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National Hellenic Museum The National Hellenic Museum is the premier institution for sharing the Greek story from ancient times to the modern Greek American experience.
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The National Hellenic Museum is the premier institution for sharing the Greek story; a story that laid the foundation for Western civilization, contributed to the building of America, and continues to innovate today.

Mission: The National Hellenic Museum (NHM) portrays and celebrates Greek heritage and the Hellenic legacy. With a rich depository of over 20,000 artifacts, the Museum highlights Greek-American contributions to the American mosaic and inspires curiosity about visitors’ own family stories though cultural expression, oral history and experiential education. Our mission is to provide lifelong learning for the whole community through classes, exhibitions and programs aim that spark inquiry and discussion about the broader issues in our lives. Located in Chicago’s Greektown, come hear our stories, learn about our shared past, and gather with others to make new memories.

Operating as usual

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – Happy Veterans Day to all who have sacrificed to serve in our armed forces and protect our freedo...
11/11/2020

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – Happy Veterans Day to all who have sacrificed to serve in our armed forces and protect our freedoms. Pictured here in front of the Spitfire he piloted is Steve N. Pisanos, one of the many Greek Americans who answered the call of duty and took up arms to defend democracy. “The Flying Greek,” as he was known, flew with the British Royal Air Force and the American 4th Fighter Group during WWII and later served as a Colonel during the Vietnam War. Throughout his years of service, Pisanos was awarded three Legions of Merit, five U.S. Distinguished Flying Crosses, and the Purple Heart. Remember to thank the veterans in your community and remind them of our gratitude for all they have done for us!

NHM Collection. 1998.53.3.2. Courtesy of Steve N. Pisanos.

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – This guitar zither is a Niagara Model, circa 1900, created by the U.S. Guitar-Zither Company, whi...
03/11/2020

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – This guitar zither is a Niagara Model, circa 1900, created by the U.S. Guitar-Zither Company, which operated out of Jersey City, New Jersey. Friederich Menzenhauer patented this instrument in 1894, and the zither was a popular instrument between the late 1800s and mid-1900s. This particular instrument was owned by Harry J Boolookas, a Greek immigrant that arrived in the United States in 1902.

NHM Collections. 1998.5.3. Courtesy of Georgia Boolookas

Today we commemorate Oxi Day - a day that literally changed the course of history and offers us hope that even in the da...
28/10/2020

Today we commemorate Oxi Day - a day that literally changed the course of history and offers us hope that even in the darkest moments, courage and valor can triumph.

On October 28, 1940, as the Axis Powers moved virtually unchallenged across Europe, the Greek Prime Minister Ioannis Metaxas rejected the demand of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini that Axis forces be allowed to enter Greece and occupy certain “strategic locations.” According to legend, Metaxas’s response was a simple “Oxi” (No). As a result, the full might of Hitler’s Germany descended upon Greece. The Battle of Greece lasted six months, seriously slowing the fascist advance across Europe and giving the Allies an important strategic and moral victory in the darkest days of the Second World War. Undoubtedly, the “Oxi” of Greece helped turn the tide of the Second World War. Today, Oxi Day is celebrated as a commemoration of Greek valor and the Hellenic spirit of freedom.

23/10/2020

It's time for Greek Word of the Week!

Today's word is:

Χαρμολύπη (charmolypi)

Etymologically this word is literally a combination of the words “sorrow” and “joy”. The feeling the word describes, however, is not just the mixing of the two. Χαρμολύπη refers to the joy that emerges out of the middle of sadness and (conversely) the sadness that merges out of joy: an integrated feeling that cannot exist without both sorrow and joy, dwelling together and giving rise to each other.

