Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC

Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC In 1982, the Wax Museum became a popular nightclub that hosted hundreds of major acts, including Tina Turner, Eurythmics, Count Basie, Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, Elivis Costello, Johnny Winter and Danny Gatton.
(46)

It closed in 1984.

Operating as usual

via Robbie White - Here is a 2 for one picture: an ad for the GENTRY in SE DC and for the Wax Museum in SW DC (God I lov...
01/22/2015

via Robbie White - Here is a 2 for one picture: an ad for the GENTRY in SE DC and for the Wax Museum in SW DC (God I loved the Wax Museum) from the July 1982 issue of Unicorn Times. BOTH clubs had GREAT shows and I was at many of these. I loved the Intentions and Sara & The Splinters and tried to see ALL their shows. Where is Sara Birdseye now? — with J Scott Watson, Scott Holland, Tom Rogers and 14 others. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153043091069928&set=a.420416979927.197641.817259927&type=1&theater

Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
01/22/2015

Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC

Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC's cover photo
01/22/2015

Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC's cover photo

Gregory Carlson- "Here is one of the B&W photographs I took that night. The original image was too blurred to work as a ...
10/26/2013

Gregory Carlson- "Here is one of the B&W photographs I took that night. The original image was too blurred to work as a straight print, so I pushed the grain and added a sepia tone tint." - © Gregory G Carlson -

JOHN KAY And STEPPENWOLF - Wax Museum Washington DC 4/8/1983 First show
10/26/2013

JOHN KAY And STEPPENWOLF - Wax Museum Washington DC 4/8/1983 First show

JOHN KAY And STEPPENWOLF - Wax Museum Washington DC 4/8/1983 First show
10/26/2013

JOHN KAY And STEPPENWOLF - Wax Museum Washington DC 4/8/1983 First show

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble - The Wax Museum Night Club, Washington DC - Dec. 27, 1982From the Neglected Black &...
10/26/2013

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble - The Wax Museum Night Club, Washington DC - Dec. 27, 1982
From the Neglected Black & White Negative Archives - © Gregory G Carlson -

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble at The Wax Muesum, Washington DC - 12/27/82 -  ©Gregory G Carlson
10/26/2013

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble at The Wax Muesum, Washington DC - 12/27/82 - ©Gregory G Carlson

Stevie Ray Vaughn - Gregory Carlson - photo credit -
10/26/2013

Stevie Ray Vaughn - Gregory Carlson - photo credit -

Marianne Faithfull- October 10, 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
10/26/2013

Marianne Faithfull- October 10, 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC

SEPTEMBER 30, 1982: CRIS WILLIAMSON - WAX MUSEUM NIGHT CLUB, WASHINGTON, DC
10/26/2013

SEPTEMBER 30, 1982: CRIS WILLIAMSON - WAX MUSEUM NIGHT CLUB, WASHINGTON, DC

10/26/2013

Bruce Cockburn - Sunday 21 October 1984 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark - Tuesday 24 July 1984 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Thompson Twins - Monday 09 April 1984 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Skip Castro Band - Saturday 31 December 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Stevie Ray Vaughan - Tuesday 27 December 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Graham Parker - Thursday 06 October 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Queensrÿche - Wednesday 26 October 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Culture Club - Sunday 27 February 1983 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC
Adam And The Ants - Monday 15 November 1982 - Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC

10/26/2013
The Dynettes @ The Wax Museum

The Dynettes @ The Wax Museum - The Dynettes @ The Wax Museum Nightclub, Wash. DC. "Walking In The Rain"
Intro by Root Boy Slim; most photos by Patricia Lanza at The Wax ('83-'84) assembled by DCorbin

The Dynettes @ The Wax Museum Nightclub, Wash. DC. "Walking In The Rain" Intro by Root Boy Slim; most photos by Patricia Lanza at The Wax ('83-'84) assembled...

10/26/2013

Tina Turner at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - January 20,1983
Willie Dixon at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - October 24, 1982
John Lee Ho**er Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - October 24,1982
Rosanne Cash Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - October 21,1982
Marshall Crenshaw Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - October 20,1982
Arlo Guthrie Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - November 7,1982

10/26/2013

Adrian Belew Power Trio Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - September 22, 1983

Paint The Road
(Adrian Belew song)

Paint The Road II
(Adrian Belew song)

I Wonder
(Adrian Belew song)

Life Without A Cage
(Adrian Belew song)

The Lone Rhinoceros
(Adrian Belew song)

Animal Grace
(Adrian Belew song)

Stop It
(Adrian Belew song)

The Ideal Woman
(Adrian Belew song)

