Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian

Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian In partnership with Native peoples, the museum fosters a richer shared human experience through a mo Museum buildings: On the National Mall at 3rd St & Independence Ave SW, Washington DC ▪︎ In Lower Manhattan at 1 Bowling Green, New York NY 10004

Operating as usual

The contributions of Indigenous people from Latin America are many, including food, mathematics, textiles, astronomy, an...
09/17/2021

The contributions of Indigenous people from Latin America are many, including food, mathematics, textiles, astronomy, and engineer. Take a virtual trip to our museum and search by Indigenous nation, region, and grade level to learn about Inka engineering, Mayan astronomy, the Taíno language, and more. https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/lessons-resources/featured

Q'eswachaka: A Living Legacy of Inka Engineering
Suspension bridges represent original and unique Inka engineering technologies. Q’eswachaka is an important example of sustainability from environmental and engineering perspectives. Check out our poster, for students in grades 5–8, that provides a general introduction to the Inka Empire and the Great Inka Road system with special focus on the engineering aspects of a suspension bridge. Students can learn from modern–day Inka descendants and gain hands-on experience as they build a suspension bridge in class.

Educators: Thank you for everything you're doing right now. We realize you’re working harder than ever to keep your students on track. If you would like to be part of improving teaching and learning about Native America, register to our 2021 Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In, this year dedicated to "Indigenous Land: Stewardship, Relationships, and Responsibility" in collaboration with Teaching for Change. Saturday, Sept. 25 from 12:30 to 3 p.m. ET (9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. PT) Not for you, or not for you this year? Please share the opportunity with another great educator. Thank you, again.

Register here: https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/professional-development/upcoming-webinars

Las contribuciones de los pueblos indígenas de América Latina son muchas, incluidas la astronomía, matemáticas, textiles y la ingeniería. Toma un viaje virtual a nuestro museo y busca por pueblo indígena, región y grado escolar para que aprendas sobre la ingeniería Inka, la astronomía Maya, el idioma Taíno y mucho más disponible en español. https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/lessons-resources/featured

Q'eswachaka: Una Maravilla de Ingeniería Inka
Los puentes colgantes representan la tecnología única y original de la ingeniería Inka. El Q’eswachaka es un ejemplo importante de sostenibilidad desde puntos de vista ambientales y de ingeniería. Visita nuestro afiche para estudiantes de 5to a 8vo grado que provee una introducción general al Imperio Inka y a la red del Gran Camino Inka con enfoque especial en los aspectos de ingeniería de un puente colgante. Los estudiantes podrán aprender de los descendientes modernos de los Inkas y ganaran experiencia práctica mientras construyen un puente colgante en el salón de clase.

Educadores: Gracias por todo lo que están haciendo en este momento. Sabemos que están trabajando más duro que nunca para mantener a sus alumnos encaminados. Si deseas ser parte de la mejora de la enseñanza y el aprendizaje sobre los indígenas americanos, regístrate en nuestro programa Teach-In del Día de los Pueblos Indígenas de 2021, este año dedicado a “Tierras indígenas: administración, relaciones y responsabilidad” en colaboración con Teaching for Change. Sábado 25 de septiembre de 12:30 a 3 p.m. ET (9:30 a.m.-12: 00 p.m. PT)

#SmithsonianHHM #SmithsonianEdu #Education #HispanicHeritageMonth

Chupícuaro shell trumpet, ca. 300-900 AD. Chupícuaro, Guanajuato State, Mexico. 24/2892Chupícuaro is an archaeological s...
09/16/2021

Chupícuaro shell trumpet, ca. 300-900 AD. Chupícuaro, Guanajuato State, Mexico. 24/2892

Chupícuaro is an archaeological site located in the southeastern area of the Lerma River basin in West #Mexico. The people of Chupícuaro are very well-known for their ceramic tradition-and for conch shell trumpets. The existence in in Chupícuaro of trumpets made from Caribbean conch shells attests to widespread trade networks.

Come see and learn more about the Chupícuaro shell trumpet on view at our New York museum as part of the Infinity of Nations exhibition that features more than 700 works of Native art from throughout North, Central, and South America.