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – George Phillos was a Greek immigrant to the US who carried his camera with him throughout his tra...
22/10/2020

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – George Phillos was a Greek immigrant to the US who carried his camera with him throughout his travels and captured unique aspects of American history. We can see a branch of the Bank of Italy in the background in this image of a parade on Market Street in San Francisco in the late 1910s. The bank was founded in the city in 1904 to serve a primarily working class clientele, and survived the 1906 earthquake and fire and was one of the first banks to begin lending following the catastrophe. You can learn more about Phillos and the world he captured through his camera lens in the NHM digital exhibition, Snapshots of Life: The George Phillos Photograph Collection. Click the below link to view the exhibition now!

https://nhmdigitalexhibitions.omeka.net/exhibits/show/snapshots-of-life--the-george-/snapshots-of-life--the-george-

NHM Collections. 2003.26.56. Courtesy of John Secaras.

NHM is excited to announce our partnership with Chicago Architecture Center through our participation in the Stories of ...
19/10/2020
Stories of (Im)Migration, Sites of Unity

NHM is excited to announce our partnership with Chicago Architecture Center through our participation in the Stories of (Im)Migration Panel as part of Open House Chicago!

Our own resident scholar Dr. Katherine Kelaidis will join a distinguished group of panelists to discuss (im)migration stories and local sites that are meaningful for their communities. Dr. Kelaidis will be joining Matt Bergstrom (Swedish American Museum), Maria Klimchak (Ukrainian National Museum), & Sherry Williams (Bronzeville / Black Chicagoan Historical Society) with moderators Andrew James Leith & Angélica Ospina from the Chicago Cultural Alliance

The program is FREE and will take place this Thursday, October 22nd at 12:00pm CDT over Zoom.

Click the link below for more information and to register for free now!
https://www.architecture.org/programs-events/detail/stories-of-im-migration-sites-of-unity/

OHC 2020 community partner Chicago Cultural Alliance co-convenes this discussion among representatives from its member organizations. Hear (im)migration stories from panelists and discover local sites that are meaningful for their communities.

16/10/2020

It's time for Greek Word of the Week!

Todays word is Μεράκι (meraki)

A verb or adverb. A word that is usually applied to creative tasks, μεράκι means to do something with passion, love, and absolute devotion.

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – This photograph shows the American Hellenic Progressive Educational Association (AHEPA) Woodlawn ...
13/10/2020

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – This photograph shows the American Hellenic Progressive Educational Association (AHEPA) Woodlawn Chapter #93 baseball team in the 1930s. AHEPA was founded in 1922 in Atlanta, Georgia, and committed to fight against the bigotry and hatred leveled against Greek immigrants at the hands of the Ku Klux Klan and other racist groups. In addition to fighting for civil rights, AHEPA provided a space for Greek Americans to gather and socialize, much like the organization continues to do to this day.

NHM Collection. 1994.126.1.

The National Hellenic Museum mourns the passing of Frank S. Kamberos. Mr. Kamberos, who has served on NHM’s Board of Tru...
12/10/2020
Frank S. Kamberos† | National Hellenic Museum

The National Hellenic Museum mourns the passing of Frank S. Kamberos.

Mr. Kamberos, who has served on NHM’s Board of Trustees since 2005, financed the construction of the National Hellenic Museum’s Frank S. Kamberos Oral History Center. A cornerstone of the Museum’s work to preserve and share the Greek American story, the Frank S. Kamberos Oral History Center has grown in the past fifteen years to become the largest depository of Greek American oral histories in the world and an important resource for scholars, genealogists, and the public. We invite you to listen to Mr. Kamberos’s own oral history by clicking the link below to learn more about the life of this fascinating and generous man --and to see for yourself the incredible value of oral histories in preserving the past.

Αἰωνία ἡ μνήμη! May his memory be eternal!

https://www.nationalhellenicmuseum.org/trustees/frank-s-kamberos-vice-chairman/

Co-founder, Treasure Island Foods, Chairman, Greek Star Newspaper Frank S. Kamberos, a native of Chicago, attended Illinois Institute of Technology and served in US Air Corps during WWII in England, France, and Germany. In 1962, …

09/10/2020
Myths & Misadventures - The Olympians Part 2

In the latest episode of Myths & Misadventures, Cairo tells some tales about Olympians Hestia, Poseidon, Hades, & Hera

Head to our YouTube page to watch all of the episodes of Myths & Misadventures and much more video content all available for free!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jaN5sZqvqic

The National Hellenic Museum staff Cairo Dye tells more about some of the Olympian Gods, telling tales of Hestia, Poseidon, Hades, & Hera in this episode "My...

