Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park

Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park Mt Zion Church and Female Union Band Society Cemeteries are two of the oldest Black cemeteries in Georgetown and greater Washington, DC. Listed on the National Registry of Historic Places and designated as a UNESCO Slave Route Project site of memory.
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Operating as usual

Can you imagine what the ancestors are saying?! #MadameVicePresident
04/29/2021

Can you imagine what the ancestors are saying?! #MadameVicePresident

Can you imagine what the ancestors are saying?! #MadameVicePresident

Check out Lisa Fager, Executive Director included as one of the featured 10 Women in Preservation at the Dumbarton "Powe...
04/28/2021
Power in Preservation – Dumbarton House

Check out Lisa Fager, Executive Director included as one of the featured 10 Women in Preservation at the Dumbarton "Power of Preservation" exhibit.
https://dumbartonhouse.org/power-in-preservation/

The Power in Preservation exhibit is a celebration of the role that women have historically played, and continue to play, in the broad field of preservation. In room one, you will learn a little about the origins of the historic preservation movement in the United States and some of the earliest his...

Thank you to  The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America of the District of Columba for inviting me to speak ...
04/21/2021
Black People Invented Memorial Day

Thank you to The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America of the District of Columba for inviting me to speak last night. I wanted to share more details of what I briefly mentioned about Decoration Day and how it came to be Memorial day and its Black History beginning.

Memorial Day, formally known as Decoration Day, was originally started by a group of African Americans. The History Channel and many credible historians have confirmed that the popular holiday was, in fact, initially an event held by newly liberated Blacks in Charleston, South Carolina. It happened....

04/11/2021

EMANCIPATION DAY IS FRIDAY!

April 16, 1862, marks the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia. Over 3,000 enslaved persons were freed eight months before the Emancipation Proclamation liberated slaves in the South. The District also has the distinction of being the only part of the United States to have compensated slave owners for freeing enslaved persons they held.

The struggle to end slavery in the District was long and arduous. From the city’s beginning, various individuals and groups, with often diverse motives, signed anti-slavery petitions, wrote negative newspaper articles, and openly deplored the wide open practice of slavery and slave trading that occurred all over the city. Incidents such as Nat Turner’s 1831 rebellion in Virginia, and Snow Riot of 1835, the Pearl Affair and Riot in 1848, and the presence of the local Underground Railroad also highlighted the issue of slavery in the District.

As thousands of blacks flocked to the Nation’s capital seeking a haven from bondage during the early years of the Civil War, pressure increased on President Abraham Lincoln to take a bold step. With the help of Henry Wilson of Massachusetts, Lincoln got the bill through Congress

04/08/2021
cite.case.law

Mary and Clement Beckett are buried in the cemetery

04/07/2021
04/01/2021
We talked about her grandmother and namesake Barbara Cole Williams who was enslaved for more than 40 yrs at Tudor Place ...
04/01/2021
She was the Rosa Parks of D.C., but her story was mostly forgotten

We talked about her grandmother and namesake Barbara Cole Williams who was enslaved for more than 40 yrs at Tudor Place to later live free just blocks away from her enslavers and is buried at Mt Zion cemetery. I also shared a story about her parents -- Alfred and Hannah Cole Pope.

Now read about Barbara Ellen Pope, unsung shero who brought change not just to DC but nationally. #BarbaraEPope

#BlackGeorgetown #BlackHistoryMatters #AmericanHistory

She also has three siblings interred at the cemetery -- Jedidah, Alice and Alfred Jr. I'm not sure where Barbara E. Pope is interred...

Half a century before the civil rights movement, Barbara Pope boarded a train — and challenged Virginia’s Jim Crow law.

03/26/2021

"I think knowing one's history leads one to act in a more enlightened fashion. I can not imagine how knowing one's history would not urge one to be an activist."

John Hope Franklin

Female Union Band Society
03/18/2021

Female Union Band Society

The fight to save our sacred burial grounds is not just here. This article describes why they meant so much and how deat...
03/15/2021
Special Project: Bethel Burying Ground Memorial - The Philadelphia Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy

The fight to save our sacred burial grounds is not just here. This article describes why they meant so much and how death reflects life

Bethel Burying Ground 1810 – c. 1864 The Bethel Burying Ground was purchased in 1810 by Bishop Richard Allen and the Trustees of Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church. The burial ground may be the first independent cemetery for the internment of the African American community. Sold to the City of Philadelph...

