Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society

Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society Bonanzaville is a pioneer village and museum located in West Fargo, ND with one of North Dakota's largest collections. There is something for everyone.
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Bonanzaville is operated by the Cass County Historical Society, with a mission to interpret the heritage of the Red River Valley. It is the region’s largest historical attraction with 43 historic buildings and more than 400,000 artifacts. Our collection includes a car museum, air museum, tractor museum, carriage museum, and so much more.

Happy Feature Friday!  This week’s feature is a candy axe from Grant’s Candies in Fargo, ND.Charles A. Everhart was born...
02/14/2020

Happy Feature Friday!

This week’s feature is a candy axe from Grant’s Candies in Fargo, ND.

Charles A. Everhart was born in Wisconsin and came to Fargo in 1895 to start the C. A. Everhart & Company; a business that produced wholesale confectionery products. The first factory was located at 17 Roberts Street in downtown Fargo.

In 1901, the company built a larger three story factory located at 813 15 N.P. Avenue. The factory was approximately 30,000 square feet and was equipped with steam heat.

According to an article in the 1902 Northwestern Journal of Progress magazine, the company manufactured “everything known in the confectionery line, from the plainest stick candy to the finest cream chocolates, marshmallows, bittersweets, putting their goods up in fancy packages which they sell to dealers only.”

In 1905 Charles Everhart sold his candy business to J. D. Grant Candy Company. In that same year, Frank Chaney, a man who had been an employee at the Everhart factory since he was 16, opened his own candy shop. Soon George Everhart, brother of Charles, joined Mr. Chaney and started the Chaney-Everhart Candy Company.

In 1914, the Chaney-Everhart Candy Company bought out the Pioneer Candy Company, which was then being produced out of the old Everhart factory on N.P. Avenue. At that point the business was renewed in the old factory under the Chaney-Everhart brand. Happy Valentine's Day Everyone--stay sweet! ~

02/14/2020

Happy Valentine's Day and Good Morning to all of you beautiful souls!! We want to say THANK YOU to each and every giving heart that donated to Bonanzaville on Giving Hearts Day! Because of your generosity, we raised $30,950!! We surpassed our goal and the Furnberg Store gets a new foundation! 🥰 Thank you for helping us preserve history!!

Happy Giving Hearts Day to all of you! We are excited to share that we are at 71% of our goal and have raised $8,970. Wi...
02/13/2020

Happy Giving Hearts Day to all of you! We are excited to share that we are at 71% of our goal and have raised $8,970. With our matching funds, our total is at $17,940.00!! Thank you so much to all of our supporters for helping us preserve the past! We can't do this without you!

We are still shy of our goal. We need to raise $30,000 to repair the foundation of the Furnberg Store this spring. Please consider a donation to Bonanzaville today! You have until 11:59pm to make your contribution! ❤️

02/09/2020
Antiques Roadshow l PBS

The last episode of Antiques Roadshow filmed at Bonanzaville airs tomorrow! 😍

Wrap up ANTIQUES ROADSHOW’s three-part visit to Bonanzaville on PBS Monday, Feb 10 at 8/7C PM with “showstopping” appraisals like this vintage button suit. Watch now!

Happy Feature Friday Friends! With Giving Hearts Day coming up next week, this week's feature is the Furnberg General St...
02/07/2020

Happy Feature Friday Friends!

With Giving Hearts Day coming up next week, this week's feature is the Furnberg General Store.

In 2019 the decision was made to close the building due to Foundation issues. We hope to reopen the Furnberg Store in the summer of 2020 if we can raise the funds needed to repair the foundation. Please consider a donation to Bonanzaville this Giving Hearts Day, February 13th. Make your mark on history by helping us preserve ours!

The Furnberg General Store was one of the first buildings to move onto the grounds of Bonanzaville. Christian Furnberg and his wife, Johanna built the store in 1899 in Osgood, North Dakota. The store stocked everything from clothing to groceries to feed and farm supplies. Other operations that took place within the store included a blacksmith and the Osgood Post Office. Mr. Furnberg, the town’s postmaster, walked to the train station to pick up incoming mail and deliver outgoing mail every day until 1911 when a rural route opened.

After operating for over fifty years, the store closed in 1953 and the Furnberg’s son, Oscar, donated the building along with its unsold merchandise to Bonanzaville in 1968. Oscar Furnberg became instrumental in the store’s restoration after its relocation to ensure future generations could experience the stores of yesteryear.

Happy Monday Everyone! We missed our Feature Friday post so to make up for it we give you....Mechanical Monday! 😂Our fea...
02/03/2020

Happy Monday Everyone! We missed our Feature Friday post so to make up for it we give you....Mechanical Monday! 😂

Our feature is a 1920's F&E Check Writer which aided in the defense against the rising practice of check forgery. These machines added two different colored inks as part of the document’s makeup to decrease the ability to alter the paper.

