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Maine Ulster Scots Project The Maine Ulster Scots Project was created to promote awareness of Maine's Scots-Irish heritage and t

NEW BOOK Ulster-Scots on the Coast of MaineThe means Massacre Background & Location Volume 1, Edition 2By John T. MannFi...
09/12/2023

NEW BOOK

Ulster-Scots on the Coast of Maine
The means Massacre Background & Location
Volume 1, Edition 2
By John T. Mann

First written and published by the Saint Andrews Society of Maine in 2006, Volume 1 has been updated and is now re-published and offered by the Maine Ulster-Scots Project.

John Mann (President Emeritus of the Maine Ulster-Scots Project) set out to write a report on the background and location of the so-called Means Massacre to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the 1756 event at Flying Point on Casco Bay. The result is an in depth story of interconnected families, forced by religious, political, and economic circumstances to abandon not just one, but two homelands.

Available at: MaineUlsterScots.com (books ordered before 12/12 will ship for delivery before Christmas). For international orders, please email: [email protected]

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.Part 5 of 6 – WHAT IS NEXT? ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSPA Se...
05/12/2023

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.

Part 5 of 6 – WHAT IS NEXT? ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSP

A Second Generation Ulster-Scots’ homestead: The “Means Massacre” site at Flying Point, Freeport, Maine

MUSP, in cooperation with the Wolfe’s Neck Center, Freeport Historical Society, and the Thomas Means Club, is now three years into a similar archaeological assessment of the Means’ family homestead at Flying Point. A fresh look at historical research of the area and of the physical findings relating to the Ulster-Scots families that settled here in the mid-eighteenth century is yielding a trove of information. New details of the daily lives and the adaptations of those who made Flying Point their home during a period of warfare and epidemics is creating a fuller picture of both the setbacks and opportunities confronted in a new land of harsh winters and previously unimaginable natural resources.

MUSP looks forward to sharing the data being collected with the local community, descendants of the many families connected to this story, and the larger international community that follows our work in Maine as our findings become ready for distribution. We expect to be on site for several more years teasing out the details left scattered and buried among the roots and plow scars of an old hay field at Flying Point.

Once again Pamela Crane is leading a group of MUSP volunteers in a methodical examination of an old hay field bordering on Maquoit Bay. This is an area that Leon Maybury and a group of neighbors identified in 1932 as the Means’ homestead site, an area that routinely turned up brick, rock, and broken pottery during farm operations in the area. Research of the property history has shown that the heirs of Thomas Means acquired title to this property one year after the 1756 event that took Thomas Means life. The property remained in the Means family through successive generations until 1893. Now Crane and her crew are uncovering artifacts and features located at the site and learning about the daily lives of the mid eighteenth century occupants and their methods of home construction. Fragments from a broken attempt at establishing a homestead during the early days of the French and Indian War (1756-1763) are being mapped, cleaned, catalogued, photographed, and compared to the source documents that describe the life and times of the Means family.

Similar to the MUSP led dig at the McFadden site, this location has proved to be a unique opportunity to capture a moment in time and learn about the on-going adaptation of Ulster-Scot emigrants to the Eastern Frontier and how their presence and efforts influenced the history of our neighborhood, state and country.

Follow us here on Facebook for the next part of the story and for more information on MUSP, visit us at: www.maineulsterscots.com

Free Online Interactive ZOOM Lecture to the world-wide audience of the Scottish American History Forum presented by Chic...
03/12/2023

Free Online Interactive ZOOM Lecture to the world-wide audience of the Scottish American History Forum presented by Chicago Scots.

Free Online Interactive ZOOM Lecture
December 8, 2023 10:00am CT (11:00am EST)

For registration and more info: https://chicagoscots.org/event/scottish-american-history-forum-31/ EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

NEW BOOKUlster-Scots on the Coast of MaineThe means Massacre Background & Location Volume 1, Edition 2By John T. MannJoh...
01/12/2023

NEW BOOK

Ulster-Scots on the Coast of Maine
The means Massacre Background & Location
Volume 1, Edition 2
By John T. Mann

John Mann set out to write a report on the background and location of the so-called Means Massacre to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the 1756 event at Flying Point on Casco Bay. The result is an in depth story of interconnected families, forced by religious, political, and economic circumstances to abandon not just one, but two homelands.