Heartbeat
(King Crimson cover)

Ballet For A Blue Whale
(Adrian Belew song)

Making Tape Loops
(Adrian Belew song)

She Is Not Dead
(Adrian Belew song)

The Rail Song
(Adrian Belew song)

Fish Head
(Adrian Belew song)

Swingline
(Adrian Belew song)

Adidas in Heat
(Adrian Belew song)

Big Electric Cat
(Adrian Belew song)

The Momur
(Adrian Belew song)

10/26/2013

Stevie Ray Vaughan Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - March 11, 1983

Testify
(The Isley Brothers cover)

So Excited

The Things (That) I Used to Do
(Guitar Slim cover)

You'll Be Mine
(Howlin’ Wolf cover)

Pride and Joy

Voodoo Chile
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

Love Struck Baby

Texas Flood
(Fenton Robinson cover)

Love Me Darlin'

Little Wing
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

Third Stone from the Sun
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

Encore:

Lenny

Manic Depression
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

10/26/2013

Stevie Ray Vaughan Setlist at Wax Museum, Washington, DC - December 27, 1983

Set 1
Testify
(The Isley Brothers cover)

Shake 'n' Bake
Voodoo Child (Slight Return)
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

Mary Had a Little Lamb
(Buddy Guy cover)

Texas Flood
(Fenton Robinson cover)

Boot Hill
Love Struck Baby

Tin Pan Alley
(Robert Geddins cover)

Rude Mood

Testify
(The Isley Brothers cover)

Lenny
Hideaway
(Freddie King cover)

Pride and Joy

Set 2
Hardcore Electric Texas Blues

Shake 'n' Bake

Voodoo Child (Slight Return)
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

The Things (That) I Used to Do
(Guitar Slim cover)

Boot Hill

Mary Had a Little Lamb
(Buddy Guy cover)

Tell Me
(Howlin’ Wolf cover)

Tin Pan Alley
(Robert Geddins cover)

Little Wing
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

Third Stone from the Sun
(The Jimi Hendrix Experience cover)

Encore:
How Long?
(with Bob Margolin)

Honey Bee
(with Bob Margolin)

Close to You
(Muddy Waters cover) (with Bob Margolin)
Instrumental
(with Bob Margolin)

Roy Ayres, Kid Creole & the Coconuts, Carl Perkins, Billy Hancock, & the Tennese Rockers, Kid Tater & the Cheaters, Rich...
10/26/2013

Roy Ayres, Kid Creole & the Coconuts, Carl Perkins, Billy Hancock, & the Tennese Rockers, Kid Tater & the Cheaters, Richard & Linda Thompson Band, David Grissman Quartet, The Dying Breed with Danny Pendleton, Jeff Wisor, Danny Gatton, Gene Johnson, Tina Turner, Henny Youngman & NRBQ, The Pointer Sisters

In 1982, the Wax Museum became a popular nightclub that hosted hundreds of major acts, including Tina Turner, Eurythmics...
10/26/2013

In 1982, the Wax Museum became a popular nightclub that hosted hundreds of major acts, including Tina Turner, Eurythmics, Count Basie, Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, Elivis Costello, Johnny Winter and Danny Gatton. It closed in 1984.

01/20/2012

Glad to see that there still are treasures surfacing from everyone out there! Be it a written memory, a band you saw, friends, photos, memorabilia, CDs, DVDs, press releases and articles. You name it we want it! Thank you!

04/11/2011

I am sure there are many undiscovered treasures of the Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC that have been yet to be seen..but well worth the wait..do you have any?

Address

Fourth And E Streets SW
Washington D.C., DC
20024

Telephone

(202) 872-0000

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.


