Kinross Museum

Kinross Museum Exploring Kinross-shire History The Kinross (Marshall) Museum is housed in the library area of Loch Leven Community Campus. The museum takes its name from the noted local antiquarian David Marshall (1831 - 1902) who amassed a huge collection of books and artefacts which he left to the people of Kinross.

The collection was originally housed in the Kinross Carnegie Library but it was not until 1974 that a dedicated museum was created above the Carnegie Library. This facility was closed by Perth & Kinross Council in 1996. The Kinross (Marshall) Museum was created as a charitable trust a year later with the aim of opening a new museum for the benefit of local residents and visitors to Kinross. The pr

The collection was originally housed in the Kinross Carnegie Library but it was not until 1974 that a dedicated museum was created above the Carnegie Library. This facility was closed by Perth & Kinross Council in 1996. The Kinross (Marshall) Museum was created as a charitable trust a year later with the aim of opening a new museum for the benefit of local residents and visitors to Kinross. The pr

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos
21/09/2021

Timeline Photos

It's #MapMonday!

This 1781 map shows part of the 'Muir of Kinross' and the distribution of land with the names of the tenants.

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This photo is on display at Perth Museum as part of their railway exhibition. It is of the 1st Kinross Boys Brigade goin...
16/09/2021

This photo is on display at Perth Museum as part of their railway exhibition. It is of the 1st Kinross Boys Brigade going to camp (probably battalion camp at Elie). Let us know if you recognise any of the faces.

This photo is on display at Perth Museum as part of their railway exhibition. It is of the 1st Kinross Boys Brigade going to camp (probably battalion camp at Elie). Let us know if you recognise any of the faces.

A lovely image from Perth & Kinross Archive
16/09/2021

A lovely image from Perth & Kinross Archive

No date for this colourised postcard view of the 'Bein Inn, Glenfarg'. The 'Famous Bein Inn' was originally built as a resting place for travellers in the days of coaching on the traditional route north from Edinburgh to the Highlands.

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A Kinross image published recently on Perth & Kinross Archive: St Paul's Episcopal Church.
14/09/2021

A Kinross image published recently on Perth & Kinross Archive: St Paul's Episcopal Church.

A colourised postcard view of the 'Episcopal Church and Muirs Kinross'. The Church was built between 1870 and 1874 with seating for 120. It was dedicated in 1874 and consecrated in 1881 and was mainly financed by three wealthy landowners.

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Sharing a post from Perth & Kinross Archive as it is very local ....
14/09/2021

Sharing a post from Perth & Kinross Archive as it is very local ....

The Glenlomond Sanitorium was opened as Glenlomond War Hospital, a military specialist neurological unit, in 1918.

In 1919 it became a civilian TB sanitorium. The building was designed by Alexander Cu***ng Dewar.

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The opening hours of the Loch Leven Community Library are changing this week, and access to the Museum Study Room will t...
29/06/2021

The opening hours of the Loch Leven Community Library are changing this week, and access to the Museum Study Room will therefore also change.
As from today (Tuesday 29 June 2021), the library opening hours are:
Tuesdays 10am – 7pm
Wednesdays 10am – 6pm
Thursdays 10am – 7pm
Fridays 10am – 6pm
Saturdays 10am – 1pm
Most of the Museum display cases are adjacent to the library and can be viewed during the above hours.
Beginning on Thursday 1st July 2021, the MUSEUM STUDY ROOM will be staffed by volunteers on
Thursdays 10am – 7pm and
Saturdays 10am – 1pm.
The Museum Study Room contains archives and further displays. Volunteers may be able to help with enquiries you may have about historical research etc. Numbers of visitors will be restricted due to Covid rules, so it is advisable to email first to [email protected] or telephone 01577 867153 (telephone during Museum Study Room opening hours).

