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Legal: http://s.si.edu/legal Established in 1972 to manage the museum grounds, Smithsonian Gardens extends the Smithsonian’s museum experience in a public garden setting, inspiring visitors with exceptional displays and educating them about horticulture, plants, the natural and built environments, and artistic design.
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Tomatoes are here! 🍅 Try this vintage recipe for broiled tomatoes from 1915 from a popular food writer of her day, Anna ...
07/09/2021

Tomatoes are here! 🍅 Try this vintage recipe for broiled tomatoes from 1915 from a popular food writer of her day, Anna B. Scott.

Scott wrote a daily newspaper column for the Philadelphia Inquirer and later, the Philadelphia North American. At a time when most newspaper food writing was done by the male editors’ wives, Anna Scott came with her own qualifications: she owned a popular restaurant in Philadelphia. Later, she started a cooking club that grew to 20,000 members.

She liked to go by “Mrs. Scott” in her columns. The “Mrs.” reminded readers that she was a wife, and therefore a homemaker, and therefore someone who knew from experience what recipes tasted best – especially on a budget. The title she preferred in her professional work was “food economist.”

Anna Scott published several cookbooks, including “A Dozen Dainty Ways to Prepare War Department Canned Meats,” which she wrote for the U.S. government to help home cooks make use of food rations distributed during World War I.

This recipe for broiled tomatoes was included in a booklet she wrote for the W. Atlee Burpee Company, “Best Ways to Cook Fresh Vegetables,” that the Burpee firm used as a way of encouraging its customers to buy more vegetable seeds.

📸
Image 1: Tomatoes on the vine, c. 1980-2005. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Ken Druse garden photography collection.
Image 2 and 3: Recipe and portrait from Best Ways to Cook Fresh Vegetables, 1915. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, W. Atlee Burpee Company Records.

Tomatoes are here! 🍅 Try this vintage recipe for broiled tomatoes from 1915 from a popular food writer of her day, Anna B. Scott.

Scott wrote a daily newspaper column for the Philadelphia Inquirer and later, the Philadelphia North American. At a time when most newspaper food writing was done by the male editors’ wives, Anna Scott came with her own qualifications: she owned a popular restaurant in Philadelphia. Later, she started a cooking club that grew to 20,000 members.

She liked to go by “Mrs. Scott” in her columns. The “Mrs.” reminded readers that she was a wife, and therefore a homemaker, and therefore someone who knew from experience what recipes tasted best – especially on a budget. The title she preferred in her professional work was “food economist.”

Anna Scott published several cookbooks, including “A Dozen Dainty Ways to Prepare War Department Canned Meats,” which she wrote for the U.S. government to help home cooks make use of food rations distributed during World War I.

This recipe for broiled tomatoes was included in a booklet she wrote for the W. Atlee Burpee Company, “Best Ways to Cook Fresh Vegetables,” that the Burpee firm used as a way of encouraging its customers to buy more vegetable seeds.

📸
Image 1: Tomatoes on the vine, c. 1980-2005. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Ken Druse garden photography collection.
Image 2 and 3: Recipe and portrait from Best Ways to Cook Fresh Vegetables, 1915. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, W. Atlee Burpee Company Records.

“If only this picture was scratch-and-sniff!Stanhopea oculata has kicked off our summer season with 45 flowers! The frag...
07/08/2021

“If only this picture was scratch-and-sniff!

Stanhopea oculata has kicked off our summer season with 45 flowers! The fragrant blooms fill our greenhouse with the delightful scent of sweet vanilla. Before even seeing the blooms, I already knew this Eye-Spot Stanhopea had opened. This is a special moment as the flowers are short-lived and only last 48 hours.

This collection item dates back to 2009 when it was first acquired as a small seedling. According to our records this plant has never produced such a fabulous display.”

