Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian

Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian In partnership with Native peoples, the museum fosters a richer shared human experience through a more informed understanding of Native peoples.
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The museum in Washington and New York is temporarily closed. Visit us online at AmericanIndian.si.edu. Museum buildings: On the National Mall at 3rd St & Independence Ave SW, Washington DC ▪︎ In Lower Manhattan at 1 Bowling Green, New York NY 10004

Temporarily closed

“Everything we need to lead a good life is here on earth.” The Ohenten Kariwatekwen is often called the Haudenosaunee Th...
11/26/2020

“Everything we need to lead a good life is here on earth.”

The Ohenten Kariwatekwen is often called the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address, but the title means “words spoken before all others.” The Haudenosaunee nations—the Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora—open and close every important gathering with a version of these thanks.

The Ohenten Kariwatekwen begins with “greetings and thanks to each other as people.” It goes on to thank “our mother, the earth,… all the waters of the world for quenching our thirst and providing us with strength,… the fish,… the vast fields of plant life,… the animals,” the elements of the sky, including the four winds and “our grandfathers, the thunderers,” and our teachers: “When we forget,… they remind us of the way we were instructed to live as people.”

The address ends, “Now we turn our thoughts to the Creator and send greetings and thanks for all the gifts of creation. Everything we need to live a good life is here on earth. For all the love around us, we gather our minds together as one and send our best words of greetings and thanks to the Creator. Now our minds are one.”

This Thanksgiving, our thoughts are with people who have lost someone they love during this difficult year. We wish everyone an easier road ahead.

You can read the complete Ohenten Kariwatekwen at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2018/11/22/haudenosaunee-thanksgiving-address/.

This translation of the Mohawk version of the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address was developed by the Six Nations Indian Museum and the Tracking Project and first published by museum in 1993. All rights reserved. English version: John Stokes and Kanawahienton (David Benedict, Turtle Clan/Mohawk). Mohawk version: Rokwaho (Dan Thompson, Wolf Clan/Mohawk). Original inspiration: Tekaronianekon (Jake Swamp, Wolf Clan/Mohawk)

Image: Velino Shije Herrera (Zia Pueblo, 1902¬1973). “Blue Deers,” 1938. Santa Fe, New Mexico. 23/8379

#Thanksgiving2020 Woodland Cultural Centre #thanksgivingblessings

🇺🇸 USA Today has nominated the National Native American Veterans Memorial as one of the United States' 10 Best New Attra...
11/24/2020
Vote - National Native American Veterans Memorial - Best New Attraction Nominee: 2020 10Best Readers' Choice Travel Awards

🇺🇸 USA Today has nominated the National Native American Veterans Memorial as one of the United States' 10 Best New Attractions of 2020. You can vote for the memorial—or another nominee, of course—once each day. Voting ends Monday, December 21 at Noon EST. The winners will be announced on Thursday, December 31.

#NNAVM #NationalNativeAmericanVeteransMemorial #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #Veterans

National Native American Veterans Memorial: Vote for your favorite new attraction of 2020!

🎥 Streaming worldwide TODAY from 5 to 6:40 PM EST (UTC -5hrs), then on demand for five days, Native Cinema Showcase: Our...
11/20/2020
Our Stories Shorts Program

🎥 Streaming worldwide TODAY from 5 to 6:40 PM EST (UTC -5hrs), then on demand for five days, Native Cinema Showcase: Our Stories Short Films

▪︎ When You're Lost in the Rain, directed by directed by Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians)

▪︎ Ribadit (Pulling in the Belt), directed by Elle Sofe Sara (Sámi)

▪︎ Now Is the Time, directed by Christopher Auchter (Haida)

▪︎ Kakatshat, directed by Eve Ringuette (Innu)

▪︎ Hinekura, directed by Becs Arahanga (Kai Tahu/Ngati Raukawa)

▪︎ Marēikura, directed by Tihini Grant (Māori), Tristin Greyeyes (Cree), and Alika Maikau (Kanaka Maoli)

▪︎ i'x (Mountain Woman), directed by Wanda López

▪︎ Runa Llakta Llakta Illakuna (Human Land, No States), directed by Vanessa Teran, produced by Charlie Urichima (Kichwa

▪︎ Sweetheart Dancers, directed by Ben-Alex Dupris (Colville)

Free at https://nmai.brand.live/c/ourstoriesshortsprogram

Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close Nov. 23
11/19/2020
Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close Nov. 23

Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close Nov. 23

Due to rising regional and national cases related to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic, all Smithsonian museums, including the National Zoo, will temporarily close to the public starting Monday, Nov. 23. This will impact the eight Smithsonian facilities in the Washington, D.C., region that had reo...