We love featuring artifacts contained within our collection, and their safety is our top priority. Factors such as temperature, humidity, light exposure, and past usage all influence the wear and tear visible on museum artifacts. Oils on our hands wear the print off of items and light exposure normally causes fading. These elements are constantly on the minds of collections managers as we do our best to keep historical artifacts around for future generations to enjoy.

Please consider a donation to Bonanzaville on Giving Hearts Day this upcoming February 13, 2020. This year we are especially focused on the conservation and restoration of the UND Ceramic Plaques depicting North Dakota, which were designed and produced by Margaret Cable in the early 1930’s, and the foundation for the Furnberg General Store.

Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society's cover photo
01/28/2020

Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society's cover photo

Happy Feature Friday!This week’s feature is a hand-made Billy Club which has “1935 Coal Strike” written on it in black i...
01/24/2020

Happy Feature Friday!

This week’s feature is a hand-made Billy Club which has “1935 Coal Strike” written on it in black ink along with the name of Fargo City Officials and law enforcement officers. The Fargo Teamsters’ coal strike of 1935 represents a controversial and dramatic episode in Dakota Teamster history.

During the Great Depression, the Dakota Teamsters formed as a union on the Northern Plains. Victory of unions in Minneapolis strengthened the resolve for leadership to branch into the Dakotas, and attention first turned to Fargo, North Dakota since the city was a significant rail and trucking center. The charter known as Local 173 of Fargo, ND and Moorhead, Minnesota assisted in multiple drivers’ strikes during the Depression. Fargo employers, intent on preventing other union advances after the milk drivers’ union’s success in the area, formed the Associated Industries of Fargo-Moorhead. Within this alliance, employers marshalled their forces for any conflict. The coal drivers’ strike had cut off the delivery of coal to Fargo in early January 1935 and was broken on January 27, 1935 when city police gassed the union hall, arrested around 95 union members, and charged them with rioting. This caused a setback for Dakota Teamsters and their International President Daniel Tobin revoked the charter for Local 173 for what he claimed were nonpayment of per capita dues. The unionizing effort, regardless of external and internal challenges, did not end with the coal strike’s failure. Unions continued to strike for better wages and more reasonable work hours, and union spirit in North Dakota began rising again by early 1938.

Happy Feature Friday!This week’s feature is a cast iron shoe repair last and form recently accepted into our permanent c...
01/03/2020

Happy Feature Friday!

This week’s feature is a cast iron shoe repair last and form recently accepted into our permanent collection. Shoe lasts were used by cobblers and cordwainers to make and repair shoes. The cast iron foot holds and forms the shape of a human foot while an artisan makes the shoe. The weight of the contoured cast iron is beneficial to forming the sole of the shoe. This shoe last is not specific to the right or left foot, which is uncommon for those newer than 1850.

On the American Frontier, shoemaking was usually done by errant cobblers who traveled from community to community with little supplies and without cast iron shoe lasts to make people shoes. Instead these traveling artisans would use materials and tools supplied by the town.

As the railroad moved west, the practice of the traveling shoemaker was displaced by standardized shoe sizing seen in factory made shoes. Shoes were then sold and ordered from general stores or catalogues like Sears-Roebuck.

Happy Feature Friday Everyone!This week’s feature is an unopened pack of souvenir playing cards from the 1984 Louisiana ...
12/27/2019

Happy Feature Friday Everyone!

This week’s feature is an unopened pack of souvenir playing cards from the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition donated by Ardeen and Clarence Sveum.

Tomorrow, December 28, 2019, is National Card Playing Day. Though from where cards originated remains a subject of debate, they have remained an excellent social pastime. As playing cards’ presence increased throughout Asia and Europe, countries contributed to innovations of the decks and their usage. An innovation contributed by the United States is the addition of the Joker cards. They were referred to as “bowers,” a term which originates with the trick game of Euchre that originated in the mid-19th century.

Happy Feature Friday!This week’s feature is a photo of David Houston, Annie Houston, and their son, David Houston, Jr., ...
12/20/2019

Happy Feature Friday!

This week’s feature is a photo of David Houston, Annie Houston, and their son, David Houston, Jr., sitting at their dining table around Christmastime. Just behind the youngest occupant of this image is their Christmas tree decorated with an array of items.