The introduction of Ulster-Scots immigrants to the Kennebec Settlement intentionally put them at the center of conflict for the domination of North America. These families were forced to confront both the French and Indian alliance and then the British Empire in order to establish a place of their own on the Coast of Maine, America’s eastern frontier. The struggle of the Means’, and their extended family, to create a homeland with religious and economic freedoms and with the rights to property ownership are detailed here in family records and historical research.

First written and published by the Saint Andrews Society of Maine in 2006, Volume 1 (72 pages) has been updated and is now re-published (96 pages) and offered by the Maine Ulster-Scots Project.

Available at: MaineUlsterScots.com (books ordered before 12/11 will ship for domestic delivery before Christmas). For international orders, please email: [email protected]

Happy Saint Andrews Day…Celebrating is something Scots do really well, and if there is one day of the year where you'll ...
30/11/2023

Happy Saint Andrews Day…

Celebrating is something Scots do really well, and if there is one day of the year where you'll hear a lot of noise from us, it's St Andrew's Day. Scots and Scots-at-heart come together to celebrate the patron saint of Scotland and the very best of Scottish culture with lots of delicious food and drink, music and ceilidh dancing.

St Andrew's Day is the feast day of Andrew the Apostle and is celebrated every year in Scotland and worldwide on the November 30th. In 1320, St Andrew officially became the patron saint of Scotland when the country's independence was declared with the signing of The Declaration of Arbroath.

Learn more with this short video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyQTfIHPrK0

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.Part 4 of 6 – WHERE TO BEGIN-THE FIRST ARRIVALS ~ John T. Man...
28/11/2023

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.

Part 4 of 6 – WHERE TO BEGIN-THE FIRST ARRIVALS ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSP

The MUSP organization includes an active committee of volunteers, led by Historic Archaeologist Pamela Crane. Historic archaeological investigation is used to uncover and share information on Maine’s Ulster-Scots families, how they established themselves in the “Eastern Frontier,” how they adapted to a new environment, and how they lived their daily lives. It was thought that finding an Ulster-Scot homestead established in 1718 and burned out during Dummer’s War in 1722, would afford the opportunity to study the earliest presence of Ulster-Scots’ life in Maine.

MUSP volunteers were able to find and investigate the McFadden homestead on Merrymeeting Bay. The site had been occupied from 1718 until its destruction by fire during the raids of 1722. MUSP spent seven years doing an archaeological dig at the site which culminated in an internationally attended symposium on Ulster-Scots studies in Maine and the book “1718-2018 Reflections on 300 years of the Scots-Irish in Maine.” (Available at www.maineulsterscots.com and at the Freeport Historical Society).

Follow us here on Facebook for the next part of the story and for more information on MUSP, visit us at: www.maineulsterscots.com

Looking for an extra special Christmas gift?  Consider two books offered by the Maine Ulster-Scots Project:“SIDESHOTS - ...
26/11/2023

Looking for an extra special Christmas gift? Consider two books offered by the Maine Ulster-Scots Project:

“SIDESHOTS - Stories from a Land Surveyor’s traverse through the District of Maine

Author, John Mann uses his perspective as a Mainer and a Land Surveyor to bring us into the kitchens and barns of old Maine families. The characters we encounter are shaped by their relationship with the land. Their circumstances are sometimes humorous, sometimes sad, but always familiar to anyone who has roots in the old District of Maine. We appreciate John's passion for "saving and sharing" the stories of the people of Maine through the lens of Scots-Irish identity. 264 page.

‘1718 – 2018’ Reflections on 300 years of the Scots-Irish in Maine'

In August 2018, in commemoration of the 1718 migration, the Maine Ulster Scots Project hosted a conference at Bowdoin College that included the presentation of papers-- academic, poetic, and personal. These papers from 19 different authors have been published together and “reflect deeper stories that remain embedded in colonial identity and conflict.” The book is offered as an exploration of “historical narratives through the lens of migration from Ulster and the way the frontier experience shaped the people who invented a nation.” 256 page.

More information on each book and to order: MaineUlsterScots.com (books ordered before 12/11 will ship for delivery before Christmas). For international orders, please email: [email protected]

Dig Deeper is a free speaker series at the Wolfe’s Neck Center in which experts from a diverse set of fields talk to our...
24/11/2023

Dig Deeper is a free speaker series at the Wolfe’s Neck Center in which experts from a diverse set of fields talk to our community about a wide range of topics.

