Milne's Scottish Collection

Milne's Scottish Collection I have been collecting Scottish books and artefacts for over 40 years. My aim is not to sell but to encourage interest in our rich unparalleled history.
(5)

31/05/2023

White Cherry Tree from Japan 🌸

30/05/2023

Amazing...

LARGEST TREE IN THE WORLD
Location : Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in Tulare County, California, USA.
The General Sherman Tree is the world's largest tree, measured by volume. It stands 275 feet (83 m) tall, and is over 36 feet (11 m) in diameter at the base. Sequoia trunks remain wide high up. Sixty feet above the base, the Sherman Tree is 17.5 feet (5.3 m) in diameter.

It is estimated to be around 2,300 to 2,700 years old.

11/01/2023

🙏🏽

05/01/2023

THE LAST JACOBITE AULD DUBRACH

After the defeat at Culloden most Jacobites were hunted and executed one of the last executed being " The fox " Lord Simon Fraser of Lovat
How ever over time such aggressive measures were relaxed ...

This resulted in Jacobites living into auld age like Peter Grant known affectionately as Auld Dubrach

According to folklore he was introduced to King George IV in 1822 during his visit to Edinburgh, its said that on the first meeting the king proclaimed "Ahh Peter my oldest friend " to
Which ye replied " Naw yer Majesty. ..am yer Auldest enemy "

This portrait of him resides in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh

23/12/2022

Without doubt, this is the most remarkable Highland Revival coat I've ever examined and am grateful to the STA for making it available. It dates to c.1786 and includes a White Rose and two buds (representing James VIII and Princes Charles Edward and Henry).

The tartan is woven in fine worsted wool with the rose and buds woven in silk. As a hand-weaver, I marvel at how this was done at a time before the Jacquard loom was invented. It would have required a draw-loom with a separate warp beam for the silk in order to account for the different tensions.

If you would like to see this coat, it will be on display next year at the V&A Dundee's Tartan Exhibition.

03/12/2022

The Scotland National Team Tartan at Hampden Park, marking 150 years since the first International Scotland Vs. England game played on St Andrew's Day.

Shop our exclusive selection of Scotland National Team Tartan gifts, kilts and outfits!
Avalable for purchase and fir hire.




28/11/2022
28/11/2022

This is the tartan coat as mentioned in William Marshall’s Historic Scenes in Forfarshire in 1875. They coat was reputedly given to James Carnegie of Boysack by Prince Charles Edward, it has not been authenticated as yet and may in reality prove to be later in date.

23/11/2022

The GNK Warehouse sale CONTINUES!!!!
Open Mon- Fri 10am - 5pm until December 23rd

We have HUGE REDUCTIONS on Ex-Hire Highlandwear, Garment Samples & Seconds, and Accessories.
Come along and grab a genuine bargain, just in time for Christmas!
Don't miss it!

Gordon Nicolson Kiltmakers
Dunbar Business Centre
Spott Road
EH42 1RS
01368 650508

13/11/2022

It is incredible how so many of the old place names relating to veterans of the Jacobite era still remain to this day. On the eastern edge of Brechin in Angus is one such place, Leuchland Farm. In 1745 it was the residence of Robert Young, who on the arrival in Scotland of Prince Charles Edward offered his services to the Jacobite cause with hearty enthusiasm.

He was consequently given a captains commission in the Second Battalion of Ogilvy’s Regiment as part of David Ferrier’s Company. Young busied himself raising men, arms and money for the cause and on the return of the Prince’s Army to Scotland from England rendezvoused with the main body and saw action at the Battle of Falkirk Muir on the 17th of January 1746.

Continuing northward he and his company successfully assisted Lord Lewis Gordon against Lord Loudoun at the skirmish at Inverurie on the 23rd of December 1745. He was present with the combined force of the Angus Regiment at the Battle of Culloden after which he was taken prisoner and died, unfortunately no other information regarding the circumstances of his unfortunate end seems to be available.

On further investigation into Leuchland, I’d hoped that the current farmhouse would prove to be the original home of Captain Young, but according to Historic Environment Scotland the present house, stylistically, dates to the very early 19th century but does go on to say earlier fabric may still exist of Young’s earlier house.

I must admit feeling slightly deflated on discovering the old house had been replaced or at best incorporated into the later building, it’s a recurring theme in the later 18th century unfortunately, but at least the place name Leuchland remains as a reminder, as does the record of Captain Robert Young’s unquestionable bravery and loyalty to the cause in which he made the ultimate sacrifice.

Sources: Alexander MacIntosh - The Muster Roll of Lord Ogilvy’s Regiment, 1914.

A Livingstone, C Aikman & B Hart - No Quarter Given, 2001.

Historic Environment Scotland.