Tonight—opening night—on Native Cinema Showcase, then on demand worldwide until November 23:"Conscience Point"7 pm Easte...
11/18/2020
Native Cinema Showcase

Tonight—opening night—on Native Cinema Showcase, then on demand worldwide until November 23:

"Conscience Point"
7 pm Eastern standard time (UTC -5 hrs)
Without powerful advocates in one of the wealthiest places in the United States, the Shinnecock Nation has been edged off its homelands by development. Is land a commodity or a birthright?

Retrospective Showcase Shorts
9 pm EST
Short films from earlier showcases explore the residential school experience, regaining cultural identity, and the loss of ancestral artifacts.

To see complete listings and to watch the films, visit https://nmai.brand.live/c/nativecinemashowcase

#NCS2020 #NCS

🍎 Educators, especially people working with students K–8, join us at 7PM Eastern time TODAY— Tuesday,  11/17—for the web...
11/17/2020
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: Giving Thanks: Telling More Complete Narratives About Thanksgiving: Session 2. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

🍎 Educators, especially people working with students K–8, join us at 7PM Eastern time TODAY— Tuesday, 11/17—for the webinar Giving Thanks: Telling More Complete Narratives about Thanksgiving. Learn more about diverse Native food traditions and why some communities give thanks throughout the year. Includes classroom resources and strategies. Participation in the first session of Giving Thanks is not required to take part in today's program.

Free. Register via https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/6116009720277/WN_iIO1GYYeQ02NbgwiTZ0snw

Guest presenter Marissa Corwin Manitowabi (Seneca), a consultant at the American Museum of Natural History, will be joining us to discuss the Three Sisters—corn, beans, and squash—and their connection to the Thanksgiving Address as it is practiced by Haudenosaunee people today.

Photo courtesy of TOCA - Tohono O'odham Community Action

#NK360 #PD #TeacherPD #ProfessionalDevelopment

Increase your confidence and ability to discuss a more accurate narrative around Thanksgiving with your students. This two-part series will provide resources and strategies to share a more appropriate and accurate representation of Native cultures in your classroom related to Thanksgiving. In sessio...

Native Cinema Showcase celebrates the best in Native film. For this 20th-anniversary showcase, the museum presents the f...
11/16/2020

Native Cinema Showcase celebrates the best in Native film. For this 20th-anniversary showcase, the museum presents the full program online, streaming new films, fan favorite classics, and conversations with filmmakers, with most programs available worldwide and on demand.

The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with Native filmmakers and stories from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and the Arctic.

🎥 Bookmark https://americanindian.si.edu/ncs
to see program details now and to enjoy the films
November 18 through 27.

#NativeCinemaShowcase #NativesInFilm #RepresentationMatters

Between Thanksgiving and Native American Heritage and Month, November is go-time for teaching and learning about Native ...
11/14/2020
Five Ideas to Change Teaching about Thanksgiving, in Classrooms and at Home

Between Thanksgiving and Native American Heritage and Month, November is go-time for teaching and learning about Native America. Here, parent and museum educator Renée Gokey shares simple ways to make the responsibility less daunting.

In addition to briefly describing strategies for learners K–12, Renée links to teaching resources from the museum and other organizations. And she notes that students can use Thanksgiving and their new tools for thinking about culture to learn and share more about their own family’s history and traditions.

#nativeamericanheritagemonth #thanksgiving #teachersoffacebook

Between Thanksgiving and Native American Heritage Month, November is go-time for teaching and learning about Native America. Parent and museum educator Renée Gokey shares simple ways to make the responsibility less daunting, using popular lesson ideas around Native foods as a starting point. In add...