The tradition of the modern Christmas tree originated in western Germany, as tree worship among pagan Europeans persisted through conversion to Christianity. For a popular medieval play on Adam and Eve, a “paradise tree” used a fir tree hung with apples as a prop. Many Germans set up “paradise trees” in their homes on December 24, and hung wafers (symbolizing the Eucharist) which were later replaced by various cookies. Germany’s Prince Albert, husband to Queen Victoria, popularized the Victorian decoration of Christmas trees, and many German immigrants brought this tradition with them to America. Trees had toys, small gifts, candles, candies, fancy cakes, and ribbons and paper chains hung from their branches.

Though we decorate our trees a little different from the Victorian candles, small cakes, and cookies, the persistence of trees decorating the home during this time of year has a long history. Happy Holidays to everyone!

Happy Feature Friday Everyone!This week’s feature is a small German doll that was donated by Diane Clemson and is now ho...
12/13/2019

Happy Feature Friday Everyone!

This week’s feature is a small German doll that was donated by Diane Clemson and is now housed in our doll collection. Featured on the doll’s dress are poinsettias, a flower native to Mexico and commonly sold at Christmastime. Dr. Joel R. Poinsett (March 1779-December 1851), whom the poinsettia is named after, served as the first U.S. Ambassador to Mexico and introduced the flower to the United States in the late 1820s.

Legend of the poinsettia tells the story of a young Mexican girl, Pepita, too poor to afford a gift for Jesus at Christmas Eve services but was told even the smallest gift will make him happy. She made a bouquet of weeds and, as she laid them at the alter, they burst into bright red flowers. These flowers were called “Flores de Noche Buena” (Flowers of the Holy Night). Their shape is believed to symbolize the Star of Bethlehem, the red color represents the blood of Christ, and white leaves represent his purity.

As we continue into the holiday season, we thought we’d focus on some items in our collection which give us the chance to highlight traditions and where they came from!

12/07/2019

Merry Christmas from Bonanzaville and The Oak Grove Choir! Christmas on the Prairie is today from 10am-5pm! We hope to see you soon!

Good Morning Friends! We are anxiously awaiting Santas arrival and we're ready for Christmas on the Prairie! The event r...
12/07/2019

Good Morning Friends! We are anxiously awaiting Santas arrival and we're ready for Christmas on the Prairie! The event runs from 10am-5pm. We hope to see you here!

THANK YOU to all of our supporters for voting Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society BEST MUSEUM 3 years in a row...
12/02/2019
Best of the Red River Valley 2019: Best Museum/Gallery | INFORUM

THANK YOU to all of our supporters for voting Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society BEST MUSEUM 3 years in a row! We are so grateful for all the support you give us and we look forward to another great year! #Bonanzaville #BestOf #BacktoBacktoBack

INFORUM your best local source for news, sports, and weather in the Fargo-Moorhead area

Happy Feature Friday!This week’s feature are a ceramic tea pot and creamer. Tea didn’t just make an important statement ...
11/29/2019

Happy Feature Friday!

This week’s feature are a ceramic tea pot and creamer. Tea didn’t just make an important statement in the Boston Harbor, as it also provided support in selling the suffrage movement.

Women held “suffragist teas” where supporters vocalized the reasoning of the women’s suffrage movement and the parties generated revenue as fundraisers. Not only did the parties raise money to support suffragist efforts, as special suffrage teas were made so the public to show their support through their purchases. One example of these teas is “Equality Tea” which began in Northern California and soon distributed by the Woman’s Suffrage Party through the rest of the state. The commodity had become a political strategy itself as mail-order tea ensured the rural and lower-class population were exposed to women’s suffrage and some women refused to pay grocery bills if the site did not carry suffrage teas.

This Sunday, December 1, 2019, is the 100th Anniversary of North Dakota ratifying the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote. We are glad to join in the national efforts of commemorating this great achievement with a Suffrage Gala this coming Sunday. If you bought tickets, we’ll see you there!

11/26/2019

Tickets for the Suffrage Gala are no longer available as of noon today. Thank you to all of you who purchased tickets and we'll see you on Sunday!

Don't forget about Christmas on the Prairie December 7th from 10am-5pm!

Happy Feature Friday Everyone!This week’s feature is “Suffrage Song” composed by suffragist Eliza Tonks to the tune of “...
11/15/2019

Happy Feature Friday Everyone!

This week’s feature is “Suffrage Song” composed by suffragist Eliza Tonks to the tune of “Dixie.” Tonks, of Washington, D.C., attended Cornell University for a Bachelor’s in Arts degree and published multiple songs for the suffrage movement. “The Suffragist,” noted her composition, “Come Forth, Ye Women of the Land,” on September 15, 1917 as it roused supporters at the release of the first six political prisoners to ever serve terms in a Government prison, the Occoquan, Virginia, Government workhouse. North Dakota Representative John M. Baer is also noted as arguing for an investigation of the reported shameful treatment of the suffragists, and was the only independent Congressman to make this demand. His resolution, however, was subsequently buried in committee but his speech stressed that suffragists pointed the way in democracy.