What an amazing story!! I hope we can make some of these discoveries in Georgetown.   If you have photos please share th...
03/15/2021
Historical society presents tale of two families

What an amazing story!! I hope we can make some of these discoveries in Georgetown.

If you have photos please share them with us.

JOHNS CREEK, Ga. — When a Johns Creek woman began tracing her genealogical lines, she never expected to find a friend in the descendant of the family that enslaved her

IS THIS YOUR "DOG WALKER"? 😠
03/08/2021

IS THIS YOUR "DOG WALKER"? 😠

IS THIS YOUR "DOG WALKER"? 😠

03/08/2021

MOUNT ZION AND FEMALE UNION BAND SOCIETY CEMETERIES ARE NOT AND NEVER WILL BE A DOG PARK!
Nobody insists on playing fetch at Oak Hill Cemetery 🙄

We are definitely big supporters of the federal proposed legislation supporting America's Black cemeteries.  H.R.1179/S....
02/25/2021
The fight to save America’s historic Black cemeteries

We are definitely big supporters of the federal proposed legislation supporting America's Black cemeteries. H.R.1179/S.2827 - African-American Burial Grounds Network Act

Proposed legislation could create a national park network of overlooked gravesites. But for now, it’s up to communities to preserve them.

Happening NOW (well almost) click link and take your Virtual SEAT -- 6:30pm WE START!!ZOOM / CLICK HERE : https://lnkd.i...
02/16/2021

Happening NOW (well almost) click link and take your Virtual SEAT -- 6:30pm WE START!!

ZOOM / CLICK HERE : https://lnkd.in/e_fd8r3

Join Citizens Association of Georgetown CAG on TUESDAY February 16, at 6:30pm for an amazing virtual community meeting in celebration of Black History Month featuring esteemed author, Chris Myers Asch! Moderated by lifelong Georgetown resident and Mt. Zion/Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park Foundation Board President, Neville Waters III, we will discuss, Asch’s prize winning book- Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nations Capital. Register today for this captivating talk!

Click the link below to register!
https://bit.ly/3jBavYU

Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race in our nation’s capital.

#georgetowntogether

@mtzionumc.dc @officialgeorgetowndc @georgetownevents

#blackhistorymonth #washingtondc #washington #dc #mtzion #georgetown #georgetowndc #zoom

Join Citizens Association of Georgetown CAG  on TUESDAY February 16, at 6:30pm for an amazing virtual community meeting ...
02/15/2021

Join Citizens Association of Georgetown CAG on TUESDAY February 16, at 6:30pm for an amazing virtual community meeting in celebration of Black History Month featuring esteemed author, Chris Myers Asch! Moderated by lifelong Georgetown resident and Mt. Zion/Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park Foundation Board President, Neville Waters III, we will discuss, Asch’s prize winning book- Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nations Capital. Register today for this captivating talk!

Click the link below to register!
https://bit.ly/3jBavYU

Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race in our nation’s capital.

#georgetowntogether

@mtzionumc.dc @officialgeorgetowndc @georgetownevents

#blackhistorymonth #washingtondc #washington #dc #mtzion #georgetown #georgetowndc #zoom

Join Citizens Association of Georgetown CAG on TUESDAY February 16, at 6:30pm for an amazing virtual community meeting in celebration of Black History Month featuring esteemed author, Chris Myers Asch! Moderated by lifelong Georgetown resident and Mt. Zion/Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park Foundation Board President, Neville Waters III, we will discuss, Asch’s prize winning book- Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nations Capital. Register today for this captivating talk!

Click the link below to register!
https://bit.ly/3jBavYU

Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race in our nation’s capital.

#georgetowntogether

@mtzionumc.dc @officialgeorgetowndc @georgetownevents

#blackhistorymonth #washingtondc #washington #dc #mtzion #georgetown #georgetowndc #zoom

Join us Tues, Feb 16 @ 6:30pm
02/14/2021

Join us Tues, Feb 16 @ 6:30pm

Join us on February 16, at 6:30pm for an amazing virtual community meeting in celebration of Black History Month featuring esteemed author, Chris Myers Asch! Moderated by lifelong Georgetown resident and Mt. Zion/Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park Foundation Board President, Neville Waters III, we will discuss, Asch’s prize winning book- Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nations Capital. Register today for this captivating talk!

