U.S. Army Center of Military History

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16 SEPTEMBER 1950 - BREAKOUT FROM THE PUSAN PERIMETER - #KoreanWar #Armyhistory #USArmy Lieutenant General Walton Walker...
09/16/2021

16 SEPTEMBER 1950 - BREAKOUT FROM THE PUSAN PERIMETER - #KoreanWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

Lieutenant General Walton Walker's Eight Army, reinforced by American and other United Nations (UN) units to begin a counter-offensive against the communist invaders. The ROK I and II Corps were positioned on the north side of the perimeter; the U.S. I Corps, composed of the 1st Cavalry Division, the 27th British Commonwealth Brigade, the 24th Infantry Division, and the 1st ROK Division, was on the Taegu front; and, the U.S. 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions and attached ROK units held positions along the Naktong River.

On 16 September, the Eighth Army attacked northward as the X Corps advanced southward from the beachhead at Inchon. Finding themselves between converging forces, the North Koreans feared being cut off and fled north while suffering heavy losses in men and materiel.

Late on 26 September, elements of the 7th Infantry Division of the X Corps and the 1st Cavalry Division of Eighth Army made contact just south of Suwon. Organized enemy resistance continued in the Eighth Army sector until the end of September as UN forces captured more than 100,000 enemy prisoners, while many North Korean units retreated through the eastern mountains.

By 30 September the NKPA had ceased to exist as an organized force below the 38th parallel, although die-hard remnants fought on as guerrillas, which continued to present a considerable threat to UN rear area security operations.

By the end of September, the Eighth Army was further reinforced by a battalion each of Philippine and Australian troops, and in early October, the U.S. 3d Infantry Division arrived in the Far East from the United States.

ALSO SEE

https://history.army.mil/html/books/019/19-7/index.html

https://history.army.mil/html/books/020/20-2/index.html

The National Museum of the United States Army holds their next Book Talk this evening, Thursday, 16 September. See the i...
09/16/2021

The National Museum of the United States Army holds their next Book Talk this evening, Thursday, 16 September. See the information below to join in for FREE!!

#ArmyHistory #USArmy

Thursday, September 16 at 7 p.m. EDT, Patrick O’Donnell recounts the history of the Marbleheaders, an early precursor to the Secret Service, and how they pulled off an “American Dunkirk.”

Reserve your spot now!

https://tickets.thenmusa.org/Info.aspx?EventID=12

09/16/2021
Video Pusan Final.mp4

16 SEPTEMBER 1950 -BREAKOUT FROM THE PUSAN PERIMETER #KoreanWar
After desperately fending off numerous strong attacks by the North Korean Army against the beachhead at the port city of Pusan, the U.S. and Republic of Korea forces began a counter-offensive. #Armyhistory #USArmy

NEW GENDER INTEGRATION HISTORY WEB PAGE#Armyhistory #USArmy #TRADOCSince 9/11, a profound transformation has taken place...
09/15/2021
Gender Integration Initiative | U.S. Army Center of Military History

NEW GENDER INTEGRATION HISTORY WEB PAGE
#Armyhistory #USArmy #TRADOC

Since 9/11, a profound transformation has taken place for women in the United States Army. Today, female Soldiers are integrated into every combat arms military occupational specialty and they have proven themselves able and willing to succeed in any capacity.

The Center of Military History, U.S. Army Women's Museum and U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Command Diversity Office have assembled this tool kit of resources designed to give leaders the ability to have professional and educational conversations with their formations about the Army’s successes and challenges in integrating women into all aspects of the organization.

Visit the new web page and share your stories and experiences in the comments below!

https://history.army.mil/genderintegration/index.html

In the two decades since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, a profound transformation has taken place for women in the United States Army. Today, female Soldiers are integrated into every combat arms military occupational specialty and they have proven themselves able and willing to succee...

15 SEPTEMBER 1950 - INCH'ON LANDING (OPERATION CHROMITE) - #KoreanWar #Armyhistory #USArmy General of the Army Douglas M...
09/15/2021

15 SEPTEMBER 1950 - INCH'ON LANDING (OPERATION CHROMITE) - #KoreanWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, commander in chief of the United Nations (UN) Command, planned Operation CHROMITE. Conducted by the newly activated X Corps, commended by Major General Edward M. Almond, the amphibious landing at Inch' on, a port of the Yellow Sea 25 miles west of Seoul, was followed by an advance to recapture the South Korean capital city and block North Korean People's Army (NKPA) troop movements and supply routes there.