📷 💬: Justin Kondrat, Orchid Horticulturist

#SmithsonianGardens #Orchids

The Mary Livingston Ripley Garden is the place to be this summer! Come check out the Mangaves, the summer blooms, and ga...
07/06/2021

The Mary Livingston Ripley Garden is the place to be this summer! Come check out the Mangaves, the summer blooms, and garden art. 🌼⛲️

#SmithsonianGardens #RipleyGarden

The Jacqueline Kennedy Garden at the White House 🌷 When John F. Kennedy took office as President, he asked a family frie...
07/02/2021

The Jacqueline Kennedy Garden at the White House 🌷 When John F. Kennedy took office as President, he asked a family friend, Rachel “Bunny” Lambert Mellon, to redesign the White House’s East Garden and Rose Garden.

Mellon recruited the help of Perry Wheeler, a Washington, D.C.-based landscape architect known for his simple, casual garden designs.

The project came with unique challenges:
1. The Rose Garden had to fit about 1,000 people for ceremonies and press conferences.
2. The plants had to thrive despite the hot summer sun of the capital city.
3. Inspired by Thomas Jefferson’s gardens, President Kennedy wanted an 18th century-style design that included fragrant boxwood hedges, flowers that were popular in the colonial era, and neat right angles in the plantings and paths.

The design and planting took about one year. Mellon drove all over D.C., looking for the right trees to frame the space. She found four Magnolia soulangeanas growing outside a government building that were dug up and replanted at the White House.

The East Garden and Rose Garden were completed by Mellon in 1963. She later helped restore the King’s Kitchen Garden at Versailles.

The East Garden was renamed for Jacqueline Kennedy by the next First Lady, Lady Bird Johnson - another famous flower-lover! - in 1965.

📸: East Garden of the White House (inscribed by Jacqueline Kennedy to Perry Wheeler). Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler Collection.

#HorticultureHERstory #BecauseOfHerStory #Smithsonian

The Jacqueline Kennedy Garden at the White House 🌷 When John F. Kennedy took office as President, he asked a family friend, Rachel “Bunny” Lambert Mellon, to redesign the White House’s East Garden and Rose Garden.

Mellon recruited the help of Perry Wheeler, a Washington, D.C.-based landscape architect known for his simple, casual garden designs.

The project came with unique challenges:
1. The Rose Garden had to fit about 1,000 people for ceremonies and press conferences.
2. The plants had to thrive despite the hot summer sun of the capital city.
3. Inspired by Thomas Jefferson’s gardens, President Kennedy wanted an 18th century-style design that included fragrant boxwood hedges, flowers that were popular in the colonial era, and neat right angles in the plantings and paths.

The design and planting took about one year. Mellon drove all over D.C., looking for the right trees to frame the space. She found four Magnolia soulangeanas growing outside a government building that were dug up and replanted at the White House.

The East Garden and Rose Garden were completed by Mellon in 1963. She later helped restore the King’s Kitchen Garden at Versailles.

The East Garden was renamed for Jacqueline Kennedy by the next First Lady, Lady Bird Johnson - another famous flower-lover! - in 1965.

📸: East Garden of the White House (inscribed by Jacqueline Kennedy to Perry Wheeler). Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler Collection.

#HorticultureHERstory #BecauseOfHerStory #Smithsonian

The Archives of American Gardens and the Smithsonian Transcription Center have just released a new set of 1915 contest l...
06/30/2021

The Archives of American Gardens and the Smithsonian Transcription Center have just released a new set of 1915 contest letters from the W. Atlee Burpee & Company records. These letters answer the question “Which seed, tree, or plant advertisement in the March issue of Successful Farming contains the best offer and the most valuable information?”

Volunpeers have already transcribed over 100 letters from farmers and gardeners across the country! Browse letters at https://transcription.si.edu/project/38037

📸: Burpee tomato seed packet. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, W. Atlee Burpee Company Records.

#GardenHistory

The Archives of American Gardens and the Smithsonian Transcription Center have just released a new set of 1915 contest letters from the W. Atlee Burpee & Company records. These letters answer the question “Which seed, tree, or plant advertisement in the March issue of Successful Farming contains the best offer and the most valuable information?”