Wednesday, November 29th, 2023 6-7:30 pm I Smith Center for Education & Research, Freeport, Maine

TOPIC: Native American Use of Natural Resources on the Changing Coastline of Casco Bay: 5000 Years Ago to the Present

SPEAKER: Nathan D. Hamilton, Associate Professor of Archaeology, University of Southern Maine and Thomas Bennet, Director, Prince Memorial Library, Cumberland, Maine

Pre-Register here: https://www.wolfesneck.org/dig-deeper/

23/11/2023
The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.Part 3 of 6 – THE HISTORIC SETTING ~ John T. Mann, Director M...
21/11/2023

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.

Part 3 of 6 – THE HISTORIC SETTING ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSP

The Ulster-Scots in the north of Ireland were being pushed by years of poor harvests, high rents, and discrimination against their Presbyterian form of Protestant religion. At the same time, they were being pulled by the opportunity to own land which was being advertised by New England clergy and owners of large land grants in the border lands located between English settlements in New England and French settlements in New France. The two European powers used both Native Americans and Ulster-Scots emigrants as chess pieces in their struggle for control of North America. The Scots-Irish came by the thousands intent on claiming their share of the American dream.

The District of Maine, at that time was at the Eastern Frontier and subject to recurring hostilities between France and England. The arrival of Ulster-Scot families in the Kennebec River valley helped trigger “Dummer’s War” in 1722. The resulting raids by Native Americans throughout the summer of 1722 destroyed many of the newly established homesteads in and around the lower Kennebec River. The conflict ended with the destruction of the Norridgewock village, the massacre of Native American men women and children living there, and the death of Father Rasle their spiritual leader.

Follow us here on Facebook for the next part of the story and for more information on MUSP, visit us at: www.maineulsterscots.com

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.Part 2 of 6 – THE BACK STORY ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSPOn ...
18/11/2023

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.

Part 2 of 6 – THE BACK STORY ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSP

On May 10, 1756, in the early days of the “French and Indian War,” the homestead farm of Thomas Means was attacked by a party of Native Americans. The raid resulted in the deaths of two members of the Means family, another wounded and one taken captive. One member of the raiding party was killed or wounded (reports differ). The conflict occurred at Flying Point in the Harraseeket District of North Yarmouth, Province of Massachusetts Bay (today’s Freeport, Maine).

Although warning had been given about Indian raids in progress, along with the recommendation that outlying settlers should shelter in their nearest garrison house, the family decided to wait until morning to go to the block house at Lower Flying Point.

The Means family lived in a log home near the shore of Maquoit Bay. The small home was occupied by seven people consisting of 33-year-old Thomas, his pregnant wife Alice, daughters Alice, 6, Jane, 3, an infant son, Robert, 16-year-old Molly (Mary) Finney, sister of the matriarch, and John Martin, a hired man.
Shortly before dawn, several of the attackers, using a log, busted open the barred door, Thomas Means was dragged from his home, and after some altercation, was shot and scalped. Molly and little Alice had been abducted. Mrs. Means, carrying her baby, barricaded the door. One of the attackers shot through a hole in the wall, killing the infant and lodging the bullet in his mother's breast. Sometime during this explosion of events, John Martin, who had been sleeping in the loft, fired his gun down through a gap in the floor timbers and wounded or killed one of the attackers causing the others to flee and allowing little Alice to escape and hide herself in a gulley behind the house. Later, after Mrs. Means had placed her dead son and husband on the only bed, three year old Jane crawled out from her hiding place in the ash pit below the floor at the back edge of the hearth and found her mother standing beside the bed grieving and believing her entire family had been lost in a matter of minutes. Little Alice arrived from her hiding place in the gulley soon after.

The Indians took Molly with them through the woods to Canada. She was given a blanket and moccasins to supplement her night-wear. Upon her arrival in Quebec, she was sold for work as a farm laborer, but was soon relocated to domestic work having proved to be unsuitable for farm work. A few months later, Captain William McLellan, of Falmouth, Maine (now Portland), was in Quebec in charge of a group of prisoners being delivered there for exchange. He had known Molly before her capture and secretly arranged for her escape. He came below her window late at night and threw her a rope which she slid down. McLellan brought her back to Falmouth on his vessel. They married shortly afterwards.

