American Battlefield Protection Program, NPS

American Battlefield Protection Program, NPS Official FB page of the National Park Service's American Battlefield Protection Program, dedicated to preserving sites of armed conflict in American history.
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ABPP administers 4 grant programs to aid in the preservation of battlefields + associated sites. While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines. If you don't comply, your message will be removed.
-We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or r

ABPP administers 4 grant programs to aid in the preservation of battlefields + associated sites. While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines. If you don't comply, your message will be removed.
-We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or r

Operating as usual

#OnThisDay in 1947, Florence A. Blanchfield was awarded permanent military rank, making her the first female army office...
07/10/2021

#OnThisDay in 1947, Florence A. Blanchfield was awarded permanent military rank, making her the first female army officer in U.S. history. But this award did not just fall into her lap; she had to fight for the right to be recognized for her decades of service and excellent leadership.

After joining the Army Nurse Corps in 1917, Blanchfield’s work took her internationally to France, the Phillipines, and China, and nationally to Michigan, DC, Georgia, California, and Missouri. In World War II, Blanchfield became superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps, and she supervised an astounding 60,000 nurses across all battlefronts. Despite her success, she had to continue to make a case for herself to be recognized with permanent, or full, rank in the regular army. She was already doing the work of someone with permanent rank, but without official status she did not qualify for same pay or benefits as her male counterparts with permanent rank did.

In April 1947, the U.S. Army announced that for the first time, women would be allowed to hold permanent rank. Less than three months later, Blanchfield was awarded the permanent rank she had strived for, when General Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed her to Lieutenant Colonel.

If you are in the DC area this summer, consider visiting Blanchfield’s gravestone in memory of her experiences. It’s located at Arlington National Cemetery, along with those of many other honored veterans.

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

#OnThisDay in 1947, Florence A. Blanchfield was awarded permanent military rank, making her the first female army officer in U.S. history. But this award did not just fall into her lap; she had to fight for the right to be recognized for her decades of service and excellent leadership.

After joining the Army Nurse Corps in 1917, Blanchfield’s work took her internationally to France, the Phillipines, and China, and nationally to Michigan, DC, Georgia, California, and Missouri. In World War II, Blanchfield became superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps, and she supervised an astounding 60,000 nurses across all battlefronts. Despite her success, she had to continue to make a case for herself to be recognized with permanent, or full, rank in the regular army. She was already doing the work of someone with permanent rank, but without official status she did not qualify for same pay or benefits as her male counterparts with permanent rank did.

In April 1947, the U.S. Army announced that for the first time, women would be allowed to hold permanent rank. Less than three months later, Blanchfield was awarded the permanent rank she had strived for, when General Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed her to Lieutenant Colonel.

If you are in the DC area this summer, consider visiting Blanchfield’s gravestone in memory of her experiences. It’s located at Arlington National Cemetery, along with those of many other honored veterans.

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

We're looking for a Lead Grants Management Specialist to join our team! The job listing is open until July 19th OR until...
07/07/2021

We're looking for a Lead Grants Management Specialist to join our team! The job listing is open until July 19th OR until we receive 50 applications, whichever comes first. Don't delay!

We're looking for a bold and dynamic teammate to assist with the American Battlefield Protection Program's work preserving battlefields and sites of armed conflict in American history. Is it you? This position primarily supports program goals and serves as lead for Financial Assistance activities associated with grant programs funded from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), including Battlefield Land Acquisition, Battlefield Interpretation, and Battlefield Restoration grants.

You'll find the opportunity announcement here:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/606521200

We're looking for a Lead Grants Management Specialist to join our team! The job listing is open until July 19th OR until we receive 50 applications, whichever comes first. Don't delay!

We're looking for a bold and dynamic teammate to assist with the American Battlefield Protection Program's work preserving battlefields and sites of armed conflict in American history. Is it you? This position primarily supports program goals and serves as lead for Financial Assistance activities associated with grant programs funded from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), including Battlefield Land Acquisition, Battlefield Interpretation, and Battlefield Restoration grants.

You'll find the opportunity announcement here:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/606521200

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with ce...
07/05/2021

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

On Independence Day, we reflect on the promise held in those words, written 245 years ago. The struggle to live up to that promise can be seen in some of our proudest moments in American history.

In 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered his speech “What, to the Slave, is the Fourth of July.” As an enslaved man who escaped bo***ge, he said “The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me.” As long as the institution of slavery endured, the country was not upholding its highest ideals, enshrined in the Declaration and celebrated each 4th of July. Douglass, though critical, was not hopeless. He dedicated his life to the promise of equality and fought for abolition and civil rights of African Americans.