Todays Great Philhellene is famous author Mary Shelley.  You most likely know her as the author of Frankenstein, but she...
18/09/2020

Todays Great Philhellene is famous author Mary Shelley. You most likely know her as the author of Frankenstein, but she was also a passionate Philhellene.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was the only child of the political philosophyer William Goodwin and Mary Woostonecraft, the author Vindication of the Rights of Women, largely considered the first significant work of feminist philosophy. Mary’s mother died shortly after she was born and her father turned her education over to a governess, whose lessons focused on Greek and Roman history. In 1814 while still a teenager, she met and fell in love with the famed poet Percy Shelly, who was then 21. Within a month of their meeting (at her mother’s grave, no less!), the couple eloped and ran off to France. France was in the midst of war and so the couple ultimately landed in Switzerland near Lake Geneva.

It is in this same year, while in Switzerland, Mary’s journals show a heightened interest in ancient Greek literature and the Greek language. Traditionally this has been attributed to her new husband’s influence over her. Like his Romantic contemporaries, most famously Lord Byron, Percy was enamored of Greek antiquity. However, modern scholars, most significantly Maria Schoina at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, have demonstrated that this deepening love for Greek antiquity was much more than a teenage girl adopting the interests of her new husband.

Perhaps the greatest evidence for Mary’s independent interest in Greek is found in Frankenstein itself, a novel that, importantly, bears the alternate title The Modern Prometheus. The summer of 1816 was famously rainy,bleak, and cold. It was a summer the Shelleys spent with Lord Byron and the summer during which Mary would write her most famous work. While deeply indebted to a host of Germanic and English folktales, the primary source material for Frankenstein is undoubtedly the story of the Greek Titan Prometheus. And the novel serves as a prime example of how ancient myths are used to wrestle with contemporary problems.

#museum #museumfromhome #maryshelley #frankenstein #prometheus

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – Pictured here is the interior of Stevens Brothers Home-Made Ice Cream, an ice cream parlor locate...
08/09/2020

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – Pictured here is the interior of Stevens Brothers Home-Made Ice Cream, an ice cream parlor located at 3658 W. 26th Street in Chicago, Illinois. Before prohibition (January 17, 1920 – December 5, 1933), the business was a tavern and restaurant, but adjusted to serving ice cream and sweets when alcohol was banned. The business was owned by Athanasios and Ioannis Hatzigiannis, who changed their surname to Stevens after immigrating to the United States.

NHM Collections. 2007.39.6.1. Courtesy of Fanny Pappas.

HAPPY LABOR DAY FROM THE NATIONAL HELLENIC MUSEUM – In the late 19th and early 20th century, many Greek immigrants worke...
08/09/2020

HAPPY LABOR DAY FROM THE NATIONAL HELLENIC MUSEUM – In the late 19th and early 20th century, many Greek immigrants worked in the mines of the western United States, providing the coal that powered America’s industrial growth. Pictured here are Greek immigrants from Crete, displaying for their families back in Greece some of the goods their labor in the mines of Clear Creek, Utah enabled them to buy. Greek Americans played an important role in the labor movement in the West, most notably Louis Tikas, a Cretan immigrant who died fighting for better working conditions during the Colorado Coalfield Wars of late 1914, one of the bloodiest labor disputes in US history.

NHM Collection. F2013.57. Unknown donor.

In recent weeks rising tensions between Greece and Turkey in the Eastern Meditterianean have caused many to recall the 1...
03/09/2020

In recent weeks rising tensions between Greece and Turkey in the Eastern Meditterianean have caused many to recall the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus.  Since the invasion, Cyprus has been divided between the Turkish northern half of the island and the Greek southern half. Like in many parts of the world where such divisions exist, the division of Cyprus has caused considerable pain to the Cypriot people.