Timeline Photos
20/06/2021

Timeline Photos

Group photograph from 1909 at the Scottish National Angling Clubs Association’s 30th annual competition on Loch Leven. 🎣

#ExploreYourArchive Ref: MS5-11

Just a reminder that after a five-month closure due to Covid restrictions, the Loch Leven Community Library reopens toda...
14/05/2021

Just a reminder that after a five-month closure due to Covid restrictions, the Loch Leven Community Library reopens today, Friday 14 May, at 4.30pm. Most of the Kinross Museum displays can be viewed when the library is open. The library opening hours are:
Fridays: 4.30pm – 7.30pm
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
The Museum Study Room, containing many of the museum’s archives, will reopen on SATURDAY 15 MAY. If you would like to undertake research in the study room, please email or telephone first: [email protected] or 01577 867153.
Subject to sufficient volunteer cover being available, the Study Room will be open as from 15 May as follows:
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm

Just a reminder that after a five-month closure due to Covid restrictions, the Loch Leven Community Library reopens today, Friday 14 May, at 4.30pm. Most of the Kinross Museum displays can be viewed when the library is open. The library opening hours are:
Fridays: 4.30pm – 7.30pm
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
The Museum Study Room, containing many of the museum’s archives, will reopen on SATURDAY 15 MAY. If you would like to undertake research in the study room, please email or telephone first: [email protected] or 01577 867153.
Subject to sufficient volunteer cover being available, the Study Room will be open as from 15 May as follows:
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm

Most of the Kinross (Marshall) Museum displays are adjacent to the community library, so can be viewed whenever the Loch...
03/05/2021

Most of the Kinross (Marshall) Museum displays are adjacent to the community library, so can be viewed whenever the Loch Leven Community Library is open.
Culture Perth & Kinross recently announced that the library will be reopening on Friday 14 May 2021 and will be open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays as follows:
Fridays: 4.30pm – 7.30pm.
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4pm.
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4pm.
The Museum Study Room, containing many of the museum’s archives, will reopen on SATURDAY 15 MAY. If you would like to undertake research in the study room, it is necessary to make contact first by email or telephone: [email protected] or 01577 867153.
Subject to sufficient volunteer cover being available, the Study Room will be open as from 15 May as follows:
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm

Most of the Kinross (Marshall) Museum displays are adjacent to the community library, so can be viewed whenever the Loch Leven Community Library is open.
Culture Perth & Kinross recently announced that the library will be reopening on Friday 14 May 2021 and will be open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays as follows:
Fridays: 4.30pm – 7.30pm.
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4pm.
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4pm.
The Museum Study Room, containing many of the museum’s archives, will reopen on SATURDAY 15 MAY. If you would like to undertake research in the study room, it is necessary to make contact first by email or telephone: [email protected] or 01577 867153.
Subject to sufficient volunteer cover being available, the Study Room will be open as from 15 May as follows:
Saturdays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm
Sundays: 9.30am – 1pm and 2pm – 4.30pm

Katie Murie – “A little sturdy woman”During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries a number of  eccentric characters wa...
29/04/2021

Katie Murie – “A little sturdy woman”

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries a number of eccentric characters walked the streets of Kinross. One was Katie Murie, described by Robert S Young as “a little sturdy woman, with a lively tongue and a much wrinkled face.”
Photos of Katie show her as a characterful, old woman dressed to survive the elements in a particular style of her own. On her head she wore an old fashioned sow-backit mutch or ladies cap and a waterproof covering was thrown over her arms and shoulders. Beneath her skirt and apron she kept her legs warm with thick, white, woollen stockings and on her feet she always wore heavy boots.
Katie earned a modest living as a hawker selling a variety of goods which she carried on each arm in two large wicker baskets. In one basket she offered for sale buttons, sewing needles, ribbons and assorted small trinkets. The other basket contained buns, bread, barley sugar and cakes known as ‘parlies’ which were thin slices of gingerbread sprinkled with small sweeties. The parlie or parliament-cake was said to have been a favourite delicacy of members of the Scottish Parliament during their sittings. To add to her colourful appearance Katie Murie smoked a pipe.
There were some about the town who thought she was a witch, a suggestion that angered Katie who knew how to lash out with her tongue if need be. Perhaps people thought she was related to Agnes Murie, ‘indweller in Kilduff’, one of the 10 women accused of dealings with the devil in the infamous 1661-62 Crook of Devon Witch Trials.
The dates of Katie Murie’s birth and death are somewhat vague but Robert Young, who knew her as an old woman, notes in his 1948 book About Kinross-shire and its Folk, that he had been told that “she perished in a snowstorm between Milnathort and Kinross about the years 1875 and 1876” and was said to have been found “below Lathro gate.” In both of these years there were severe snowstorms, one reaching a climax on New Year’s Day 1875 when trains were trapped south of Kinross, the other during the last week of 1876 when the town, under three feet of snow, was cut off for two days.
The Kinross Photographer Peter Ewing (1819-1900), whose career has been written up by Museum Volunteer Janet Mullan, took photos of Kinross characters such as Tam Daw and Katie Murie, some of which are to be found in Perth and Kinross Archives and others, such as the image accompanying this article, in Kinross (Marshall) Museum.