Thomas Means’ widow, Alice, later married Colonel George Rogers. They are buried at Flying Point Cemetery in Freeport. Thomas and Robert’s headstone is in Brunswick's First Parish Cemetery. His daughter, Alice, is buried at Old Harpswell Common Burying Ground, alongside her husband, Clement Skolfield, whom she married in 1773. Jane married Joseph Anderson, of Flying Point. Their headstones are at Woodlawn Cemetery on West Street in Freeport.

Thomas Means, II. was born in December 1756, a few months after the death of his father and brother, in the block house at Flying Point. He went on to achieve the rank of major in the Continental Army. He died in 1828, aged 71 or 72. His headstone is at the Mast Landing Cemetery on Upper Mast Landing Road, Freeport.

The Means massacre was the last act of resistance by the indigenous people to occur within the limits of North Yarmouth.

In 1932, a reenactment of the event was held in front of 1,000 people. Nearly all of the actors were descended from one of the Means involved. In July and August 2006, an exhibition and lecture commemorating the event was on view at Freeport's Harrington House and another reenactment was held near the original site.

During the summer of 2021, the Maine Ulster-Scots Project began an initial ground survey to identify the site of the Means family homestead and has now begun a multi-year, formal archaeological dig of the area. Work is expected to continue for several years and yield new information on the daily life and times of Ulster-Scot families living on colonial America’s Eastern Frontier.

Follow us here on Facebook for the next part of the story and for more information on MUSP, visit us at: www.maineulsterscots.com

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look. Part 1 of 6 – INTRODUCTION ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSPThe ...
15/11/2023

The Ulster-Scots ‘Means’ homestead story gets a fresh look.

Part 1 of 6 – INTRODUCTION ~ John T. Mann, Director MUSP

The 1756 event is, perhaps, not as well known today as it was in 1964, but it is certainly part of Freeport Maine’s common folk lore and the story has shown a durability that puts it into a category of classic tales that have taken on a life of their own. The plight of the Means family has been the subject of re-enactments, plays, songs, and romanticized historic novels. The 250th anniversary of the ‘Means Massacre’ in 2006 triggered a series of public events as well as a desire to learn more about the factual context of the Means’ story and determine the specific location of the Means’ home.

The Maine Ulster Scots Project (MUSP) was organized in 2006 with a mission to investigate, save, and share the stories of Ulster-Scots (aka Scotch-Irish) families, like the Means, who arrived in Maine between 1718 and 1763 as part of a great exodus of people from the North of Ireland to the frontier districts of America. The Ulster-Scots’ experience in Maine has gone largely undocumented. Stories of their lives, handed down through family oral traditions, were on the verge of being lost as the Maine coast population was being replaced or influenced by a newer wave of people “from away.” MUSP set out to capture those stories before they were lost forever. The Means family story and the 250th anniversary of their “massacre” was the impetus to start the process.

Follow us here on Facebook for the next part of the story and for more information on MUSP, visit us at: www.maineulsterscots.com

We continue to offer some “Maine words for those from away”….
13/11/2023

We continue to offer some “Maine words for those from away”….

On this Veterans Day, whether at home or abroad, active duty, reserves or retired, we say, “Thank you for serving our co...
11/11/2023

On this Veterans Day, whether at home or abroad, active duty, reserves or retired, we say, “Thank you for serving our country and protecting our freedoms!”

Reminder:Kirkin' O' the TartanThis Sunday, November 12, 2023, 10:10 amMid Coast Presbyterian Church84 Main Street, Topsh...
08/11/2023

Reminder:

Kirkin' O' the Tartan
This Sunday, November 12, 2023, 10:10 am
Mid Coast Presbyterian Church
84 Main Street, Topsham, Maine

Celebrate our Scottish heritage and the Presbyterian Church’s Scottish roots with bagpipes and a blessing of the tartans. Wear your family tartan (or plaid!) for the occasion. All are welcome and bid a Ceud Mile Failte - One Hundred Thousand Welcomes!

Thank you for 1,600 page likes.  Grab a cup of coffee and take a minute to scroll back through some of our past postings...
06/11/2023

Thank you for 1,600 page likes.

Grab a cup of coffee and take a minute to scroll back through some of our past postings to see what you may have missed. When you see one that you find interesting – please give it a thumbs up, share it, or leave us a comment. We always appreciate hearing from you as we save and share Maine's rich Scots-Irish Heritage.