Our New York museum is open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. #Free #InfinityofNations #HispanicHeritageMonth #SmithsonianHHM

Chupícuaro shell trumpet, ca. 300-900 AD. Chupícuaro, Guanajuato State, Mexico. 24/2892

Chupícuaro is an archaeological site located in the southeastern area of the Lerma River basin in West #Mexico. The people of Chupícuaro are very well-known for their ceramic tradition-and for conch shell trumpets. The existence in in Chupícuaro of trumpets made from Caribbean conch shells attests to widespread trade networks.

Come see and learn more about the Chupícuaro shell trumpet on view at our New York museum as part of the Infinity of Nations exhibition that features more than 700 works of Native art from throughout North, Central, and South America.

Our New York museum is open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. #Free #InfinityofNations #HispanicHeritageMonth #SmithsonianHHM

Register now! How do you make environmental development more just and equitable? This Thursday, Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. ET, j...
09/13/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: Youth in Action: Environmental Justice in South America | Juventud en acción: Justicia ambiental en Sudamérica. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

Register now! How do you make environmental development more just and equitable? This Thursday, Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. ET, join the museum’s cultural interpreters in a conversation with young Indigenous activists from South America who are combating overexploitation of natural resources and developing more sustainable solutions.

This conversation will take place in Spanish. Simultaneous English interpretation and closed captioning in Spanish and English will be available.

This program is part of the Youth in Action: Conversations about Our Future series, which features young Native activists and changemakers from across the Western Hemisphere who are working towards equity and social justice for Indigenous peoples.

Image: Youth outside the Brazilian embassy protesting the wildfires in the Amazon rainforest, Bogotá, Colombia, August 23, 2019. The signs read “The future is the youth, but we are youth without future” and “If you don't behave like adults, we will do it.” REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez. Alamy Stock Photo

https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/8016250767641/WN_POaJcUjARTW4vLZ1UyEy3Q

How do you make environmental development more just and equitable? Join the museum’s cultural interpreters in a conversation with young Indigenous activists from South America who are combating overexploitation of natural resources and developing more sustainable solutions. ⭐ This conversation w...

Strawberries are celebrated every year by many Native communities. The plants flower in late spring and bring an abundan...
09/08/2021
Summer Strawberry Fun

Strawberries are celebrated every year by many Native communities. The plants flower in late spring and bring an abundance of nourishing fruit throughout the summer. They have been long enjoyed by Native people as the first fruit after long winter months.

Learn more by watching this video, and have fun creating a decorative paper strawberry to hang in your home.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMpFc8YRzhc

Strawberries are celebrated every year by many Native communities. The plants flower in late spring and bring an abundance of nourishing fruit throughout the...

MUSEUM UPDATE: Due to delays from inclement weather, the National Museum of the American Indian in New York will open at...
09/02/2021

MUSEUM UPDATE: Due to delays from inclement weather, the National Museum of the American Indian in New York will open at noon today, September 2. We apologize for any inconvenience.

MUSEUM UPDATE: Due to delays from inclement weather, the National Museum of the American Indian in New York will open at noon today, September 2. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Join us for our 2021 Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In, this year dedicated to "Indigenous Land: Stewardship, ...
08/24/2021
2021 Indigenous Peoples' Day Curriculum Teach-In - Teaching for Change

Join us for our 2021 Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In, this year dedicated to "Indigenous Land: Stewardship, Relationships, and Responsibility" in collaboration with Teaching for Change. Saturday, Sept. 25 from 12:30 to 3 p.m. ET (9:30AM-12:00PM PT)

The rivers, trees, and other plants have existed and been governed by natural laws for millennia. What if they had legal, sovereign rights, too? How can we honor the land? What relationships with the land can we mend through Indigenous thinking and practices? Discuss, be inspired, and connect with your curriculum!

Registration cost is $10.

Learn more and register at https://www.teachingforchange.org/2021-indigenous-peoples-teach-in?fbclid=IwAR3EEIChjeblMcsYp3CpqHzHBgDOp8y4pAfMY22BKyYe5RON4JNlTiQ8Z8w

Indigenous Land: Stewardship, Relationships, and Responsibility Saturday, September 25, 2021 | 12:30PM–3:00PM ET (9:30AM-12:00PM PT) The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) and Teaching for Change host a day of online conversation, curriculum sharing, and ideas exchange. ...