For the last 20 years, Native Cinema Showcase has provided a venue for Native filmmakers who are using the medium as a c...
11/13/2020
Films for Fans of All Kinds from the Museum’s Native Cinema Showcase 2020, This Year Screening Online

For the last 20 years, Native Cinema Showcase has provided a venue for Native filmmakers who are using the medium as a catalyst for change by telling their own stories in their own voices. This year, from November 18 through 27, the National Museum of the American Indian brings its annual film festival to a global audience online. Almost all the films will be available to view anywhere in the world. Here, the museum’s New York film programmer highlights showcase films for every audience.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2020/11/10/native-cinema-showcase-2020/

For the last 20 years, the National Museum of the American Indian's annual film festival has provided a venue for Native filmmakers who are telling their own stories in their own voices and using the medium as a catalyst for change. This year, from November 18 through 27, the museum presents Native....

🇺🇸 Native Americans have served in the US Armed Forces since the country’s founding. And their families and communities ...
11/11/2020
Opinion | Honoring the service of Native Americans

🇺🇸 Native Americans have served in the US Armed Forces since the country’s founding. And their families and communities have long looked forward to the recognition and honor represented by the National Native American Veterans Memorial, opening today.

Here, museum director Kevin Gover (Pawnee) shares his hopes for Native veterans and their families. Join him in celebrating a very special Veterans Day.

#VeteransDay #nnavm #NativeVeterans

A memorial brings long overdue recognition to the tens of thousands of American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians who have served in peace and war for two and a half centuries.

“The National Native American Veterans Memorial will serve as a reminder to the nation and the world of the service and ...
11/11/2020

“The National Native American Veterans Memorial will serve as a reminder to the nation and the world of the service and sacrifice of Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian veterans. Native Americans have always answered the call to serve, and this memorial is a fitting tribute to their patriotism and deep commitment to this country.” —Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian

Join us Wednesday, November 11, online at AmericanIndian.si.edu for the opening of the National Native American Veterans Memorial. The moment will be marked with a short virtual message to honor the service and sacrifice of Native veterans and their families.

The memorial, which sits on the grounds of the museum, was commissioned by Congress to give “all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.” Native Americans have served in every major military conflict in the U.S. since the Revolutionary War. The memorial is the first national landmark in Washington, D.C., to honor the contributions of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians who have served in the military.

The design by Harvey Pratt (Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma) features an elevated stainless steel circle resting on a carved stone drum. It also incorporates water for sacred ceremonies, benches for gatherings, and four lances where veterans, family members, tribal leaders and others can tie cloths for prayers and healing.

The museum planned to host a dedication ceremony and veterans’ procession to mark the memorial’s completion but postponed those events due to current health and safety guidelines. The museum will reschedule both events when it is safe to do so.

Major support for the National Native American Veterans Memorial has been provided by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes; Chickasaw Nation; Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies; Poarch Band of Creek Indians; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians; and Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. The memorial has also been widely supported by tribal governments and tribal veterans organizations. More than 85 tribes, individuals, corporations and other organizations have contributed to the memorial.
#NationalNativeAmericanVeteransMemorial #NNAVM

🔥TODAY at noon ET, join interviewer-extraordinaire Kojo Nnamdi and Cynthia Vidaurri, a traditional culture specialist in...
11/02/2020
For Día De Los Muertos, Remembering Those Lost To The Coronavirus

🔥TODAY at noon ET, join interviewer-extraordinaire Kojo Nnamdi and Cynthia Vidaurri, a traditional culture specialist in the museum's Research & Scholarship Group, to talk about the #DayoftheDead. Explore how the holiday—long celebrated in communities throughout Mexico and now part of the world's intangible cultural heritage—continues to evolve today. On WAMU FM in DC and online everywhere via http://kojosho.org.

The Kojo Nnamdi Show #kojonnamdi #DiaDeMuertos

The National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago does an annual exhibit for the Day of the Dead. This year, it's centered on those who have died — and will die — in the pandemic.

10/31/2020

!Feliz Día de los Muertos! Celebrate the Day of the Dead with the museum. Colleagues and friends share an illustrated introduction to the holiday, a chef's tour of its rich culinary heritage, and how to make paper marigolds.

Folklorist Cynthia Vidaurri answers frequently asked questions. What is Día de los Muertos? How is it different from Halloween? What are the meanings of ofrendas' beautiful decorations? Cynthia illustrates her presentation with images she has collected while doing research, as well as photos from past years' Days of the Dead at the museum.

