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What is the origin of misinformation in the American press? When did Americans decide that they needed to be concerned w...
10/01/2024

What is the origin of misinformation in the American press? When did Americans decide that they needed to be concerned with figuring out whether the information they heard or read was truthful or fake?

Jordan E. Taylor joins Ben Franklin's World to find answers to these questions. Jordan is a historian who studies the history of media and the ways early Americans created, spread, and circulated news. He is also the author of the book Misinformation Nation: Foreign News and the Politics of Truth in Revolutionary America. Listen more here ⬇️

In this episode, historian Jordan E. Taylor joins us to discuss the origin of misinformation in the American press.

05/01/2024

Home is where the hearth is! 🔥 Gather around the fire as we delve into community and the shared experiences around the hearth in the 18th century in the latest installment of our "What the Huzzah is That?" series. Tell us, what’s your favorite meal to cook with friends and family?

This video has a corresponding mini lesson plan for educators, available in our Bob & Marion Wilson Educator Resource Library: https://bit.ly/4a4IXFi

Happy Holidays from us to you! 🌲 Discover more surprising origins of this beloved holiday and how early Americans got in...
24/12/2023

Happy Holidays from us to you! 🌲 Discover more surprising origins of this beloved holiday and how early Americans got in the festive spirit in the latest blog post ⬇️

Christmas stirs warm nostalgia on cold nights. Envisioning a simple, sentimental past, Americans have developed many misconceptions about the holiday’s beginnings in North America. Below are a dozen of the most common myths.

17/12/2023

Unveiling the second installment of our ‘What the Huzzah is That?’ series—Slate and Pencil! ✏️ Dive into the 18th-century world of creativity and learning, and marvel at how similar tools still shape our education today.

These videos have corresponding mini lesson plans for educators, available in our Bob & Marion Wilson Educator Resource Library: https://bit.ly/3Rm44KE

14/12/2023

Fun Fact: This item in our collection is a mourning ring and contains bits of both George and Martha Washington's hair! 💇

in 1799, George Washington died of an apparent throat infection at George Washington's Mount Vernon at the age of 67, less than 3 years after leaving office as president. Even though 1799 was a politically contentious year in the young nation’s history, Americans united to mourn the death of the man one writer referred to as “our parent.” Eulogies would be offered by leaders of all stripes. Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee famously remembered Washington as “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.” Even Thomas Paine, who had been a sharp critic at times, celebrated his virtue and called him “the political magnet in the center of discord.”

Have you ever heard of a mourning ring? Let us know in the comments ⬇️

📸: Mourning Ring with George and Martha Washington's Hair, 1802. Object Number 1992-49.

Friendly reminder to join us this Thursday (12/14) at 7PM EST as the Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute and the Ame...
11/12/2023

Friendly reminder to join us this Thursday (12/14) at 7PM EST as the Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute and the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown spill the tea on Virginians’ protests against the 1773 Tea Act in our virtual chat!🍵

In this monthly informal educator chat, connect with us and fellow educators to gain insights, explore digital resources, and network with your peers. These chats happen on Zoom and have limited space for 50 participants, so register early! It's entirely free and first-come, first-served: bit.ly/3R47HET

Join me for this teacher professional development program: Either to Inform or Delight: Virtual Teacher Chats - Spilling the Tea on Tea Parties in Virginia Click here to register now:

Introducing our newest teaching video series, ‘What the Huzzah Is That?’ 🧑‍🏫 Designed for early grade-schoolers, each vi...
05/12/2023

Introducing our newest teaching video series, ‘What the Huzzah Is That?’ 🧑‍🏫 Designed for early grade-schoolers, each video highlights a different facet of 18th-century community life to spark curiosity and draw connections to our world today. For example, consider how a simple object (like a ball ⚾) can bring people together!

These videos have corresponding mini lesson plans for educators, available on our Teacher Institute microsite. Learn more here: https://bit.ly/3N9c5RJ

Kids throughout time have played together with all kinds of toys! Play helps us build relationships with others, work together, and follow rules.Explore the ...

Did you know that the Boston Tea Party was not the only such event in the colonies in response to the Tea Act? ☕ On Thur...
01/12/2023

Did you know that the Boston Tea Party was not the only such event in the colonies in response to the Tea Act? ☕ On Thursday, Dec. 14 at 7PM EST, join the Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute and the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown as we spill the tea on Virginians’ protests against the 1773 Tea Act.

In this monthly informal educator chat, connect with us and fellow educators to gain insights, explore digital resources, and network with your peers. These chats happen on Zoom and have limited space for 50 participants, so register early! It's entirely free and first-come, first-served: bit.ly/3R47HET

Don’t miss out on this engaging and educational event!

Join me for this teacher professional development program: Either to Inform or Delight: Virtual Teacher Chats - Spilling the Tea on Tea Parties in Virginia Click here to register now:

Early America was a diverse place. A significant part of this diversity came from the fact that there were at least 1,00...
29/11/2023

Early America was a diverse place. A significant part of this diversity came from the fact that there were at least 1,000 different Indigenous tribes and nations living in different areas of North America before the Spanish and other European empires arrived on the continent’s shores.