What is your favorite memory from the grand opening of our DC museum in 2004? We are celebrating the 175th birthday of t...
08/10/2021

What is your favorite memory from the grand opening of our DC museum in 2004?

We are celebrating the 175th birthday of the @smithsonian with pictures of the Native procession in Washington, D.C.

More than 80,000 people came to the National Mall for the grand opening day of the National Museum of the American Indian on September 21, 2004. Twenty-five thousand Indigenous peoples and other supporters joined the Native Nations Procession, the largest gathering of Indigenous communities in recent history.

Starting at the Smithsonian Castle, dignitaries walked the symbolic journey eastward to the site of the opening ceremony. Behind them flowed a sea of people; participants wore traditional clothing. Some tribal members carried banners announcing where they were from as they walked to the museum at the foot of the U.S. Capitol.

Immediately following the grand opening ceremony, more than 300 participants from 500 tribes and Native communities from throughout the Western Hemisphere began the First Americans Festival.

#Smithsonian175 #Smithsonian #Indigenous #NativeAmerican #WashingtonDC

📷 Opening Day Procession for NMAI, 2004, Smithsonian Institution.

📷5: Led by Suzan Shown Harjo, Rick West and his family are followed by Native elders and special guests into the front doors of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Photo by John Harrington.

We wish a Happy 175th Birthday to the @smithsonian 🎂 Feliz cumpleaños! On this special occasion, we’re sharing pictures ...
08/10/2021

We wish a Happy 175th Birthday to the @smithsonian 🎂 Feliz cumpleaños! On this special occasion, we’re sharing pictures of the first days of our two museums and the Cultural Resources Center.

Sitting at the foot of the Wiechquaekeck Trail, an old Algonquin trade route (aka Broadway), the New York location is the direct descendant of the original Museum of the American Indian established by George Gustav Heye in 1916.

It became part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1989 when President George H. W. Bush signed legislation creating the National Museum of the American Indian. The legislation provided for a small museum to be maintained in New York, a storage facility in Maryland, and a flagship museum in Washington, DC. Over the next several years, museum staff consulted with Indigenous communities across the Americas to help develop the museum’s programs and design. In 1994, the George Gustav Heye Center opened in the old Alexander Hamilton Customs House in New York City. Designed by architect Cass Gilbert, the building was originally completed in 1907 and covers three city blocks.

#Smithsonian175 #Smithsonian #Indigenous #NativeAmerican #NewYork

Image 1: The 155th Street side of the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation building, seen from the southeast across Broadway, ca. 1922. National Museum of the American Indian / George Gustav Heye Center

Image 2: George and Thea Heye with Wey-hu-si-wa (Zuni), governor of Zuni Pueblo at the time, and Lorenzo Chavez (Zuni) in front the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation building in 1923. National Museum of the American Indian / George Gustav Heye Center

Image 3: Singers at George Gustav Heye Center Opening, 1994, Smithsonian Institution Archives, ID SIA2011-1532 and 95-287.

Image 4: The National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. Photo by David Sundberg (2016)

“An Indigenous International Festival took place in March of 2010 when North American Natives sharing their expertise in...
08/09/2021

“An Indigenous International Festival took place in March of 2010 when North American Natives sharing their expertise in the international law, journalism, the visual arts, culinary skills and cultural performing arts with counterparts from South America. A dance group comprised of the National Museum of the American Indian museum staff were among those who shared their cultures in various venues in Sao Paulo and the Indigenous National Festival in Bertioga, Brazil.”

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is observed each year on August 9. The date marks the day of the first meeting, in 1982, of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights.

Photo: Dennis Zotigh (Kiowa/San Juan Pueblo/Santee Dakota Indian) and an Indigenous leader from South America get ready so share their cultures in Bertioga, #Brazil.

