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One of the most well known aerial disasters of the 20th century. 97 people were on board the Hindenburg on its tragic fi...
22/11/2020

One of the most well known aerial disasters of the 20th century. 97 people were on board the Hindenburg on its tragic finale voyage, May 6, 1937...
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Boy Scout Gathering in Belleville, New Jersey, 1950's...-----------
22/11/2020

Boy Scout Gathering in Belleville, New Jersey, 1950's...
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Martin Luther King Jr. shooting pool in Chicago, IL, 1966...--------
22/11/2020

Martin Luther King Jr. shooting pool in Chicago, IL, 1966...
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Happy Halloween...------
22/11/2020

Happy Halloween...
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This old-school helmet that allows for someone driving a motorcycle to communicate with their passenger. Around 1940...-...
22/11/2020

This old-school helmet that allows for someone driving a motorcycle to communicate with their passenger. Around 1940...
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A teenage girl has her hair straightened with an iron, before a night out with friends, New York, 1964...----------     ...
22/11/2020

A teenage girl has her hair straightened with an iron, before a night out with friends, New York, 1964...
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Fifteen year old Bill Gates rides his bicycle, 1970. Five years later, he started a company called Microsoft...---------...
22/11/2020

Fifteen year old Bill Gates rides his bicycle, 1970. Five years later, he started a company called Microsoft...
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Automatic voting machines remained the primary method of voting for decades...--------
22/11/2020

Automatic voting machines remained the primary method of voting for decades...
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New York City voters in line on election day, 1912...------------
22/11/2020

New York City voters in line on election day, 1912...
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Race Organizers Attempt To Stop Kathrine Switzer From Competing In The Boston Marathon. She Became The First Woman To Fi...
22/11/2020

Race Organizers Attempt To Stop Kathrine Switzer From Competing In The Boston Marathon. She Became The First Woman To Finish The Race, 1967...
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Apollo program astronauts training in Arizona for the Moon missions, 1960s...--------
22/11/2020

Apollo program astronauts training in Arizona for the Moon missions, 1960s...
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The use of masks during the Spanish flu pandemic, 1918...---------       #1916
22/11/2020

The use of masks during the Spanish flu pandemic, 1918...
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#1916

22/11/2020

Albert Einstein arrives in America, San Diego, 1930...
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The last Civil War veterans shake hands in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1913...--------------       #1913                  ...
22/11/2020

The last Civil War veterans shake hands in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1913...
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#1913

Vinyl listening booths to discover new music, 1950s...-----------------
22/11/2020

Vinyl listening booths to discover new music, 1950s...
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Remembering the original Woodstock, 1969...------------------
22/11/2020

Remembering the original Woodstock, 1969...
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Chicago, 1948...----------
22/11/2020

Chicago, 1948...
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American prisoners of war who refused to return to America at the end of the Korean War, 1960s...------------           ...
22/11/2020

American prisoners of war who refused to return to America at the end of the Korean War, 1960s...
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Ryland Huntley's Radio Lounge, 1948...
22/04/2020

Ryland Huntley's Radio Lounge, 1948...

Fishing boat covered in ice, 1916...
22/04/2020

Fishing boat covered in ice, 1916...

22/04/2020
Hilltop Park, NY before the home opener against the Washington Senators, 1911...
07/02/2020

Hilltop Park, NY before the home opener against the Washington Senators, 1911...

5th Ave. NYC, 1913...
07/02/2020

5th Ave. NYC, 1913...

“Smokey” Buchanan from the West Palm Beach police force, measuring the bathing suit of Betty Fringle on Palm Beach, to e...
07/02/2020

“Smokey” Buchanan from the West Palm Beach police force, measuring the bathing suit of Betty Fringle on Palm Beach, to ensure that it conforms with regulations introduced by the beach censors, 1925...

Gary Anderson, at age 23, designed the recycling logo for a contest in 1970...
02/02/2020

Gary Anderson, at age 23, designed the recycling logo for a contest in 1970...

Australian soldiers after their release from Japanese captivity in Singapore, 1945...
02/02/2020

Australian soldiers after their release from Japanese captivity in Singapore, 1945...