10/11/2022

in 1752, Seamus a'Ghlinne (James of the Glen) was executed for the murder of Colin Campbell of Glenure - the Red Fox.

James Stewart undoubtedly went to the gallows an innocent man. He was tried by a jury of 11 Campbells and sentenced to death by the Duke of Argyll - the Campbell clan chief and brother to the Red Fox. He was hanged at the south end of the Ballachulish Ferry and his body was left on display for 18 months as a warning to other clans. A memorial, erected in 1911, now stands at this spot (pictured) - the inscription reads: "To the memory of James Stewart of Acharn...executed on this spot...for a crime of which he was not guilty".

So who really shot Colin Campbell? It is said that the real killer had to be forcibly restrained on the day of James Stewart's ex*****on to prevent him from giving himself up. The identity of this man has become one of the best-kept secrets in Scottish history, supposedly passed down through female members of the Stewart family from generation to generation. Even now there are those who claim to be one of the few to know what really happened on the day of Colin Campbell's death...

Scabbard finished and the mounts soldered up. Just a bit of file work and then polishing of both to finish. Very difficu...
02/11/2022

Scabbard finished and the mounts soldered up. Just a bit of file work and then polishing of both to finish. Very difficult to mix the dyes to the same colour of the wood. However, Im pretty happy with the results. Once polished will enhance the colour too.

Two early 18th century dirks finished over the past 3 weeks. Both with similar style of blade from a cut down sword. The...
28/10/2022

Two early 18th century dirks finished over the past 3 weeks. Both with similar style of blade from a cut down sword. The first is made from old Scottish oak. The second is made from purpleheart wood which is very dense and heavy and hard to carve. pierced hearts with red material at the back of the pommel plate. All the dirks I make have a full tang with threaded tang nut. Scabbards still to complete.

28/10/2022

The Bear Gates of Traquair on an autumn afternoon. Closed in 1745 following the visit of Bonnie Prince Charlie and awaiting the return of a Stuart king before they are opened again. A long wait…

27/10/2022

Being relatively close to home I thought I’d have a look at a little dwelling called Sunnybrae Cottage said to be the oldest house still standing in Pitlochry, just a little south of Blair Atholl in Perthshire. It dates from the early 18th century and has fairly recently been restored. In its heyday it was an Alehouse and in 1767 was the scene of the murder of one of the most powerful Lairds in Atholl, John Stewart of Bonskeid by his cousin and fellow Laird Donald Stewart of Shierglas.

Back in 1745 when John was just 14 he tried to raise his tenantry for the army of Charles Edward Stuart but they appear to have successfully prevented this on the grounds of his age, and in the years following Culloden he appears to have matured into a somewhat nasty and extremely violent individual, and by 1760 was in the pay of the goverment as a recruiter for the British Army.

Donald of Shierglas was married to John’s sister Sophia in 1756 and being relations the two men were on friendly terms. In 1767 the two men met at market and afterwards that evening were drinking and eating in the little Ale House (today’s Sunnybrae Cottage) when Donald, who in the process of casually cutting cheese and transferring it to his mouth with his dirk, accidentally cut his lip which caused a great furore of laughter amongst the company. At this, Donald presumably felt completely humiliated, lost control and lashed out with his dirk stabbing John in the chest killing him. The incident is sometimes put down as a tragic accident but Donald’s true intentions aren’t recorded.

Donald would be forced to leave the country but not before John’s funeral procession, as it was important in Highland tradition that not to be haunted by the ghost of the dead man the perpetrator must see daylight beneath the coffin which he indeed managed to achieve. Abroad, Donald Stewart of Shierglas spent many years in the Dutch service reaching the rank of Lieutenant before returning in 1785 to end his days at Norham in the north of England completely unmolested.

Sunnybrae Cottage is very easy to view being situated just opposite the north side of the A924 road which runs through the centre of Pitlochry.

Source: The Stewart Society Vol 21 - 2000.

27/10/2022

THE DEATH OF A QUEEN

On this day in 1327

Elizabeth De burgh wife of King Robert the Bruce and Queen Of Scots died at Cullen in Banffshire
Her body was taken to dunfermline abbey where she was laid to rest
An act that The Bruce would repeat a mere 18 months later

Elizabeth was born in Ireland in the 1280s and was the daughter of one of Irelands most powerful nobels Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster who was a close friend and ally of King Edward I of England
She was Roberts Second wife and bore him 4 children
King David II the most important historically speaking of the four
During thr Scottish wars of independence she was captured at sanctuary of St. Duthac at Tain by the Earl of Ross who was a supporter of the comyns
Bruces young daughter Marjorie was taken to a nunnery while Elezebeth was imprisoned for many years till King Robert the Bruce Defeated King Edward II at Bannockburn in 1314
She was moved to carlisle for a prisoner transfer and returned to Scotland before the yule period

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

THE WALLACE TRAIL NEED YOU ☝️👊

The Society is in the process of creating Falkirks Wallace trail that will tell the story of Wallaces action in Falkirk His close friendship with Sir John de Graeme , the Battle of Falkirk 1298 and impact the battle had on Scottish history

To help us create this trail and bring to life some of Scotlands shrouded history you can donate via our crowdfunder...

https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/thewallacetrail?utm_term=q5Y55Jqpb

15/10/2022

Also called The Great Raid of 1322, the Scots led an attack into Yorkshire against King Edward II on October 14.