This is a photo from the National Hellenic Museum’s collection of “The Women’s Walk Home.”
The Women’s Walk Home was a protest movement led by Greek Cypriot women which aimed to end the division of the island. In the Spring of 1975 (and then again in 1987 and 1989), these women attempted to cross the heavily militarized “Green Line” that divides Cyprus. Their refusal at the border provides the powerful image below.

"The fire started on Sunday near the tomb of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae, one of the major centres of civilization in...
02/09/2020
Fire erupts near ancient Greek site of Mycenae

"The fire started on Sunday near the tomb of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae, one of the major centres of civilization in the Mediterranean in the second millennium BC. According to legend, Agamemnon led the Greek forces in the Trojan war.

The flames licked the ruins but the fire department insisted there was no danger to the museum on the site in Greece's Peloponnese region."

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/08/fire-erupts-ancient-greek-site-mycenae-200830165758062.html

Huge fire rages near ruin of the Bronze age site, prompting authorities to vacate tourists to the archeological site.

Is that the famous outlaw, Clyde Barrow? This is actually George Phillos, and though he wasn’t an outlaw, he led a very ...
31/08/2020

Is that the famous outlaw, Clyde Barrow? This is actually George Phillos, and though he wasn’t an outlaw, he led a very interesting life and documented much of it with his camera. Click the link below to hop on over to the new NHM digital exhibit: Snapshots of Life: The George Phillos Photograph Collection, to learn more about life in early 20th century America as seen through the eyes of a Greek immigrant.

https://nhmdigitalexhibitions.omeka.net/

NHM Collection. 2003.26.87. Courtesy of John Secaras.

Today’s Great Philhellene is Alice Kober.The written language of the Mycenaeans is known as Linear B. First discovered b...
28/08/2020

Today’s Great Philhellene is Alice Kober.

The written language of the Mycenaeans is known as Linear B. First discovered by the great archaeologist Arthur Evans at Knossos, Crete in 1906, Linear B remained undeciphered until 1952 when the English architect and classicist Micheal Ventris cracked the code.

Ventris’s work, however, was based largely on the nearly two decades of work by the American classicist Alice Kober. Born in 1906 to Hungarian immigrant parents on Manhattan’s Upper Eastside, Kober majored in Latin at Hunter College, financed in part by a $100 prize She would later go on to earn a Ph.D. in Classics at Columbia. Withdrawn and private, Kober had a natural gift for languages and mastered many, including Hittite, Old Irish, Akkadian, Tocharian, Sumerian, Old Persian, Basque and Chinese. She taught herself Braille so that she could translate books and exams for blind students at Brooklyn College, where she taught throughout her career.

Beginning in the early 1930s, Kober turned her attention to the yet undeciphered Linear B script. Her work was meticulous. She kept detailed notes on the 180,000 known tablets, creating a kind of handmade database of the language. She won a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1946 to study Linear B full-time and traveled to Oxford where she poured over the tablets kept in Evans’s collection. During her time in Oxford, Kober made what would become the definitive clue in uncoding Linear B: Linear B is an inflected language (Languages in which words change their form based on their grammatical role are called inflected. Both ancient and modern Greek are examples of inflected languages).

Unfortunately, in the years following her discovery, her further progress on Linear B was significantly slowed by the extent of her teaching duties and her work as the editor of Sir John Linto Myres's book on archaic Greek script Scripta Minoa. Alice Kober died 1950 at the age of 43, only two years before Michael Ventris would complete her life’s work.

#museum #museumfromhome #history #hellenism

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – The original Millenium Monument stood at the corner of Randolph Street and Michigan Avenue betwee...
18/08/2020

FROM THE COLLECTIONS – The original Millenium Monument stood at the corner of Randolph Street and Michigan Avenue between 1917 and 1953. The replica that currently sits on the same site is slightly smaller than the original, which we can thank George Phillos for photographing for us in the 1930s. Phillos traveled far and wide, documenting much of what he saw with his camera. He captured a unique period in American history, and you can learn more by visiting the new NHM digital exhibit: Snapshots of Life: The George Phillos Photograph Collection through the link below.
https://nhmdigitalexhibitions.omeka.net/

NHM Collection. 2003.26.73. Courtesy of John Secaras.