Albert Einstein teaching at Lincoln, the United State's first Historical Black University, 1946...
14/01/2020

Albert Einstein teaching at Lincoln, the United State's first Historical Black University, 1946...

1906 the SAN Francisco Earthquake struck, magnitude 7.9. 3000 + people died and 80 % of the city was destroyed...
13/12/2019

1906 the SAN Francisco Earthquake struck, magnitude 7.9. 3000 + people died and 80 % of the city was destroyed...

French Calvary, 1917...
20/11/2019

French Calvary, 1917...

Ohio River beach across from Cincinnati, Ohio in the early 1900's...
20/11/2019

Ohio River beach across from Cincinnati, Ohio in the early 1900's...

The poverty and beauty of Old Ireland photos taken 120 years ago...
19/11/2019

The poverty and beauty of Old Ireland photos taken 120 years ago...

Mormons Imprisoned for Polygamy, Utah 1889...
14/11/2019

Mormons Imprisoned for Polygamy, Utah 1889...

Enjoy these colorized photos...
14/11/2019

Enjoy these colorized photos...

14/11/2019

Bulletproof vest test, 1923...
14/11/2019

Bulletproof vest test, 1923...

Construction of Berlin Wall, 1962...
14/11/2019

Construction of Berlin Wall, 1962...