Katie Murie – “A little sturdy woman”

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries a number of eccentric characters walked the streets of Kinross. One was Katie Murie, described by Robert S Young as “a little sturdy woman, with a lively tongue and a much wrinkled face.”
Photos of Katie show her as a characterful, old woman dressed to survive the elements in a particular style of her own. On her head she wore an old fashioned sow-backit mutch or ladies cap and a waterproof covering was thrown over her arms and shoulders. Beneath her skirt and apron she kept her legs warm with thick, white, woollen stockings and on her feet she always wore heavy boots.
Katie earned a modest living as a hawker selling a variety of goods which she carried on each arm in two large wicker baskets. In one basket she offered for sale buttons, sewing needles, ribbons and assorted small trinkets. The other basket contained buns, bread, barley sugar and cakes known as ‘parlies’ which were thin slices of gingerbread sprinkled with small sweeties. The parlie or parliament-cake was said to have been a favourite delicacy of members of the Scottish Parliament during their sittings. To add to her colourful appearance Katie Murie smoked a pipe.
There were some about the town who thought she was a witch, a suggestion that angered Katie who knew how to lash out with her tongue if need be. Perhaps people thought she was related to Agnes Murie, ‘indweller in Kilduff’, one of the 10 women accused of dealings with the devil in the infamous 1661-62 Crook of Devon Witch Trials.
The dates of Katie Murie’s birth and death are somewhat vague but Robert Young, who knew her as an old woman, notes in his 1948 book About Kinross-shire and its Folk, that he had been told that “she perished in a snowstorm between Milnathort and Kinross about the years 1875 and 1876” and was said to have been found “below Lathro gate.” In both of these years there were severe snowstorms, one reaching a climax on New Year’s Day 1875 when trains were trapped south of Kinross, the other during the last week of 1876 when the town, under three feet of snow, was cut off for two days.
The Kinross Photographer Peter Ewing (1819-1900), whose career has been written up by Museum Volunteer Janet Mullan, took photos of Kinross characters such as Tam Daw and Katie Murie, some of which are to be found in Perth and Kinross Archives and others, such as the image accompanying this article, in Kinross (Marshall) Museum.

Subject to confirmation, we hope that the Kinross (Marshall) Museum will be able to reopen sometime in early May. In the...
25/04/2021

Subject to confirmation, we hope that the Kinross (Marshall) Museum will be able to reopen sometime in early May. In the meantime, during lockdown, we have continued to respond to enquiries as best we can and have submitted feature articles to the Kinross Newsletter.

Subject to confirmation, we hope that the Kinross (Marshall) Museum will be able to reopen sometime in early May. In the meantime, during lockdown, we have continued to respond to enquiries as best we can and have submitted feature articles to the Kinross Newsletter.

The media has been full of memories of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh since he passed away on Friday 9 April and we take this...
21/04/2021

The media has been full of memories of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh since he passed away on Friday 9 April and we take this opportunity to share with you the attached image of Prince Philip who accompanied HM The Queen on a royal visit to Kinross on 10 October 1960. The royal couple are seen alongside the late Sir Alan Smith who was at that time Provost of Kinross.
Were you present at this royal visit?

The media has been full of memories of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh since he passed away on Friday 9 April and we take this opportunity to share with you the attached image of Prince Philip who accompanied HM The Queen on a royal visit to Kinross on 10 October 1960. The royal couple are seen alongside the late Sir Alan Smith who was at that time Provost of Kinross.
Were you present at this royal visit?

Sharing Perth & Kinross Archive's unusually colourful postcard of the Green Hotel, circa 1949.
29/03/2021

Sharing Perth & Kinross Archive's unusually colourful postcard of the Green Hotel, circa 1949.

