GB Images

GB Images Banerjee González Images is a Virtual Photographic Gallery. [BG Images es una Galería Virtual de Fotografías] An enterprise of Banerjee Gonzalez Group.

Operating as usual

GB Images
02/12/2020

GB Images

Photos from GB Images's post
20/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

Photos from GB Images's post
13/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

Photos from GB Images's post
13/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

Photos from GB Images's post
13/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

New book released on January 2020.
11/11/2019

New book released on January 2020.

New book released on January 2020.
11/11/2019

New book released on January 2020.

New camera decoration
13/05/2019
Nikon F3 Film SLR Camera

New camera decoration

This is a model of the Nikon F3, which is considered by many to be the best film camera Nikon ever made. For those who aren't familiar with old cameras, the F3 was an SLR camera, SLR standing for single lens reflex. SLR cameras differ from the...

06/04/2019
BG Publishing

BG Publishing

We are currently working on the next BG Image Exhibition Book due next January.

We have prepared a lot of surprises for this year. Happy new year.
01/01/2019

We have prepared a lot of surprises for this year. Happy new year.

Best wishes to all during the holidays.
08/12/2018

Best wishes to all during the holidays.

Light & Land Photographic Tours and Workshops
18/05/2018
Light & Land Photographic Tours and Workshops

Light & Land Photographic Tours and Workshops

What does it take to become a best-selling landscape photographer whose work is celebrated all over the world?

You’ve spent years developing your portfolio and now comes the challenge of exhibiting and selling. The purpose of this two-day workshop is to teach aspiring professionals how to curate an exhibition and make the big leap to securing full gallery representation, and achieving their first sales.

This is a rare opportunity to gain an insight into the highly specialised world of art sales from celebrated landscape photographer Charlie Waite Photography and his agent Luke Whitaker, who runs the highly successful Bosham Gallery. As the title suggests this is not just about the making of the photographs, the workshop is focused on the commercial aspects of the business; namely how to run an exhibition and successfully sell your photography.

Books
03/02/2018

Books

BG Images's cover photo
24/11/2017

BG Images's cover photo

I chose Spain rather than Madrid because I wanted to Toledo City as this is very small and next to Madrid.  The architec...
24/11/2017

I chose Spain rather than Madrid because I wanted to Toledo City as this is very small and next to Madrid. The architecture of Madrid and Toledo are beautiful and it can depict the Moorish influence.

The exhibition depicts the most famous buildings in Madrid and one in Toledo like:

1. Alcázar de Toledo (Alcázar of Toledo) – this building was built on top of rock in the city of Toledo. This building location made it a great asset in the military strategy. During the 3rd century was a Roman Palace and after 568 was established as a Royal Residence. This building currently hostess the Army Museum and there are visible damages caused by bullets during the Spanish Civil war.

2. Las Ventas (Las Ventas Bullring) – this is the most famous bullring in the World. The building is located in the East of Madrid in the district of Salamanca. The building was opened in 1931 to replace the one in Aragon highway as it was not big enough. The building was designed by architect José Espeliú in a Moorish style with ceramic details. The building is divided into two the arena and the seating area. The area has 60m in diameter and the seats are orientated with the sun to allow some seats to be in the shadow as it is an open arena.

3. Banco de España (Bank of Spain) – this is the national central bank of Spain. The building is located in the centre of Madrid and was opened in 1891 by King Alfonso XIII. The building was designed by architects Eduardo Adaro and Severino Sainz de la Lastra. However, the current building is the result of various architectural changes since 1969. The façade is a combination of eclectic decorations and sober bricks is depicting the importance of the institute that hostess.

4. Palacio Real (Royal Palace of Madrid) – this is the official residence of the King of Spain; however, the King currently does not live there and uses the building to host state ceremonies and solemn acts. The building has a 135,000m2 and 3418 rooms is almost double in size to Buckingham Palace and Versailles Palace. The building is located in the Plaza de Oriente. The building was constructed by demands of King Felipe V started in 1738 by architect Filippo Juvara in a baroque style. The idea was to take inspiration from the Louvre Palace in Paris.

5. Plaza de España (Spain Square) – this square is located in Argüelles district of Moncloa-Aravaca. The square was built after the destruction of San Gil quartets in 1909 and the plans for the square were drawn in 1911. The square has a statue of author Miguel de Cervantes, which was built to celebrate 300 years of the birth of the author, and the gardens depict the adventures of Don Quijote and Sancho Panza based on the author’s best known book.