In this episode of Ben Franklin's World, Diane Hunter and John Bickers join host Liz Covart to investigate the history and culture of one of these distinct Indigenous tribes: the Myaamia. Listen now ⬇️

Diane Hunter and John Bickers join us to investigate the history and culture of the Myaamia people, from pre-contact to the present.

22/11/2023
Attention all educators 🍎 The Bob & Marion Wilson Teacher Institute scholarship application is NOW OPEN! Each of our fiv...
18/11/2023

Attention all educators 🍎 The Bob & Marion Wilson Teacher Institute scholarship application is NOW OPEN! Each of our five onsite programs offers a hands-on experience and behind-the-scenes interactions with the interpreters and tradespeople of our Historic Area. Scholarships include:
🍎 Admission to all program activities
🍎 Lodging at an official Colonial Williamsburg hotel
🍎 Most meals
🍎 Most scholarships include airfare and ground transportation to Williamsburg

To learn more about these Teacher Institute programs and apply for scholarships, click here:

Subscribe to receive emails from Teacher Institute and stay informed about Colonial Williamsburg instructional resources, teacher professional development opportunities, and scholarships.

Join us for monthly informal educator chats, where you can connect with us and fellow educators. Each session is a uniqu...
12/11/2023

Join us for monthly informal educator chats, where you can connect with us and fellow educators. Each session is a unique opportunity to gain insights, explore digital resources, and network with your peers. These chats happen on Zoom and have limited space for 50 participants, so register early! It's entirely free and first-come, first-served.

On November 16 at 7pm EST, Join us for our November program, all about Dancing Into the Holidays. Discover the 18th-century Virginians' love for dance, where it was said they were "of genuine blood. They will dance or die!" We'll be joined by Colonial Williamsburg's Historical Research team, to dive into Virginia's most popular pastime.

Don't miss out on this engaging and educational event!

Register here:

Join me for this event: Either to Inform or Delight: Virtual Teacher Chats - Dancing Into the Holidays Click here to register now:

Join us for Elections, Then and Now: A Journey through Democracy on Wednesday, November 1, from 7 - 8:30 p.m. We are co-...
30/10/2023

Join us for Elections, Then and Now: A Journey through Democracy on Wednesday, November 1, from 7 - 8:30 p.m. We are co-hosting this program with Center for Civic Education and it will offer educators a captivating exploration of the evolution of elections from early America to the modern electoral process. Earn 1.5 contact hours for professional development.

Register by November 1, 2023, 1:30 p.m., here: bit.ly/3s2qyYG

30/08/2023

NEW EPISODE RELEASE 🤩

It's our last stop on our Summer road trip: Prince Edward Island!
2020 commemorated the 300th anniversary of French presence on Prince Edward Island. Like much of North America, the Canadian Maritime provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island, and Prince Edward Island were highly contested regions. In fact, the way France and Great Britain fought for presence and control of this region places the Canadian Maritimes among the most contested regions in eighteenth-century North America.

In this recast episode, Anne Marie Lane Jonah, a historian with the Parks Canada Agency, joins us to explore the history of Prince Edward Island and why Great Britain and France fought over the Canadian Maritime region.

Listen and learn more: benfranklinsworld.com/365

28/08/2023

How do we know about the people who lived and worked at Custis Square? How do we know what Williamsburg's first Baptist Meeting House looked like? Find the answers to these questions and more by joining a guided tour of the Colonial Williamsburg Archaeology Lab! See archaeological objects, hear abo...

26/08/2023

in 1773, Williamsburg’s first female printer, Clementina Rind was listed as the printer of her version of the Virginia Gazette, a week after the death of her husband, printer William Rind. Clementina continued to produce her edition of the Virginia Gazette until her death in September 1774.

In her brief time as a printer, the Gazette published coverage of the Boston Tea Party, the dissolution of the Virginia General Assembly, and the start of the First Continental Congress.

The Virginia Gazette, Number 381, Thursday August 26, 1773. Explore the issue: bit.ly/3YKeTcF.

LET US INTRODUCE YOU!With the new school year underway, Colonial Williamsburg is excited to announce the *NEW* Bob & Mar...
26/08/2023

LET US INTRODUCE YOU!
With the new school year underway, Colonial Williamsburg is excited to announce the *NEW* Bob & Marion Wilson Educator Resource Library. Developed by historians and educators with your classroom in mind, this web portal includes lesson plans, multimedia content, primary sources, and more, for teachers and students.

https://teacherresources.colonialwilliamsburg.org/

TODAY IN HISTORY - August 23, 1775Following the Battle of Bunker Hill, King George III declares the American colonies to...
23/08/2023

TODAY IN HISTORY - August 23, 1775
Following the Battle of Bunker Hill, King George III declares the American colonies to be in a state of "open and avowed rebellion." This proclamation, called the Proclamation of Rebellion, was later one of key reasons leading to the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

The lower margin reads: "His Most Sacred Majesty George the III. King of Great Britain, &c./ J. Meyer pinx.t/ C. Spooner fecit/ London, Printed for CARINTON BOWLES, Ma …

22/08/2023

📢NEW EPISODE RELEASE!! 📢

We've made it to the next stop in our water-themed Summer road trip: the La Pointe-Krebs House & Museum in Mississippi!

