The Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum

The Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum Museum devoted to the history of Glasgow and Ayrshire's local regiment and its people.
(29)

We are small, local museum devoted to passing on knowledge on The Royal Highland Fusiliers, its history (their predecessors Highland Light Infantry and Royal Scots Fusiliers), people and impact. As well as sustaining memory of British troops all over the world, including regiment successors 2nd Bn The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Commemoration of VE Day was not forgotten on the Isle of Cumbrae; as on Friday 8 May at 11 am; one of our veterans, John...
10/05/2020

Commemoration of VE Day was not forgotten on the Isle of Cumbrae; as on Friday 8 May at 11 am; one of our veterans, John F Kennedy, accompanied by mascot, Meg the Westie, laid a wreath at the WWII War Memorial.

Piper Eric Smith was on hand to play appropriate tunes.

John, perhaps better known "JFK" was originally a member of 1st Battalion, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who transferred to 1st Battalion, The Royal Highland Fusiliers when the Argylls were reduced to Balaklava Company in 1971.

John's younger brother, Alastair "Yogi" Kennedy remained with the Argylls.

Yesterday, a small number of members of the Armed Forces gathered together at the Central Station in Glasgow to commemor...
09/05/2020

Yesterday, a small number of members of the Armed Forces gathered together at the Central Station in Glasgow to commemorate VE Day and to observe the 2 minutes silence at 11 am.

Sadly, due to the coronavirus lockdown, numbers had to be limited; however, Standards of The Highland Light Infantry Association and Glasgow & West of Scotland Branch of The Parachute Regimental Association were on parade.

Well done to everyone who took part; not forgetting, of course, that you featured on the TV!

Today is the 75th Anniversary of Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) celebrating the formal acceptance by the Allies of  Worl...
08/05/2020

Today is the 75th Anniversary of Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) celebrating the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces on Tuesday, 8 May 1945.

However, it was not the day on which the surrender was actually signed; and, when I thinking about how to mark this day for the Museum, I was reminded of a veteran from one of our antecedent regiments who came into the Museum a couple of years ago and told how he was involved with the so-called Surrender Stone.

Obviously, we are in lockdown at the moment, so I have no access to my notes, which are in the Museum; however, I think that this veteran had been a member of The HIghland Light Infantry - I apologise if he had been a Royal Scots Fusilier - my memory is not what it was! Anyway, he had been a National Serviceman in Germany in 1958 and, together with some of his fellows, he was due to return to the UK to be demobbed - but the Army had one last task for them to do on the way home!

They were sent to Luneburg Heath to dismantle the Luneburg Heath Memorial and accompany it back to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst to be reassembled on the Square, where it still stands today.

So, what does this have to do with VE Day?

Clearly, VE Day did not just happen - it took some time to negotiate the surrender, particularly, as the Allies were adamant that it had to be an Unconditional Surrender. Lüneburg had been captured by the British forces on 18 April 1945 with Field Marshall Montgomery establishing his headquarters at a villa in the village of Häcklingen. Following these negotiations, on 4 May 1945, Field Marshall Montgomery accepted the unconditional surrender of the German forces in a carpeted tent at his Headquarters on Timeloberg hill, which he later renamed Victory Hill.

Shortly after the event, a small oak plaque was erected on the spot; sadly, this was quickly stolen, replaced and defaced again.

In November 1945, a much larger memorial, weighing 9 tons replaced the wooden plaque..

Five Germans were employed to guard the memorial night and day. By the end of 1955 the annual cost of security was over DM100,000 and the guard was withdrawn. The following month, the bronze text was stolen and the stonework defaced. A new bronze panel was produced and the local Burgermeister was held responsible for its security. For three years the monument remained unguarded (and undamaged) but, in 1958, following a visit by Field Marshal Montgomery, the memorial was moved to RMA Sandhurst.

So, this important memorial was entrusted to our National Serviceman and his friends; and quite rightly, he was was extremely proud of his part in history!

