with generous support from Art Fund, Arts Council England and Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. Future Collect is a three-year initiative to reimagine the future of public collections at major art galleries and museums throughout the UK and provide paid curatorial trainee opportunities.

Sepake Angiama, Artistic Director of Iniva, said: “We are delighted with our new collaboration with The Hepworth Wakefield to radically rethink new models for commissioning for our collections so that they are a better reflection of our contemporary culturally diverse society. Following our successful partnership with the Manchester Art Gallery we are very pleased to work with such a committed and dedicated team in engaging their community with culturally diverse practices.”

https://iniva.org/blog/2021/04/16/iniva-announce-gallery-partner-for-year-2-of-future-collect/

Iniva is pleased to announce that it has selected The Hepworth Wakefield in West Yorkshire as its partner for the second year of Future Collect. Future Collect was established in 2020 with generous support from Art Fund, Arts Council England and Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. Future Collect is a three...

As part of our project in partnership with GLA, "Reflections on Public Realm", artist and writer Harun Morrison has writ...
05/04/2021
ice cream over bronze

As part of our project in partnership with GLA, "Reflections on Public Realm", artist and writer Harun Morrison has written a text proposing monuments for the future. Read the full piece at the link below. https://iniva.org/blog/2021/04/01/ice-cream-over-bronze/

"Part 3

The best monument? A return of land to the commons. Hands off branches. Make it illegal for trees over 40 to be lopped. Each inhabitant afforded the time to design their own monument, from clay or mash-potato or ice-cream. A monument to cleaners? Raise the minimum wage. A monument to nurses? Properly funded hospitals. A monument to soldiers? Dissolution of the arms industry."

When a large statue is stolen at night, sawn to pieces, then sold to a yard; it’s rightly considered an act of vandalism. Newspapers take grim glee in reporting something worth only a few thousand pounds as scrap-metal being worth millions as sculpture. Typically such sculptures are monumental, we...

As part of our project in partnership with GLA, "Reflections on Public Realm", artist and writer Harun Morrison has writ...
04/04/2021

As part of our project in partnership with GLA, "Reflections on Public Realm", artist and writer Harun Morrison has written a text proposing monuments for the future. Read the full piece at the link below. https://iniva.org/blog/2021/04/01/ice-cream-over-bronze/

"Part 2

When a large statue is stolen at night, sawn to pieces, then sold to a yard; it’s rightly considered an act of vandalism. Newspapers take grim glee in reporting something worth only a few thousand pounds as scrap-metal being worth millions as sculpture. Typically such sculptures are monumental, weighty and commanding of the space around them. Cranes, reinforced ground, multiple crews of workers are all needed to install them, and they are similarly demanding feats to remove. However, what if in this case such a sculpture is not stolen by thieves for profit? Instead it is stolen by the artist themself, who proposes through this clandestine act to reimagine their work in public space. Nor is it stolen alone, but in consort with others, for whom it is local, who have spent time with the sculpture, even loved it, but have similarly come to understand that renewal must balance constancy.

The reimagination is instigated with the act of removal. The sculpture is removed, but doesn’t simply disappear, it becomes a story, a rumour, as solid and persistent as it ever was in situ. It is melted and reconstituted into necklaces, rings, prosthetics limbs, tooth fillings and electrical components. These items are gradually redistributed back into the locality the sculpture occupied, so the work returns. In the sculpture’s afterlife it has acquired a new intimacy with, and proximity to organic bodies. The circuits of art are interlaced with repair shop phones and body parts. Every now and then the artist and their co-conspirators might recognise an item around a neck, or a particular bracelet, this warmed them. Nevertheless they remained unsatisfied. Although they didn’t doubt the value of their effort they felt they missed their mark, but couldn’t put their finger on why."

As part of our project in partnership with GLA, "Reflections on Public Realm", artist and writer Harun Morrison has written a text proposing monuments for the future. Read the full piece at the link below. https://iniva.org/blog/2021/04/01/ice-cream-over-bronze/

"Part 2

When a large statue is stolen at night, sawn to pieces, then sold to a yard; it’s rightly considered an act of vandalism. Newspapers take grim glee in reporting something worth only a few thousand pounds as scrap-metal being worth millions as sculpture. Typically such sculptures are monumental, weighty and commanding of the space around them. Cranes, reinforced ground, multiple crews of workers are all needed to install them, and they are similarly demanding feats to remove. However, what if in this case such a sculpture is not stolen by thieves for profit? Instead it is stolen by the artist themself, who proposes through this clandestine act to reimagine their work in public space. Nor is it stolen alone, but in consort with others, for whom it is local, who have spent time with the sculpture, even loved it, but have similarly come to understand that renewal must balance constancy.

The reimagination is instigated with the act of removal. The sculpture is removed, but doesn’t simply disappear, it becomes a story, a rumour, as solid and persistent as it ever was in situ. It is melted and reconstituted into necklaces, rings, prosthetics limbs, tooth fillings and electrical components. These items are gradually redistributed back into the locality the sculpture occupied, so the work returns. In the sculpture’s afterlife it has acquired a new intimacy with, and proximity to organic bodies. The circuits of art are interlaced with repair shop phones and body parts. Every now and then the artist and their co-conspirators might recognise an item around a neck, or a particular bracelet, this warmed them. Nevertheless they remained unsatisfied. Although they didn’t doubt the value of their effort they felt they missed their mark, but couldn’t put their finger on why."

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By Underground Take the Victoria Line to Pimlico. By Bus: 88, 87, C10, N87.

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Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5:15pm

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