Comments

OCT, 26, 1983 Twisted Sister with Wrathchild at Wax Museum, Washington, DC, USA Tour: You Can't Stop Rock 'n' Roll Great set opener from TS's debut album: What You Don't Know (sure can hurt you)
OCT, 26, 1983 Twisted Sister with Wrathchild at Wax Museum, Washington, DC, USA Tour: You Can't Stop Rock 'n' Roll Great set opener from TFS's debut album: What You Don't Know (sure can hurt you)
Published on Dec 26, 2020 Dying Breed featuring Danny Gatton - The Wax Museum 1982 - audio only - "Dammit Debbie" and then a bluegrass standard that Danny plays BOTH GUITAR AND BANJO! Just a couple tunes but awesome stuff! Thanks to Gary G from Baltimore for recording this (he in fact came for the main act: David Grisman!) and I'm not sure if he knew in advance that Danny was part of this band, Dying Breed, but so glad he had the tape!
Published on Dec 26, 2020 Dying Breed featuring Danny Gatton - The Wax Museum 1982 - audio only - "Dammit Debbie" and then a bluegrass standard that Danny plays BOTH GUITAR AND BANJO! Just a couple tunes but awesome stuff! Thanks to Gary G from Baltimore for recording this (he in fact came for the main act: David Grisman!) and I'm not sure if he knew in advance that Danny was part of this band, Dying Breed, but so glad he had the tape!
Via Steve Brown: All the bands I recorded live at the Wax Museum...those were the days!! Dickey Betts, Butch Trucks, Jimmy Hall and Chuck Leavell January 26, 1983 - Paul Butterfield Blues Band w/Blonde Chaplan March 26, 1983 - Roy Buchanan August 3, 1982 - James Cotton Blues Band May 25, 1983 - Marshall Crenshaw October 20,1982 - Danny and The Fatboys December 12, 1982 - Diversions January 5, 1983 - Willie Dixon and The Chicago Blues Allstars October 24, 1982 - Downtown November 13, 1982 - Jonathan Edwards and Friends October 17, 1982 - Charlie Feathers June 16, 1983 - Rythm Masters February 19, 1983, May 25, 1983 - James Harold Ray and The Assassins May 28, 1983 - Tex Rubinowitz May 21, 1983, June 16, 1983, December 29, 1983 - Johnny Saeton Band w/Danny Gatton June 16, 1983 - Otis Rush and The Double Dynamite Band January 31, 1983 - John Sebastion w/NRBQ December 9, 1982 - Son Seals Blues Band February 19, 1983 - Robbin Thompson Band August 13, 1982 - Fabulous Thunderbirds August 17, 1983 - Stevie Ray Vaughn and Double Trouble March 11, 1983 - Junior Walker and The Allstars November 13, 1982 - Edgar Winter Group February 24, 1983 - Leslie West and Corky Laing December 29, 1982 - NRBQ September 8, 1983 - John Hammond Jr. September 6, 1983 - Buddy Guy and Junior Wells September 28, 1983 - David Crosby Band April 19, 1983 - Robert Gordon w/Danny Gatton January5, 1983 - Levon Helm and Rick Danko December 20, 1982 - John Lee Ho**er and The Coast to Coast Blues Band October 24, 1982 - Robert Hunter October 17, 1982 - Incredible Snakes May 12, 1983 - Jake and The Family Jewels March 3 1983 - Evan Johns and The H-Bombs January 1, 1983 - Etta James January 31, 1983 - Juke Jumpers October 24, 1982 - David Johanssen August 4, 1982 - Tommy Keene Group August 4, 1982 - Jorma Kaukonen March 20, 1982 - B.B. King August 17, 1983 - Tough Luck w/Lips Lacowitz August 3, 1982 - Marvelletes November 13, 1982 - John Mayall and The Blues Breakers June 17, 1982 - Bob Margolin Blues Band January 26, 1983 - Nitty Gritty Dirt Band November 18, 1982 - NRBQ August 26, 1982 - NRBQ December 9, 1982 - Graham Parker September 28, 1983 - Wilson Picket April 28, 1983 - Billy Price and The Keystone Rhythm Band March 15, 1983 - Paul Butterfield w/Rick Danko and Blonde Chaplin May 12, 1983 - John Lee Ho**er and The Coast to Coast Blues Band September 6, 1983 - John Prine September 14, 1983 - Buddy Guy and Junior Wells September 28, 1983 - Aztec Camera October 5, 1983 - Tex Rubinowitz December 29, 1983 - Tex Rubinowitz February 2, 1984 - Link Wray and The Raymen December 29, 1983 - Chris Smithers August 3, 1982 - Fabulous Thunderbirds February 2, 1984 - NRBQ December 15, 1983 - Duke Robillard and The Pleasure Kings March 24, 1984 - Nicksilver October 4, 1983 - Hot Tuna October 20, 1983 Please take the time to suggest Wax Museum Night Club Washington DC page to your friends so we might piece the puzzle back together again for future generations. Your contribution is just one more part that helps convey the renaissance that the tristate area has experience. Wax Museum brought some memorable ti...mes for music in the Washington, DC area and lingers fondly in the memories of many. Thank you. https://m.facebook.com/Wax-Museum-Night-Club-Washington-DC-268980526216/
I went to see John Mayall and The Blues Breakers reunion concert June 17, 1982. I met John McVie that night backstage at 3:00 AM in the morning, he was drunk and tired after two long sets, and he got me Mayall's and Mick Taylor's autographs. This photo is actually the one that the "Wax" used, it has their writing on the back.