Operation CHROMITE was coordinated with the Eighth Army offensive to break out of the Pusan Perimeter and move northward to meet the X Corps advancing southward. Early on 15 September a battalion of the 1st Marine Division, covered by tactical air and naval gunfire support, quickly captured Wolmi Island, just offshore from Inch'on, followed by Marine assault waves during the high tide into the port itself. The rest of the 1st Marine Division disembarked and advanced toward Kimpo Airfield, the Han River, and Seoul.

The Army's 7th Infantry Division then followed ashore, sending some elements southeastward toward Suwon, south of Seoul, to link up with Eighth Army, while the rest joined the marines advancing toward Seoul. After capturing Kimpo Airfield on the 18th, Far East Air Forces transport plans began delivering supplies to augment those landed by the Navy at Inch'on, and flew in the paratroopers of the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team to reinforce the UN airhead defenses.

After heavy fighting between advancing UN forces and North Koreans determined to fight for Seoul street by street, MacArthur announced the city was again in friendly hands on 26 September, although enemy pockets of resistance kept fighting for several more days. In a 29 September ceremony at the battle-scarred capitol building, MacArthur returned control of Seoul to South Korea's President Syngman Rhee.

ALSO SEE

https://history.army.mil/html/books/019/19-7/index.html

https://history.army.mil/html/books/020/20-2/index.html

09/15/2021
Video Inchon_V2 Final.mp4

15 SEPTEMBER 1950 - INCH'ON LANDING - #KoreanWar
General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, commander in chief of the United Nations (UN) Command, planned Operation CHROMITE. the amphibious landing at Inch' on, a port of the Yellow Sea 25 miles west of Seoul.
#Armyhistory #USArmy

14 - 15 SEPTEMBER 1862 - BATTLES OF SOUTH MOUNTAIN and HARPERS FERRY - #CivilWar #Armyhistory #USArmyConfederate General...
09/14/2021

14 - 15 SEPTEMBER 1862 - BATTLES OF SOUTH MOUNTAIN and HARPERS FERRY - #CivilWar #Armyhistory #USArmy
Confederate General Robert E. Lee followed his victory at Second Bull Run with an immediate attempt to invade the North. He set the Confederate States Army of Northern Virginia in motion and by 4 September it had reached Frederick, Maryland with about 55,000 troops. He then detached Major General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's wing of the army to guard against interference from a small but worrisome Union garrison at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, as he moved with the remainder of his command across the Blue Ridge to Hagerstown, Maryland.

Meanwhile Major General George B. McClellan had moved north with most of the United States Army of the Potomac, about 90,000 men, which arrived at Frederick on 12 September. After learning of Lee's plans from a copy of orders carelessly left behind at an abandoned camp site, he initiated a cautious pursuit, hoping to defeat the divided enemy forces in detail. While Jackson enveloped and captured Harpers Ferry on 14-15 September, U.S. forces were advancing from Frederick.

The rebel units conducted a skillful delaying action in the Battle of South Mountain on 14 September, which enabled Jackson to complete the capture of Harpers Ferry and Lee's scattered troops to move toward his headquarters. As McClellan paused on 15 September, the rebel army began to concentrate. By the evening of 16 September, McClellan's Army of the Potomac confronted Lee’s army at Sharpsburg, Maryland, on Antietam Creek.

DID YOU KNOW
The surrender 12,000 men at Harpers Ferry was the largest capture of U.S. troops until the surrender of the Philippines in 1942.

ALSO SEE
https://history.army.mil/html/books/075/75-6/index.html
https://history.army.mil/html/books/030/30-21/index.html

The National Museum of the United States Army holds their next Book Talk on Thursday, 16 September. See the information ...
09/14/2021

The National Museum of the United States Army holds their next Book Talk on Thursday, 16 September. See the information below to join in for FREE!!

#ArmyHistory #USArmy

Thursday, September 16 at 7 p.m. EDT, Patrick O’Donnell recounts the history of the Marbleheaders, an early precursor to the Secret Service, and how they pulled off an “American Dunkirk.”

Reserve your spot now!

https://tickets.thenmusa.org/Info.aspx?EventID=12

TRIVIA TUESDAY - WHY LIMBER UP?DID YOU KNOWAlthough "limber up" now means to warm up when preparing for exercise, it was...
09/14/2021

TRIVIA TUESDAY - WHY LIMBER UP?

DID YOU KNOW

Although "limber up" now means to warm up when preparing for exercise, it was originally a military term.

When artillery pieces were drawn by two-wheeled vehicles called "limbers," to "limber up" meant to attach the gun to its limber in preparation to move.

During the Civil War-era the limber was equipped with an ammunition box, and is often misidentified as a "caisson."

A Civil War-era caisson, also a two-wheel horse-drawn artillery vehicle, was fitted with two ammunition boxes and a spare wheel, and was drawn by a limber of its own.

Each gun was supported by a caisson.