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Listen as U.S. Navy Sailor, Bill Grannetino (A First Wave D-Day Survivor of Omaha Beach) describes his reassignment to a British Infantry Unit that’s preparing to fight street to street liberating the French City of Caen.
See us on the web at - https://www.ishouldhavewrittenabook.com/
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On Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Should-Have-Written-Book-Sailors/dp/1525535978
About the Author - https://www.amazon.com/TomGrannetino/e/B07WND7NTV%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share
From the Book - We were told the British were supposed to have taken the city of Caen on D-Day, and that even after a couple of weeks of fighting and several attempts, they still hadn’t pushed the Germans out of Caen. Our American commanders had decided to help the British with some reinforcements. They were now gathering any available men and sending them to help those British troops. Because most of us were doing nothing more than busy work, it was decided that half our crew would be assigned to this new duty. Reading the list of names, it included both Tillins and me.
The next morning, several other U.S. sailors along with Tillins and myself gathered our personal belongings and reported to an army supply tent. There we were issued army clothing, a loaded backpack, a rifle, and ammunition. Next we were loaded onto trucks and driven to a British camp north of Caen.
Arriving at the British camp midday, at which point all of us Americans were paired up and assigned to British squads. Understanding the value of having a friend in unfamiliar territory, Tillins and I gladly paired up and were assigned to a group of eight British soldiers. These British guys seemed like a bunch of really nice fellows with great attitudes, which was remarkable considering they had spent the last two weeks trying to fight their way into Caen.
As we introduced ourselves, the looks of confusion were clearly visible on their faces, and their first question to us was, why in the hell were a couple of American navy guys assigned to a British infantry squad? We told them we really didn’t have any idea why and that their guess was as good as ours. All we knew was that we were a couple of U.S. sailors following orders.
When we finally got into Caen hardly a building was standing. Tillins and I advanced with a group of British foot soldiers on a main road in our squad’s section of Caen. We moved in and out of the various buildings, using them as cover until we came to a large factory comprised of several large buildings. When we started crossing the loading yard in the center of the plant, enemy fire opened up. Several men who were leading the squad fell dead. The rest of us took cover and started returning fire.
From somewhere on the opposite end of the factory, the Germans had a machine gun set up. Several other German soldiers were shooting from doors or windows, while others had taken positions on the different roofs of the factory’s buildings.
Our British sergeant started yelling out orders, ordering us to fall back. Tillins and I ran back through the inside of the factory’s shipping building. When we got back to the main road, we were quickly divided up and sent to positions to defend ourselves. Tillins and I were sent with several others of the remaining British soldiers to stop any flanking attempt by the Germans. No sooner were we set up when they began trying to flank our position. As we watched their advance, we were told to hold our fire until the last possible moment.
When we could see about ten or twelve of the Germans within what I would say was about thirty-five to forty yards of us, we opened fire. Several fell dead; others ran for cover into the collapsed buildings. We shot at them and they returned fire for a few minutes. Then, all of a sudden, the firefight stopped and it became quiet. They were now holding fire and we held fire. Seeing no enemy to shoot at, we just maintained our positions. Both sides were on watch for each other’s next move. With this break in the fighting, our sergeant called for reinforcements.
As we waited for our reinforcements, we also continued watching for the Germans’ next move. We kept particularly careful watch on the areas where we last saw the enemy. As I was peeking over the collapsed stone wall, I could smell the smoke of wood burning. I turned to see what was burning and saw British soldiers starting a fire to heat water for tea. I couldn’t believe it. At any minute we could be overrun and killed! There were men not too far from us lying dead men that we had just killed. How could they be thinking of tea at a time like this? How could they not stay on watch in the event the Germans made a move? I just looked at Tillins and shook my head. Tillins said under his breath, “It must be some really good tea.”
When our reinforcements showed up, they had an American bazooka with them. I watched as our British sergeant and these guys talked about the best way to attack the building where the Germans were taking cover. It was decided that we would all get into different angled positions so we could put different angles of fire on the building. In the center of this, the bazooka team would start off by firing into the front window of the building where the Germans were last seen. Then, immediately, we infantry soldiers would start shooting to keep pressure on them as the bazooka reloaded to fire again. The overall plan was to attack and keep attacking until they were all dead, had retreated, or had surrendered—whichever came first.
It only took a few minutes until we were all in position. The bazooka team got ready to fire by first looking left and then right. With that, they fired and there was a huge explosion. Fire blew out all the doors and windows. Immediately we added fire while the bazooka was reloading. Wood splintered and stone collapsed and fell. The bazooka fired several more shots into several other main areas as we continued shooting and keeping the pressure on with more and more continuous fire.
Then we were all ordered to hold our fire. I figured we had gotten all of them; I was sure that nothing or no one could live through what we had just witnessed. Within a few seconds of holding our fire, we started receiving fire from within the buildings our bazooka had just decimated. I couldn’t believe it! How could they still be alive? If they had lived through that, they should have been waving a white flag in surrender, not shooting back. Those sons-of-bitches were some really tough bastards; they had to have been the bravest men I had ever seen—or the dumbest. They had to know they were going to die if they didn’t give up, but instead they were shooting back at us.
Within a few seconds we were all shooting again as the bazooka fired into the center of what was left of the occupied building. Several Germans were killed in that blast. Their shooting stopped for a moment. I expected the final survivors to start filing out with their hands over their heads. To our continued surprise, the few who were left started shooting again. It looked as though we would have to kill every single one of those bastards. With that, we kept heavy fire on them while the bazooka fired into several main doors and windows of the buildings from which they were firing. Finally, all their shooting stopped, indicating the men inside were finally dead. The pile of debris that was once a building was now burning, and heavy smoke was pouring out of openings that were once doors and windows.
We walked over toward the buildings and looked at the dead Germans. I couldn’t believe it. Not one of those guys looked to be over eighteen or twenty years old. They were nothing more than kids. We couldn’t understand why they didn’t surrender. One of the older British soldiers said, “It’s like flushing rats out of a garbage can. If they had any good sense, they would have given up and lived.” I just kept thinking to myself that they were some of the toughest and bravest guys I had ever seen in my life. I still couldn’t believe how they fought back as we were firing a bazooka on their position. They had to know they were all going to die for nothing.

Photo # 1 – American, British & Canadian Normandy Landings - June 6, 1944, Clipart.
Photo # 2 – Photo of a Church in Caen after WW2, photo from US National Archives.
Photo # 3 – Photo of the same Church in Caen during WW2, photo from US National Archives.
Photo # 4 – View of Caen’s destructions, photo from the US National Archives.
Photo # 5 – British Infantry moving into Caen, 1944, photo B 6727 from Imperial War Museums.
Photo # 6 – Bill Grannetino’s Navy Picture, 1944.
Photo # 7 – I Should Have Written a Book.