Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre We are the Local Record Centre for Cumbria, a local hub for info on Cumbrian wildlife.
We are a not-for-profit centre which keeps information about Cumbrian wildlife. Contact us here or via www.cbdc.org.uk
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The Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle keeps wildlife information for the county of Cumbria. Tullie House Museum, in its role as a local natural history museum, has collected and disseminated records of wildlife in Cumbria since its inception in 1893. From the early 1990s the Museum has developed a computerised database of species and habitat records in Cumbria and has taken the central role in providing a local biodiversity data service for the county. This role was restyled as Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC) in 2010, a not-for-profit organisation hosted by Tullie House Museum and advised by local stakeholders.

Mission: Bringing together and making available information on Cumbria's natural history, wildlife sites and habitats for education, research and decision making.

20/05/2020
UoC Wildlife Society

CBDC's contribution to the UoC Wildlife Society's virtual Bioblitz today. Help with the bee and hoverfly identification required! Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery

Did you know that your garden is a haven for all sorts of incredible wildlife? Debs Muscat, Manager for the Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre, undertook her own mini-BioBlitz on 15th May to show off the incredible breadth of species that can be seen in a very ordinary back-garden. #UoCVirtualBB

Debs would love to hear the results of any garden bioblitzes that people undertake, so be sure to send her a list of your findings to [email protected].

20/05/2020
UoC Wildlife Society

UoC Wildlife Society

We kick off our first ever Virtual BioBlitz with a workshop from Wildlife Media lecturer, Cain Scrimgeour. Listen to the world’s natural orchestra and discover the species singing. #UoCVirtualBB

The schedule for the day will go out at 8:30am, and you'll be able to check out all the workshops we've got lined up for you!

Nothing to do today - why not join Cumbrian students with their virtual BioBlitzhttps://www.facebook.com/UoCWildlifeSoc/...
20/05/2020

Nothing to do today - why not join Cumbrian students with their virtual BioBlitz

https://www.facebook.com/UoCWildlifeSoc/photos/a.1840906942648668/3882303671842308/)

We may still be in lockdown, but that doesn't mean we can't interact with nature. Join us on Wednesday 20th May for our first ever Virtual BioBlitz! 🐾 🌳

We'll be streaming nature-themed workshops and activities on our page throughout the day for you to get involved with, as well as featuring videos from students of their local wildlife. We've got some great content lined up - you don't want to miss this 🎥 🦔

Lockdown Recording.  Send us your wildlife pictures, films etc  Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery Covid-19 collection.  ...
12/05/2020

Lockdown Recording. Send us your wildlife pictures, films etc Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery Covid-19 collection.
Have you made some surprising records in your garden, on your doorstep....let us or Tullie know.

HELP!
We want to catalogue your pandemic experience for future generations. So we're asking people to send photos eg notices, signs, symbols of support... (Please do not travel especially to take photos)

Please send images to [email protected] along with the following information:
Name
Contact details
Where and when the photograph was taken
Why they photograph was taken (if there is a reason it was interesting, or meant something to the photographer)

Find out more: https://www.tulliehouse.co.uk/covid-19-collection

Now is a good time to look for the distinctive Hoverfly Rhingia campstris. It looks scary with its long snout and orange...
06/05/2020

Now is a good time to look for the distinctive Hoverfly Rhingia campstris. It looks scary with its long snout and orange abdomen, but it is harmless. The snout is used to delve deep into tube like flowers e.g. bluebells, bugle, red campion. Males feed on nectar and females feed on the protein rich pollen, which it needs for egg production. Eggs are laid in cow dung. If you are walking along hedgerows or in woodlands near fields of cows then keep an eye open for these pollinators.

There are 2 species in the UK R. campestris is the most common recorded in Cumbria and is widespread across the UK. However, R. rostrata is less frequent, but there have been a few confirmed sightings in the South of the county. You can tell the difference between the 2 species by checking the abdomen. If it has a strong central line it will be R. campestris, if has no (or very faint) line then it will be R. rostrata.

