Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale

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Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale http://www.riverspringhealth.org/art As a member of the American Alliance of Museums, the Hebrew Home at Riverdale by RiverSpring Health is committed to publicly exhibiting its art collection throughout its 32-acre campus, including the Derfner Judaica Museum and a sculpture garden overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades.

Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection provides educational and cultural programming for residents of the Hebrew Home, their families and the general public from throughout New York City, its surrounding suburbs and visitors from elsewhere. RiverSpring Health is a nonprofit, non-sectarian geriatric organization serving more than 18,000 older adults in greater New York through its resources and community service programs. The Art Collection, Sculpture Garden & Grounds The Art Collection is comprised of more than 4,500 paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, prints and works on paper by such artists as Salvador Dali, Alex Katz, Joan Mitchell and Andy Warhol. These works are exhibited throughout the main public spaces of the Hebrew Home and elucidated by text panels and labels. The Art Collection & Sculpture Garden Hours: Daily, 10:30 am - 4:30 pm Derfner Judaica Museum The Judaica Museum was founded in 1982 when Riverdale residents Ralph and Leuba Baum donated their collection of Jewish ceremonial art to the Hebrew Home. A refugee from Nazi persecution, Ralph and his wife, Leuba, had an intense desire to preserve and pass on to future generations the memory embodied in the objects they collected, the majority of which were used by European Jews before the Holocaust. In 2008 The Judaica Museum was named in honor of the late Helen and Harold Derfner. It opened in a newly furnished space in June 2009 with a permanent exhibition of the collection entitled, Tradition and Remembrance: Treasures of the Derfner Judaica Museum, that explores the intersections of Jewish history and memory. The Museum also features a rotating gallery space for modern art relating to Jewish life and culture. Museum Hours: Sun - Thurs, 10:30 am - 4:30 pm

Operating as usual

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, we are featuring this poster designed by Puerto Rican graphic artist...
06/10/2020

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, we are featuring this poster designed by Puerto Rican graphic artist Lorenzo Homar, announcing the first Latin-American Print Biennial in San Juan (Primera Bienal de San Juan del Grabado Latinoamericano) which took place in 1970. Around 180 artists participated in the Biennial with the support of the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture (Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña). A silkscreen print, this poster features stylized topography on a red ground with minimal, yet visually striking graphic elements.

Homar was born in 1913 in the San Juan neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra to Spanish-born parents. The family relocated to New York City in 1928, seeking new opportunities, and settled in Spanish Harlem, El Barrio. Homar studied at the Art Students League in 1930, and then at Pratt Institute. At the same time, he worked as a designer for Cartier, where he developed an interest in calligraphy and typography that influenced his artistic practice.

An important Nuyorican artist, Homar developed a political consciousness on the city’s streets. He enlisted in the US Army during World War II where he served in military intelligence and learned cartography. He was awarded the Purple Heart after being wounded.

Homar returned to Puerto Rico in 1950 at which time he co-founded the Center of Puerto Rican Art (Centro de Arte Puertorriqueño). In 1957, after winning a Guggenheim Fellowship, he went on to organize the Graphic Arts Workshop of the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture (El Taller de Gráfica del Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña) where he taught until 1973, profoundly influencing two generations of Puerto Rican graphic artists. He remained active until his death in 2004.

Homar's graphic works spanning 1937-1999 are included in the Princeton University Library and his work is in the collections of Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, San Juan, and in New York at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art and El Museo del Barrio, among others.

Image: Lorenzo Homar, “1ra Bienal del Grabado Latino-Americano en San Juan de Puerto Rico,” 1970, silkscreen-printed poster, 31 x 23 inches, HHAR 2893.