Get an early start of your Christmas shopping with two great books offered by The Maine Ulster-Scots Project:‘1718 – 201...
04/11/2023

Get an early start of your Christmas shopping with two great books offered by The Maine Ulster-Scots Project:

‘1718 – 2018’ Reflections on 300 years of the Scots-Irish in Maine'

In August 2018, in commemoration of the 1718 migration, the Maine Ulster Scots Project hosted a conference at Bowdoin College that included the presentation of papers-- academic, poetic, and personal. These papers from 19 different authors have been published together and “reflect deeper stories that remain embedded in colonial identity and conflict.” The book is offered as an exploration of “historical narratives through the lens of migration from Ulster and the way the frontier experience shaped the people who invented a nation.” 256 page.

“SIDESHOTS - Stories from a Land Surveyor’s traverse through the District of Maine

Author, John Mann uses his perspective as a Mainer and a Land Surveyor to bring us into the kitchens and barns of old Maine families. The characters we encounter are shaped by their relationship with the land. Their circumstances are sometimes humorous, sometimes sad, but always familiar to anyone who has roots in the old District of Maine. We appreciate John's passion for "saving and sharing" the stories of the people of Maine through the lens of Scots-Irish identity. 264 page.

Book available at: MaineUlsterScots.com
For international orders, please email: [email protected]

Imagining Ulster:This one hour documentary looks at the history, identity & idea of Ulster as a place distinct from the ...
02/11/2023

Imagining Ulster:
This one hour documentary looks at the history, identity & idea of Ulster as a place distinct from the rest of Ireland through the centuries old influence of its Scottish settlers.

Documentary looking at the history, identity & idea of Ulster as a place distinct from the rest of Ireland through the centuries old influence of its Scottis...

William Phips, the Massachusetts Governor Who Got Tough on WitchcraftIn the year 1692, Massachusetts’ new royal governor...
30/10/2023

William Phips, the Massachusetts Governor Who Got Tough on Witchcraft
I
n the year 1692, Massachusetts’ new royal governor William Phips (born and bred in the District of Maine) decided he needed to get tough on witchcraft. The colony was losing the war against the French and Indians in Maine, just 10 years after the devastation of King Philip’s War. Refugees from Maine had streamed into Massachusetts, and many families had lost loved ones in the conflict.

Read the full article published by the New England Historical Society:
https://tinyurl.com/mrx3bdmx

SAVE THE DATE: Sunday November 12, 2023 for the annual Kirkin' O' the Tartan at Mid Coast Presbyterian Church.Celebrate ...
28/10/2023

SAVE THE DATE:
Sunday November 12, 2023 for the annual Kirkin' O' the Tartan at Mid Coast Presbyterian Church.

Celebrate our Scottish heritage with bagpipes and a blessing of the tartans. Wear your family tartan (or plaid!) for the occasion as we celebrate the Presbyterian Church’s Scottish roots.. All are welcome and bid a Ceud Mile Failte - One Hundred Thousand Welcomes!

Kirkin' O' the Tartan
Sunday, November 12, 2023, 10:10 am
Mid Coast Presbyterian Church
84 Main Street, Topsham, Maine

There have been several new projects recently released under Northern Ireland Screen’s  Ulster-Scots Broadcast Fund.  Pr...
24/10/2023

There have been several new projects recently released under Northern Ireland Screen’s Ulster-Scots Broadcast Fund.

Projects include:
Discover Ulster-Scots Places Northern Ireland is a new series of 7 x 10-minute films showcasing some of Northern Ireland’s finest tourist attractions and their Ulster-Scots connections.

Produced by Clean Slate TV, the series can be viewed here. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_I5ncC1fw0R1gZygaW8IzSRDCubRtn7T

The seven locations featured in the series are Belfast's Queen's Island & Titanic Quarter; Slemish Mountain and Glenarm; The Derry Walls; Fermanagh & Lough Erne; The Gobbins & Glenariff Forest; The Ulster American Folk Park; and The Ards Peninsula.

We continue to offer “Maine words for those from away”….
22/10/2023

We continue to offer “Maine words for those from away”….

1718 Migration from Ulster to New England In summer 1718, Ulster-Scots communities along the River Foyle and the River B...
20/10/2023

1718 Migration from Ulster to New England

In summer 1718, Ulster-Scots communities along the River Foyle and the River Bann waved goodbye to around five ships, carrying Presbyterian ministers and their congregations across the wild Atlantic. They left Ulster’s coasts and castles, churches and villages, to start a new life in New England – today’s New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts and Connecticut.

