Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park

Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park Mt Zion Church and Female Union Band Society Cemeteries are two of the oldest Black cemeteries in Georgetown and greater Washington, DC. Listed on the National Registry of Historic Places and designated as a UNESCO Slave Route Project site of memory.

Operating as usual

09/08/2021

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @BlackGeorgetown

So many amazing finds/mysteries in the cemeteries these past few monthsLOOK HERE! #seashells were found among other inte...
09/07/2021

So many amazing finds/mysteries in the cemeteries these past few months

LOOK HERE! #seashells were found among other interesting finds when the National Trust for Historic Preservation @hopecrew removed weeds, trees and debris in order for us to have ground penetrating radar phase II completed.

Seashells were commonly left at African American grave markers and these could have been at one or some or even part of the entrance. This area was the original entrance to the cemeteries (something we desire to have again).

One thought to this tradition was that the sea brought them to America and the sea would return them to Africa when they died.

#AncestorsAreSpeaking
#Blackgeorgetown
#Rediscovering #HopeCrew
#AfricanAmericanBurialGrounds
#sacredspace
#seashells

Unfortunately we can relate...😔
08/31/2021
Historic Black cemetery under threat of being washed away in Old Town

Unfortunately we can relate...😔

Michael Johnson's grandfather, Albert, died two months before Michael was born and is buried somewhere in Douglass Memorial Cemetery. Where he is exactly buried is unclear, since Albert's gravestone and several others have been lost as recent flooding threatens to wash away a historic Black cemetery

Minnesota park recognized as historic, sacred cemetery
08/04/2021
Minnesota park recognized as historic, sacred cemetery

Minnesota park recognized as historic, sacred cemetery

Kalle BenallieIndian Country Today As far back as Samantha “Sam” Odegard can remember, Indian Mounds Park was an example of how sacred sites have been

Thank you to the Topp Notch Bike Club for your service today removing the evergreen that was taken down by the tornado. ...
07/31/2021

Thank you to the Topp Notch Bike Club for your service today removing the evergreen that was taken down by the tornado. We love our volunteers! We'd also like to thank the Blue Knights Bike Club who hooked us up with #tnbc #bikeclub #blackcemeteriesmatter #volunteers #georgetown #washingtondc

07/17/2021

Come on DC Government make it make sense!

#tbt2020 What did Avery learn during 2020 Covid Summer? #LeeFamily #BlacklivesMatter #blackgeorgetown #AmercianHistory #...
07/13/2021
Avery's Report Mt Zion Georgetown

#tbt2020
What did Avery learn during 2020 Covid Summer? #LeeFamily #BlacklivesMatter #blackgeorgetown #AmercianHistory #criticalracetheory #HeadstonesANDHistory #eagleeyetutoring

From the Headstones & History: Black Lives Matter(ed) pilot program Summer 2020

07/08/2021

Follow us on Twitter and IG

@BlackGeorgetown

Thank you Georgetown University students, Professor Davenport and Mary Beth Corrigan at the GU Slave Archives!  WE are s...
07/08/2021
Black Georgetown Rediscovered: Students Help Preserve History at Underground Railroad Hideout - Georgetown University

Thank you Georgetown University students, Professor Davenport and Mary Beth Corrigan at the GU Slave Archives! WE are so happy to have you on the team. :) Once you start volunteering with us, you are now family!!

https://www.georgetown.edu/news/black-georgetown-rediscovered-students-help-preserve-history-at-underground-railroad-hideout/

Students in the Black Georgetown Rediscovered course toured the Mount Zion - Female Union Band Society cemeteries and helped document the estimated 9,000 Black residents of Georgetown buried at the site.

Franklin Jennings is one of the many notable war veterans interred at the Female Union Band Society cemetery. He served ...
05/31/2021

Franklin Jennings is one of the many notable war veterans interred at the Female Union Band Society cemetery. He served in the civil war in 5th Mass Calvalry. He was born into slavery as was his father, Paul Jennings. Paul was the enslaved footman of President James Madison. Paul as a free man assisted in one of largest slave escape attempt in US history in 1848 called "the Pearl Affair".