Get Cumbria Buzzing - Record the Buzz. https://www.cbdc.org.uk/about-us/projects/get-cumbria_recording-the-buzzzing_page/

Reviewing the 2018 records CBDC came across the following record:  3 August 2018, Book Chelifer, Cheiridium museorum (Fa...
30/04/2020

Reviewing the 2018 records CBDC came across the following record: 3 August 2018, Book Chelifer, Cheiridium museorum (False scorpion), Lorton, Nr Cockermouth. Along with the recorder’s comment, “found in bedroom” and a photo to prove it.

There are 28 species of pseudoscorpions recorded in the UK and Ireland. Although they are abundant, their size makes them difficult to find and requires careful examination of leaf litter, rotting wood and decaying vegetation samples; where they hunt and kill small insects using their impressive venomous claws (pedipalps).

The Book Chelifer is one of two UK species of pseudoscorpion associated with dwellings and is less than 1.4mm (so, finding it was an achievement in itself). The species is found across the UK in barns and grain-stores as well as birds’ nests found alongside houses and buildings such as house sparrow, pigeon, starling and other species. For a comprehensive overview of this amazing, yet under recorded group visit http://britishspiders.org.uk/wiki2015/index.php?title=Pseudoscorpion_Recorders_Group.

And of course feel free to tell us about unexpected, unusual biological records in your bedroom.

5 minutes to make you smile!  An interview with the Green Cellar Slug (aka Dr Ben Rowson, Senior Curator: Invertebrate B...
23/04/2020
The Green Cellar Slug

5 minutes to make you smile! An interview with the Green Cellar Slug (aka Dr Ben Rowson, Senior Curator: Invertebrate Biodiversity (Terrestrial Mollusca), National Museum Cardiff)
Messages from the Wild is Back. Listen to the series of brief interviews with animals, offering them a chance to give us a perspective on their environment.
https://nutricologist.podbean.com/e/the-green-cellar-slug/

Some slugs are useful. And funny.   with many thanks to Dr Ben Rowson Senior Curator: Invertebrate Biodiversity (Terrestrial Mollusca), National Museum Cardiff https://museum.wales/cardiff/    Illustrations by Annabazyl www.fiverr.com/annabazyl Feedback to...

22/04/2020
Will

Will

I have noticed a lot more wood ants lately. Are they making a comeback?

Pass the word around....
09/04/2020

Pass the word around....

*Species of the week*.  Prionocera pubescens Loew RDB2. Now categorised as “Nationally Vulnerable”.  A rare cranefly tha...
30/03/2020

*Species of the week*. Prionocera pubescens Loew RDB2. Now categorised as “Nationally Vulnerable”. A rare cranefly that is a stenotopic inhabitant of lowland bogs. Two females have been confirmed (from photos alone), seen in April 2019 at a coastal location close to the Sphagnum lawns of Duddon Mosses NNR. In England it has been found at a handful of widely scattered sites in Hampshire, Surrey, Cheshire, Yorkshire, and there are also single sites in Wales and Scotland. The larval ecology is poorly known, but there appears to be an association with Sphagnum lawns.
In Cumbria, a previous record of a single male (2014) has been noted in an article in The Lakeland Naturalist Vol 3 (1).
A feature of this species is the distinct pubescent appearance of the head and thorax, which can be seen in the photo below. The genus is distinctive in having serrate antennae. Nigel Gilligan,

18/03/2020

Still got last years's records to process? Then now could be a good time! Although Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery Trust has taken the difficult decision to close the building and grounds from Thursday 19th March, in accordance with Government Guidance. CBDC will continue to operate with staff working from home, but sadly we have had to cancel all face to face meetings and training up to the end of April.

2 places for CBDC conference are now available.  Great Programme. Book now - https://www.cbdc.org.uk/get-involved/record...
24/02/2020
Recorders' Conference | Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

2 places for CBDC conference are now available. Great Programme. Book now - https://www.cbdc.org.uk/get-involved/recorders-conference/

Recorders’ Conference Established in 2011 the Recorders Conference has become an Annual Event welcoming speakers and recorders from Cumbria and beyond. We aim for a range of speakers and posters on a wide variety of topics – focused on a particular species, group or habitat; results of recording...