With the week-long holiday of Sukkot beginning tomorrow night, we are featuring this drypoint etching from the collectio...
01/10/2020

With the week-long holiday of Sukkot beginning tomorrow night, we are featuring this drypoint etching from the collection by Belorussian-born Anatoli Lvovich Kaplan (1901–1980), a master of lithography who worked in a range of media. Kaplan began to make etchings in the mid-1970s and used the medium to create one of his last graphic series, “Remembrance of Rogachev.” In “Sukkot” (1978), a work from the series, Kaplan depicts a man reciting the blessing of the lulav and etrog during the fall harvest festival and commemoration of the wanderings of the Israelites during the Exodus. He holds the myrtle, palm frond and willow in his right hand and the etrog, a yellow citron, in his left, as a group of children and a woman look on. The spare, linear compositions of the “Rogachev” series reduce to their essentials the familiar scenes from shtetl life that were common in his earlier lithographs. Evocative of a vanishing past, they recollect the artist’s memories of the town in which he was born.
Kaplan studied at what was at the time the Leningrad Academy of Arts and early in his career worked as a theater designer. In 1939, he became a member of the Artists Union, which allowed him to work as an official artist in the Soviet Union. He began to exhibit regularly and learned printmaking at the Leningrad Lithography Workshop, completing a series on the theme of “Kasrilevke,” the fictional village in the work of Sholem Aleichem. In 1957, he was commissioned to illustrate “The Bewitched Tailor” on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the author’s birth. His other portfolios include “Song of Songs,” “Yiddish Folksongs,” “The Little Goat” and “Tevia the Milkman.” The Grosvenor Gallery in London, which first included his work in both group and solo exhibitions in 1961, brought Kaplan to public attention in the West. Supporters in the United States also promoted his work.

The engraved inscription on this Shofar quotes Psalm 47, which is traditionally recited seven times before the sounding ...
15/09/2020

The engraved inscription on this Shofar quotes Psalm 47, which is traditionally recited seven times before the sounding of the ram's horn on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. "Rise to God with the Teruah, with the sound of the Shofar. Sing, Lord, Sing!" The significance of the sounding of the shofar has many interpretations. During the period of reflection ushered in at the beginning of the year, it is a call to service, a reminder of loss and destruction, and an admonition to examine one's own shortcomings.

Image: Shofar, Poland, 19th C. Ram's horn, engraved. Ralph and Leuba Baum Collection, Derfner Judaica Museum, B. 198.

Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale's cover photo
27/07/2020

Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale's cover photo

#ADA30 The Derfner Judaica Museum was designed by  Louise Braverman Architect in compliance with the landmark Americans ...
27/07/2020

#ADA30 The Derfner Judaica Museum was designed by Louise Braverman Architect in compliance with the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act signed into law 30 years ago this month. In the words of the architect, "the museum establishes a sophisticated prototype for the design of cultural institutions in the era of the aging, urbane, baby-boom generation." Learn more about the design at https://louisebravermanarch.com/portfolio-items/derfner-judaica-museum/

In memory of iconic graphic designer Milton Glaser, today's featured artwork from the permanent collection is this silks...
29/06/2020

In memory of iconic graphic designer Milton Glaser, today's featured artwork from the permanent collection is this silkscreen print entitled "Window" (ca. 1986). It was designed to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the social service organization American Association of Homes for the Aging (today known as LeadingAge). Glaser explained where his inspiration came from: "The problem was to find an appropriate image for an organization that provides housing for senior citizens. Standing at my window, I saw how a vase of flowers and a brightly lit room transformed the winter’s darkness. Voila! The problem was solved." (MiltonGlaser.com)

#miltonglaser #illustration #commercialdesign #printmaking #stilllife #graphicdesign

Today, we’re featuring a photograph from The Art Collection by Atlanta-based African American artist Cedric Smith. Smith...
04/06/2020

Today, we’re featuring a photograph from The Art Collection by Atlanta-based African American artist Cedric Smith. Smith is a self-taught painter and photographer whose work reflects on African American life in the rural South. In this photograph entitled Cupcake, Smith places a vintage snapshot into a contemporary setting, creating a striking composition rich with color and texture. The image suggests the importance of maintaining a connection from past to present in order to preserve the legacy of Black culture in the South. More of Smith’s work can be found at his page Cedric Smith Studio

Cedric Smith
Cupcake, 2006
UltraChrome print
13 x 19 inches
HHAR 5341

#blackouttuesday
02/06/2020

#blackouttuesday

Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale's cover photo
01/06/2020

Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale's cover photo

The Israeli sculptor Menashe Kadishman (1932–2015) worked as a shepherd on Kibbutz Ma’ayan Baruch between 1950 and 1953....
28/05/2020

The Israeli sculptor Menashe Kadishman (1932–2015) worked as a shepherd on Kibbutz Ma’ayan Baruch between 1950 and 1953. This experience had a lasting impact on his later work, and figured prominently in an installation of a flock of colored live sheep he presented at the Venice Biennale in 1978. Sheep became a frequent subject of his colorful expressionistic paintings and by the 1980s in his sculpture, too, such as The Sacrifice of Isaac (1985).

