Garden Museum

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Operating as usual

Wondering what to wear in the garden this weekend? How about taking some fashion cues from this horticultural college st...
17/09/2021

Wondering what to wear in the garden this weekend? How about taking some fashion cues from this horticultural college student c.1920? We are particularly fond of the collared tunic: practical and stylish!

Wondering what to wear in the garden this weekend? How about taking some fashion cues from this horticultural college student c.1920? We are particularly fond of the collared tunic: practical and stylish!

We are thrilled to announce three new Trustees joining the Garden Museum Board! Welcome Hazel Gardiner, Nicola Saunders ...
16/09/2021

We are thrilled to announce three new Trustees joining the Garden Museum Board! Welcome Hazel Gardiner, Nicola Saunders and Jeremy Clay. Our new Trustees will help steer and shape the future of the Museum at an exciting time of growth and development.

Here’s what they say about their new roles:

Hazel Gardiner, Florist, Broadcaster Hazel Gardiner Design - “The opportunity to help attract a new audience of young, diverse individuals to the horticultural world, as well as expanding on the wealth of digital possibilities to encourage greater accessibility, is hugely exciting. The Museum has been a sanctuary for me on so many occasions and it is a real honour to be in a position to help shape its future.”

Nicola Saunders, Director, Business Improvement & Innovation, Arts Council England - "I am thrilled to be joining the Garden Museum as a Trustee. I have long been a visitor to the museum so I’m incredibly happy that I will be able to bring my passion for gardening along with my experience of working in the commercial side of the museums sector to the board."

Jeremy Clay, Real Estate Lawyer - "The Garden Museum is a great resource for those, like me, with an interest in the history of gardens and garden design. I am therefore honoured to serve on the Board of Trustees at what is an exciting time for the Garden Museum and look forward to contributing to the Museum’s continued growth and success.”

"Some time in 1937 I received an invitation to go to New York to give two lectures on flower arrangement for the Women’s...
16/09/2021

"Some time in 1937 I received an invitation to go to New York to give two lectures on flower arrangement for the Women’s Auxiliary of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden…I had yet to learn something about the extreme enthusiasm of American women for their flowers, their gardens, and their houses." - Constance Spry

In 1937 Spry was invited to New York to give two lectures for the @Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Spry intrigued the audiences with her images of arrangements that mixed humble blackberries with delicate roses and her original style of combining cultivated flowers and plants with items foraged from hedgerows. Fame, and an exclusive New York boutique designed with pieces from Syrie Maugham’s shop, followed...

Keep reading: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/constance-spry-in-america/

Prince Morgan is a keen gardener in South East London whose passion is growing tropical and exotic plants and foods like...
14/09/2021

Prince Morgan is a keen gardener in South East London whose passion is growing tropical and exotic plants and foods like cho cho, sweet potatoes, watermelon, okra, sugar cane, callaloo, spinach, scotch bonnet peppers, mangos, banana, avocado, both in his polytunnel and outdoors.

He was born in Jamaica and came to Britain when he was about 7 years old.

His vision is to create a garden that people can visit, join in workshops and buy plants; a nursery that is accessible to people of colour so that they can see a wide variety of tropical plants and take some home. He’s inspired by the Eden project in Cornwall and wants to create one on a smaller scale in London.

🌿 Our #SowingRoots project kicks off with its first event this Sunday in Ruskin Park Community Garden! Join us for a Q&A with Prince Morgan, some breadfruit tasting, and to find out more about our project exploring the history and culture of Caribbean gardening in South London.

Sun 19 September, 3pm. Free entry, register to attend - https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/sowing-roots-caribbean-gardening-heritage-community-workshop-ruskin-park/

Prince Morgan is a keen gardener in South East London whose passion is growing tropical and exotic plants and foods like cho cho, sweet potatoes, watermelon, okra, sugar cane, callaloo, spinach, scotch bonnet peppers, mangos, banana, avocado, both in his polytunnel and outdoors.