Click the link below to register!
https://bit.ly/3jBavYU

Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race in our nation’s capital.

#georgetowntogether

@mtzionumc.dc @officialgeorgetowndc @georgetownevents

#blackhistorymonth #washingtondc #washington #dc #mtzion #georgetown #georgetowndc #zoom

Hey WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio  we still exist!  We are the oldest Black cemeteries in DC and located 5 block...
02/13/2021
An African American Burial Site Could Be Hidden Beneath A Quiet Georgetown Street

Hey WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio we still exist! We are the oldest Black cemeteries in DC and located 5 blocks from where those bodies were found. We are at 27th & Q Street and have been here since 1809. Just FYI

Evidence is growing that a pre-Civil War African American burial ground is buried beneath a historic street full of million-dollar townhouses. But that's just one theory.

Join us Feb 19th!  Register TODAY
02/12/2021

Join us Feb 19th! Register TODAY

On February 19, explore Georgetown's Black history and learn how to preserve your own family photographs, documents, and more in a virtual community program. Curators, collections managers, and other experts will share tips and techniques while they explore the family collection of Neville Waters, a sixth-generation Georgetown resident and the current president of the Mt. Zion/FUBS Cemetery Foundation Board. Register at linktr.ee/dumbartonhouse.

This is the first in a series of lectures entitled the Black Georgetown Community History Project, presented in partnership with Georgetown Heritage, Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park, and Tudor Place Historic House & Garden.

#tbt Our Board President Emeritus, Vincent DeForest in 2016 talking to 7th graders at Lowell School.  Vincent deForest’s...
02/09/2021
Empowering Voice

#tbt Our Board President Emeritus, Vincent DeForest in 2016 talking to 7th graders at Lowell School.

Vincent deForest’s hushed voice captured the attention of 7th graders and kept them at the edge of their seats for an hour. Calmly, he stood in front of the students recounting his experiences as an activist during the Civil Rights era. The competition for silence set the stage for an inspiring talk. DeForest brought to life many aspects of the 60’s and spoke about his recent donation to the National African American History Museum. “I could have listened to him all day,” says Michelle Belton, director of diversity.

As a young man and soldier, deForest served in the military and struggled with the realities of the Jim Crow south. He was angered by the ignorance that pervaded society and joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to affect change.

In 1968 he became involved with the Poor People’s Campaign, which was planning to build a city on the National Mall. Then, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr was assassinated. “Washington erupted, flames came out of the buildings on U Street,” said deForest. In the wake of King’s assassination, it was decided that the city, known as Resurrection City, would continue as planned.

Vincent deForest’s hushed voice captured the attention of 7th graders and kept them at the edge of their seats for an hour as he recounted his experiences as an activist during the Civil Rights era.

02/08/2021

On MLK day Jan 18, 2021, we gathered with friends of Mt Zion - Female Union Band Society Cemeteries and unveiled our National Register of Historic Places plaque. Please watch our short version of a wonderful and spiritual day.

Let's unlearn and re-learn history together.  Julia Ann Chinn, enslaved woman in Kentucky. Let's rediscover her amazing ...
02/07/2021
He became the nation’s ninth vice president. She was his enslaved wife.

Let's unlearn and re-learn history together.

Julia Ann Chinn, enslaved woman in Kentucky. Let's rediscover her amazing story or was it? How many more Congressmen and others lived this way and records destroyed?

Her name was Julia Chinn, and her role in Richard Mentor Johnson's life caused a furor when the Kentucky Democrat was chosen as Martin Van Buren's running mate in 1836.

Alfred and Hannah Pope Residence - GeorgetownIn the last month, we've found two more of Alfred and Hannah Pope's childre...
02/02/2021
Alfred and Hannah Pope Residence in Georgetown, D.C. (PHOTOS) - Pricey Pads

Alfred and Hannah Pope Residence - Georgetown

In the last month, we've found two more of Alfred and Hannah Pope's children buried in the Mt Zion/FUBS cemeteries. Alice Pope, 20, Alfred Pope, Jr (21) and Jedidah Thompson (49). We also know that Barbara Cole Williams' Hannah's mother is also buried here. She died when she was 83 and was living with the Popes at that time.