06/10/2022

A lawyer from Renfrewshire who as a student helped to steal the Stone of Destiny from Westminster has died at the age of 97.
Ian Hamilton KC had been the last surviving member of the gang of four students who took the famous stone, on which kings and queens of Scotland were traditionally crowned, from Westminster Abbey on Christmas Day 1950.
Read more: bit.ly/3Cvc7i0

27/09/2022

Flodden Tartan by Gordon Nicolson
This special commemorative tartan was designed by Gordon Nicolson in 2013 to mark the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden, where 5000 English and 10,000 Scots lost their lives. It forms a potent stitch in a thread of historic remembrance intrinsic to the City of Edinburgh and the Border Common Ridings.
The colours of the Flodden tartan symbolically unite the two opposing sides of a devastating battle, which saw James IV become the last Scottish monarch to fall in combat. The Tudor green and white of the English Army are bound inextricably to the deep red and gold colours of the Scottish forces, set against the grey and brown of the ground they fought on, where many lie still.
business

25/09/2022
Very rare dirk with its sheath. Even rarer is the date on both items, No mounts on the scabbard. However, there is inter...
20/09/2022

Very rare dirk with its sheath. Even rarer is the date on both items, No mounts on the scabbard. However, there is intergrated carving on the grip. The steel pommel plate indicates that it was a expensive item for its time. Steel was more expesive than brass and it has a rudimentary start of the development of the pommel plate. "Highland dirk with a wooden hilt and mounts of iron, dated 1696, Sheath for a Highland dirk with a wooden hilt and mounts of iron, dated 1696". (note no bottom mount present, probably, not there at all). Photograph courtesy of National Museum of Scotland.

Late 17th century dirk with fully carved grip and full mounts of brass. Triangular section blade contemporary with the t...
20/09/2022

Late 17th century dirk with fully carved grip and full mounts of brass. Triangular section blade contemporary with the time. "Dirk with wooden handle carved with an interlaced pattern, and steel blade with a deep groove on both sides edged with incised segments of circles: Scottish, Highland, 17th century" Note the refinment in the blade. This is not a typical dirk for any Highlander. The pure workmanship and refinment means it would have been made for a Chief or Nobleman. Photograph courtesy of National Museum of Scotland. Amendment with reservations ?

Dirk found on the battle site of Sherrifmuir (1715). The grip more than likey made from heather root or tree burr. Note,...
20/09/2022

Dirk found on the battle site of Sherrifmuir (1715). The grip more than likey made from heather root or tree burr. Note, no carving just a plain grip with a forged blade, pommel plate missing. Made in the highlands of Scotland. photograph courtesy of National Museum of Scotland. Probably made around mid 17th century.

Few hallmarked silver Sgians I made a wee while back.
15/08/2022

Few hallmarked silver Sgians I made a wee while back.

Lovely brass cantled sporran copied from Drummonds Ancient Scottish Weapons. Made this not too long ago.
07/06/2022

Lovely brass cantled sporran copied from Drummonds Ancient Scottish Weapons. Made this not too long ago.

Some of the dirks ive made in the past few years. All hand carved and the blades made from EN45 and 1070 high carbon ste...
07/06/2022

Some of the dirks ive made in the past few years. All hand carved and the blades made from EN45 and 1070 high carbon steel.

26/05/2022

It's in the details...
Expertly handcrafted sgian dubh, created by local artisan Norman Milne.
The top of the sgian dubh includes a coin from the year 1746 - the year of Culloden and the introduction of the Dress Act, outlawing kilts and tartan in the highlands when worn by men of fighting age out with a military regiment.
This sgian dubh is not only beautiful and completely unique, but contains a wee part of history from a year that is forever poignant to us.
Captured by
Modelled by Matthew Donachie

06/05/2022

Monarch of the Glen, the mighty Stag.
Our beautiful brooch pin created exclusively for us by the skilled hands of Mr Norman Milne, a modern-day Jacobite with a passion for heritage.
Norman carefully crafts unique sgian dubhs, dirks, targes and other pieces inspired by authentic historical examples. His workmanship an attention to detail are exceptional.
Delicate enough to fasten a scarf, robust enough to weight a kilt.

Only available from



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