Estorick Collection

Estorick Collection Formed by Eric and Salome Estorick during the 1950s. The Collection is known internationally for its core of Futurist works. The Estorick Collection of modern Italian art was formed by Eric and Salome Estorick during the 1950s.
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The Collection is known internationally for its core Futurist works as well as figurative painting and sculpture from 1895 -1950s. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Estorick Follow us on Instagram https://instagram.com/estorickcollection

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Marino Marini was born #onthisday in 1901.Born in Pistoia, Marini (1901-1980) initially studied painting at the Academy ...
27/02/2021

Marino Marini was born #onthisday in 1901.

Born in Pistoia, Marini (1901-1980) initially studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence before switching to sculpture. Along with the work of Arturo Martini, his imagery epitomises the maniera etrusca (Etruscan Style) so prevalent in Italian art during the inter-war years.

🐎 Marino Marini, Horse and Rider, 1949

Gino Severini died #onthisday in 1966.Born in Cortona on 7 April 1883, he moved to Rome where he studied Divisionist tec...
26/02/2021

Gino Severini died #onthisday in 1966.

Born in Cortona on 7 April 1883, he moved to Rome where he studied Divisionist techniques alongside Boccioni under Giacomo Balla.

In Paris he became friend with Modigliani that introduced him to the avant-garde circle and in 1910 he joined the Futurist movement.

During his life he painted using different styles, starting from a cubist inspired style, moving then to total abstraction between 1913 and 1914 and returning to a robust figurative style for his war paintings. Simultaneously he also developed a Synthetic Cubist style.

🖼️ Gino Severini, Dancer (Ballerina+Sea), 1913

In this painting the red flag in the background recalls the flag of Communism, while the intimacy of the scene, with the...
24/02/2021

In this painting the red flag in the background recalls the flag of Communism, while the intimacy of the scene, with the figure lying in a hospital bed, arouses the viewer’s sympathy for this political martyr.

The work has an almost documentary or reportage quality to it, so that the subject appears to be drawn directly from life, even if the ‘hero’ depicted remains symbolic, nameless and unidentified.

🎨 Renato Guttuso, Death of a Hero, 1953

"The challenges posed by modern rug design have been tackled in various ways: some designers champion uniform dyes; some...
23/02/2021

"The challenges posed by modern rug design have been tackled in various ways: some designers champion uniform dyes; some choose monochrome designs and then play with different pile lengths, as MITA has done; some stick to repeating small-scale motifs, as MITA has also done." - Gio Ponti

🪑 Gio Ponti, Chairs rug, 1935; Gio Ponti, Design for Chairs rug, 1935, Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, Genoa.

“Modigliani was not prone to vice, he was neither a vulgar alcoholic nor a degenerate. Where are all those abuses that h...
22/02/2021

“Modigliani was not prone to vice, he was neither a vulgar alcoholic nor a degenerate. Where are all those abuses that have created volumes of literature? What did the bourgeoisie think, after all? That the same mentality necessary for calculating total sums in account books or for duping customers could also give rise to the creation of paintings? So much of humanity, without drinking a drop of wine, is more vulgar than Modigliani ever was, even after two or three absinthes!” Gino Severini

🎨 Amedeo Modigliani, Dr François Brabander, 1918

Futurism was founded #onthisday in 1909, with the publication of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s manifesto on the front page...
20/02/2021

Futurism was founded #onthisday in 1909, with the publication of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s manifesto on the front page of the Parisian newspaper Le Figaro. Marinetti’s vivid and dynamic article fired the imagination of a number of poets and visual artists, including Giacomo Balla, Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Luigi Russolo and Gino Severini. Controversial, iconoclastic and multifaceted, Futurism represents Italy’s most significant contribution to European Modernism.

The Futurists believed that Italy’s great artistic heritage represented an obstacle to the development of a vibrant and innovative modern culture. They argued that the only sure means of injecting new life into the country’s somewhat provincial artistic climate was to focus on the modern world as a source of inspiration, maintaining that since the urban environment and the machine offered entirely new sensations, the artist would be required to develop equally novel means of expression to capture them. It was their conviction that “there can be no modern painting without the starting point of an absolutely modern sensation”.