On America’s 100th birthday, members of the National Woman Suffrage Association took up the language of Independence and reminded the country that there was still work to do. Susan B. Anthony read the following: “Our faith is firm and unwavering in the broad principles of human rights proclaimed in 1776.... Yet we cannot forget... that while all men of every race... have been invested with the full rights of citizenship under our hospitable flag, all women still suffer the degradation of disfranchisement.” Anthony did not see women get universal suffrage, but other women picked up her torch and continued to fight for it throughout the 20th century.

Our dedication to the promise of the Declaration is something to take pride in this #IndependenceDay. Happy #4thofJuly everyone.

#PromiseofAmerica #AmericanAspirations

To read Douglass’ full speech: https://bit.ly/Douglass4thofJuly

To read the entire “Declaration of Rights of the Women of the US": https://bit.ly/DeclarationRightsofWomen

Image courtesy the Library of Congress: “The flag that has waved one hundred years,” 1876

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

On Independence Day, we reflect on the promise held in those words, written 245 years ago. The struggle to live up to that promise can be seen in some of our proudest moments in American history.

In 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered his speech “What, to the Slave, is the Fourth of July.” As an enslaved man who escaped bo***ge, he said “The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me.” As long as the institution of slavery endured, the country was not upholding its highest ideals, enshrined in the Declaration and celebrated each 4th of July. Douglass, though critical, was not hopeless. He dedicated his life to the promise of equality and fought for abolition and civil rights of African Americans.

On America’s 100th birthday, members of the National Woman Suffrage Association took up the language of Independence and reminded the country that there was still work to do. Susan B. Anthony read the following: “Our faith is firm and unwavering in the broad principles of human rights proclaimed in 1776.... Yet we cannot forget... that while all men of every race... have been invested with the full rights of citizenship under our hospitable flag, all women still suffer the degradation of disfranchisement.” Anthony did not see women get universal suffrage, but other women picked up her torch and continued to fight for it throughout the 20th century.

Our dedication to the promise of the Declaration is something to take pride in this #IndependenceDay. Happy #4thofJuly everyone.

#PromiseofAmerica #AmericanAspirations

To read Douglass’ full speech: https://bit.ly/Douglass4thofJuly

To read the entire “Declaration of Rights of the Women of the US": https://bit.ly/DeclarationRightsofWomen

Image courtesy the Library of Congress: “The flag that has waved one hundred years,” 1876

Ever wonder how July 4th became Independence Day? Because that was the day the Declaration was signed, right? Turns out,...
07/04/2021

Ever wonder how July 4th became Independence Day? Because that was the day the Declaration was signed, right? Turns out, that's the simple version of the story.

Our friends at Independence NHP, Edgar Allan Poe NHS & Thaddeus Kosciuszko NM have the full scoop - check it out 👇

07/02/2021
Little Round Top

During the second day of the Battle of #Gettysburg, the assault at Little Round Top occurred. The 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment, led by Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, fought its most famous engagement there, ending in a dramatic downhill bayonet charge. Check out the video to learn more 👇

After, head over to their website to check out some awesome before and after pictures: https://go.nps.gov/LittleRoundTop

The battle of #Gettysburg started #OnThisDay in 1863. This battle had the largest number of casualties of the entire Civ...
07/02/2021

The battle of #Gettysburg started #OnThisDay in 1863. This battle had the largest number of casualties of the entire Civil War and is often described as its turning point.

Gettysburg also served as a turning point in the way the public cared for and remembered the dead. According to historian Drew Gilpin Faust, “the establishment of national cemeteries and the emergence of the Civil War pension system to care for the dead and their survivors yielded programs of a scale and reach unimaginable before the war.”

On a human scale, you can see this desire to make meaning from unimaginable loss with the story of Amos Humiston, who died at the Battle of Gettysburg, an ambrotype of his three children clasped in his hand. The discovery of Amos holding the image was so captivating to those who found him that it sparked a search for his family. Dr. John Francis Bourn publicized a description of the image in the Philadelphia Inquirer, asking “Whose Father Was He?”

The question was answered months later by Amos’ widow, Philinda from New York. The description of the image matched the photograph she had sent her husband months earlier. The doctor made plans to return the original portrait to Philinda, along with the proceeds from selling its copies during the search. The entire story was wildly followed in newspapers and even inspired the creation of the National Orphans’ Homestead in Gettysburg.

Amos’ devotion to his family continues to inspire. His war letters have been published by historian Mark H. Dunkelman and a monument with his children’s portrait stands in Gettysburg. Unless you’ve experienced it, it’s hard to fathom the loss felt by the families of the 51,00 soldiers who died at Gettysburg. Stories like Amos’ remind us that each one of them has a story.

Learn more about the battle check out our friends Gettysburg National Military Park #CivilWar

Image, "An Incident at Gettysburg," from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Jan. 2, 1864. Courtesy the Library of Congress.

The battle of #Gettysburg started #OnThisDay in 1863. This battle had the largest number of casualties of the entire Civil War and is often described as its turning point.