6. Plaza Mayor (Main Square) – the square is located in the centre of Madrid. The square was built in 1580 by architects Juan de Herrera and Juan Gómez de Mora. The square’s dimensions are 129x94 meters and is completely surrounded by three-floor apartments with 237 balconies. The buildings were named after trades: Casa de la Panadería (Bakery House) and Casa de la Carnicería (Butchery House). The middle of square there is statue of King Felipe III mounting a horse by Italian sculpture Juan de Bolonia.

7. Fuente de la Cibeles (Cibeles Fountain) – this fountain is located in the Cibeles square. This sculpture was designed by architect Ventura Rodríguez and built by sculpture Roberto Michel based on the architect’s sketches. The style is Neoclassical and its dimensions are height 5.5m, width 4.7m and depth 12.5m. The fountain depicts mother goddess Cibeles, whom is the mother of the Olympian gods and is the symbol of earth and fertility. The goddess is mounted in a car pulled by lions.

8. Museo Centro Sofía, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (Queen Sofía Museum) –the building was formerly Madrid’s General Hospital. The building is a neoclassical and was built in 1800s and located in the Atocha region. The building was designed by José de Hermosilla and finished by Francesco Sabatini. The museum hostess a permanent exhibition of great Spanish artist of the 20th century like Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Joan Miró.

9. Museo del Prado (Prado Museum) – this building has 41,995m2 and was built in 1819. The building was designed by architect Juan de Villanueva but many other architect have enhanced it architecture until the building it is today. The building has two elongated galleries, which ends in square pavilions in each edge. The north façade has an entrance with Ionian columns in a neoclassical style. The museum hostess 35,000 objects including 8,045 paintings, 10,219 drawing, 6,159 engravings, 971 sculptures. The museum depicts the artistic preferences of the Spanish royalty as some of the pieces were specifically created for the Royal collection, making this a very intense and distinguish collection.

10. Palacio de la Comunicación, Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communication Palace) – this building is located in Madrid city center, in Los Jerónimos in the Retiro district, next to the Cibeles Fountain and it comprises of two buildings with white facade. This building was opened in 1919 in a neoplateresque, salamancan baroque and eclectic style. This building was designed by architect Antonio Palacios and built by engineers Joaquín Otamendi and Ángel Chueca Sainz. The façade is built to match the style of the Cibeles Fountain and has some masonic details.

11. Puerta de Alcalá (Alcalá Gate) – this structure is one of the gate that gives Access to the city of Madrid. This gate is located in the Independence Square and was built in 1769 and was designed by architect Francesco Sabatini in a neoclassical style. The gate has 43,967m of width and 21,946m of height. The gate has five arches depicting guns, flags, legends and cornucopias.

12. Puerta de Toledo (Toledo Gate) – this structure is one of the gates that gives Access to the city of Madrid. This gate was built in 1813 and designed by architect Antonio Aguado and was erected in honor of King Fernando VII to commemorate the Spanish independence from France. This structure is located Toledo Gate roundabout. The gate has a neoclassical style and was the last gate erected in Madrid. The gate comprises of a central arch with two lateral arches, with decorations in Ionian style.

13. Teatro de la Zarzuela (Zarzuela Theatre) – this building is located in the central district. This building was built in 1856 by architects Jerónimo de la Gándara and José María Guallart, and has the capacity of hosting 1,242 persons. This theatre originally designed to hostess the zarzuela performance (Spanish musical theatre), however, today is also hostess operas, dances and flamenco (Spanish national dance).

I chose Spain rather than Madrid because I wanted to Toledo City as this is very small and next to Madrid. The architecture of Madrid and Toledo are beautiful and it can depict the Moorish influence.

The exhibition depicts the most famous buildings in Madrid and one in Toledo like:

1. Alcázar de Toledo (Alcázar of Toledo) – this building was built on top of rock in the city of Toledo. This building location made it a great asset in the military strategy. During the 3rd century was a Roman Palace and after 568 was established as a Royal Residence. This building currently hostess the Army Museum and there are visible damages caused by bullets during the Spanish Civil war.

2. Las Ventas (Las Ventas Bullring) – this is the most famous bullring in the World. The building is located in the East of Madrid in the district of Salamanca. The building was opened in 1931 to replace the one in Aragon highway as it was not big enough. The building was designed by architect José Espeliú in a Moorish style with ceramic details. The building is divided into two the arena and the seating area. The area has 60m in diameter and the seats are orientated with the sun to allow some seats to be in the shadow as it is an open arena.