#WorldIndigenousPeoplesDay #InternationalDayoftheWorldsIndigenousPeoples #IndigenousPeoplesDay

“An Indigenous International Festival took place in March of 2010 when North American Natives sharing their expertise in the international law, journalism, the visual arts, culinary skills and cultural performing arts with counterparts from South America. A dance group comprised of the National Museum of the American Indian museum staff were among those who shared their cultures in various venues in Sao Paulo and the Indigenous National Festival in Bertioga, Brazil.”

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is observed each year on August 9. The date marks the day of the first meeting, in 1982, of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights.

Photo: Dennis Zotigh (Kiowa/San Juan Pueblo/Santee Dakota Indian) and an Indigenous leader from South America get ready so share their cultures in Bertioga, #Brazil.

#WorldIndigenousPeoplesDay #InternationalDayoftheWorldsIndigenousPeoples #IndigenousPeoplesDay

Today’s uncontrolled fires are hotter, larger, more intense and in large measure the result of increased temperatures, d...
07/30/2021

Today’s uncontrolled fires are hotter, larger, more intense and in large measure the result of increased temperatures, drought and tree-killing insect infestations—all linked to climate change. But have you ever taken to heart the saying “fight fire with fire”? Several tribes located in California help prevent wildfires by burning the underbrush and keep the fires contained.

From a 25-foot granite ledge in the foothills of California’s southern Sierra Nevada, one can look out onto a large golden meadow next to a wide creek where for millennia a Miwok village of some 600 people thrived. This view had been obscured by thick brush, thistle, poison oak and gnarled dead trees. But this past February, the dense overgrowth was devoured by fire. Not wildfire, but flames carefully ignited by the descendants of the Miwok and other American Indian tribes from the region.

Members of the Miwok, North Fork Mono and Chukchansi Tribes gathered at the former village site for a four-day “cultural burn” to clear overgrown fields on private land outside Mariposa, California. They were joined by neighbors and dozens of volunteers, including staff from the Forest Service and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire).

This annual cultural burn is one of many efforts to bring Indigenous fire management back to the landscape. These efforts are meant to restore plant growth, benefit wildlife and put nutrients back into the soil while helping clear the dense underbrush that fuels the massive wildfires now common across the West.

Read more in the article by David Helvarg published in the museum’s American Indian magazine "Using Fire to Fight Fire: California Tribes' Cultural Burns Restore Land and Keep Flames at Bay"

https://www.americanindianmagazine.org/story/using-fire-to-fight-fire

Photographer Stuart Palley covers the environment, art and other subjects. His recent book “Terra Flamma: Wildfires at Night” documents catastrophic wildfires in California.

Today’s uncontrolled fires are hotter, larger, more intense and in large measure the result of increased temperatures, drought and tree-killing insect infestations—all linked to climate change. But have you ever taken to heart the saying “fight fire with fire”? Several tribes located in California help prevent wildfires by burning the underbrush and keep the fires contained.

From a 25-foot granite ledge in the foothills of California’s southern Sierra Nevada, one can look out onto a large golden meadow next to a wide creek where for millennia a Miwok village of some 600 people thrived. This view had been obscured by thick brush, thistle, poison oak and gnarled dead trees. But this past February, the dense overgrowth was devoured by fire. Not wildfire, but flames carefully ignited by the descendants of the Miwok and other American Indian tribes from the region.

Members of the Miwok, North Fork Mono and Chukchansi Tribes gathered at the former village site for a four-day “cultural burn” to clear overgrown fields on private land outside Mariposa, California. They were joined by neighbors and dozens of volunteers, including staff from the Forest Service and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire).

This annual cultural burn is one of many efforts to bring Indigenous fire management back to the landscape. These efforts are meant to restore plant growth, benefit wildlife and put nutrients back into the soil while helping clear the dense underbrush that fuels the massive wildfires now common across the West.

Read more in the article by David Helvarg published in the museum’s American Indian magazine "Using Fire to Fight Fire: California Tribes' Cultural Burns Restore Land and Keep Flames at Bay"

https://www.americanindianmagazine.org/story/using-fire-to-fight-fire

Photographer Stuart Palley covers the environment, art and other subjects. His recent book “Terra Flamma: Wildfires at Night” documents catastrophic wildfires in California.

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