National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery We tell the story of America by portraying the people who shape the nation’s history, development and culture. Meet the most remarkable Americans all in one place.
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From George Washington to George Carlin, Sequoyah to Rosa Parks, James Monroe to Marilyn Monroe, we are home to the icons of our nation's history and culture. Join us to discover the nation's story through the people who've shaped it. On-topic discussion is encouraged in a civil manner. Please treat other users with respect. Legal: si.edu/legal

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Few American sportsmen have ever possessed athletic talents comparable to those of boxer Muhammad Ali; none with such ab...
04/30/2021

Few American sportsmen have ever possessed athletic talents comparable to those of boxer Muhammad Ali; none with such abilities have ever equaled him for charisma and bravado.

Born Cassius Clay, he first made national headlines after winning a gold medal at the 1960 Olympics. Turning professional, he attained the heavyweight crown in 1964. But as powerful as he was in the ring, it was his words and actions outside the ring that made him a larger-than-life figure. His outrageous boasts—often in poetic verse—won him a large following. However, when he joined the Nation of Islam in 1964 and changed his name, controversy ensued. His refusal to serve in Vietnam further angered many Americans and led boxing officials to strip him of his crown. After being reinstated, Ali would reclaim the heavyweight crown, lose it, and regain it again before retiring in 1981.

Image Credit: Float Like a Butterfly...Sting Like a Bee advert, 1977. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Chisholm Larsson Gallery, New York City. © 1977 GCC Beverages Inc. © 1977 Herbert Muhammad Enterprises

Few American sportsmen have ever possessed athletic talents comparable to those of boxer Muhammad Ali; none with such abilities have ever equaled him for charisma and bravado.

Born Cassius Clay, he first made national headlines after winning a gold medal at the 1960 Olympics. Turning professional, he attained the heavyweight crown in 1964. But as powerful as he was in the ring, it was his words and actions outside the ring that made him a larger-than-life figure. His outrageous boasts—often in poetic verse—won him a large following. However, when he joined the Nation of Islam in 1964 and changed his name, controversy ensued. His refusal to serve in Vietnam further angered many Americans and led boxing officials to strip him of his crown. After being reinstated, Ali would reclaim the heavyweight crown, lose it, and regain it again before retiring in 1981.

Image Credit: Float Like a Butterfly...Sting Like a Bee advert, 1977. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Chisholm Larsson Gallery, New York City. © 1977 GCC Beverages Inc. © 1977 Herbert Muhammad Enterprises

Have you missed us? We've missed you! Beginning May 14, we will reopen to the public. ✨ Visitors will need to reserve fr...
04/23/2021

Have you missed us? We've missed you!

Beginning May 14, we will reopen to the public. ✨ Visitors will need to reserve free timed-entry passes for all locations. There will be reduced hours and added health and safety measures. Full reopening information at si.edu/visit.

Have you missed us? We've missed you!

Beginning May 14, we will reopen to the public. ✨ Visitors will need to reserve free timed-entry passes for all locations. There will be reduced hours and added health and safety measures. Full reopening information at si.edu/visit.

Don't miss new episodes of season 3's PORTRAITS podcast with host, director Kim Sajet! Listen to the podcast on Apple, G...
04/20/2021

Don't miss new episodes of season 3's PORTRAITS podcast with host, director Kim Sajet! Listen to the podcast on Apple, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, and Radio Public. 🎙

Seasons 1-2 available now: https://npg.si.edu/podcasts

Don't miss new episodes of season 3's PORTRAITS podcast with host, director Kim Sajet! Listen to the podcast on Apple, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, and Radio Public. 🎙

Seasons 1-2 available now: https://npg.si.edu/podcasts

04/15/2021

Today is World Art Day. Have a little fun, get a little creative!

Don't know where to start? Browse our many Open Studio and Drawn to Figure lessons, led by artist and instructor, Jill Galloway!

🖌: youtube.com/smithsoniannpg

On the night of April 14, 1865, Lincoln was attending the play, "Our American Cousin," at Ford’s Theatre, accompanied by...
04/15/2021

On the night of April 14, 1865, Lincoln was attending the play, "Our American Cousin," at Ford’s Theatre, accompanied by his wife and their guests, Major Henry R. Rathbone and his fiancée, Clara Harris.

That evening, the guard assigned to the president had thought it safe to abandon his post. As a result, John Wilkes Booth found it relatively easy to enter Lincoln’s box and shoot him.

Portraiture became part of the mourning process that followed Abraham Lincoln’s assassination on April 14, 1865. In the ensuing months, print publishers furnished the image of Lincoln in all guises.