He was born in Jamaica and came to Britain when he was about 7 years old.

His vision is to create a garden that people can visit, join in workshops and buy plants; a nursery that is accessible to people of colour so that they can see a wide variety of tropical plants and take some home. He’s inspired by the Eden project in Cornwall and wants to create one on a smaller scale in London.

🌿 Our #SowingRoots project kicks off with its first event this Sunday in Ruskin Park Community Garden! Join us for a Q&A with Prince Morgan, some breadfruit tasting, and to find out more about our project exploring the history and culture of Caribbean gardening in South London.

Sun 19 September, 3pm. Free entry, register to attend - https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/sowing-roots-caribbean-gardening-heritage-community-workshop-ruskin-park/

Gardening amongst the ruins 🏰🌿 “Lowther Castle occupies a majestic spot, gazing out to the Lowther Valley and the mounta...
13/09/2021

Gardening amongst the ruins 🏰🌿 “Lowther Castle occupies a majestic spot, gazing out to the Lowther Valley and the mountains of the Lake District beyond. The Castle was built at the turn of the 19th century, but the site has a fascinating history dating back to 1150 and the Vikings, with the word ‘Lowther’ believed to come from Old Norse for ‘foaming river’. The River Lowther is but a skipped stone away…

Since 1999, the Lowther team has sought to regenerate the site, working with Dan Pearson to design and implement a rethinking of the gardens and grounds.”

As part of his Horticultural Traineeship at the Garden Museum, Thomas Rutter has the opportunity to work with experienced gardeners across the UK. This recently saw him making the long drive north from London to Cumbria to spend a week working with the gardening team at Lowther Castle.

Read the full story and see more of the gardens at Lowther 🌹 including a rose garden laid out in concentric circles to mimic the cross-section of a rose! - https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/gardening-amongst-ruins-a-visit-to-lowther-castle/

09/09/2021
Constance Spry's flowers for the Shah of Iran's visit

We have one last Constance Spry film to share with you today, and this one’s a treat: Penny Snell (National Garden Scheme VP) is back sharing more memories of working with Spry, specifically when her company was tasked with decorating the Royal Opera House for a visit from the Shah of Iran, hosted by Queen Elizabeth II.

Constance Spry and the Fashion for Flowers is open until 26 September: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/constancespry/

Meadows are crucial to Britain’s biodiversity, but an astonishing 97% of wildflower meadowland has been lost in a single...
07/09/2021

Meadows are crucial to Britain’s biodiversity, but an astonishing 97% of wildflower meadowland has been lost in a single century. The charity Plantlife: saving wild plants has led the creation of 5,000 hectares of wildflower meadows since 2013 – including 90 meadows to mark the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s coronation.

These meadows inspired Hugo Rittson-Thomas to create the photos currently on display at the Museum in his exhibition Wildflowers for the Queen.

To celebrate the show, next Thursday 16 September at 7pm Hugo will be in conversation with Plantlife CEO Ian Dunn. The talk will delve into the value of wildflower meadows and take a closer look at the botanical diversity under our noses.

Book tickets: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/wildflowers-for-the-queen-hugo-rittson-thomas/

Image: Muker Meadow, Yorkshire by Hugo Rittson-Thomas

Meadows are crucial to Britain’s biodiversity, but an astonishing 97% of wildflower meadowland has been lost in a single century. The charity Plantlife: saving wild plants has led the creation of 5,000 hectares of wildflower meadows since 2013 – including 90 meadows to mark the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s coronation.

These meadows inspired Hugo Rittson-Thomas to create the photos currently on display at the Museum in his exhibition Wildflowers for the Queen.

To celebrate the show, next Thursday 16 September at 7pm Hugo will be in conversation with Plantlife CEO Ian Dunn. The talk will delve into the value of wildflower meadows and take a closer look at the botanical diversity under our noses.