This monumental work in Corten steel was created after war broke out between Israel and Lebanon in October 1982 when Kadishman’s own son was a soldier. The sacrifice of Isaac was a metaphor for the sacrifices made on the battlefield. The section on the left depicts two grieving women, mothers who have lost their sons. Isaac is depicted as a round head on the ground. The ram looms over the scene in a threatening manner precluding the possibility of redemption.

#MuseumFromHome

The art world mourns the loss of Richard Anuszkiewicz, whose Sequential Portfolio (1972) is part of the Art Collection.
26/05/2020
Richard Anuszkiewicz (1930–2020)

The art world mourns the loss of Richard Anuszkiewicz, whose Sequential Portfolio (1972) is part of the Art Collection.

American painter Richard Anuszkiewicz, a leading proponent of Op art who experimented with perception through startling tonal harmonies, has died at age eighty-nine. After mentoring with Josef Albers in the 1950s, Anuszkiewicz became known for nesting squares of vibratory, complementary hues in his....

Graham Nickson is known for his structured and highly saturated figure paintings on a monumental scale. He often works i...
21/05/2020

Graham Nickson is known for his structured and highly saturated figure paintings on a monumental scale. He often works in series, sometimes painting and repainting his canvases, and executed many bather scenes in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Nickson was born in Lancashire, England, and has shown his work in New York since the 1970s. He is represented in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY; the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; The Morgan Library and Museum, New York, NY; National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, Boston, MA; The Albright Knox Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Frye Art Museum, Seattle, WA; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT; and the Lillehammer Kunstmuseum, Lillehammer, Norway, among others. He has been a faculty member and Dean of the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture since 1988.

Graham Nickson, Bather: Ziggurat, 1991, lithograph and silkscreen. Gift of The Carol and Arthur Goldberg Collection.

#MuseumVacation #MuseumFromHome

Born Charles Hargrove in 1963 in the South Bronx, Kool Koor is considered a pioneer of street and graffiti art in New Yo...
20/05/2020

Born Charles Hargrove in 1963 in the South Bronx, Kool Koor is considered a pioneer of street and graffiti art in New York City. His artistic practice began with graffiti art, tagging subway cars with other Bronx street artists. He also exhibited at Fashion Moda, the influential alternative art space established in 1978 in the South Bronx. In 1979, Kool Koor expanded his studio practice to produce paintings like the one featured here with spray paint and acrylic on canvas, entitled Space Station. The artist uses vivid colors and abstract forms dotted with a graffiti art aesthetic, lending a kinetic energy to the work. Kool Koor is currently based in Brussels, Belgium.

Kool Koor, Space Station, ca. 1990s, spray paint and acrylic on canvas. Gift of William Marlieb.

#graffitiart #graffitifineart #Bronx #SouthBronx #SouthBronxArtists #koolkoor

Edith Isaac-Rose (1929-2018) was a lesbian artist whose work aligned with the leftist politics of the 1960s, focusing on...
18/05/2020

Edith Isaac-Rose (1929-2018) was a lesbian artist whose work aligned with the leftist politics of the 1960s, focusing on the brutalities of war, political corruption, social oppression, radical feminism and gay liberation. This oil on canvas, Untitled (Blue Tea Set), from 1996, is one of two works by Isaac-Rose that were donated to the Museum last year by Elliot and Charles Kreloff. Isaac-Rose graduated from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1951 and moved to New York in 1959. In 1981, she met her life partner and fellow artist, Bea Kreloff, at a gallery opening. They lived as an out lesbian couple for the next 35 years until Kreloff's death in 2016.

In keeping with the theme of diversity and inclusion for 2020 International Museum Day, the acquisition of this work by an important LGBTQ+ woman artist continues efforts to promote diversity in our permanent collection.