#memorialday #decorationday
#blacklivesmatter #Blackhistorymatters #AmericanHistory
#FranklinJennings
#PaulJennings
#AmericanHeroes

A MUST WATCHThe African Burial Ground 30 Years Later: Impacts On Black CemeteriesIn 1991, an archaeological survey at a ...
05/10/2021
The African Burial Ground 30 Years Later: Impacts On Black Cemeteries

A MUST WATCH

The African Burial Ground 30 Years Later: Impacts On Black Cemeteries

In 1991, an archaeological survey at a construction site for a General Services Administration building in New York City revealed intact human remains 30 ft below street level on Broadway in Manhattan. Further research was charged to Howard University, which formed the African Burial Ground Project, directed by Dr. Michael Blakey. This project changed what know about slavery in the North, how we engage with descendant communities and led to new understandings about what we can learn from Black cemeteries. Join the Robert F. Smith Explore Your Family History Center as we welcome Dr. Blakey to discuss the impacts and legacy of the African Burial Ground project and National Memorial 30 years later. He will be joined by Peggy King Jorde and Dr. Joseph Jones, both of whom worked on the African Burial Grounds project and have continued to advocate for Black cemeteries and descendant communities.

https://video.ibm.com/recorded/129834330

About this Event In 1991, an archaeological survey at a construction site for a General Services Administration building in New York City revealed intact human remains 30 ft below street level on Broadway in Manhattan. Further research was charged to Howard University, which formed the African Buria...

Can you imagine what the ancestors are saying?! #MadameVicePresident
04/29/2021

Can you imagine what the ancestors are saying?! #MadameVicePresident

Can you imagine what the ancestors are saying?! #MadameVicePresident

Check out Lisa Fager, Executive Director included as one of the featured 10 Women in Preservation at the Dumbarton "Powe...
04/28/2021
Power in Preservation – Dumbarton House

Check out Lisa Fager, Executive Director included as one of the featured 10 Women in Preservation at the Dumbarton "Power of Preservation" exhibit.
https://dumbartonhouse.org/power-in-preservation/

The Power in Preservation exhibit is a celebration of the role that women have historically played, and continue to play, in the broad field of preservation. In room one, you will learn a little about the origins of the historic preservation movement in the United States and some of the earliest his...

Thank you to  The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America of the District of Columba for inviting me to speak ...
04/21/2021
Black People Invented Memorial Day

Thank you to The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America of the District of Columba for inviting me to speak last night. I wanted to share more details of what I briefly mentioned about Decoration Day and how it came to be Memorial day and its Black History beginning.

Memorial Day, formally known as Decoration Day, was originally started by a group of African Americans. The History Channel and many credible historians have confirmed that the popular holiday was, in fact, initially an event held by newly liberated Blacks in Charleston, South Carolina. It happened....

Address

2501 Mill Rd NW
Washington D.C., DC
20007

General information

The Mount Zion Cemetery and adjacent Female Union Band Society Cemetery are two of the oldest remaining African American cemeteries in Georgetown and greater Washington, DC. They were officially listed in the National Register on August 6, 1975. The sites historical significance dates to both pre- and post- Civil War eras, including a connection with the Underground Railroad and other historical references of importance. In October 2018, the Mt. Zion - FUBS Cemetery was given the international designation "Site of Memory associated with the UNESCO Slave Route Project". The first in Washington, DC.

Telephone

+12025966474

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Mt. Zion-Female Union Band Historic Memorial Park:

Videos

Category

Mount Zion-Female Union Band Society Cemetery

The Mount Zion Cemetery, formerly known as the Old Methodist Burial Ground, and adjacent Female Union Band Society Cemetery, are two of the oldest remaining African American cemeteries in Georgetown and greater Washington, DC. The Joint Committee on Landmarks designated the cemeteries as Category II landmarks of importance that contribute to the cultural and visual beauty of the District. They were officially listed in the National Register on August 6, 1975, in the Archeology-Historic and Social /Humanitarian categories with an 1809 – 1950 period of significance. Although found within the Georgetown Historic District, the cemeteries’ historical significance is sufficiently different to merit individual listings. The two sites’ historical importance date to the pre- and post – Civil War eras, including a connection with the Underground Railroad, as a physical reminder of the city’s African-descended culture. This aspect of cemeteries’ significance is also revealed through their association with local African American religious activism and the cooperative role of benevolent societies, both of which continue through the Mount Zion United Methodist Church and the trustees of the Female Union Band Society.

Nearby museums


Comments

Thank you Professor Vincent DeForest and Mt. Zion folks. Very important what you do. A people without a history and culture is a people without a soul. Long live Carter G. Woodson and Mt. Zion and Female Union Band Society. Their souls live. Thank you
Marsha Goodrum, the organization I was telling you about.
I recently visited this site yesterday 7/29/19 and was able to see the vault used on the Underground Railroad. One particular young lady (I wish I could recall her name) at Dumbarton House was helpful in explaining the legacy of the cemetery and assisted us in locating the vault.. I would love to be able to contribute in any way to the restoration of this historic beautiful cemetery but I highly recommend viewing the vault.