Book tickets: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/wildflowers-for-the-queen-hugo-rittson-thomas/

Image: Muker Meadow, Yorkshire by Hugo Rittson-Thomas

In 1953, as a mature student, Cecil Beaton enrolled on a course at the Slade School of Fine Art which allowed him to exp...
06/09/2021

In 1953, as a mature student, Cecil Beaton enrolled on a course at the Slade School of Fine Art which allowed him to explore painting and drawing and develop his already considerable skills. In the 1960s Beaton painted ‘The Cutting Garden’ (c.1960) which the Garden Museum recently bought at auction, a fine example of the vibrant style Beaton developed at the Slade.

With the brightly coloured blooms of nasturtiums and morning glory filling the canvas, the work combines two of his key interests from this period; his garden and painting.

And while nasturtiums and morning glory are not immediately acknowledged as traditional cut flowers, Constance Spry arranged morning glory to great effect, and their inclusion in the cutting garden is perhaps illustrative of Spry’s encouragement to her friend Cecil Beaton to grow and use non-traditional flowers for cutting and arranging.

This painting by Cecil Beaton was recently acquired for the Garden Museum Collection with assistance from the ACE/V&A Purchase Grant, the Art Fund and donations to the Museum.

In 1953, as a mature student, Cecil Beaton enrolled on a course at the Slade School of Fine Art which allowed him to explore painting and drawing and develop his already considerable skills. In the 1960s Beaton painted ‘The Cutting Garden’ (c.1960) which the Garden Museum recently bought at auction, a fine example of the vibrant style Beaton developed at the Slade.

With the brightly coloured blooms of nasturtiums and morning glory filling the canvas, the work combines two of his key interests from this period; his garden and painting.

And while nasturtiums and morning glory are not immediately acknowledged as traditional cut flowers, Constance Spry arranged morning glory to great effect, and their inclusion in the cutting garden is perhaps illustrative of Spry’s encouragement to her friend Cecil Beaton to grow and use non-traditional flowers for cutting and arranging.

This painting by Cecil Beaton was recently acquired for the Garden Museum Collection with assistance from the ACE/V&A Purchase Grant, the Art Fund and donations to the Museum.

Each year during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, we ask the designer of a show garden to tell the story behind their master...
03/09/2021

Each year during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, we ask the designer of a show garden to tell the story behind their masterpiece, from conception to design to planting.

This year we have invited Harris Bugg Studio to speak, designers of the M&G Garden and one of the UK’s leading garden design studios.

The M&G Garden is about transforming neglected, unloved areas into new, tranquil and beautiful green spaces in the places we need them most – our towns and cities.

Charlotte Harris and Hugo Bugg collaborated with the architect Andrew McMullan on the creation of a 100 linear metre metal pipework sculpture that weaves its way around the garden. The result is a sensory experience that reimagines an everyday object – steel pipes – into a beautiful and elegant part of the garden. Andrew will Charlotte and Hugo to talk about working together on the garden, in a conversation chaired by designer Jo Thompson.

Join us to find out more on Weds 22 September, 7pm. This event will take place in person at the Museum (live stream option also available) - https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/chelsea-flower-show-talk-harris-bugg-studio/

Constance Spry relaxed by doing needlepoint whilst she smoked after dinner. Just before WW2, she started her most ambiti...
02/09/2021

Constance Spry relaxed by doing needlepoint whilst she smoked after dinner. Just before WW2, she started her most ambitious project to date: a carpet of 24 squares, each with a flower taken from the book Thornton’s ‘Temple of Flora’.

She quickly began to despair that she could not finish them all in her lifetime, and even debated turning the first square into an oversized pin-cushion. Instead Spry did what she always did, and got friends to help her finish off the carpet.

It was put on the drawing room floor at Winkfield where it was thought to have been trampled into extinction. But a few intact squares were saved by her son, Tony Marr, and have been kindly donated to the Garden Museum by the estate of the late Mrs Tony Marr.