MITA produced this large woollen tapestry to decorate Pulitzer's first-class library for the Andrea Doria, which left Ge...
19/02/2021

MITA produced this large woollen tapestry to decorate Pulitzer's first-class library for the Andrea Doria, which left Genoa for New York on 15 January 1953 and tragically sank in the Atlantic on 26 July 1956.

Conceived by the designer and architect Michael Rachlis, this work depicted a stylized marine landscape in a neo-Cubist vocabulary.

🎨 Michael Rachlis, Design for the tapestry in the Andrea Doria's first-class reading room 1952, tempera on paperboard. Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, Genoa.

#ThrowbackThursday to our 2011 exhibition The Poster King: Edward McKnight Kauffer.Edward McKnight Kauffer produced some...
18/02/2021

#ThrowbackThursday to our 2011 exhibition The Poster King: Edward McKnight Kauffer.

Edward McKnight Kauffer produced some of the most iconic and influential commercial imagery of the early twentieth century. The use of geometry was always important in his design, as was the inclusion of a focal still-point. A good poster he argues, should be concentric rather than eccentric, drawing the attention of the observer towards the centre of the sheet.

Discover more with the exhibition catalogue, still available from our online shop: https://www.estorickcollection.com/shop/e-mcknight-kauffer-the-poster-king

🎨 Museum of Natural History, 1923

Today Italy celebrates Martedì Grasso (Fat Tuesday), last day of Carnival week 🎉Carnival is a colourful celebration that...
16/02/2021

Today Italy celebrates Martedì Grasso (Fat Tuesday), last day of Carnival week 🎉

Carnival is a colourful celebration that takes place in many Roman Catholic countries every year, the week before Lent.

During Carnival week there are typically parades with music, dancing, feasting and a masquerade.

Taking inspiration from the Commedia dell'Arte and the Puppet Theatre, the Italian Carnival has its own traditional masks and costumes that vary in each regional area 🤡

🖼️ Marco Bissoni, Clown scarf, 1959. Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, Genoa.

Did you know that in 1985, Morandi’s beloved village of Grizzana was renamed ‘Grizzana Morandi’ in his honour?🎨 G. Moran...
15/02/2021

Did you know that in 1985, Morandi’s beloved village of Grizzana was renamed ‘Grizzana Morandi’ in his honour?

🎨 G. Morandi, Mountains of Grizzana, 1929

When in lockdown and separated  from loved ones, let them know you'd sail to be with them!🎨 Enrico Paulucci, Barche (Boa...
14/02/2021

When in lockdown and separated from loved ones, let them know you'd sail to be with them!

🎨 Enrico Paulucci, Barche (Boats) tapestry, c. 1953. Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, Genoa.

The 2007 exhibition “A Slap in the Face! Futurists in Russia”, continued the Estorick Collection’s efforts to situate ou...
13/02/2021

The 2007 exhibition “A Slap in the Face! Futurists in Russia”, continued the Estorick Collection’s efforts to situate our permanent collection of twentieth-century Italian works in a wider context, not only within Italian art but also a wider, international dimension. This show concerning the influences of Italian futurism on the Russian avant-garde followed other very successful shows on vorticism and European avant-garde graphics.

Delve into Russian Futurism with the exhibition catalogue, still available from our online shop!💥

🎨 Olga Rozanova, Explosion in a Trunk, 1916; El Lissitzky Tatlin Working on the Monument to the Third International 1921-22

Zoran Music was born #onthisday in 1909. “Painting itself should be a pleasure. I never understand artists who say how m...
12/02/2021

Zoran Music was born #onthisday in 1909.

“Painting itself should be a pleasure. I never understand artists who say how much they suffer when they paint. Why suffer?”

🖼️ Zoran Music, Black Mountain, 1952

Carlo Carrà was born #onthisday 140 years ago in 1881. He moved to Milan in 1895, where he met Umberto Boccioni and Luig...
11/02/2021

Carlo Carrà was born #onthisday 140 years ago in 1881.

He moved to Milan in 1895, where he met Umberto Boccioni and Luigi Russolo. Like them, he experimented with Divisionism, but was dissatisfied with current trends in painting, and in 1910 signed the ‘Manifesto of the Futurist Painters’ and the ‘Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painting’. In 1913 he published the manifesto ‘The Painting of Sounds, Noises and Smells’, reflecting a new interest in synaesthesia.