To watch an interview conducted with Isaac-Rose and Kreloff in 2003 on YouTube, click here:
https://youtu.be/maaM57cPExw

#IMD2020 #internationalmuseumday #inclusionmatters #museumweek #lgbtqartists #museumsforequality #museums4equality

An example of Jewish folk art, this delicately hand-carved and painted Decalogue featuring the Ten Commandments flanked ...
14/05/2020

An example of Jewish folk art, this delicately hand-carved and painted Decalogue featuring the Ten Commandments flanked by a pair of lions originally adorned the Torah ark at Beth Hamedrosh Hagadol, a synagogue once located on East 105th Street in Harlem. It was there that the Hebrew Home for the Aged opened a shelter for the elderly early in the 20th century. In 1951, when the Hebrew Home moved to Riverdale and the synagogue closed, the Decalogue was removed from the building and eventually became part of the collection of the Derfner Judaica Museum.

A pair of lions flanking the Ten Commandments is a frequent motif on Torah arks since the third century C.E. and is commonly found in American synagogues.Though its maker is unknown, Decalogues such as this one were created by immigrant craftsmen from Eastern Europe who brought their rich wood carving traditions to Jewish communities throughout the United States. A Decalogue likely by the same hand as the Museum's example with its skillfully carved and animated lions and other decorative motifs, once decorated B'nai Sholom Synagogue in Harlan, Kentucky. Our example is crowned, a motif missing in the Kentucky Decalogue.

#OurSharedHeritage #JewishAmericanHeritageMonth

While the Museum is temporarily closed please visit our current exhibition, Impressions of Eastern Europe: Prints from t...
08/05/2020

While the Museum is temporarily closed please visit our current exhibition, Impressions of Eastern Europe: Prints from the Permanent Collection, online.
https://www.riverspringhealth.org/online-exhibitions-impressions-of-eastern-europe/
The exhibition features lithographs, etchings, engravings and woodcuts by 16 artists who were participants in some of the most significant art movements of the 20th century. They worked at a time of rapid change, including urbanization, secularization, industrial and technological innovation, and seismic political and cultural shifts. Their genre scenes, folk tale illustrations, portraits and character studies evoke nostalgia for a communal past, solemn awareness of the fragility of life and deep reverence for tradition.
Image: Ilya Schor (b. Złoczów, Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire, now Zolochiv, Ukraine, 1904–d. New York, 1961), Jewish Wedding, 1950s, wood engraving with hand coloring, 8 15/16 x 12 in. (22.7 x 30.5 cm). Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection, Gift of Estelle Reingold, HHAR 6354. © Mira Schor. Reproduced with Permission.

1 Day until the free screening of "100/100 The Itinerant Portraitist," a feature of the Rhode Island Roving Eye Internat...
02/05/2020

1 Day until the free screening of "100/100 The Itinerant Portraitist," a feature of the Rhode Island Roving Eye International Film Festival, taking place during Reimagine: Life, Loss, & Love, hosted by Reimagine. Join us tomorrow, Sunday, May 3, at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT for this virtual event by reserving your spot here: https://letsreimagine.org/3780/100100-the-itinerant-portraitist

Join us on Sunday, May 3, at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT for a free online screening of "100/100: The Itinerant Portraitist,"...
01/05/2020

Join us on Sunday, May 3, at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT for a free online screening of "100/100: The Itinerant Portraitist," a feature of the Rhode Island Roving Eye International Film Festival about artist Brenda Zlamany's portrait series of Hebrew Home at Riverdale residents. R.S.V.P. to register and access the short film here: https://letsreimagine.org/3780/100100-the-itinerant-portraitist (note 11 a.m. PDT/2 p.m. EDT screen time).

In 2017, the iconic Hebrew Home at Riverdale turned 100. That summer, portraitist Brenda Zlamany painted 100 residents from direct observation. 100 surprising, unique, and inspiring stories emerged.

Reimagine: Life, Loss, & Love is a Worldwide Virtual Festival taking place from May 1-July 9 during COVID-19, hosted by Reimagine. This collective effort is bringing communities together to confront illness, dying, grief, fear, and isolation in these challenging and uncertain times.