Gettysburg also served as a turning point in the way the public cared for and remembered the dead. According to historian Drew Gilpin Faust, “the establishment of national cemeteries and the emergence of the Civil War pension system to care for the dead and their survivors yielded programs of a scale and reach unimaginable before the war.”

On a human scale, you can see this desire to make meaning from unimaginable loss with the story of Amos Humiston, who died at the Battle of Gettysburg, an ambrotype of his three children clasped in his hand. The discovery of Amos holding the image was so captivating to those who found him that it sparked a search for his family. Dr. John Francis Bourn publicized a description of the image in the Philadelphia Inquirer, asking “Whose Father Was He?”

The question was answered months later by Amos’ widow, Philinda from New York. The description of the image matched the photograph she had sent her husband months earlier. The doctor made plans to return the original portrait to Philinda, along with the proceeds from selling its copies during the search. The entire story was wildly followed in newspapers and even inspired the creation of the National Orphans’ Homestead in Gettysburg.

Amos’ devotion to his family continues to inspire. His war letters have been published by historian Mark H. Dunkelman and a monument with his children’s portrait stands in Gettysburg. Unless you’ve experienced it, it’s hard to fathom the loss felt by the families of the 51,00 soldiers who died at Gettysburg. Stories like Amos’ remind us that each one of them has a story.

Learn more about the battle check out our friends Gettysburg National Military Park #CivilWar

Image, "An Incident at Gettysburg," from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Jan. 2, 1864. Courtesy the Library of Congress.

Can we talk openly? “It is time to recognize that sacrifice, valor and integrity are no more defined by sexual orientati...
06/30/2021

Can we talk openly? “It is time to recognize that sacrifice, valor and integrity are no more defined by sexual orientation than they are by race or gender, religion or creed.”

In December 2010, President Obama signed into law the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the official US military policy banning service members from talking about their sexual orientation. Even before this policy was enacted, the US Army was an unwelcoming place for LGBTQ soldiers. The life and service of Henry Ge**er serves as an example of an individual insisting on his right to serve openly and with dignity.

Ge**er enlisted in 1914, serving in the US Navy and then off and on in the Army until he was honorably discharged in 1942. While in Germany in WWI, Ge**er encountered advocates for the civil rights of “homosexuals," inspiring his own activism when he returned home. As a civilian, he founded the Society for Human Rights in 1924, the first American gay rights organization. Soon after, Chicago police arrested Ge**er, raided his home, and confiscated his Society papers. He lost his job as a result. Similarly, when he reenlisted in the Army in New York later in life, his quarters were searched. He was held in a guardhouse on Governors Island for weeks, but the Army found no evidence of illegal behavior.

Throughout these trials, Ge**er continued to publish articles advocating for gay rights. Not long ago, a soldier like Ge**er openly speaking about their sexual orientation had grave consequences. While attempts to erase his experience hindered later generations from drawing inspiration from his story, Ge**er endured. Words have power and Ge**er’s persistence is an important part of American history.

Ge**er was born #OnThisDay in 1892.

You can learn more about Ge**er’s story from our friends National Historic Landmarks Program: https://go.nps.gov/HenryGe**erHouse

#Pride #LGBTQHistory

Can we talk openly? “It is time to recognize that sacrifice, valor and integrity are no more defined by sexual orientation than they are by race or gender, religion or creed.”

In December 2010, President Obama signed into law the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the official US military policy banning service members from talking about their sexual orientation. Even before this policy was enacted, the US Army was an unwelcoming place for LGBTQ soldiers. The life and service of Henry Ge**er serves as an example of an individual insisting on his right to serve openly and with dignity.

Ge**er enlisted in 1914, serving in the US Navy and then off and on in the Army until he was honorably discharged in 1942. While in Germany in WWI, Ge**er encountered advocates for the civil rights of “homosexuals," inspiring his own activism when he returned home. As a civilian, he founded the Society for Human Rights in 1924, the first American gay rights organization. Soon after, Chicago police arrested Ge**er, raided his home, and confiscated his Society papers. He lost his job as a result. Similarly, when he reenlisted in the Army in New York later in life, his quarters were searched. He was held in a guardhouse on Governors Island for weeks, but the Army found no evidence of illegal behavior.

Throughout these trials, Ge**er continued to publish articles advocating for gay rights. Not long ago, a soldier like Ge**er openly speaking about their sexual orientation had grave consequences. While attempts to erase his experience hindered later generations from drawing inspiration from his story, Ge**er endured. Words have power and Ge**er’s persistence is an important part of American history.

Ge**er was born #OnThisDay in 1892.

You can learn more about Ge**er’s story from our friends National Historic Landmarks Program: https://go.nps.gov/HenryGe**erHouse

#Pride #LGBTQHistory

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