🎨 Carlo Carrà, Atmospheric Swirls - A Bursting Shell, 1914

❄️❄️❄️ A winter view from our 2019 special display “Lithography from Leningrad: Eric Estorick's Adventure in Soviet Art”...
10/02/2021

❄️❄️❄️ A winter view from our 2019 special display “Lithography from Leningrad: Eric Estorick's Adventure in Soviet Art”.

During the early 1960s, when Eric Estorick (1913-1993) was running London’s Grosvenor Gallery, he developed a strong interest in Soviet art alongside his passion for modern Italian painting. During that year he had visited Leningrad’s Experimental Graphics Laboratory, and was so impressed that he bought several hundred works on the spot. In 1961 Eric Estorick mounted a landmark exhibition of Soviet prints, Lithography from Leningrad presented the work of a number of artists included in this show.

🖼️ VY Brodsky (1905-1981), University, Mendeleev Line, 1973, Lithography, Frants Family Collection

Gino Severini had always seen himself as somewhat apart from the other principal protagonists of the Futurist movement d...
09/02/2021

Gino Severini had always seen himself as somewhat apart from the other principal protagonists of the Futurist movement due to his location in Paris, the centre of the avant garde in the early twentieth century. This is visible in the influence of Cubism that appears in many of Severini’s works, occurring much earlier than in those of the members of the Futurist movement based in Italy.

🖼️ Gino Severini, Quaker Oats - Cubist Still Life, 1917

Did you know that Umberto Boccioni and Carlo Carrà, together with Luigi Russolo and Giacomo Balla, signed the Manifesto ...
08/02/2021

Did you know that Umberto Boccioni and Carlo Carrà, together with Luigi Russolo and Giacomo Balla, signed the Manifesto of Futurist Painters in 1910?

Carlo Carrà, Boccioni II, 1916

Eugenio Carmi's work for MITA was based on operational procedures with which he had already experimented at the iron and...
07/02/2021

Eugenio Carmi's work for MITA was based on operational procedures with which he had already experimented at the iron and steel company Cornigliano ILVA/ Italsider (where he served as artistic director from 1956 to 1965) and informed by his experiences at the Galleria del Deposito, which he founded in 1963 with the Gruppo Cooperativo di Boccadasse (Cooperative Group of Boccadasse).

🎨 Eugenio Carmi, Fabric design, 1954–55 - Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, Genoa.

The temporary closure of the museum during the Covid-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on our income so now, more...
06/02/2021

The temporary closure of the museum during the Covid-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on our income so now, more than ever, we need your support. Please consider making a donation to the museum.

https://bit.ly/36UliYk

Image: Giorgio Morandi, Still Life, 1929.

When Friday nights meant dancing shoes and sequins...#FlashBackFriday to our 2018 exhibition Rationalism on Set: Glamour...
05/02/2021

When Friday nights meant dancing shoes and sequins...

#FlashBackFriday to our 2018 exhibition Rationalism on Set: Glamour and Modernity in 1930s Italian Cinema.

🖼️ Rita Franchetti and Vittorio De Sica in a scene from the film Due cuori felici (Two Happy Hearts; Dir. Baldassarre Negroni, 1932), set design by Gastone Medin, gelatin silver print on paper, 14.5 x 23.2 cm, Collezione Museo Nazionale del Cinema, Turin.

Luigi Russolo died #OnThisDay in 1947.His most important contribution to the Futurist movement was made in the musical s...
04/02/2021

Luigi Russolo died #OnThisDay in 1947.

His most important contribution to the Futurist movement was made in the musical sphere.
In 1913 he published his revolutionary manifesto ‘The Art of Noises’, calling for the integration of a range of different sound effects into musical compositions. To this end, he developed rudimentary instruments called intonarumori (‘noise-intoners’) to replicate the screeching, hissing and roaring of the industrial age.