Marsha Pels' "Lupa" (1998) is one of more than three dozen outdoor sculptures that grace the northwest Bronx campus of t...
25/04/2020

Marsha Pels' "Lupa" (1998) is one of more than three dozen outdoor sculptures that grace the northwest Bronx campus of the The Hebrew Home at Riverdale. While the campus is temporarily closed to visitors, we look forward to when we can welcome everyone back.
Part of a series of works on the deconstruction of motherhood and its representation in art, "Lupa" is a cast bronze she-wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, the mythical founders of Rome, set on two Ionic columns. Visitors encounter the installation of "Lupa" as if chancing upon an ancient ruin. The work was cast at the Casting Institute at the State University of New York at Buffalo during Pels’ fellowship there in 1997 and completed the next year. The work symbolizes the relationship between mothers and their offspring and reflects Pels’ interest in the relationships between animals and humans. "Lupa" was a gift to The Art Collection from the artist in memory of her mother, Ruth Pels (1917-2005), and was installed in October 2010. #ISDay International Sculpture Day

On this Earth Day we are highlighting Leonard Ursachi whose works were featured in an exhibition here last summer. Ursac...
22/04/2020

On this Earth Day we are highlighting Leonard Ursachi whose works were featured in an exhibition here last summer. Ursachi addresses themes of environmental and social crises and reflects on how the destruction of natural resources is intimately interconnected with the effacement of human history and culture. Learn more here https://www.riverspringhealth.org/erosion-works-by-leonard-ursachi/

This velvet fish-scale embroidered matzah bag edged with silver metallic fringes is a treasure of our collection. At the...
12/04/2020

This velvet fish-scale embroidered matzah bag edged with silver metallic fringes is a treasure of our collection. At the top above a goat and a ram, two geese flank the crown of Torah and featured among the leaves and flowers are embroidered accent insects and fish. Skillfully crafted, the fish-scale technique would have been used to imitate pearl embroidery without the expense of the precious material.

Image: Girls’ Orphan Home
Jerusalem, late 19th century
Velvet: embroidered with metallic thread and couched fish scales
Gift of Hannah Lazarus Fraenkel
92.01

Address


Subway (bus transfer necessary): 1 train to 231 Street stop or A train to 207 Street. Transfer to Bx7 bus (available at both subway stops) and ride to W. 261 Street. Walk west on W. 261 Street. toward the Hudson River. HHAR gate is on Palisade Ave on the right. MNR: Hudson Line to Riverdale. Walk north on Palisade Ave. HHAR Gate is on left.Express Bus: BxM1 or BxM2 to W. 261 Street. Check schedule for departure times.

General information

The Derfner Judaica Museum, Art Collection and sculpture garden are free and open to the public. For security purposes, all visitors must present photo I.D. to confirm identity at the front security gate.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 10:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:30 - 16:30
Thursday 10:30 - 16:30
Sunday 10:30 - 16:30

Telephone

(718) 581-1596

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About Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection

As a member of the American Alliance of Museums, the Hebrew Home at Riverdale by RiverSpring Health is committed to publicly exhibiting its art collection throughout its 32-acre campus, including Derfner Judaica Museum and a sculpture garden overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades. Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection provides educational and cultural programming for residents of the Hebrew Home, their families and the general public from throughout New York City, its surrounding suburbs and visitors from elsewhere. RiverSpring Health is a nonprofit, non-sectarian geriatric organization serving more than 18,000 older adults in greater New York through its resources and community service programs. The Art Collection, Sculpture Garden & Grounds The Art Collection is comprised of more than 4,500 paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, prints and works on paper by such artists as Salvador Dali, Alex Katz, Joan Mitchell and Andy Warhol. These works are exhibited throughout the main public spaces of the Hebrew Home and elucidated by text panels and labels. The Art Collection & Sculpture Garden Hours: Daily, 10:30 am - 4:30 pm Derfner Judaica Museum The Judaica Museum was founded in 1982 when Riverdale residents Ralph and Leuba Baum donated their collection of Jewish ceremonial art to the Hebrew Home. A refugee from Nazi persecution, Ralph and his wife, Leuba, had an intense desire to preserve and pass on to future generations the memory embodied in the objects they collected, the majority of which were used by European Jews before the Holocaust. In 2008 The Judaica Museum was named in honor of the late Helen and Harold Derfner. It opened in a newly furnished space in June 2009 with a permanent exhibition of the collection entitled, Tradition and Remembrance: Treasures of the Derfner Judaica Museum, that explores the intersections of Jewish history and memory. The Museum also features a rotating gallery space for modern art relating to Jewish life and culture. Museum Hours: Sun - Thurs, 10:30 am - 4:30 pm