#Armyhistory #USArmy

09/13/2021
Video Heartbreak_Ridge-FINAL 13 Sep .mp4

13 SEPTEMBER 1951 - BATTLE OF HEARTBREAK RIDGE BEGINS - #KoreanWar
UN forces began a series of costly piecemeal assaults on 13 September. Unable to capture and hold the high ground until 13 October, American G.I.'s soon named it "Heartbreak Ridge."

09/13/2021

Today marks the 100th anniversary of one of the Army’s most storied formations, the 1st Cavalry Division. Established in 1921 at the end of the horse cavalry era, the division served in the Pacific Theater during World War II, became a mechanized division after the war, and went on to serve in Korea, Vietnam, Operation DESERT STORM, and repeatedly during the GWOT.

CMH is proud to be partnered with the National Mounted Warrior Foundation as we look toward the late 2022/early 2023 opening of the Museum of the Mounted Warrior, a new public-facing museum at Fort Hood that will continue the story of the 1st Cavalry Division with innovative and engaging new exhibits, objects, and programs.
#Armyhistory #USArmy 1st Cavalry Division #CAV100 #BeTheLegend #CAV #ArmyMuseums

13 SEPTEMBER 1847 - BATTLE OF CHAPULTEPEC - War with Mexico #Armyhistory #USArmy #MexicanWar On 13 September 1847, U.S. ...
09/13/2021

13 SEPTEMBER 1847 - BATTLE OF CHAPULTEPEC - War with Mexico
#Armyhistory #USArmy #MexicanWar

On 13 September 1847, U.S. Army troops commanded by Lieutenant General Winfield Scott attacked Chapultepec Castle, a fortress on top of a hill 200 feet above the surrounding plain, and the Mexican army's military academy. The garrison and 200 cadets were reinforced to about 1,000 men plus artillery. Most defenders were posted in the fortress with the rest in entrenchment, batteries and redoubts outside its stone walls.

The U.S. artillery preparation began at dawn and lasted to dusk on 12 September, and resumed at dawn the next day. The infantry attacked at 0800 with two divisions advancing from the west, on the right, with the 3d Division of Major General Gideon Pillow making the main effort and Brigadier General William Worth’s 1st Division in support. In the center, Brigadier John Quitman’s 4th Division approached along a causeway as Pillow’s division fought through a swamp and grove of trees to the base of Chapultepec hill, then charged up the slope under heavy fire, but halted when the scaling ladders did not arrive as planned.

Mexican artillery fire on the causeway also stopped Quitman’s column. To break the impasse, Scott committed a brigade to outflank the position blocking the causeway and sent another carrying ladders to Pillow's assistance. The American attack over causeways and up rugged slopes under heavy fire resumed.

Although many officers and NCOs became casualties, junior leaders and private soldiers rose to the occasion and continued the assault to win a resounding victory. The capture of the last obstacle blocking the way to Mexico City. The capture and occupation of the enemy capital hastened the end of the war.

ALSO SEE:

http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/030/30-21/index.html

http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/030/30-21/index.html

12-14 SEPTEMBER 1814 - BATTLE OF BALTIMORE - #Warof1812#Armyhistory #USArmyOn the morning of 12 September 1814, a Britis...
09/12/2021

12-14 SEPTEMBER 1814 - BATTLE OF BALTIMORE - #Warof1812
#Armyhistory #USArmy

On the morning of 12 September 1814, a British invasion force of three infantry brigades, about 3,000 battle-hardened veterans, supported by several pieces of artillery encountered a brigade consisting of about 4,500 Maryland militia soldiers landed at North Point.

Acting as the covering force for the main line of defenses outside of Baltimore, the American troops executed a delaying action that yielded ground grudgingly as they retreated. Expecting to rout the American militia as they had done at Bladensburg before capturing Washington, DC, only a few weeks before, the determined stand by these militiamen caused the British commanders to cancel their planned main attack on the city two days later.

After their fleet failed to bombard Fort McHenry into submission and sail into the harbor to outflank Baltimore's line of defensive trenches, the British commanders saw that the planned ground attack was hopeless.

DID YOU KNOW:

The 1814 Battle of Baltimore included a land-battle at North Point.

The British attack on Fort McHenry was part of the naval-phase of the battle.

The 175th Infantry of the Maryland Army National Guard carries the lineage and honors of the 5th Maryland Volunteer Militia Infantry Regiment of the War of 1812

The original title of "The Star Spangled Banner" was "The Defense of Fort McHenry."