🎞️ Luigi Russolo al rumorarmonio, Mart - Archivio del ‘900 – Rovereto, Fondo Russolo

The Eric and Salome Estorick Foundation was established in 1994 as an educational charity. It was the Estoricks’ son Mic...
03/02/2021

The Eric and Salome Estorick Foundation was established in 1994 as an educational charity. It was the Estoricks’ son Michael who suggested buying Northampton Lodge to house the Collection. Its renovation was planned and overseen by architect Nathaniel Gee, and funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Having been open to the public for almost twenty years, the museum closed for five months in 2016 to undergo a major phase of renovation and refurbishment intended to greatly improve the visitor experience. The entrance and shop were remodelled, and a glass conservatory extended the café space into the museum’s tranquil garden – an oasis of peace in busy Islington.

02/02/2021
Metaphysical Art 101

"What is especially needed is great sensitivity: to look upon everything in the world as enigma… To live in the world as in an immense museum of strange things." Giorgio de Chirico

Discover our MITA exhibition from the comfort of your own home with our exhibition catalogue, available from our online ...
01/02/2021

Discover our MITA exhibition from the comfort of your own home with our exhibition catalogue, available from our online shop! 🛍 https://bit.ly/2TZoOe1

Fortunato Depero, Design for a Rug, 1927

The Estoricks met Massimo Campigli in 1948 and they established a close and sincere friendship. Eric Estorick described ...
31/01/2021

The Estoricks met Massimo Campigli in 1948 and they established a close and sincere friendship. Eric Estorick described the artist as a shy character with whom he got on very well and claimed “I really had a fixation on his work. I mean these strange […] Etruscan type women somehow spoke to my unconscious and it touch my taste, however primitive or undeveloped or subtle you may care to regard it”

🖼️ Massimo Campigli, Woman at the Loom, 1951

🧵 Italian Threads: MITA Textile Design 1926-1976Founded by Mario Alberto Ponis, MITA was formed “with the aim of using n...
30/01/2021

🧵 Italian Threads: MITA Textile Design 1926-1976

Founded by Mario Alberto Ponis, MITA was formed “with the aim of using new mechanical inventions in the manufacture of classic hand-knotted carpets”, merging new technologies with craft traditions for a characteristically Italian approach to industry.

MITA began collaborating with creative thinkers at the forefront of modernism who produced rug patterns and designs that captured the aesthetic spirit of Futurism, Rationalism and the Novecento movement. Many of these partnerships lasted for years and were represented in submissions to world’s fairs and the Triennales of Decorative and Modern Industrial Art in Milan.

Find out more: https://bit.ly/3i4TjsG

#Flashbackfriday to our 2018 exhibition "The Enchanted Room: Modern Works from the Pinacoteca di Brera". The show featur...
29/01/2021

#Flashbackfriday to our 2018 exhibition "The Enchanted Room: Modern Works from the Pinacoteca di Brera". The show featured paintings and sculptures donated to the @PinacotecadiBrera by Emilio and Maria Jesi and it included iconic images by Umberto Boccioni, Gino Severini and Mario Sironi, an extraordinary nucleus of Metaphysical paintings by Carlo Carrà, and important works by Giorgio de Chirico, Giorgio Morandi and Filippo De Pisis.

Like Eric and Salome Estorick, Emilio and Maria Jesi were primarily drawn to figurative art and sculpture, although their collection does include a characteristic work of geometric abstraction by the maverick painter Osvaldo Licini.

On donating their works to the Brera in 1976, they stated: “This collection of the art of our time, entrusted to the State, is dedicated to the artists and art lovers of yesterday, today and tomorrow.”

Discover more about the Jesi Collection with our exhibition catalogue, available from our online shop. http://bit.ly/3j0Xqrv

Sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest news from the Estorick Collection in your inbox! 📩  https://bit.ly/3jYFr...
27/01/2021

Sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest news from the Estorick Collection in your inbox! 📩 https://bit.ly/3jYFrSY

🎨 Umberto Boccioni, Dynamism of a Cyclist, 1913

How many birds can you spot? 🦜 🖼️ Emanuele Luzzati, Design for The Thieving Magpie tapestry, c.1968
26/01/2021

How many birds can you spot? 🦜

🖼️ Emanuele Luzzati, Design for The Thieving Magpie tapestry, c.1968

A snowy Estorick this morning! ❄️
24/01/2021

A snowy Estorick this morning! ❄️

"This painting [Leaving the Theatre, c. 1910] was inspired by a winter evening when I was leaving La Scala. The foregrou...
23/01/2021

"This painting [Leaving the Theatre, c. 1910] was inspired by a winter evening when I was leaving La Scala. The foreground depicts a figure shovelling snow along with several couples of elegant women and men wearing top hats. I am of the opinion that this canvas, completely ignored in Italy, is one of the works in which I best expressed the ideas I had about painting at that time.” Carlo Carrà

Bernie don't be sad, the wait will soon be over!Ottone Rosai, Man Waiting, 1919
21/01/2021

Bernie don't be sad, the wait will soon be over!