3. Banco de España (Bank of Spain) – this is the national central bank of Spain. The building is located in the centre of Madrid and was opened in 1891 by King Alfonso XIII. The building was designed by architects Eduardo Adaro and Severino Sainz de la Lastra. However, the current building is the result of various architectural changes since 1969. The façade is a combination of eclectic decorations and sober bricks is depicting the importance of the institute that hostess.

4. Palacio Real (Royal Palace of Madrid) – this is the official residence of the King of Spain; however, the King currently does not live there and uses the building to host state ceremonies and solemn acts. The building has a 135,000m2 and 3418 rooms is almost double in size to Buckingham Palace and Versailles Palace. The building is located in the Plaza de Oriente. The building was constructed by demands of King Felipe V started in 1738 by architect Filippo Juvara in a baroque style. The idea was to take inspiration from the Louvre Palace in Paris.

5. Plaza de España (Spain Square) – this square is located in Argüelles district of Moncloa-Aravaca. The square was built after the destruction of San Gil quartets in 1909 and the plans for the square were drawn in 1911. The square has a statue of author Miguel de Cervantes, which was built to celebrate 300 years of the birth of the author, and the gardens depict the adventures of Don Quijote and Sancho Panza based on the author’s best known book.

6. Plaza Mayor (Main Square) – the square is located in the centre of Madrid. The square was built in 1580 by architects Juan de Herrera and Juan Gómez de Mora. The square’s dimensions are 129x94 meters and is completely surrounded by three-floor apartments with 237 balconies. The buildings were named after trades: Casa de la Panadería (Bakery House) and Casa de la Carnicería (Butchery House). The middle of square there is statue of King Felipe III mounting a horse by Italian sculpture Juan de Bolonia.

7. Fuente de la Cibeles (Cibeles Fountain) – this fountain is located in the Cibeles square. This sculpture was designed by architect Ventura Rodríguez and built by sculpture Roberto Michel based on the architect’s sketches. The style is Neoclassical and its dimensions are height 5.5m, width 4.7m and depth 12.5m. The fountain depicts mother goddess Cibeles, whom is the mother of the Olympian gods and is the symbol of earth and fertility. The goddess is mounted in a car pulled by lions.

8. Museo Centro Sofía, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (Queen Sofía Museum) –the building was formerly Madrid’s General Hospital. The building is a neoclassical and was built in 1800s and located in the Atocha region. The building was designed by José de Hermosilla and finished by Francesco Sabatini. The museum hostess a permanent exhibition of great Spanish artist of the 20th century like Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Joan Miró.

9. Museo del Prado (Prado Museum) – this building has 41,995m2 and was built in 1819. The building was designed by architect Juan de Villanueva but many other architect have enhanced it architecture until the building it is today. The building has two elongated galleries, which ends in square pavilions in each edge. The north façade has an entrance with Ionian columns in a neoclassical style. The museum hostess 35,000 objects including 8,045 paintings, 10,219 drawing, 6,159 engravings, 971 sculptures. The museum depicts the artistic preferences of the Spanish royalty as some of the pieces were specifically created for the Royal collection, making this a very intense and distinguish collection.

10. Palacio de la Comunicación, Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communication Palace) – this building is located in Madrid city center, in Los Jerónimos in the Retiro district, next to the Cibeles Fountain and it comprises of two buildings with white facade. This building was opened in 1919 in a neoplateresque, salamancan baroque and eclectic style. This building was designed by architect Antonio Palacios and built by engineers Joaquín Otamendi and Ángel Chueca Sainz. The façade is built to match the style of the Cibeles Fountain and has some masonic details.

11. Puerta de Alcalá (Alcalá Gate) – this structure is one of the gate that gives Access to the city of Madrid. This gate is located in the Independence Square and was built in 1769 and was designed by architect Francesco Sabatini in a neoclassical style. The gate has 43,967m of width and 21,946m of height. The gate has five arches depicting guns, flags, legends and cornucopias.

12. Puerta de Toledo (Toledo Gate) – this structure is one of the gates that gives Access to the city of Madrid. This gate was built in 1813 and designed by architect Antonio Aguado and was erected in honor of King Fernando VII to commemorate the Spanish independence from France. This structure is located Toledo Gate roundabout. The gate has a neoclassical style and was the last gate erected in Madrid. The gate comprises of a central arch with two lateral arches, with decorations in Ionian style.