15/08/2020

The National Hellenic Museum wishes you a joyous Feast of the Assumption. In the Orthodox Church, this feast celebrates the death and bodily assumption into Heaven of the Virgin Mary. As in the Roman Catholic Church and some Protestant churches, this is a major holiday and consequently is celebrated by Greeks around the world. This day, and the Virgin Mary, are so important to Greek Americans That half of all Greek Orthodox churches in America are dedicated to the commemoration of this feast and so named “Assumption” or some variation of that name. (And Χρόνια Πολλά! to everyone celebrating their name day today!)

Today's Great Philhellene is Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.   Most widely known by the Sanskrit honorific Mahatmas Gandhi, ...
14/08/2020

Today's Great Philhellene is Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. Most widely known by the Sanskrit honorific Mahatmas Gandhi, he is famous for leading the non-violent struggle for Indian independence. Gandhi is a figure who needs no introduction. However, his lifelong love of Classical philosophy is less well-known. It is, however, an important part of his political and intellectual development, and evidence of the wide and enduring impact of the Hellenic legacy.

Educated in the British colonial system, Gandhi discovered the ancient Greek authors young and would turn to them, especially to Plato and Socrates, for inspiration and strength throughout his life. In 1908, while still a young civil rights activist in South Africa, Gandhi wrote Hind Swaraji, a dialogue on Indian philosophy that bears a striking resemblance in forum to Plato’s dialogues. It was published in the weekly magazine Gandhi ran during his time in South Africa longside Plato’s Apology.

The Apology, which documents the last days of Socrates, was particularly important to Gandhi, who saw in Socrates behavior a model of bravery and individual moral courage and he would read the text of The Apology several times while imprisoned in the 1920s. Socrates remained a powerful inspiration to Gandhi throughout his life, as he led the fight for his nation’s independence, turning always to Socrates' insistence upon speaking the truth and defending justice even at great personal cost. Gandhi would later say that “We must learn to live and die like Socrates.” A powerful testament to the enduring Hellenic legacy.

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Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

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(312) 655-1234

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It has come to my attention and I find it completely Tragic that your humble board of directors have not created a wing of Greek-American Painters and Sculptors as the list is long with so many local and US based Art Collectors, owners of Art Galleries / Art Dealers, Art Critics and Curators working and living in the USA. At least those Artists who no longer are with us. Yet these artists have cultural value let alone have achieved recognition in US museums and their creations have acquired sales figures in Auction houses across the globe.
Thank you to the National Hellenic Museum for offering SS. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Cathedral of Merrillville, IN a grant to visit the museum. We took a group of 58 parishioners of all ages to the Museum today and they accommodated us beautifully, offering tours for three different age groups, crafts for the kids, and above all, a very knowledgeable and enthusiastic staff!
ACCADEMIA NAPOLETANA to save #Hellenic #Heritage and #Language in #Naples and in #Campania
JOIN Midwest Hellenic Dance Festival-Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Chicago FOR THE BEST "PARADOSIAKO GLENDI" ON THIS SIDE OF THE ATLANTIC!!! Featuring music from ALL areas of Greece, provided by Endasi Mousiki, with Dimitris Spatharakis! Cretans, Pontians, Messenians, Epirotans, Macedonians, Roumeliotans, all Islanders UNITE for an EPIC EVENING!!!! Click on the EventBrite link for tickets!!! Don't miss out on the Early Bird Pricing, ending September 25!!! ΕΛΑΤΕ ΝΑ ΓΛΝΤΗΣΟΥΜΕ ΜΑΖΙ!!!! 🇬🇷️❣️😍💃🕺
A very interesting development surrounding the Parthenon sculptures.