Everyone at the Museum (in lockdown) wishes everyone a very Happy VE Day and we hope that you enjoy the celebrations!

Some film footage of the rededication of the Stone at RMA Sandhurst can be seen at http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8bbc84c2f3a440fa93504a321c4e953b

A very merry St George's Day to all our readers!St George is the patron saint of England and also a military saint; howe...
23/04/2020

A very merry St George's Day to all our readers!

St George is the patron saint of England and also a military saint; however, at this time, he is perhaps even more relevant at the moment!

During the Middle Ages, people believed that St George was one of the 'Fourteen Holy Helpers' – a group of saints who could help during epidemic diseases. St George's protection was invoked against several nasty diseases, many fatal and with infectious causes, including the Plague and leprosy.

St George was was said to have been martyred on 23 April 303 - he was a Roman officer, who died because he refused to renounce his Christian faith as decreed by the Emperor Diocletian. The famous story about slaying the dragon to save a princess came later and became a major part of plays in the Middle Ages.

St George was celebrated in England from the 9th century and he became popular with English kings. Edward I (1272-1307) had banners bearing the emblem of St George (a red cross on a white background) and Edward III (1327-77) had a strong interest in the saint and owned a relic of his blood.

Being a frugal nation, 23 April is a busy day for celebration for the English, as Shakespeare is not only said to have been born on this day, but also to have died!

24/03/2020
National Memorial Arboretum
11/03/2020

National Memorial Arboretum

#OnThisDay in 2010 the Basra Wall memorial was rededicated at the Arboretum. Originally located at Basra Airport, the wall is a tribute to the 178 members of the Armed Forces and 1 Ministry of Defence civilian who died in combat operations in Iraq between 2003 and 2009.

Thanks to James Taub for sharing this rare footage of Mutt, the YMCA dog, delivering cigarettes to the trenches in WWI!
09/03/2020
media.giphy.com

Thanks to James Taub for sharing this rare footage of Mutt, the YMCA dog, delivering cigarettes to the trenches in WWI!

We recently said goodbye to an Intern Europe intern who, after being with us for 4 months, had really become part of the...
02/03/2020

We recently said goodbye to an Intern Europe intern who, after being with us for 4 months, had really become part of the family at the Museum.

Alice Sansa will be sadly missed as she achieved a great deal during her stay with us; from designing new children's badges for the shop to digitising & cataloguing many of our photograph albums, so that they can be safely conserved away from the damage caused by light and humans!

Alice has returned to her home in Northern Italy, which, in the light of current health fears, may be quite challenging; although, she will be glad to get away from Scottish food, which was the one thing that we could not persuade her to like! To be fair, we probably benefited from this aberration, as she baked her own cakes, which were quite delicious!

Everyone at the Museum wishes Alice all the best for the future and we will certainly miss your cheery face around the Museum.

Nowhere to go & nothing to do this half-term - come to the RHF Museum at 518 Sauchiehall Street!Loads of fun, including ...
06/02/2020

Nowhere to go & nothing to do this half-term - come to the RHF Museum at 518 Sauchiehall Street!
Loads of fun, including a free-to-enter competition!
And, best of all, entry is totally free!
We are open from 9am to 4pm (Mon-Thu) and 9am to 3pm (Fri).
Our Half-Term event runs from Fri 7 Feb until Wed 12 Feb (inclusive) - look forward to seeing you!

Some recent photographs of members of the Regiment meeting the Duke & Duchess of Sussex!
09/01/2020

Some recent photographs of members of the Regiment meeting the Duke & Duchess of Sussex!

The Museum welcomed Staff & Volunteers to the annual Christmas lunch on Monday - this year, 35 staff & volunteers attend...
11/12/2019

The Museum welcomed Staff & Volunteers to the annual Christmas lunch on Monday - this year, 35 staff & volunteers attended the event of the year!