Constance Spry and the Fashion for Flowers is open until 26 September: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/constancespry/

🧚✨ What a magical time we had at the first Festival of Fairytales! Thank you to all the little woodland creatures and fa...
31/08/2021

🧚✨ What a magical time we had at the first Festival of Fairytales! Thank you to all the little woodland creatures and fairies who came along and lent a touch of sparkle and mystery to the Museum for a day 🌳🧞‍♂️

And we have exciting news: the Festival of Fairytales will be back for a second round on 14 August 2022! Tickets are available NOW at the special Early Bird price of £10 – https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/festival-of-fairytales-2022/

31/08/2021
Charlie McCormick's Constance Spry Vase Collection

Requiring vases that worked practically for her floral arrangements, Spry tasked her art assistant Florence Standfast to develop wide mouthed bowls to fit an abundance of blooms and foliage. These initial designs were handmade in papier-mâché and coated in varnish or plaster.

In 1935 they began commercial manufacturing with Fulham Pottery, who used press-moulding techniques to make the range. The vases were biscuit-fired and then glazed on the interior only, leaving the desired plaster-like exterior finish.

Fulham Pottery continued to produce vases for Spry’s company until the mid-1950s. They are now hugely sought after by collectors and design enthusiasts and are still popular with flower designers who find them perfectly adapted to the task they were originally produced for.

In this film, gardener @mccormickcharlie shares his love for Constance Spry’s Fulham Pottery vases, showing us his personal collection at his home in Dorset.

See more films in our Constance Spry Online Exhibition - https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/constancespryonline/

“Since my birth, I was surrounded by creative people. My grandfather played violin, was a rock climber and passionate ga...
27/08/2021

“Since my birth, I was surrounded by creative people. My grandfather played violin, was a rock climber and passionate gardener, he bred and named wild orchids from the local mountain in Arita. My grandmother was an amazing cook and kimono maker, my uncles are fishing experts, my mother used to be a china painter, my father is an architect.

Ever since I was old enough to talk, I was telling people that I would become an artist. I spent most of my school holidays in Arita playing in the wild with my cousins. I don’t remember us being given any toys to play with, all we had was nature: the woods, the streams, the sea, and the quarry (for porcelain) were our playground.”

🍃 Ceramicist Kaori Tatebayashi was born in Arita, Japan, the home of traditional Imari porcelain. Now based in South London, Kaori creates delicately lifelike sculptures of plants and flowers, often based on those grown in her garden.

We chatted with Kaori to find out more about her work, and the ceramic bramble she created for our Constance Spry exhibition: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/kaori-tatebayashi-ceramic-plant-life/

Photo of Kaori by Lisa Linder.

Later in life Constance Spry turned to the garden, renouncing floral decoration almost entirely for a life of growing.To...
26/08/2021

Later in life Constance Spry turned to the garden, renouncing floral decoration almost entirely for a life of growing.

To look at the world of flower growing today, we’re gathering four formidable growers to discuss what compelled them to become flower growers, their inspirations and the challenges of flower farming:

🌷Cel Robertson - Forever Green Flower Company
🌷Jane Scotter - Fern Verrow
🌷Kitten Grayson - Kitten Grayson Flowers
🌷Marianne Mogendorff - Wolves Lane Flower Company
🌷Chaired by Polly Nicholson - Bayntun Flowers

All About Flowers! will take place in person at the Museum on Tuesday 7 September, 7pm: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/events/talk-all-about-flowers/

The Garden Museum is sad to hear that Dame Elizabeth Blackadder died peacefully at her home in Edinburgh this week.Black...
25/08/2021

The Garden Museum is sad to hear that Dame Elizabeth Blackadder died peacefully at her home in Edinburgh this week.