12-13 SEPTEMBER 1918 - ST. MIHIEL CAMPAIGN #WWI#Armyhistory #USArmy The St. Mihiel Offensive was a three-pronged assault...
09/12/2021

12-13 SEPTEMBER 1918 - ST. MIHIEL CAMPAIGN #WWI
#Armyhistory #USArmy

The St. Mihiel Offensive was a three-pronged assault on the German salient. First Army attacked the south face of the salient with the I Army Corps - 82d, 90th, 5th, and 2d Divisions in line and 78th in reserve - on the right and IV Army Corps - 89th, 42d, and 1st Divisions in line and the 3d in reserve - on the left.

The V Army Corps - U.S. 26th and French 15th Colonial Divisions, and U.S. 8th Infantry Brigade, 4th Division, in line, with the 4th (-) in reserve - conducted a secondary attack against the west face of the salient along the Meuse River. The French II Colonial Corps - French 39th Colonial, 26th and 2d (Dismounted) Cavalry Divisions in line - conducted a supporting attack against the apex of the salient to hold enemy attention and maintain contact with the IV and V Corps to its right and left, respectively.

First Army had the American 35th, 80th, and 91st Divisions in reserve. The Allied forces involved about 650,000 men with 550,000 American and 100,000 Allied, mostly French, troops. First Army was supported by over 3,000 artillery pieces, 400 (mostly French) tanks, and 1,500 Allied airplanes - 609 piloted by Americans. Colonel William "Billy" Mitchell of the First Army Air Service directed the Allied air campaign - in which British, French, Italian, Portuguese, and American aviation units participated - in the war's largest air effort to date.

In the first major operation planned and conducted by an American Army under its own command, First Army eliminated the salient and threat of a German attack on the rear of Allied fortifications at Nancy and Verdun, improved Allied lateral rail communications, and opened the way for a possible future offensive to seize Metz and the Briey iron fields.

ALSO SEE

https://history.army.mil/html/books/077/77-7/index.html

https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/resmat/wwi/prologue/default/index.html

11 SEPTEMBER 1777 - BATTLE OF BRANDYWINE - #RevolutionaryWar #Armyhistory #USArmy At Brandywine, the American Army comma...
09/11/2021

11 SEPTEMBER 1777 - BATTLE OF BRANDYWINE - #RevolutionaryWar
#Armyhistory #USArmy

At Brandywine, the American Army commanded by General George Washington was outflanked by the British army commanded by General Sir William Howe, which continued its advance to Philadelphia. Although defeated, unlike after losing battles of the previous year, the Army was neither routed nor beaten. The soldiers had fought well, their morale remained high and were ready to fight again.

The British national strategy of 1777 had two major objectives: (1) to isolate New England from the rest of the states by an advance of one army from Canada and down the Hudson River to Albany and link up with another British force advancing north from New York City; and (2) to seize Philadelphia, the seat of the Continental Congress.

The campaign against Philadelphia began when about 15,000 troops under Howe sailed from New York on 23 July and landed at Head of Elk (now Elkton), Maryland, a month later (25 August). Washington took defensive positions on the eastern side of Brandywine Creek with about 11,000 Continental Army and militia soldiers to block the way to Philadelphia at Chadd's Ford in Pennsylvania.

On 11 September, Howe sent one division of mostly German auxiliaries under Hessian Lieutenant General Wilhelm von Knyphausen on a diversion against the American main line while a second mostly British division under Lieutenant General Charles Lord Cornwallis made a wide movement around the American right flank. When this maneuver became apparent late in the day, Washington redeployed his forces to meet this new threat.

With the army forced from its original position, Major General Nathanael Greene's division held off the British advance as the whole American force withdrew to Chester in a hard-pressed but orderly retreat. Patriot losses in this engagement totaled about 1,000 killed, wounded, and prisoners. British casualties were less than 600.

ALSO SEE

https://history.army.mil/html/books/069/69-6-1/index.html

https://history.army.mil/html/books/070/70-6-1/index.html

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102 4th Avenue, Building 35
Washington D.C., DC
FORT MCNAIR, DC 20319-5060

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Please send any inquiries directly to CMH at [email protected] The U.S. Army Center of Military History has three divisions—History, Field Programs, and Museums. All have a presence at Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, D.C. The Museum Division also operates two storage and support facilities, Museum Support Center — Belvoir at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and Museum Support Center — Anniston at Anniston Army Dept. Alabama. The Army’s core art and historical collection is stored at Fort Belvoir. The future National Museum of the U.S. Army also will be located at Fort Belvoir. The U.S. Army and Heritage Center at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, operates a rotating exhibits gallery and houses archives and photographs in its Military History Institute. Other Army documents are housed at the National Archives. The Army Historical Foundation is a 501(c)(3) private not-for-profit educational organization, founded in 1983, located in Arlington, Virginia. Among other activities, it is conducting fundraising for the proposed National Museum of the U.S. Army.

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