John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers - The 1982 Reunion Concert - 1994 - One Way Records Legendary British blues artist John Mayall has always been an eclectic blues artist because of his tendency to incorporate jazz and folk elements into his music. This "reunion" set from 1982 recorded at the Wax Museum, Washington DC, on 17 June 1982, is a good attempt by John and his band to contemporize the electric Chicago blues style. John and his band, including Mick Taylor, John McVie, and Colin Allen cover 10 tracks, eight of which are solely composed by John, himself. "I Should Know Better" is a collaboration with Mick Taylor, and "My Time After Awhile" is a Robert Geddins & Ron Badger standard. Sound quality on this album could be better, but it won't stop your enjoyment of listening to "the father of the British blues movement" and his band in action. John Mayall has always retained his loyal fan base. Eric Clapton stated that "John Mayall has actually run an incredibly great school for musicians." Listen to the brilliant John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers 1967 "Crusade" album, his now classic 1968 "Blues from Laurel Canyon" album, JMB's brilliant Grammy-nominated "Wake Up Call" album featuring Buddy Guy, Mavis Staples, Albert Collins, and it is also worth hearing John's 2001 release (under the banner "John Mayall and Friends"), "Along For The Ride", where John Mayall got together with a number of his former mates, including Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, as well as ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons, Jonny Lang, Steve Miller, Billy Preston, Steve Cropper, Otis Rush, Gary Moore, Jeff Healey, Reese Wynans of Steve Ray Vaughan's band and Shannon Curfman for an amazing display of blues power at its finest. British blues doesn't come much better than those albums. N.B: Tracks 2,3,4,6 and 8 appeared on the 1994 Australian release, "The Return of the Bluesbreakers" album, where eight tracks, from what was to became John Mayall's 1994 "Cross Country Blues" album, are also included. Some issues of this reunion album include the extra track, "Get Me Some Dollars" composed by John Mayall. Be careful of repetition with these albums TRACKS 1 Hard Times Again (4:54) 2 You Never Can Be Trusted (3:57) 3 Howlin' Moon (4:15) 4 Ridin' on the Santa Fe (3:34) 5 I Should Know Better (5:25) 6 My Time After Awhile (5:28) 7 She Can Do It (3:50) 8 Lookin' for Willie (9:29) 9 Room to Move (6:58) 10 Have You Heard (7:34) All songs composed by John Mayall, except "My Time After Awhile" by Robert Geddins & Ron Badger and "I Should Know Better" by John Mayall & Mick Taylor BAND John Mayall - Guitar, Piano, Organ, Harmonica, Vocals Mick Taylor - Lead Guitar, Keyboards with John Mayall on "Room To Move" John McVie - Bass Guitar Colin Allen - Drums BIO As the elder statesman of British blues, it is John Mayall's lot to be more renowned as a bandleader and mentor than as a performer in his own right. Throughout the '60s, his band, the Bluesbreakers, acted as a finishing school for the leading British blues-rock musicians of the era. Guitarists Eric Clapton, Peter Green, and Mick Taylor joined his band in a remarkable succession in the mid-'60s, honing their chops with Mayall before going on to join Cream, Fleetwood Mac, and the Rolling Stones, respectively. John McVie and Mick Fleetwood, Jack Bruce, Aynsley Dunbar, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Andy Fraser (of Free), John Almond, and Jon Mark also played and recorded with Mayall for varying lengths of times in the '60s. Mayall's personnel has tended to overshadow his own considerable abilities. Only an adequate singer, the multi-instrumentalist was adept in bringing out the best in his younger charges (Mayall himself was in his thirties by the time the Bluesbreakers began to make a name for themselves). Doing his best to provide a context in which they could play Chicago-style electric blues, Mayall was never complacent, writing most of his own material (which ranged from good to humdrum), revamping his lineup with unnerving regularity, and constantly experimenting within his basic blues format. Some of these experiments (with jazz-rock and an album on which he played all the instruments except drums) were forgettable; others, like his foray into acoustic music in the late '60s, were quite successful. Mayall's output has caught some flak from critics for paling next to the real African-American deal, but much of his vintage work — if weeded out selectively — is quite strong; especially his legendary 1966 LP with Eric Clapton, which both launched Clapton into stardom and kick-started the blues boom into full gear in England. When Clapton joined the Bluesbreakers in 1965, Mayall had already been recording for a year, and been performing professionally long before that. Originally based in Manchester, Mayall moved to London in 1963 on the advice of British blues godfather Alexis Korner, who thought a living could be made playing the blues in the bigger city. Tracing a path through his various lineups of the '60s is a daunting task. At least 15 different editions of the Bluesbreakers were in existence