Blackadder (1931 – 2021) was the first woman to be elected to both the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy. She taught at Edinburgh College of Art from 1962 until her retirement in 1986. She was one of Scotland’s greatest artists, celebrated for her paintings of flowers and still life subjects.

We look forward to celebrating her life’s work in our upcoming exhibition with The Scottish Gallery, open 19 Oct - 21 Nov 2021: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/elizabeth-blackadder-favourite-flowers/

Image: Dame Elizabeth Blackadder in her garden, 1989.

The Garden Museum is sad to hear that Dame Elizabeth Blackadder died peacefully at her home in Edinburgh this week.

Blackadder (1931 – 2021) was the first woman to be elected to both the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy. She taught at Edinburgh College of Art from 1962 until her retirement in 1986. She was one of Scotland’s greatest artists, celebrated for her paintings of flowers and still life subjects.

We look forward to celebrating her life’s work in our upcoming exhibition with The Scottish Gallery, open 19 Oct - 21 Nov 2021: https://gardenmuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/elizabeth-blackadder-favourite-flowers/

Image: Dame Elizabeth Blackadder in her garden, 1989.

Address

5 Lambeth Palace Rd
London
SE1 7LB

Buses: To Lambeth Road 3 & 344 To Lambeth Palace Road C10, 77, 507 (Mon to Fri only) Underground: Vauxhall, Lambeth North, Westminster or Waterloo Trains: Vaxhall, Waterloo or Victoria

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 10am - 5pm

Telephone

020 7401 8865

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About the Garden Museum

The Garden Museum explores and celebrates British gardens and gardening through its collection, temporary exhibitions, events and garden.

Visitors will also see a permanent display of paintings, tools, ephemera and historic artefacts: a glimpse into the uniquely British love affair with gardens.

Whether you are an enthusiastic amateur gardener, more of a specialist or someone with a passion for museums, history or architecture, the Museum has something for you.

Nearby museums


Comments

I thought you might like to read this brilliant post by a Key Ethical Influencer from an elite network based in the UK!
Hi I have signed the petition and wanted to share on FB but you havent posted it yet Please do so?
I thoroughly enjoyed the discussion on zoom. Seeing beauty in wilderness. A love of plants and nature was my way in to appreciating the life and work of this talented and vibrant man. Thank you.
Con la declaración del Estado de Alarma por crisis sanitaria COVID-19 y el consecuente confinamiento en nuestros hogares, hemos vuelto a utilizar ese espacio olvidado de los balcones, tribunas a la calle desde donde gritamos y aplaudimos una respuesta social en común, sea de denuncia o de agradecimiento. ¡LLENA DE FLORES TUS BALCONES! Aprovechemos estos espacios como elementos vivos de la ciudad y gocemos de sus beneficios ambientales, estéticos, espirituales y sociales. Los balcones son piezas representativas de nuestras proclamas y de nuestro paisaje urbano. Implantemos un buen ambiente en nuestro balcón, pongámolos a florecer¡ Llenemos de flores y encanto nuestros balcones¡
Is the Constance Spry exhibition at the Garden Museum still scheduled to happen and what date please?
Love visiting The Garden Museum when in London.
Lovely visit to this unique & charming museum today. I loved it. The climb up the old church tower well worth it too. However the cafe, despite good web reviews, fails in a most basic way in that it is really poor for anyone with a food allergy Although it apparently serves wonderful food, no attempt made to cater for those 3% or so of us who can’t eat wheat (& our families) I was told, “yes we do cater for gluten free” then offered the opportunity to eat scrambled eggs without toast yum 🤮
What is the nearest Tube/Train station?
Re The upcoming #ladybird books exhibition, ppl might also like a current show in #NewWalkMuseum #leicester
BBC R4 Kitchen Cabinet!
I enjoyed my visit to the museum. I was expecting more from the Exhibition, it was nice but fell a little flat considering how lovely Cecily Barkers paintings are. However, I’m glad I visited, Lambeth Palace is next on my list, a Magnificent Building!!!