23/02/2020

CBDC Recorders Conference SOLD OUT. 100 seats filled - see you all next Saturday. Reminder - please send in hot lunch orders.

Only 8 seats left at the Cumbria Recorders' Conference.  Full programme of presentations and displays andhow to book : h...
19/02/2020
Recorders' Conference | Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

Only 8 seats left at the Cumbria Recorders' Conference. Full programme of presentations and displays andhow to book : https://www.cbdc.org.uk/get-involved/recorders-conference/

Recorders’ Conference Established in 2011 the Recorders Conference has become an Annual Event welcoming speakers and recorders from Cumbria and beyond. We aim for a range of speakers and posters on a wide variety of topics – focused on a particular species, group or habitat; results of recording...

Can you identify our Recorders' Conference key speaker?  'Recording Recovery - biological recording for a Wilder Future'...
31/01/2020

Can you identify our Recorders' Conference key speaker? 'Recording Recovery - biological recording for a Wilder Future' will touch on Nature Recovery Networks (in the new Environment Bill read last night) as well as explaining the Wildlife Trust’s “Wilder Future” campaign, Living Landscapes and Action for Insects. It is, of course, Steve Garland, Entomologist, Chair of Lancashire Wildlife Trust & Chair of The Wildlife Trusts England Committee and regular Cumbrian Recorder. Book your FREE place on the Cumbria Recorders’ conference @tulliehouse 29th February www.cbdc.org.uk/get-involved/recorders-conference/

How about spending sleepless nights counting SLUGS instead of sheep?  The last major study of slug diversity and activit...
23/01/2020

How about spending sleepless nights counting SLUGS instead of sheep? The last major study of slug diversity and activity in gardens was carried out in the 1940s by entomologists Barnes and Weil (https://www.jstor.org/stable/1386?seq=1). Newcastle Uni and RHS are looking for volunteers to survey garden slugs (https://www.rhs.org.uk/science/help-our-research/slug-count). Photo'd below; Limax maximus on the CBDC Recording Day in Gilsland 2019. A real gardener's friend - eats fungi, rotting veg and other slugs!😝😝😝

Memorable Mushrooms. Paul Nichol has been taking a look through CBDC’s fungi dataset. There are a few records that stick...
17/01/2020

Memorable Mushrooms. Paul Nichol has been taking a look through CBDC’s fungi dataset. There are a few records that stick in his mind. It might be that they are are rare, a first for Cumbria or simply unusual, like David Nattrass' 2017 find - Morchella esculenta. Hear more at the Cumbria Recorders’ Conference at Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery Trust on 29th Feb. FREE book now www.cbdc.org.uk/get-involved/recorders-conference/

Bees are not the only pollinators #getcumbriabuzzing. Flies do a great job too.  @TullieHouse Diptera collection is pret...
09/01/2020
The compelling case for why flies are actually fabulous

Bees are not the only pollinators #getcumbriabuzzing. Flies do a great job too. @TullieHouse Diptera collection is pretty impressive....maybe we can do a Cumbria Fly Promo like this one from NHMhttps://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/compelling-case-why-flies-are-fabulous.html?utm_source=tw-image-post-20200107-lh&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=collections

Discover the amazing diversity of flies, weird and wonderful specimens in the Museum collection and the critical ways in which these insects help us.