Music plays a large part in our lives, whether studying for an exam, exercising, or protesting for rights. Suffragists in the United States composed hundreds of tunes for their cause, and rallies played such music to unify and spread the word of their movement’s goals. Suffrage songs were composed to well-known tunes, such as “America” and “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” and ensured simple participation. The likely hope for producing lyrics supporting women’s suffrage to old national songs was to create a realm of familiarity with a bold and declarative method.

11/14/2019

ATTENTION ALL COLLEGE STUDENTS!

We have a great deal for you! If you would like to attend the Women's Suffrage Gala on December 1st, we are offering a discounted ticket price of only $20.00 through November 21, 2019. Details of the event can be found on our page. Join us for an evening of food, guest speakers and entertainment. We hope to see you there!

Hello Everyone!Our Suffrage Gala is fast approaching! Please consider celebrating the 100th Anniversary of women’s suffr...
11/12/2019

Hello Everyone!

Our Suffrage Gala is fast approaching! Please consider celebrating the 100th Anniversary of women’s suffrage in North Dakota with us on December 1, 2019.

Tickets are available at https://www.bonanzaville.org/events/suffrage-gala-social-dinner-entertainment-5-00-pm-to-9-00-pm. Available in the Gift Shop or as your gift with the purchase of the VIP Gold ticket will be a small booklet containing a transcript of Clara Dillon Darrow’s “I Want to Vote” speech.

Clara Dillon Darrow, as the wife of a wealthy physician (Edward Darrow), had the means to take part in various causes important to her. One cause she adamantly stood behind was women’s suffrage.

Darrow invited famed English suffragist Sylvia Pankhurst to Fargo in 1912 to help organize a strong North Dakota suffrage movement. Pankhurst assisted in establishing the Votes for Women League of North Dakota and Darrow was chosen as its first President. Her biggest contribution to the cause was her 1914 speech, “I Want to Vote.” It was so powerful that she was asked to speak at the National Women’s Suffrage Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. In the speech, Clara describes her wish to vote, first hoping she could vote with her father, her brothers, and then her husband. It ends on the hope that she would be able to vote with her children.

Darrow would never get to fulfill her wish as she passed away in 1915. Her husband and children, however, continued to fight for women’s suffrage after her death.

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1351 Main Ave W
West Fargo, ND
58078

General information

The pioneer village is open from May 1 to September 30.

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Comments

Hey did you see the guy from the antique roadshow with the watch was on Inside edition?
This is from my mother’s side of the family and thought you might be interested to see it.
Great museum! Thanks for all the effort put into preserving the history. https://guide2travel.ca/2019/10/visit-the-amazing-bonanza-farm-bonanzaville-museum-in-north-dakota/
I just read this about Melvina Massey - other than the fictional novel about her (which looks pretty good!!) are there any existing books about her. https://hpr1.com/index.php/feature/culture/madam-melvina-massey-and-the-crystal-palace/
In light of the WDAY news story the other day about the woman in Otter Tail County that was cleaning headstones by chiseling away at lichen on the stone with a metal tool, would your organization ever consider offering classes to the public on how to properly clean a headstone?
Does anyone know if there exist a photo of the Lower Maple River Church in Harwood? The church is not htere anymore, but hope to find a photo. Some of my relatives are buried at the Lower Maple River Cemetery.
Take a look for yourself, lots of history in those 40 buildings.
We're excited to be holding our annual convention in Fargo this summer :)
A Huge Thank You to Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society for having us again this year! We are very grateful for all your wonderful help & support over the years!!! We have been preparing for the Golden Drive's 7th Annual Community Event & Bike Run.This is a family event filled w/many, many activities! Our core mission is raising Awareness for our homeless kids. Also our silent auction will be huge, we already have a huge amount of auction items! All bikers & classic cars are welcome. If you would like to help or be part of our event, please msg us! And remember you do make a beautiful difference! Thank you for supporting our homeless kids. Blessings & "Stay Golden" #supportourhomelesskids
Disappointed with the cancelation of the Car Show and Swap for this year. I don't know the under workings, but only saw a jammed Bonanzaville with vintage cars and some cars even being turned away. It would seem to me that a well attended event would be very much welcomed at Bonanzaville. If it doesn't pull in the revenue you want, you should build on it instead of giving up.
Question, Have you got any estimates on what the damage could add up too? That was a lot of water and water can do a lot of damage... Just worried that the money goal you set is not enough. It is amazing how the people are coming out in support of Bonanzaville. Love it! Thank you community!!!!!
Bonanzaville - Cass County Historical Society your automotive museum has been added to the map of museums to visit in the US!