Ottone Rosai, Man Waiting, 1919

Did you know that the Estorick Collection’s entrance gates are based on one of Giacomo Balla’s studies of light, titled ...
18/01/2021

Did you know that the Estorick Collection’s entrance gates are based on one of Giacomo Balla’s studies of light, titled Radial Iridescent Interpenetration (Prismatic Vibrations) dating from 1913-14?

Emanuele Luzzati, Design for Happy New Year 1955 scarf, 1954 - Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Du...
17/01/2021

Emanuele Luzzati, Design for Happy New Year 1955 scarf, 1954 - Archivio MITA, Nervi, on loan to Wolfsoniana – Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura, Genoa.

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39A Canonbury Square
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N1 2AN

Highbury and Islington (Victoria Line/ Silver Link Metro/ Network SE) 3 Mins; Essex Road ( Network SE) 5 Mins. Buses - 271 to door; 4, 19, 30, 43 to Upper Street/ Canonbury Lane; 38, 56, 73, 341 to Essex and Canonbury Roads. The gallery is outside the central London congestion charge zone.

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About the Estorick Collection

The Estorick Collection of modern Italian art was formed by Eric and Salome Estorick during the 1950s. The Collection is known internationally for its core Futurist works as well as figurative painting and sculpture from 1895 -1950s. Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Estorick Follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/estorickcollection

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Je viens de visiter cette très belle et rare exposition du futuriste italien Tullio Crali à Londres...à voir!
‘Amazing’(according to grandson) book making session this morning! Trying to emulate Fortunata Deparo’s iconic nuts and bolt book!...
CE&DU3A monthly talk on 9th August was about the Estorick Collection. Now I had never heard of this but was so glad I went along. The booked speaker was unable to attend and Luke took on the task at the last minute. He was a very good presenter of the talk with great slides showing examples of the Collection, housed in a beautiful Georgian building in Islington. The Collection is some 120 Futurist paintings, drawings etc by Italian artists collected by American Eric Estorick and his wife Salome. They set up a foundation for their collection which was eventually housed at 39a Canonbury Square. Luke also told us that as well as the permanent collection they have regular special exhibitions. The current one being The Art of Campari – a collection of advertising material for the company founded in 1860. As this looked interesting 3 U3A members, myself, Julie Vaggars and Angela Dawson, visited on 22nd . Despite the best efforts of TfL (W3 and 144 buses on a huge diversion) we managed to meet at Finsbury Park and caught the 19 to Islington. As we were early and Angela was desperate for coffee we popped into http://www.maisondetrecafe.co.uk/ at 154 Canonbury Road – lovely coffee and wonderful gluten free choc cake. The Estorick Collection https://www.estorickcollection.com/ consists of about 6 small rooms. The Campari exhibition was in 3 rooms and the permanent collection in the rest. The Campari material was wonderful – I remembered a lot of the images from the 1960s and 1970s TV and magazine ads. They were wonderfully evocative of the eras they represented. Very innovative. Wonderful graphics. We all enjoyed it. We then had a look at the Futurist collection – I found some of it interesting but much of it was not to my taste in art. My favourites were the Quaker Oats painting and Acrobats sculpture. Thanks to Angela I discovered the Smartify App to get more info about particular works of art. Me and Julie decided decided to sample Campari which the lovely café is serving with soda. I had never tried it before. Julie had and said she didn’t like it – too bitter. Anyway we forced ourselves and it was very refreshing. Very pretty too. After a long chat it was lunchtime so we sat in the garden and ordered. We all had different dishes – all very nice. Thanks to our lovely CE&DU3A we visited a lovely gallery and had a very nice day. Pix at https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1852624178139715&type=1&l=814e7048cb