Snowy Owl (Bubo Scandiacus) - CBDC has never received a record of the beautiful snowy owl but there are 3 records for Cu...
19/12/2019

Snowy Owl (Bubo Scandiacus) - CBDC has never received a record of the beautiful snowy owl but there are 3 records for Cumbria.
This iconic high arctic species has a circum-polar breeding distribution, wintering in different regions depending on the availability of food, moving somewhat south to achieve this. It is generally a sedentary species, staying in one place for a long time, but irruptions are caused by a lack of their mammal prey.
It is thought that birds arriving in Britain come mostly from Scandinavia but some arriving in the southwest may have Nearctic origins. The first record for Britain is of a bird shot on Unst Shetland in 1808 and they have been recorded at times throughout the year, some being long-stayers; breeding took place on Fetlar from 1967 until the early 1990s.
The three records for Cumbria were at: West Moor End, Aspatria in 1930; Moss Rigg, Tilberthwaite in 1959; Kentmere Valley, South Lakes in 2001.
Thanks to Chris Hind and the NBN Atlas for information and images.

Too much brandy in mince pies in the Conservation Jobs Office today me thinks!  😂 (The article is about the well known H...
16/12/2019

Too much brandy in mince pies in the Conservation Jobs Office today me thinks! 😂 (The article is about the well known Hawaiian duck aka Koloa)

Lathbury’s Nomad Bee (Nomada lathburiana) spotted by Ben Deed on April 23rd whilst on a trip away from his usual home at...
08/12/2019

Lathbury’s Nomad Bee (Nomada lathburiana) spotted by Ben Deed on April 23rd whilst on a trip away from his usual home at the @MerseysideBioBank. A widespread, but local species, its main host is another mining bee - Andrena cineraria.
CBDC has only 7 records of this species all of which are in VC 69. Ben’s bee sighting was not far from the VC 70 border….so if you are walking north of Grasmere in April next year keep an eye out and take a close up photo. This is a cryptic species but it has been verified on iNaturalist thanks to the orange/reddish hairs on the thorax which is unique in nomad bees.

This lovely octopus was washed up on Haverigg Beach on 1 November. David Hartley reported that several had washed up ove...
03/12/2019

This lovely octopus was washed up on Haverigg Beach on 1 November. David Hartley reported that several had washed up over a couple of weeks in the area. This is a rare record for CBDC – we only have 3 historic records and it looks like the NBN Atlas is not doing a lot better.
The octopus has a double row of suckers on relatively short legs (up to 3x the mantle length) which makes it the Common Octopus (Octopus vulgaris). A single row of suckers on longer legs would be the horned, curled or lesser octopus (Eledone cirrhosa). If you find an octopus or squid whilst wandering along the beach check out the Cephalopod ID guide and let us know.http://www.nmbaqcs.org/media/1717/cephalopod-guide-150917.pdf

Gowbarrow Hall (3rd August 2019) – one of our best ever recording days…1064 records of 584 species.  Over 300 flowering ...
18/11/2019

Gowbarrow Hall (3rd August 2019) – one of our best ever recording days…1064 records of 584 species. Over 300 flowering plant species and 104 moth species were recorded.
A big thank you to everyone who has submitted their records so far. Highlights of the day included the Dark Green Fritillary and the Lesser Bladderwort.

Love Slow worms?  Remember Sylvia?  Suzie Collinson will be presenting her Slow worm project at University of Cumbria, F...
18/10/2019

Love Slow worms? Remember Sylvia? Suzie Collinson will be presenting her Slow worm project at University of Cumbria, Fusehill St. Carlisle. 6pm Monday 21st October. FREE EVENT.

Big Thank you to Lanercost Primary School’s Eco Warriors who have been learning about habitats and classification.  They...
10/10/2019

Big Thank you to Lanercost Primary School’s Eco Warriors who have been learning about habitats and classification. They invited CBDC to help them use their knowledge in Island Wood next to the school. Together we made 101 records, which included new species records for Lanercost including Stinkhorn, Larch ladybird, Pill milipede. CBDC is looking forward to receiving more records in the future.

Alien species alert. Have you seen the Water Primrose?  See Defra's Poster
24/09/2019

Alien species alert. Have you seen the Water Primrose? See Defra's Poster

12/09/2019
Water Shrew

Its never too late to send in your records, pics and videos. Linda sent this in and we think it is the first 10k square record.