The Mississippi Gulf Coast was the home of many different peoples, cultures, and empires during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. According to some historians, the Gulf Coast region may have been the most diverse region in early North America.

In this recast episode, Matthew Powell, a historian of slavery and southern history and the Executive Director of the La Pointe-Krebs House & Museum in Pascagoula, Mississippi, joins us to investigate and explore the Mississippi Gulf Coast and a prominent family who has lived there since about 1718.

Listen and learn more: benfranklinsworld.com/364

The first significant improvement to fire engine design came not from the likes of a Benjamin Franklin but from Richard ...
21/08/2023

The first significant improvement to fire engine design came not from the likes of a Benjamin Franklin but from Richard Newsham, a London button maker! His "new water engine for quenching and extinguishing fires" was granted a patent in 1721,

Philadelphia was the first colonial city to acquire one of Newsham's engines in 1730, New York City did the same in 1731, and Salem, Massachusetts, ordered one in 1749. Newsham's engines were so effective that some were used for more than a century. Many survive today in museum collections on both sides of the Atlantic as a testament to their popularity, quality, and usefulness.

Richard Newsham's patented "4th size" hand pump fire engine. A coiled leather hose, a hard hose, miscellaneous fittings and 3 fire buckets (1960-236, 2 thru 1960-236, …

20/08/2023

After 12 years, Sequoyah successfully devised a method of writing for the Cherokee language. ⁣⁣Born around 1770, Sequoyah was a skilled warrior, hunter, and silversmith. ⁣⁣
⁣⁣
His syllabary included eighty-six symbols representing each of the language’s syllables. This writing system got approved by the Cherokee chiefs in 1825. ⁣⁣

A rapid spread of literacy throughout the Cherokee Nation ensued. Written documents were being created, including a constitution in 1827. ⁣⁣The following year, the “Cherokee Phoenix,” a weekly bilingual newspaper, began publication in New Echota, Georgia. 🗞️⁣⁣

🖼: "Sequoyah" (full view and detail) by Henry Inman (copied after Charles Bird King), c. 1830. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.
⁣⁣

TODAY IN HISTORY - August 19, 1814During the War of 1812, British troops land at Benedict, Maryland, on the shores of th...
19/08/2023

TODAY IN HISTORY - August 19, 1814
During the War of 1812, British troops land at Benedict, Maryland, on the shores of the Patuxent River. The British fleet, had chased the U.S. ships into the Patuxent River, but the true goal was capturing the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C. — only a few days' march away.

British Troops Land in Maryland on the Way to Burn Washington | The Origins of Children’s Television

18/08/2023

Leather breeches were workwear for men and boys in the 18th century. Durable and available in a wide range of price points, they were the blue jeans of their...

TODAY IN HISTORY - August 17, 1790The Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, presents a congratulatory address to...
17/08/2023

TODAY IN HISTORY - August 17, 1790
The Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, presents a congratulatory address to President George Washington on the occasion of his visit to their city.

“To Bigotry No Sanction, To Persecution No Assistance”

16/08/2023

This week in Jamestown history: in 1611, Lieutenant Governor Thomas Gates returned to Virginia with 280 new settlers, supplies, and live cattle and swine. He assumed control of the colony in the absence of the Governor, Lord De La Warr, and expanded the martial laws that dictated how livestock and other resources were protected and distributed.

The years following the Starving Time were marked by this martial law, which Virginia Company leaders saw as the best way to turn around the failing colony and one day maybe turn a profit.

Archaeological evidence inside the Second Well suggests that Gates' arrival may have been marked by a feast - the first barbecue at Jamestown? Learn more at https://historicjamestowne.org/collections/artifacts/faunal-bone/

This hand-colored 17th-century print illustrates the large leaf, flowers, and stems of the to***co plant.
15/08/2023

This hand-colored 17th-century print illustrates the large leaf, flowers, and stems of the to***co plant.

Text reads: "1./ Tabacum latifolium."

15/08/2023
14/08/2023

This embroidery of an elegant woman is an example of colonial Boston’s most famous form of needlework, featuring the so-called “fishing lady” motif. It first captured the attention of collectors and scholars when seven canvaswork pictures depicting an identical woman holding a fishing pole were published in 1923. However, it wasn’t until 1941 that evidence emerged suggesting that such works were created by young girls who attended Boston boarding schools. ⁠

At first, twelve fishing ladies were recorded within a group of fifty-eight related pieces, and eventually they all became known as “fishing lady” pictures – whether or not they showed the fishing pole. Today, seventeen pieces that depict this similar motif are known, but only six makers have been identified and the schools they attended remain unknown. ⁠

Hannah Carter (Dates Unknown), Hannah Carter Canvaswork Picture, Boston, Massachusetts, c. 1748. Silk and wool on fine linen, 21 1/16 × 18 7/8". Collection American Folk Art Museum. Gift of Ralph Esmerian, 2013.1.44. Photo by John Parnell.

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