These early settlers came to Maine that Autumn and were one of the earliest waves. Hundreds of thousands followed. Today, over 20 million Americans have Scotch-Irish ancestry. This is our shared story.

Link to 20 page booklet PDF published by the Ulster-Scots Agency to document and celebrate the 1718 Migration:
https://www.ancestryireland.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/The_1718_Migration.pdf

Let us look back to this day in 2018 – commemorating the 300th Anniversary of Ulster-Scots arrival to Maine.In the Autum...
17/10/2023

Let us look back to this day in 2018 – commemorating the 300th Anniversary of Ulster-Scots arrival to Maine.

In the Autumn of 1718, two ships of migrants arrived in Casco Bay, marking the beginning of the first large migration from Ireland to North America. The ‘McCallum’ and ‘Robert’ brought settlers from Ulster in Northern Ireland. These ships carried the ancestors of many modern residents of Maine.

In recognition of the 300th anniversary of this arrival, Lois Galgary Reckitt, Maine State Representative for District 31 (herself a descendent of Scottish migrants) presented a Joint Resolution recognizing the Scotch-Irish Migrants of 1718 to Dr. Mary Drymon-DeRose, Scotch-Irish Historian, at the site on the Fore River in South Portland where the ‘Robert’ had landed 300 years ago. The ship became frozen in the ice during the bitterly cold winter of 1718-1719, with many families remaining aboard until the spring.

The presentation ceremony was attended by descendants of some of those settlers and other interested participants of Scots and Irish descent. David McCausland, wearing his familial Buchanan Tartan kilt and Nancy Tudor represented their ancestor, ‘Robert’ passenger James McCausland. George Pulkkinen, official piper of the St. Andrews Society of Maine (and pipe major, Dunlap Highland Band) provided authentic Scottish music. Nick DeRose, Joshua Powers, and Adrian Dowling, former Chairperson of the South Portland Arts and Historical Preservation committee also attended.

Dr. DeRose read a list of the names of those who overwintered in Maine and Ms. Reckitt read the following:

“JOINT RESOLUTION RECOGNIZING THE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STATE OF THE SCOTCH-IRISH MIGRANTS OF 1718 ON THE OCCASION OF THE 300TH ANNIVERSARY OF THEIR ARRIVAL

WHEREAS, October 2018 marks the 300th anniversary of the arrival in Casco Bay of 2 ships, the ‘McCallum’ and the ‘Robert’, carrying a large group of immigrants from the north of Ireland; and

WHEREAS, the ‘Robert’ anchored in the Fore River off the coast of what is now South Portland and the ‘McCallum’ discharged settlers in the area of Merrymeeting Bay; and

WHEREAS, Maine has many descendants of these settlers and later immigrants from the north of Ireland, who brought with them a unique worldview, language and musical culture that enriched and influenced Maine's development; and

WHEREAS, the settlers brought with them fundamental beliefs in representative democracy and in freedom of religion, as they had been persecuted in Scotland and Ireland for their Presbyterian faith; and

WHEREAS, they planted some of the first field crops of potatoes to be grown in New England, an agricultural product that has played a key role in the State's economic development; and

WHEREAS, they brought with them a knowledge of textile production, having participated in the linen manufacturing trade in Ireland, and helped establish important textile manufacturing industries in Maine; and

WHEREAS, these settlers and their descendants participated fully in Maine's local militias and the descendants have participated in all military activities in which the United States has been involved since 1776; and

WHEREAS, these settlers and their descendants have produced many significant legislative and political figures who have played important roles in the history of the State and there have been at least 20 American Presidents with Scotch-Irish ancestry; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED: That We, the Members of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Legislature now assembled in the Second Special Session, on behalf of the people we represent, take this opportunity to recognize in October 2018 the contributions of the Scotch-Irish in Maine and the Tricentennial of the Arrival of the 1718 Migrants.”

"Reflections on 300 years of the Scots Irish in Maine, 1718-2018"In August 2018, in commemoration of the 1718 migration,...
15/10/2023

"Reflections on 300 years of the Scots Irish in Maine, 1718-2018"

In August 2018, in commemoration of the 1718 migration, the Maine Ulster Scots Project hosted a conference at Bowdoin College that included the presentation of papers-- academic, poetic, and personal. These papers from 19 different authors have been published together and “reflect deeper stories that remain embedded in colonial identity and conflict.” The book is offered as an exploration of “historical narratives through the lens of migration from Ulster and the way the frontier experience shaped the people who invented a nation.”

