Gotfrit 1275

Gotfrit 1275 This is my hypothetical recreation of the clothing and equipment of an Austrian male from ca. 1275

This basic infantry spear is the latest addition to my collection. The shaft is made of ash and covered with two layers ...
29/10/2023

This basic infantry spear is the latest addition to my collection. The shaft is made of ash and covered with two layers of linseed oil to protect the wood. The spearhead was adapted to fit the shaft nicely. Many pole arms (especially in the later Middle Ages) had shafts with square, hexagonal or octagonal cross sections. This can be useful when a blade is attached to the shaft. I decided to use a shaft with a round cross section because a spear would not need a polygonal cross section as it is mainly used for thrusting. The length over all is 242 cm, the diameter of the shaft is 3 cm.

This picture was taken two weeks ago when I had the honour to participate in a high quality living history event in Dimb...
11/08/2023

This picture was taken two weeks ago when I had the honour to participate in a high quality living history event in Dimbach, Upper Austria. It's the first picture where I am wearing my sword around the waist and this may lead to a question about the status of the person I am trying to represent.

Many people would say that I must be a knight because only a knight would have been allowed to own a sword. But there are some reasons why it is not unthinkable that a person of a lower status than a knight may have also owned a sword.
documents prohibiting the possession of a sword are rare for the 13th century and on the other hand there are written sources like an interesting document from Bavaria, the "Landfrieden von 1244" wich tells us that peasants were allowed to own armor but not to wear it except on a Sunday when going to church. Peasants that owned houses had the right to carry a sword on their walk to church. And there are some illustrations from the 13th century that show people wielding swords that don't look very noble or knightly. There are also sources that tell about multiple sieges of towns in Austria in the 13th century (Vienna witnessed five sieges in the whole century). It is possible that a part of the citizens or burghers of a city like Vienna could have owned swords as it was a normal thing in the 14th century. And I think the ability to purchase items like mail hauberks, kettle hats and other armor or weapons was not an exclusive right of the nobility in this time as we see threw the Assize of Arms from England.

I just wanted to explain my point of view about the legal status of sword ownership in southern Germany in the second half of the 13th century. And after all it should be said that my goal for this project is to portray a character that illustrates a part of society in between the nobility and the peasantry. I know that it makes it a little difficult to associate my character with a typical role of medieval society but it was an intentional decision as I think it helps to show that the society of this time had many variations in wealth and status.

These are four original "Pfennige" from Vienna. They date back to the timeframe of 1251-1276 and they are my first origi...
18/07/2023

These are four original "Pfennige" from Vienna. They date back to the timeframe of 1251-1276 and they are my first original objects from the 13th century. They were a lovely birthday present and they are some very special objects of my collection.

I am very happy to show you my new sword. It was made by VB Swordshop Kft.  and it has some customized parts. It fits th...
09/05/2023

I am very happy to show you my new sword. It was made by VB Swordshop Kft. and it has some customized parts. It fits the time frame and geographical area better than my previous sword. The straight cross bar and the "cocked hat" pommel are elements that can be seen in various german manuscript illuminations of the 13th century and a few originals of this type were found in Central Europe. It is very well balanced and the blade is almost sharp to give a good weight distribution.

These textile garments form a basic layer to go under my hauberk and mail coif and there are different words to describe...
26/04/2023

These textile garments form a basic layer to go under my hauberk and mail coif and there are different words to describe it. Mostly it's called a gambeson or aketon. The use of such garments under mail hauberks in the late 13th century is debated but a famous Norwegian textual source mentions such a protective garment made from layers of linen. The "Koller" or collar is an important part to protect the neck and it is described as a seperate part in german written sources. The whole garment, "Koller" and coif are made from only four layers of linen so the shoulder parts are padded with eight layers of linen. It's made to be light and it seems to provide enough protection and comfort to wear my hauberk above it. A theory that sounds plausible says that early gambesons were not meant as a padding from hard impacts but more as a light protection and to increase comfort. Some adjustments will be made in the future and maybe I will add triangles to the sides but I don't really see a reason for them and that's why I decided to leave them away. At last I have to say that the whole garment is very hypothetical.