1843 was the last reliable record of a Wildcat in Cumbria - killed near Loweswater!   Hear about Marianne Taylor's searc...
05/09/2019

1843 was the last reliable record of a Wildcat in Cumbria - killed near Loweswater! Hear about Marianne Taylor's search for the Wildcat in Scotland. Marianne will be in conversation with Deb Muscat, CBDC Manager, in Tullie House Museum on Sunday 6th October at 10:30am. Follow link to book your seat.

https://www.borderlinescarlisle.co.uk/events/2019/marianne-taylor/

BatsWe have received a few calls recently from people who are finding young bats in their gardens so we thought we would...
19/08/2019
Help with injured or grounded bat - Advice - Bat Conservation Trust

Bats

We have received a few calls recently from people who are finding young bats in their gardens so we thought we would tell you a bit about bats in the UK and Cumbria and what to do if you stumble across one.

There are 17 different species of bat found in the UK with 9 of these being found in Cumbria. Bats hibernate in roosts throughout the winter and then breed throughout the summer. Bats are an important pest controller and can eat up to 3,000 midges in one night. In other parts of the world, they are important pollinators – without them there would be a lot less chocolate! Unfortunately, bats are in trouble with 25% of the world’s species at risk of extinction and 12 identified species already extinct. This is due to a number of man-made reasons from changes and loss of areas to roost and forage, loss of insects to feed on and the impact from artificial lighting on feeding and roost site. Cats are also responsible for a lot of bat casualties. Due to the risk to bats all species and their roosts are protected by law in the UK and Europe.
The main cause of bats being found at this time of year is the young who are learning to fly for the first time, but this is not always the case.

If you do come across an injured or grounded bat then make sure it is safe from immediate danger, the best thing to do is to pick it up with a towel or glove and place it in a cardboard box. The towel or glove will protect the bat when you pick it up and provide something to cling to in the box. Also, add a milk bottle top of water and poke holes in the lid of the box for ventilation and place the box in a cool, quiet place. Then phone the NATIONAL BAT EMERGENCY HELPLINE. They will give you further advice and contact a local qualified bat handler to visit you. The bat handler will check the bat for injuries and give you further advice or they might take the bat away for rehabilitation.

More information on finding a bat; https://www.bats.org.uk/advice/help-with-injured-grounded-bat

For more advice and information about bats in Cumbria visit https://www.cumberlandbatgroup.org.uk/ or https://cumbriabats.wordpress.com/

Image below shows a common pipistrelles

Address

Tullie House Museum
Carlisle
CA3 8TP

General information

Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC) is one of a network of local records centres (LRCs) throughout the UK. LRCs are organisations that collect, collate, manage and disseminate information relating to the biodiversity and geodiversity of a region on a not-for-profit basis. This information is received from a variety of sources, including from professional ecologists, local natural history groups and volunteer recorders. The information is put to use in helping protect and improve the biodiversity of the region through better informed decision making. Data is stored and shared electronically where possible, including via the internet.

Telephone

01228 618732

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Comments

Hi I'm worried about the decline in bat's in my area, last week I spotted about 4 maybe 5 but last night only 1 or 2
Rhingia campestris on Water Avens seen around Kings Meaburn over the past 3 weeks or so
Messages from Wild - a series of 5 minute podcasts that make you smile 😊. Wish my science lessons had been delivered like this. Find out about the life of a great crested newt, barn owl, dung beetle and many more!
I have noticed a lot more wood ants lately. Are they making a comeback?
Hi do we have a date for the Recorders conference please ?
American Mink on River Kent in #Kendal this morning. Gorgeous but shouldn’t really be here
Ooh, never seen one of these before! How exotic!
Holly blue in my Carlisle garden yesterday !
Just a quick question. Our local parish magazine says that all three Woodpecker species have been recorded at Wythop Woods, (top of Bassenthwaite). Does anyone have details of the Lesser Spotted Woodpecker sighting? Thanks.
Nice walk around Finglandrigg today
Bloody nose beetles very abundant at Lowick South Lakes today
Hi, can anyone advise about terrestrial flatworms? Found one in my allotment - brown, about 10cm long extended - now in my fridge.