Image Credit: Unidentified Artist, 1865. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

On the night of April 14, 1865, Lincoln was attending the play, "Our American Cousin," at Ford’s Theatre, accompanied by his wife and their guests, Major Henry R. Rathbone and his fiancée, Clara Harris.

That evening, the guard assigned to the president had thought it safe to abandon his post. As a result, John Wilkes Booth found it relatively easy to enter Lincoln’s box and shoot him.

Portraiture became part of the mourning process that followed Abraham Lincoln’s assassination on April 14, 1865. In the ensuing months, print publishers furnished the image of Lincoln in all guises.

Image Credit: Unidentified Artist, 1865. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood was one of the first African Americans to be awarded the Medal of Honor. In September...
04/14/2021

Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood was one of the first African Americans to be awarded the Medal of Honor. In September 1864, as the Union army struggled to advance on the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, Fleetwood and 1,100 soldiers of the Fourth United States Colored Troops received orders to attack southern forces entrenched at New Market Heights.

Under withering enemy fire that decimated his brigade and cut down its color guard, he risked his life to keep the U.S. flag from falling into Confederate hands. In recognition of this conspicuous act of bravery, Fleetwood received nation’s highest military award.

Image Credit: Merritt & VanWagner, c.1890. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood was one of the first African Americans to be awarded the Medal of Honor. In September 1864, as the Union army struggled to advance on the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, Fleetwood and 1,100 soldiers of the Fourth United States Colored Troops received orders to attack southern forces entrenched at New Market Heights.

Under withering enemy fire that decimated his brigade and cut down its color guard, he risked his life to keep the U.S. flag from falling into Confederate hands. In recognition of this conspicuous act of bravery, Fleetwood received nation’s highest military award.

Image Credit: Merritt & VanWagner, c.1890. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

According to western lore, after robbing a Nevada bank in 1900 and escaping with more than $30,000, the Wild Bunch (Will...
04/13/2021

According to western lore, after robbing a Nevada bank in 1900 and escaping with more than $30,000, the Wild Bunch (William Todd Carver, Harvey Logan, Harry Longbaugh, Ben Kilpatrick and Robert Le Roy Parker) outfitted themselves in dapper suits and sat for this group portrait, copies of which were sent to the bank and the Pinkerton Detective Agency as a joke.

The Wild Bunch, also known as the "Hole in the Wall Gang," had a varied membership; however, its most notorious members are shown in this group portrait. The heist of the Nevada bank was one of their most successful robberies and one of their final jaunts as a group. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid later escaped to South America, where they continued their life of crime.

Image Credit: John Swartz, 1990. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Pinkerton's, Inc.

According to western lore, after robbing a Nevada bank in 1900 and escaping with more than $30,000, the Wild Bunch (William Todd Carver, Harvey Logan, Harry Longbaugh, Ben Kilpatrick and Robert Le Roy Parker) outfitted themselves in dapper suits and sat for this group portrait, copies of which were sent to the bank and the Pinkerton Detective Agency as a joke.

The Wild Bunch, also known as the "Hole in the Wall Gang," had a varied membership; however, its most notorious members are shown in this group portrait. The heist of the Nevada bank was one of their most successful robberies and one of their final jaunts as a group. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid later escaped to South America, where they continued their life of crime.

Image Credit: John Swartz, 1990. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Pinkerton's, Inc.

Welcome our new Director of Curatorial Affairs, Rhea L. Combs, effective May 10! Combs comes to the Portrait Gallery fro...
04/06/2021

Welcome our new Director of Curatorial Affairs, Rhea L. Combs, effective May 10! Combs comes to the Portrait Gallery from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, where she has served as curator of film and photography and head of the museum’s Earl W. and Amanda Stafford Center for African American Media Arts.

At the Portrait Gallery, Combs will work with the museum’s Curatorial, History, Conservation and Audience Engagement departments to draw connections between portraiture, biography and identity.

Image Credit: Abe Mohammadione/Ideas United

Welcome our new Director of Curatorial Affairs, Rhea L. Combs, effective May 10! Combs comes to the Portrait Gallery from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, where she has served as curator of film and photography and head of the museum’s Earl W. and Amanda Stafford Center for African American Media Arts.

At the Portrait Gallery, Combs will work with the museum’s Curatorial, History, Conservation and Audience Engagement departments to draw connections between portraiture, biography and identity.