It was a bit of a squeeze, but we managed to fit everyone into the Colonel of the Regiment's Room for a fun-packed afternoon! As usual, the festivities kicked off with a traditional, Christmas supper of choice from a local chippy - getting 35 suppers from the chippy to the plate while still hot has become a well-honed operation: suppers are labelled with diner's name & supper; collected from the chippy, rushed back to the Museum, before being distributed quickly & efficiently by our team of runners & servers supervised by Steven!

Our shop ladies, Nikki, Liza and Hannah, kept everyone well-plied with the demon drink and, after a few words of welcome from the Regimental Secretary, the assembled throng pulled crackers, donned silly hats and played even sillier games! Pass the bomb turned out to be a little more dangerous than anticipated, even though, Willie, who had lovingly crafted the bombs assured us that they had been deactivated!

A visit from a grumpy old man and the usual array of strange presents concluded the formal part of the party and party-goers were free to socialise.

Joking apart, this is the one time in the year, where we get our staff and volunteers together to thank them for all the hard work and effort that they put in during the year - it is a truism to say that we could not run the Museum without their continued support and we are extremely grateful.

We are always looking for new volunteers and if you would like to join our merry throng, we would be delighted to see you - all sorts of stuff to do from family research, cataloguing and museumy-type stuff to can collections & outreach. No previous experience or references are needed - just get in touch, come in for a chat and we can almost certainly find you something interesting to do!

Always delighted to see veterans who are at a loose end - you can help to identify people & places in photographs, make videos or help with general museum stuff.

There is always lots to do - and, don't forget, you get to enjoy our annual Christmas party!

Incidentally, the photographs are courtesy of Linda Drummond, who volunteers in the White Hackle social club and has just (somewhat rashly!) offered to help at can collections - so, big thank your to Linda!

01/12/2019
The Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland

Today we celebrate St Andrews Day. The Royal Regiment of Scotland are proud of our Scottish heritage. Whether you are from Scotland or elsewhere, you are always made welcome in the regiment!

Happy St Andrews Day!

26/11/2019
Tremendous result at Central Station!At our can collection in Central Station on Friday, our team of veterans raised an ...
23/11/2019

Tremendous result at Central Station!

At our can collection in Central Station on Friday, our team of veterans raised an impressive and very welcome £1,040.56 for the Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum Heritage Appeal!

A huge thank-you to everyone who gave up their time to help at a very chilly Central Station - it is very much appreciated!

And, also, to the amazing support from everyone at Central Station and who took time to chat at our Museum table - Bugle proved to be a bit of a star - much admired by many passers-by!

Hopefully, we can do it all again next year - we will keep you informed and will be undoubtedly calling for volunteer can collectors - so watch this space!

Chilly morning at Central Station in Glasgow; but, warm welcome from travellers!
22/11/2019

Chilly morning at Central Station in Glasgow; but, warm welcome from travellers!

One of our veterans, Willie, collecting with us today at Central Station today.  Willie also is a mainstay of our outrea...
22/11/2019

One of our veterans, Willie, collecting with us today at Central Station today. Willie also is a mainstay of our outreach programme to local primary schools. What would we do without him?

Bugle is front and centre at our can collection at Central Station today - if you are around - come and see us at our ta...
22/11/2019

Bugle is front and centre at our can collection at Central Station today - if you are around - come and see us at our table

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.At the going down...
11/11/2019

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them."

These familiar lines were part of a much longer poem, “For the Fallen” by Laurence Binyon. He wrote the poem while sitting on a cliff-top at Pentire Point in Cornwall – a plaque now marks the spot – in mid-September 1914, a few weeks after the outbreak of the First World War; soon after the retreat from Mons and the Battle of Le Cateau.

Laurence said that the four lines, so familiar to us all and known as “Binyon’s Lines”, came to him first.

In 1915, despite being too old, at 46, to enlist in the armed forces, Laurence Binyon volunteered at a British hospital for French soldiers, Hôpital Temporaire d'Arc-en-Barrois, Haute-Marne, France, working briefly as a hospital orderly. He returned in the summer of 1916 and took care of soldiers taken in from the Verdun battlefield. He wrote about his experiences in For Dauntless France (1918) and his poems, "Fetching the Wounded" and "The Distant Guns", were inspired by his hospital service in Arc-en-Barrois.