from January 1963 through mid-1970. Some notable musicians (like guitarist Davy Graham, Mick Fleetwood, and Jack Bruce) passed through for little more than a cup of coffee; Mayall's longest-running employee, bassist John McVie, lasted about four years. The Bluesbreakers, like Fairport Convention or the Fall, was more a concept than an ongoing core. Mayall, too, had the reputation of being a difficult and demanding employer, willing to give musicians their walking papers as his music evolved, although he also imparted invaluable schooling to them while the associations lasted. Mayall recorded his debut single in early 1964; he made his first album, a live affair, near the end of the year. At this point the Bluesbreakers had a more pronounced R&B influence than would be exhibited on their most famous recordings, somewhat in the mold of younger combos like the Animals and Rolling Stones, but the Bluesbreakers would take a turn for the purer with the recruitment of Eric Clapton in the spring of 1965. Clapton had left the Yardbirds in order to play straight blues, and the Bluesbreakers allowed him that freedom (or stuck to well-defined restrictions, depending upon your viewpoint). Clapton began to inspire reverent acclaim as one of Britain's top virtuosos, as reflected in the famous "Clapton is God" graffiti that appeared in London in the mid-'60s. In professional terms, though, 1965 wasn't the best of times for the group, which had been dropped by Decca. Clapton even left the group for a few months for an odd trip to Greece, leaving Mayall to straggle on with various fill-ins, including Peter Green. Clapton did return in late 1965, around the time an excellent blues-rock single, "I'm Your Witchdoctor" (with searing sustain-laden guitar riffs), was issued on Immediate. By early 1966, the band was back on Decca, and recorded its landmark Bluesbreakers LP. This was the album that, with its clean, loud, authoritative licks, firmly established Clapton as a guitar hero, on both reverent covers of tunes by the likes of Otis Rush and Freddie King and decent originals by Mayall himself. The record was also an unexpected commercial success, making the Top Ten in Britain. From that point on, in fact, Mayall became one of the first rock musicians to depend primarily upon the LP market; he recorded plenty of singles throughout the '60s, but none of them came close to becoming a hit. Clapton left the Bluesbreakers in mid-1966 to form Cream with Jack Bruce, who had played with Mayall briefly in late 1965. Mayall turned quickly to Peter Green, who managed the difficult feat of stepping into Clapton's shoes and gaining respect as a player of roughly equal imagination and virtuosity, although his style was quite distinctly his own. Green recorded one LP with Mayall, A Hard Road, and several singles, sometimes writing material and taking some respectable lead vocals. Green's talents, like those of Clapton, were too large to be confined by sideman status, and in mid-1967 he left to form a successful band of his own, Fleetwood Mac. Mayall then enlisted 19-year-old Mick Taylor; remarkably, despite the consecutive departures of two star guitarists, Mayall maintained a high level of popularity. The late '60s were also a time of considerable experimentation for the Bluesbreakers, which moved into a form of blues-jazz-rock fusion with the addition of a horn section, and then a retreat into mellower, acoustic-oriented music. Mick Taylor, the last of the famous triumvirate of Mayall-bred guitar heroes, left in mid-1969 to join the Rolling Stones. Yet in a way Mayall was thriving more than ever, as the U.S. market, which had been barely aware of him in the Clapton era, was beginning to open up for his music. In fact, at the end of the 1960s, Mayall moved to Los Angeles. Released in 1969, The Turning Point, a live, all-acoustic affair, was a commercial and artistic high point. In America at least, Mayall continued to be pretty popular in the early '70s. His band was no more stable than ever; at various points some American musicians flitted in and out of the Bluesbreakers, including Harvey Mandel, Canned Heat bassist Larry Taylor, and Don "Sugarcane" Harris. Although he's released numerous albums since and remained a prodigiously busy and reasonably popular live act, his post-1970 output generally hasn't matched the quality of his '60s work. Following collaborations with an unholy number of guest celebrities, in the early '80s he re-teamed with a couple of his more renowned vets, John McVie and Mick Taylor, for a tour, which was chronicled by Great American Music's Blues Express, released in 2010. It's the '60s albums that you want, though there's little doubt that Mayall has over the past decades done a great deal to popularize the blues all over the globe, whether or not the music has meant much on record. [from http://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/john-mayall/id44649?showBio=1] http://overdoseoffingalcocoa.blogspot.com/2011/07/john-mayall-and-bluesbreakers.html?m=1