Image Credit: Abe Mohammadione/Ideas United

In Search of the Authentic Ernest Hemingway
04/05/2021
In Search of the Authentic Ernest Hemingway

In Search of the Authentic Ernest Hemingway

An upcoming PBS documentary prompts a deep-dive into the story behind this rarely published Smithsonian portrait of the legendary writer

Halle Berry began her career as a model and transitioned to acting in the late 1980s. Director Spike Lee cast her in her...
03/29/2021

Halle Berry began her career as a model and transitioned to acting in the late 1980s. Director Spike Lee cast her in her first movie role in Jungle Fever in 1991, a film that focused on racism and in*******al relationships.

Since then, Berry has established herself as one of Hollywood’s best-paid actresses, taking on a wide range of roles, from dramas to action movies. Berry became the first woman of color to win the Academy Award for Best Actress, for her performance in Monster’s Ball in 2001.

Image Credit: Jérôme De Perlinghi, 1999. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; acquired through the generosity of Robert and Jan Newman. © Jérôme De Perlinghi.

Halle Berry began her career as a model and transitioned to acting in the late 1980s. Director Spike Lee cast her in her first movie role in Jungle Fever in 1991, a film that focused on racism and in*******al relationships.

Since then, Berry has established herself as one of Hollywood’s best-paid actresses, taking on a wide range of roles, from dramas to action movies. Berry became the first woman of color to win the Academy Award for Best Actress, for her performance in Monster’s Ball in 2001.

Image Credit: Jérôme De Perlinghi, 1999. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; acquired through the generosity of Robert and Jan Newman. © Jérôme De Perlinghi.

Born in Corpus Christi, Texas, self-described “Texican” and award-winning actor Eva Longoria had her breakthrough in the...
03/28/2021

Born in Corpus Christi, Texas, self-described “Texican” and award-winning actor Eva Longoria had her breakthrough in the role of Gabrielle Solis in the series Desperate Housewives, becoming the first pivotal and primetime Latina character in U.S. television.

Her work beneath and beyond the national spotlight—as a philanthropist, social activist, and businesswoman—has garnered her equal, if not greater, acclaim than her onscreen work. Her casual but self-assured appearance in this portrait carries a quality of everydayness that celebrates female power. Longoria is the founder of Eva’s Heroes, an organization committed to enriching the lives of developmentally challenged youth; she has served as executive producer of the documentaries The Harvest and Food Chains, about farm work and social justice. In 2013 she received a master’s degree in Chicano studies from California State University, Northridge.

Image Credit: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 2010. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. © 2010 Timothy Greenfield-Sanders.

Born in Corpus Christi, Texas, self-described “Texican” and award-winning actor Eva Longoria had her breakthrough in the role of Gabrielle Solis in the series Desperate Housewives, becoming the first pivotal and primetime Latina character in U.S. television.

Her work beneath and beyond the national spotlight—as a philanthropist, social activist, and businesswoman—has garnered her equal, if not greater, acclaim than her onscreen work. Her casual but self-assured appearance in this portrait carries a quality of everydayness that celebrates female power. Longoria is the founder of Eva’s Heroes, an organization committed to enriching the lives of developmentally challenged youth; she has served as executive producer of the documentaries The Harvest and Food Chains, about farm work and social justice. In 2013 she received a master’s degree in Chicano studies from California State University, Northridge.

Image Credit: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 2010. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. © 2010 Timothy Greenfield-Sanders.

One of America’s most important writers and poets, Maya Angelou wrote a series of seven autobiographical novels that are...
03/27/2021

One of America’s most important writers and poets, Maya Angelou wrote a series of seven autobiographical novels that are an indelible record of resistance and achievement by African Americans, particularly African American women. Angelou had a difficult and endangered childhood, shuttling back and forth between relatives in the North and South. She suffered from economic hardship and sexual abuse, which she documented in her first book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), and in subsequent volumes. Her subject was always her own life, and her autobiographies are not necessarily strictly factual or literally “true,” but rather a retelling of emotional truths. A politically engaged writer, Angelou was also a poet; she read her poem “On the Pulse of the Morning” at President Bill Clinton’s 1993 inauguration.

Image Credit: Brigitte Lacombe, 1987. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Brigitte Lacombe.