Laurence was an English poet, dramatist and art scholar, who was short-listed to be the Poet Laureate, he went on to be the Professor of Poetry at Harvard University.

Laurence died on 10 March 1943, aged 73 years.

To the Fallen:

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England's foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain,
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.

In Flanders fields the poppies blowBetween the crosses, row on row,That mark our place; and in the skyThe larks, still b...
09/11/2019

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

“In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae, May 1915.

Major John McCrae was serving as the military doctor and second-in-command of the 1st Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery; when on the evening of 2 May 1915, in the second week of fighting during the Battle of Ypres, he began to pen this poignant poem.

Accounts vary as to exactly why he wrote the poem, but, it is generally accepted that the death of his friend, Alexis Helmer, was the main inspiration, as were the poppies that sprang from the ground between the many graves in the burial ground.

During 1915, John sent his poem to The Spectator magazine, but it was returned to him unpublished; however, Punch magazine subsequently published it on 8 December 1915.

Sadly, on 28 January 1918, while commanding No 3 Canadian General Hospital (McGill) at Boulogne, John died of pneumonia and was buried in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission section of Wimereux Cemetery.

And so, John’s legacy, the poppy, in its many versions, has become the universal emblem of remembrance – the Canadian poppy featured below is particularly distinctive.

Do you need a Regimental tie for Remembrance Day - we have them all: Royal Highland FusiliersRoyal Scots FusiliersHighla...
03/11/2019

Do you need a Regimental tie for Remembrance Day - we have them all:
Royal Highland Fusiliers
Royal Scots Fusiliers
Highland Light Infantry
Royal Regiment of Scotland
Glasgow Highlanders.
Drop into the Museum shop or shop online at www.rhf.org.uk
The ladies will be delighted to help you - contact them at [email protected] or 0141 332 5639.

The Museum shop is now a Hallowe'en-free area!  Nikki and Alice, our Italian Intern Europe intern, spent yesterday takin...
02/11/2019

The Museum shop is now a Hallowe'en-free area!
Nikki and Alice, our Italian Intern Europe intern, spent yesterday taking down all the decorations and setting up our window to commemorate Remembrance.
We are very grateful to Tony "the Pony" McDowall, an Argyll veteran, who very kindly donated the amazing "Tommy", who forms the centre-piece of the window display!

Meet our new team of Museum Attendants at the Museum!You may all remember that Maureen, Museum Attendant for over 20 yea...
29/10/2019

Meet our new team of Museum Attendants at the Museum!

You may all remember that Maureen, Museum Attendant for over 20 years retired earlier this year; and, our new team will consist of three part-time ladies, who will all be delighted to welcome you to the Museum and shop.

Nikki, who has been holding the fort single-handedly, for the last few months, is a Glaswegian, married with a son, who is talented young footballer - one to watch for the future!

Hannah also lives in Glasgow, has one daughter and enjoys reading, which will be useful for answering all those questions on regimental history!

And, finally, Lisa, also a Glaswegian, is married with a young son and will be trying to teach us all about Twitter and Instagram - so don't forget to follow our tweets!

There is one thing that our ladies all have in common, they love to listen, chat, keen to help and will always greet you with a smile - so drop into the Museum soon and meet them all!

Address

518 Sauchiehall Street
Glasgow
G2 3LW

Opening Hours

Monday 13:15 - 16:00
Monday 09:00 - 12:30
Tuesday 13:15 - 16:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 12:30
Wednesday 13:15 - 16:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 12:30
Thursday 13:15 - 16:00
Thursday 09:00 - 12:30
Friday 13:15 - 15:00
Friday 09:00 - 12:30

Telephone

01413320961

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when The Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Nearby museums


Other Community Museums in Glasgow

Show All