This lovely circa 1949 postcard view is of the Green Hotel in Kinross. Dating back to the 18th Century, the hotel was originally a traditional coaching inn, hosting stagecoaches that ran between Queensferry and Perth, allowing them to change their horses.
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You may have seen Kinross Museum Chairman David Munro’s article in the March issue of the Kinross Newsletter about Tam D...
23/03/2021

You may have seen Kinross Museum Chairman David Munro’s article in the March issue of the Kinross Newsletter about Tam Daw, a celebrated Kinross character who lived from 1825 to 1888.
Tam’s mother, Katie Daw or Catherine Dall was a character in her own right and was bell ringer of Kinross for 39 years until her death in 1853 at the age of 73. The family lived in a house called the Hollyhand situated in The Damside which is now Mill Street and following his mother’s death Tam lived there with his sister Lizzie.
Tam plied a variety of trades about town ranging from coal porter, wheel-turner and cattle executioner to vendor of herring and haddock. His roles as town crier and ringer of the town’s steeple bell at certain hours of the day were legendary.
Of all his activities around the town, it was his for his role as a troubadour that’ The Daw’ was best known. He is seen in the accompanying image carrying a horn that was from time to time painted in bright colours by local painter lads and to which were attached ribbons given to him by drapers’ apprentices. Tam played music of a kind on his celebrated horn at occasions ranging from the return to Kinross of newly-weds after their honeymoon to market days such as the July Fair where he earned a few coppers. Displayed at Kinross (Marshall) Museum’s first exhibition in 2010, Tam Daw’s horn forms part of the Marshall Bequest held in Perth Museum.
Tam’s house ‘Hollyhand’ was most likely one of the houses in Mill Street that was eventually demolished. Does anyone know of this name? It would be interesting to know if it survives in some form, even in distant memory.

You may have seen Kinross Museum Chairman David Munro’s article in the March issue of the Kinross Newsletter about Tam Daw, a celebrated Kinross character who lived from 1825 to 1888.
Tam’s mother, Katie Daw or Catherine Dall was a character in her own right and was bell ringer of Kinross for 39 years until her death in 1853 at the age of 73. The family lived in a house called the Hollyhand situated in The Damside which is now Mill Street and following his mother’s death Tam lived there with his sister Lizzie.
Tam plied a variety of trades about town ranging from coal porter, wheel-turner and cattle executioner to vendor of herring and haddock. His roles as town crier and ringer of the town’s steeple bell at certain hours of the day were legendary.
Of all his activities around the town, it was his for his role as a troubadour that’ The Daw’ was best known. He is seen in the accompanying image carrying a horn that was from time to time painted in bright colours by local painter lads and to which were attached ribbons given to him by drapers’ apprentices. Tam played music of a kind on his celebrated horn at occasions ranging from the return to Kinross of newly-weds after their honeymoon to market days such as the July Fair where he earned a few coppers. Displayed at Kinross (Marshall) Museum’s first exhibition in 2010, Tam Daw’s horn forms part of the Marshall Bequest held in Perth Museum.
Tam’s house ‘Hollyhand’ was most likely one of the houses in Mill Street that was eventually demolished. Does anyone know of this name? It would be interesting to know if it survives in some form, even in distant memory.

Sharing a post from Perth & Kinross Archive showing a very old postcard view of Kinross High Street.
13/03/2021

Sharing a post from Perth & Kinross Archive showing a very old postcard view of Kinross High Street.

Undated postcard view of 'High Street, Kinross, looking North'. Bit busier these days folks?

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Address

Loch Leven Community Campus
Kinross
KY13 8FQ

Opening Hours

Thursday 10am - 7pm
Saturday 10am - 1pm

Telephone

+441577867153

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Sunday 10th January 2020 saw the 80th anniversary of the re-founding of Kinross BB by Roddy Beaton - this is his inscription on the inside cover of the BB roll book used back then.
Together with Kinross Museum and TRACS (Traditional Arts & Culture Scotland) and designer Esther Kent, KLEO has produced a Loch Leven Story map which will 'premiere'/be handed out for the first time at The Blether Bus Tours on Sunday 24 Nov, 11am and 2pm leaving from Loch Leven Community Campus. This image is part of the map designed by Esther. For more info about the bus tours click here: http://www.kleo.org.uk/kinross-winter-festival/news/the-bus-tour-is-back-
I have come into the possession of a little book published by Robert Grant, Edinburgh, in 1928 entitled “A Seceder’s Notebook of Sermons, 1698 to 1721” written down by William Flockhart of Annacroich. In the forward a descendent, Jane Edith Flockhart, tells something of the discovery of this book on a local farm. She has also inscribed the book, about the size of a paperback. I have been unable to find any reference to this book on the internet and assume it was a very small printing run. If you can point me toward anyone who may be able to help, or if there is an historical association that can do the same, it would be much appreciated. If the book is of historical significance I would be glad to donate it. The Rev. Canon George R. Eves [email protected]