Alfred was born in the Carolinas and moved with his mother, Jedidah, to South Carolina Congressman Colonel John Carter’s home near Tudor Place, where he grew up. They were sent north because Alfred too closely resembled his father, the plantation master. He first saw Hannah in the yard at Tudor House. Alfred asked Carter to purchase Hannah so they could live together. They married in 1845 and had ten children, the first two born enslaved. In 1848, Alfred was one of 77 enslaved African Americans who attempted to escape on the Pearl. Upon Alfred’s return from the thwarted runaway, Colonel Carter decided to free his entire enslaved household and in 1850, upon his death on June 20, his will fulfilled that promise. Working to support his growing family and mother, Alfred collected “night waste,” eventually purchasing property in Georgetown and Alexandria, owning a coal and lumber yard, and serving as an advocate for freed persons after the Civil War. Their home was a place where people came seeking food, clothing, employment, and assistance in managing finances and daily life. Hannah learned to read and write after all her children were grown. As a prominent community leader, Alfred sold land to Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, worked with the Freedmen’s Bureau, served as a member of the Negro School Board, and represented Georgetown in the 1870 Congressional hearings on the merger of Georgetown with Washington City. By the time of this death, Alfred Pope owned half a block of land in Georgetown. Pope was a member of the “Sub-Board, Seventh Division” of the DC Colored Schools. The Popes remained in this house until their deaths – his in 1906 and hers in 1910.

Alfred and Hannah Pope Residence in Georgetown, D.C. 2900 O Street NW, Washington, D.C., United States, 20007 “Alfred was born in the Carolinas and moved with his mother, Jedidah, to South Carolina Congressman Colonel John Carter’s home near Tudor Place, where he grew up. They were sent north be...

Address

2501 Mill Rd NW
Washington D.C., DC
20007

General information

The Mount Zion Cemetery and adjacent Female Union Band Society Cemetery are two of the oldest remaining African American cemeteries in Georgetown and greater Washington, DC. They were officially listed in the National Register on August 6, 1975. The sites historical significance dates to both pre- and post- Civil War eras, including a connection with the Underground Railroad and other historical references of importance. In October 2018, the Mt. Zion - FUBS Cemetery was given the international designation "Site of Memory associated with the UNESCO Slave Route Project". The first in Washington, DC.

Telephone

+12025966474

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Mount Zion-Female Union Band Society Cemetery

The Mount Zion Cemetery, formerly known as the Old Methodist Burial Ground, and adjacent Female Union Band Society Cemetery, are two of the oldest remaining African American cemeteries in Georgetown and greater Washington, DC. The Joint Committee on Landmarks designated the cemeteries as Category II landmarks of importance that contribute to the cultural and visual beauty of the District. They were officially listed in the National Register on August 6, 1975, in the Archeology-Historic and Social /Humanitarian categories with an 1809 – 1950 period of significance. Although found within the Georgetown Historic District, the cemeteries’ historical significance is sufficiently different to merit individual listings. The two sites’ historical importance date to the pre- and post – Civil War eras, including a connection with the Underground Railroad, as a physical reminder of the city’s African-descended culture. This aspect of cemeteries’ significance is also revealed through their association with local African American religious activism and the cooperative role of benevolent societies, both of which continue through the Mount Zion United Methodist Church and the trustees of the Female Union Band Society.

Nearby museums


Comments

Thank you Professor Vincent DeForest and Mt. Zion folks. Very important what you do. A people without a history and culture is a people without a soul. Long live Carter G. Woodson and Mt. Zion and Female Union Band Society. Their souls live. Thank you
Marsha Goodrum, the organization I was telling you about.
I recently visited this site yesterday 7/29/19 and was able to see the vault used on the Underground Railroad. One particular young lady (I wish I could recall her name) at Dumbarton House was helpful in explaining the legacy of the cemetery and assisted us in locating the vault.. I would love to be able to contribute in any way to the restoration of this historic beautiful cemetery but I highly recommend viewing the vault.