Chef Neftali Duran leads a culinary journey through the foods associated with Día de los Muertos. Learn about the layers of Mexican flavors and especially about moles, sauces as diverse as Mexico's Indigenous communities.

The colorful petals and distinct fragrance of cempasuchil (Nahuatl for marigolds) lead the souls of loved ones to family altars for the Day of the Dead. Evelyn Orantes (Quiche Maya) and Joaquin Newman (Yaqui/Mexica) take us into their home to learn step-by-step how to make paper marigolds.

A captioned version of this program will streaming simultaneously on the museum’s YouTube channel:
https://youtu.be/Uj7tBwHpI0M

Please visit our Facebook album of ofrendas and post comments in memory of your loved ones:
https://www.facebook.com/NationalMuseumOfTheAmericanIndian/posts/10158888241543554

Federal support for this program is provided by the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Image: Detail from the mural "Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park," painted in 1946–47 by Diego Rivera. Museo Mural Diego Rivera, Mexico City

Smithsonian Latino Center

🔥 Today—Sunday, November 1—at 2PM Eastern time, see the 2020 Día de los Muertos Virtual Festival with presenters standin...
10/31/2020

🔥 Today—Sunday, November 1—at 2PM Eastern time, see the 2020 Día de los Muertos Virtual Festival with presenters standing by live to reply to comments and questions. Until then, please enjoy a few ofrendas from earlier years' celebrations at the museum. And, if you like, post memories of loved ones in the comments.

10/30/2020

!Feliz Día de los Muertos! Celebrate the Day of the Dead with the museum. Colleagues and friends share an illustrated introduction to the holiday, a chef's tour of its rich culinary heritage, and how to make paper marigolds.

Folklorist Cynthia Vidaurri answers frequently asked questions. What is Día de los Muertos? How is it different from Halloween? What are the meanings of ofrendas' beautiful decorations? Cynthia illustrates her presentation with images she has collected while doing research, as well as photos from past years' Days of the Dead at the museum.

Chef Neftali Duran leads a culinary journey through the foods associated with Día de los Muertos. Learn about the layers of Mexican flavors and especially about moles, sauces as diverse as Mexico's Indigenous communities.

The colorful petals and distinct fragrance of cempasuchil (Nahuatl for marigolds) lead the souls of loved ones to family altars for the Day of the Dead. Evelyn Orantes (Quiche Maya) and Joaquin Newman (Yaqui/Mexica) take us into their home to learn step-by-step how to make paper marigolds.

A captioned version of this program is streaming simultaneously on the museum’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SmithsonianNMAI

Please visit our Facebook album of ofrendas and post comments in memory of your loved ones.

Federal support for this program is provided by the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Image: Detail from the mural "Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park," painted in 1946–47 by Diego Rivera. Museo Mural Diego Rivera, Mexico

🔥 The best things to do online this weekend? For us, they start tonight with illumiNations: Día de los Muertos at the Na...
10/30/2020
The best things to do — virtually and in person — while quarantined in the D.C. area

🔥 The best things to do online this weekend? For us, they start tonight with illumiNations: Día de los Muertos at the National Museum of the American Indian's Facebook and YouTube pages. The Washington Post agrees:

"Though the Day of the Dead is traditionally observed Nov. 1 and 2, it will be celebrated all weekend around Washington. The National Museum of the American Indian kicks off its virtual festivities on Friday night with illumiNATIONS, featuring Grammy-winning Chicano rock band Quetzal; a discussion of Dia de los Muertos masks with Arizona sculptor Zarco Guerrero; and Smithsonian scientists talking about monarch butterflies."

Streaming TODAY at 6 PM Eastern time. Free. Sign up requested: https://illuminations-dia-de-los-muertos.eventfarm.com/app/pages/8cc23d1f-0da2-4ea8-94c8-edb72e476693

Virtual film festivals, trivia nights, concerts and poetry slams offer an escape for everyone staying at home.

Address


Washington, D.C. Museum: METRO -- L'Enfant Plaza (Green/Yellow/Blue/Orange lines) exit "Maryland Ave/Museums" Federal Center SW (Blue/Orange lines) New York Museum: Subway -- 4/5 to Bowling Green; 1 to Rector Street or South Ferry; 2/3 to Broad Street; J/Z to Wall Street; R to Whitehall Bus -- M5, M15 or M20

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