The different layers of male clothing can be seen in these pictures. The undergarments are made of white linen. (The que...
16/04/2023

The different layers of male clothing can be seen in these pictures. The undergarments are made of white linen. (The question about how white linen could and would be bleached with the traditional method of using the sun and grass is rather difficult to answer. I decided to use nearly white linen but this topic could be discussed more.) The hoses are attached to the breeches with naturally colored (white, brown) woolen laces. These are made with fingerloop technique and have tips made of brass. The breeches are not very wide as it is shown in some german sources. The shoes that I wear in these pictures are an alternative to my turnshoes and they are meant for hiking and occasional LARPing. They are designed after findings from London but the soles are not historically accurate as they are made with wooden nails to be more durable than turnshoes. The "Nuppenbecher" is such a beautiful piece that it had to be shown too :) Another item of my clothing is the linen coif. It is often said that it was only worn for dirty and/or hard work and this seems understandable of course but in many 13th century manuscript illustrations it can be seen worn by men performing very different tasks so it seems to be another topic suitable for discussion.
Collecting and recronstructing clothing, household items and military equipment of the later 13th century is a very exciting project for me. However it is sometimes difficult to narrow down and localize geographical fashions and styles that existed in Central Europe in this time frame. My approach is to display an Austrian burgher of medium wealth or a liegeman/henchman of a ministerialis and therefore some of my items are made after German or when possible Austrian illustrations or archeological findings. However in some cases it's unavoidable to use sources from other geographical areas than Austria or Germany but I try to be very careful with such decisions.

This beautiful replica of a Southern German drinking glass is made from forest glass with its typical greenish colour. I...
06/01/2023

This beautiful replica of a Southern German drinking glass is made from forest glass with its typical greenish colour. It's called a "Nuppenbecher" and this one is decorated with 99 glass k***s. This kind of drinking glass was not uncommon in the late 13th century but they may have been more or less expensive.
It's a special Christmas present and a good start for the new year.

This photo shows a door on the southern side of the "Pfarrkirche St. Stephan" in Tulln with elements from the 12th centu...
22/08/2022

This photo shows a door on the southern side of the "Pfarrkirche St. Stephan" in Tulln with elements from the 12th century.

photo by Stefan Skrivanek

My fibula or "Fürspan" wich is a reconstruction of a piece from a treasure that was found near Freistadt in Upper Austri...
21/08/2022

My fibula or "Fürspan" wich is a reconstruction of a piece from a treasure that was found near Freistadt in Upper Austria. The treasure from Fuchsenhof is dated to the 1270s and the original piece is made of silver. This reconstruction is made of bronze but is otherwise identical to the original.

This is my mail coif and the hauberk wich are both made from flat riveted and solid rings (8mm ID) The coif is a DIY set...
17/08/2022

This is my mail coif and the hauberk wich are both made from flat riveted and solid rings (8mm ID) The coif is a DIY set from Ironskin and I made the hauberk a bit narrower to fit me better but it still needs adjustmensts.

This photo shows the western portal of the "Pfarrkirche St. Stephan" in Tulln with the pillars on the sides wich were ma...
17/08/2022

This photo shows the western portal of the "Pfarrkirche St. Stephan" in Tulln with the pillars on the sides wich were made in the early 13th century.

I am wearing a cotta and hoses made of twill wool and the cotta is dyed with indigo and reseda. The underwear and the coif are made from white linen. I am wearing linen footwraps and the shoes are turnshoes. A belt with a buckle made of bronze and a fibula make this basic set of clothing for a man of this time period complete. I am carrying a sword with a scabbard and a white knotted swordbelt. Gotfrit could be a medium wealthy town citizen or a liegeman of a ministerialis.

More detailed photos and information will follow soon and I am happy about questions and comments.

photo by Stefan Skrivanek

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