The 256 page book is available at: MaineUlsterScots.com
For international orders, please email: [email protected]

In 1718, the first organized migration of Ulster-Scots to New England took place. They arrived late summer and into the ...
12/10/2023

In 1718, the first organized migration of Ulster-Scots to New England took place. They arrived late summer and into the fall in Maine.

Watch and share this 7.25 minute video prepared and presented by Discover Ulster-Scots in association with Tourism Ireland.

Link:

In 1718, the first organised migration of Ulster-Scots Presbyterians took place. Five ships carried families from both Aghadowey and Dunboe in County Londond...

Maine’s Largest Fiddle OrchestraFiddle-iciousPresents four concerts: “Taste the Music”Saturday, October 21, 7PM McCormac...
09/10/2023

Maine’s Largest Fiddle Orchestra
Fiddle-icious
Presents four concerts: “Taste the Music”

Saturday, October 21, 7PM McCormack Performing Arts Center, Gorham High School
Sunday, October 22, 2PM, South Portland High School Auditorium
Saturday, October 28, 7PM, Freeport Performing Center
Sunday, October 29, 2PM, Franco Center, Lewiston

Tickets at the door and at https://fiddleicious.com/

Fiddle-icious concerts are not just about the fiddles! We have step-dancers, singers, and very special guests Erica Brown and Matt Shipman, and the Arnott siblings. It will be a really fun time for us and for you.

Fiddle-icious is an open community-based orchestra of over 140 members, accepting all levels of musicians to preserve the cultural heritage of Maine’s traditional fiddle music. At our bimonthly meetings, we join together to learn traditional tunes, dances, and songs passed down from our Scottish, Irish, Quebecois, and Acadian ancestors. The members of Fiddle-icious enjoy being part of a larger fellowship that brings joy and purpose to all who participate—all while keeping the musical tradition alive and thriving. More about the group at: https://fiddleicious.com/

Maine Words for those “from away”:We continue to offer some “Maine words for those from away”….
06/10/2023

Maine Words for those “from away”:
We continue to offer some “Maine words for those from away”….

Saint Andrews Society of Maine Annual Scottish Ball. October 28, 20235:00 to 9:00 PMHilton Garden InnFreeport DowntownFe...
02/10/2023

Saint Andrews Society of Maine Annual Scottish Ball.
October 28, 2023
5:00 to 9:00 PM
Hilton Garden Inn
Freeport Downtown

Featured music presented by Scottish Fish with a fresh take on traditional and contemporary Scottish and Cape Breton music. Their lively and unique arrangements are woven together from session music handed down from generations of the tradition's finest players. They have performed at the Boston Celtic Music Festival, the Bellingham Celtic Festival, Club Passim, and at various other public and private venues across the United States.

Tickets are limited and available here:
https://www.mainehighlandgames.org/upcoming-events

Today is Michaelmass. Back in the day, ships in early Maine and New England needed to head back across the Atlantic or r...
29/09/2023

Today is Michaelmass. Back in the day, ships in early Maine and New England needed to head back across the Atlantic or risk destruction in winter storms.

Maine’s Largest Fiddle OrchestraFiddle-iciousPresents four concerts: “Taste the Music”Saturday, October 21, 7PM McCormac...
26/09/2023

Maine’s Largest Fiddle Orchestra
Fiddle-icious
Presents four concerts: “Taste the Music”

Saturday, October 21, 7PM McCormack Performing Arts Center, Gorham High School
Sunday, October 22, 2PM, South Portland High School Auditorium
Saturday, October 28, 7PM, Freeport Performing Center
Sunday, October 29, 2PM, Franco Center, Lewiston

Tickets at the door and at https://fiddleicious.com/

Fiddle-icious is an open community-based orchestra of over 140 members, accepting all levels of musicians to preserve the cultural heritage of Maine’s traditional fiddle music. At our bimonthly meetings, we join together to learn traditional tunes, dances, and songs passed down from our Scottish, Irish, Quebecois, and Acadian ancestors. The members of Fiddle-icious enjoy being part of a larger fellowship that brings joy and purpose to all who participate—all while keeping the musical tradition alive and thriving. More about the group at: https://fiddleicious.com/

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