13. Teatro de la Zarzuela (Zarzuela Theatre) – this building is located in the central district. This building was built in 1856 by architects Jerónimo de la Gándara and José María Guallart, and has the capacity of hosting 1,242 persons. This theatre originally designed to hostess the zarzuela performance (Spanish musical theatre), however, today is also hostess operas, dances and flamenco (Spanish national dance).

15/09/2017

Next photographic exhibition will be about Madrid and Toledo both beautiful cities from Spain.

BG Images's cover photo
25/08/2017

BG Images's cover photo

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the...
25/08/2017

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park. The show was named “Enlightenment”. The ceremony was directed by Bradley Hemmings and Jenn Sealey and was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II.

The message conveyed by the Olympic Games was “inspire a generation” by Lord Sebastian Coe, chairman of the LOCOG (London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games). The ceremony was divided into segments and these included:

• Pre-Show – this section is when the stadium opened for the public and the display was set awaiting the performance to start.

• The Age of Enlightenment – this section depicted Stephen Hawking (physicist) delivered a memorable speech about the big bang and what followed this.

• Miranda (Science of History, Colour of Science) – this section depicted Miranda whom was the guide of the ceremony was introduce and the journey started from the depth of space, sea navigation and Newton’s apple.

• Spirit in Motion – this section depicted the parade of the athletes. The Nations parade is in alphabetical order in the native language of the hosting country (or French). Each flag bearer was accompanied by a young woman carrying a transparent umbrella with the country’s name in English on top and the country’s flag was depicted on the skirt.

• End of Athletes Parade – this section depicted the Great Britain’s team which as the parade always ends with the hosting team.

• Brave New World – this section started with the giant umbrella in the centre of the stadium was lifted and Miranda was on top of book The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And the section ended when Miranda recited the speech from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

• Navigation – this section was a tribute to scientists, mathematicians and astronomers that used their imagination to challenge the boundaries of the known world. The planets were depicted in mobile structures that rotate around the library.

• Gravity – this section was a tribute to Sir Isaac Newton and the garden where he observed the apple dropping. The section ended with all the stadium biting an apple and creating a big crunching sound.

• Enlightenment – this section depicted the lightening of the Paralympic Flame. The cauldron was lighted by Margaret Maughan, Britain’s first gold medallist at the Paralympic Games in 1960.

• I am What I am – this section depicted the culmination of the opening ceremony. The last performance was the entire stadium singing “I am what I am”. This song is about empowerment and accepting each person as they are. The section ended with a pyrotechnic display and the entire cast, included volunteers, becoming part of the closing act.

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park. The show was named “Enlightenment”. The ceremony was directed by Bradley Hemmings and Jenn Sealey and was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II.

The message conveyed by the Olympic Games was “inspire a generation” by Lord Sebastian Coe, chairman of the LOCOG (London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games). The ceremony was divided into segments and these included:

• Pre-Show – this section is when the stadium opened for the public and the display was set awaiting the performance to start.

• The Age of Enlightenment – this section depicted Stephen Hawking (physicist) delivered a memorable speech about the big bang and what followed this.

• Miranda (Science of History, Colour of Science) – this section depicted Miranda whom was the guide of the ceremony was introduce and the journey started from the depth of space, sea navigation and Newton’s apple.

• Spirit in Motion – this section depicted the parade of the athletes. The Nations parade is in alphabetical order in the native language of the hosting country (or French). Each flag bearer was accompanied by a young woman carrying a transparent umbrella with the country’s name in English on top and the country’s flag was depicted on the skirt.

• End of Athletes Parade – this section depicted the Great Britain’s team which as the parade always ends with the hosting team.

• Brave New World – this section started with the giant umbrella in the centre of the stadium was lifted and Miranda was on top of book The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And the section ended when Miranda recited the speech from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

• Navigation – this section was a tribute to scientists, mathematicians and astronomers that used their imagination to challenge the boundaries of the known world. The planets were depicted in mobile structures that rotate around the library.

• Gravity – this section was a tribute to Sir Isaac Newton and the garden where he observed the apple dropping. The section ended with all the stadium biting an apple and creating a big crunching sound.

• Enlightenment – this section depicted the lightening of the Paralympic Flame. The cauldron was lighted by Margaret Maughan, Britain’s first gold medallist at the Paralympic Games in 1960.

• I am What I am – this section depicted the culmination of the opening ceremony. The last performance was the entire stadium singing “I am what I am”. This song is about empowerment and accepting each person as they are. The section ended with a pyrotechnic display and the entire cast, included volunteers, becoming part of the closing act.

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