Actress and activist Susan Sarandon started her film career as a self-declared "hippie chick" in Joe (1970) and The Rock...
03/26/2021

Actress and activist Susan Sarandon started her film career as a self-declared "hippie chick" in Joe (1970) and The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), then charted an independent course through five decades of films. Sarandon’s mix of wide-eyed wonder and relaxed resilience marks her singular film persona, captured here by Brigitte Lacombe. Her cool sensuality runs through her roles in Pretty Baby (1978) and Atlantic City (1980)—both directed by Louis Malle—and her tough-mama turns in Bull Durham (1988) and Thelma & Louise (1991). She has often explored women’s sexuality openly on screen, from her le***an scene in The Hunger (1983) to the class struggle of White Palace (1990). Over the past generation, Sarandon has brought together her acting and social activism, narrating various documentaries on political issues and earning an Oscar for Dead Man Walking (1995).

Image Credit: Brigitte Lacombe, 1983. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. © Brigitte Lacombe.

Actress and activist Susan Sarandon started her film career as a self-declared "hippie chick" in Joe (1970) and The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), then charted an independent course through five decades of films. Sarandon’s mix of wide-eyed wonder and relaxed resilience marks her singular film persona, captured here by Brigitte Lacombe. Her cool sensuality runs through her roles in Pretty Baby (1978) and Atlantic City (1980)—both directed by Louis Malle—and her tough-mama turns in Bull Durham (1988) and Thelma & Louise (1991). She has often explored women’s sexuality openly on screen, from her le***an scene in The Hunger (1983) to the class struggle of White Palace (1990). Over the past generation, Sarandon has brought together her acting and social activism, narrating various documentaries on political issues and earning an Oscar for Dead Man Walking (1995).

Image Credit: Brigitte Lacombe, 1983. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. © Brigitte Lacombe.

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8th And G Streets, NW
Washington D.C., DC
20001

Nearest Metro Stop: Gallery Place-Chinatown (Red, Yellow and Green lines). Take the Arena exit at 7th and F Streets. The DC Circulator also serves the museum's Penn Quarter neighborhood.

Telephone

(202) 633-8300

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Comments

I am extremely dismayed that you are now displaying a picture of ex-president Trump. This man deserves no respect in any fashion and your display attempts to normalize his treachery against the nation. He attempted to destroy our democracy by encouraging and help plan an insurrection on the capitol, and is still pushing his big lie about Biden's win. And, due to his incompetence, hubris, and lack of morality, he caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Americans from Covid-19. These are only two of the many transgressions he instigated against our nation. PLEASE, REMOVE HIS PICTURE!
Kim Sajet -- Here is another Unknown Abraham Lincoln image for you - show it to Ann, so she'll know what he looks like ! This makes my second unknown Lincoln !
Could you help me and my cousin identify this person. My cousin owns this portrait. We know this portrait was painted by Charles T. Webber in 1870 and that this women is from Ohio.
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In searching Family history, read an article about Bartholomew Gosnold, realizing you have him at the Smithsonian. They said, they believe it's him, needed DNA to comfirm. My maternal side, is related to him, he's my first cousin 13 times removed. Sir Robert Gosnold III. is my 12th Great Grandfather. Can my DNA confirm if it's him? Thank you all, for all the work you've done, to find him. Looking forward, in hearing from you. Virginia
How wonderful to be back in your space for a visit today. Everything is being handled perfectly for a safe museum visit. We had a wonderful time and will be back soon.
May we never forget! "The World Keeps Spinning Round!" Fred Barreto and I wrote this song after 911 and, given our current state, it resonates even more strongly today.
I have a little a book published in l851 which shows a engraving of George Washington when he reviewing the Continental Army on Boston Common in 1776. Who could put a value of this for me.
At this precise moment in American history, we are finding ourselves cleansing any and all names associated with racism directed at African Americans from the public arena. One of these names resides at The National Portrait Gallery; the name, and bust, of one Margaret Sanger. In this time of self-cleansing, will this Institution take the lead, and remove this bust from public display; the bust of the likeness of the person that said " We don't want the word to get out that we want to exterminate the Negro population "? We Americans would expect the Smithsonian Institute to not only participate in this quest, but be a lead voice. We are expecting this Organization to do the right thing.
I've looked around a bit and please excuse me if I missed it, but is there any word on re-opening? I had been looking forward to seeing the Sargent charcoal portrait exhibit for months and am now worried that it will need to move on before you re-open and won't get to see it.
----Definition - Ineptitude ,,,, When you submit Unknown Lincoln Image's to the National Portrait Gallery and they are denied because of ineptitude by the person reviewing them !
Hello Ladies and Gentlemen at the National Portrait Gallery, I hope you are doing just fine. I would like to show you this oil painting that I just finished. It took 6 weeks of full time work, and measures 5 ft high. I hope you like it. My best regards. (if you want to see this and other works in progress please go to my instagram: pacolealart ) Thank you.