Volunpeers have already transcribed over 100 letters from farmers and gardeners across the country! Browse letters at https://transcription.si.edu/project/38037

📸: Burpee tomato seed packet. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, W. Atlee Burpee Company Records.

#GardenHistory

It’s going to be hot, hot, hot today! 🔥 We hope you find a cool, tropical oasis to escape the heat. 😎 Find some shade in...
06/30/2021

It’s going to be hot, hot, hot today! 🔥 We hope you find a cool, tropical oasis to escape the heat. 😎 Find some shade in our tropical plant display in the Enid A. Haupt garden and you May spot some of those colorful tropical hibiscus. 🌺

Photos: Hibiscus ‘Fiesta’, ‘Midnight Tryst’, ‘Voila’, ‘Orange Cappuccino’, ‘Black Dragon’

📷: Matthew Fleming, Horticulturist

#Hibiscus

The Little Gardeners 🌱 June 1910These children are getting an introduction to gardening at the Tuskegee Normal Institute...
06/28/2021

The Little Gardeners 🌱 June 1910

These children are getting an introduction to gardening at the Tuskegee Normal Institute in Alabama, a school developed in part by educator Olivia A. Davidson.

Olivia A. Davidson was a young teacher trained in agriculture and other subjects at the Hampton Institute of Virginia. She earned a teaching degree in Massachusetts and taught in the Worcester public schools until wealthy whites objected to having a Black teacher for their children.

Undaunted, Davidson began to raise funds for a Black school in Alabama alongside her husband, educator and author Booker T. Washington. Washington was Tuskegee’s first principal; Davidson served as an assistant principal or “lady principal” in charge of the female students.

Her young students at Tuskegee learned gardening skills and helped run experiments on enriching and nourishing the Alabama soil, which was worn out from decades of cotton-growing.

“No single individual did more toward laying the foundations of the Tuskegee Institute so as to insure the successful work that been done there than Olivia A. Davidson.” – Booker T. Washington

📸: Carver, George Washington. Nature Study and Gardening for Rural Schools. Tuskegee Institute, Ala.: Experiment Station Bulletin No. 18. Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. 1910.

#HorticultureHERstory #BecauseOfHerStory

The Little Gardeners 🌱 June 1910

These children are getting an introduction to gardening at the Tuskegee Normal Institute in Alabama, a school developed in part by educator Olivia A. Davidson.

Olivia A. Davidson was a young teacher trained in agriculture and other subjects at the Hampton Institute of Virginia. She earned a teaching degree in Massachusetts and taught in the Worcester public schools until wealthy whites objected to having a Black teacher for their children.

Undaunted, Davidson began to raise funds for a Black school in Alabama alongside her husband, educator and author Booker T. Washington. Washington was Tuskegee’s first principal; Davidson served as an assistant principal or “lady principal” in charge of the female students.

Her young students at Tuskegee learned gardening skills and helped run experiments on enriching and nourishing the Alabama soil, which was worn out from decades of cotton-growing.

“No single individual did more toward laying the foundations of the Tuskegee Institute so as to insure the successful work that been done there than Olivia A. Davidson.” – Booker T. Washington

📸: Carver, George Washington. Nature Study and Gardening for Rural Schools. Tuskegee Institute, Ala.: Experiment Station Bulletin No. 18. Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. 1910.

#HorticultureHERstory #BecauseOfHerStory

Happy #PollinatorWeek!
06/22/2021

Happy #PollinatorWeek!

Join us Thursday, June 24th at noon EST for a chat on ‘Carbon in the Capital Region: Analyzing changes CO2 concentration...
06/20/2021

Join us Thursday, June 24th at noon EST for a chat on ‘Carbon in the Capital Region: Analyzing changes CO2 concentrations in Washington D.C. during the COVID Pandemic.’

The coronavirus-related lockdowns affected human beings and nature in many ways. Unusual animal sightings occurred in many cities, while human beings dramatically changed their daily lives and commuting patterns. But did these changes to everyday life affect the air we breathe? Marc Rosenfield, an ecosystem ecologist and PhD candidate at George Washington University, studied the exchange of carbon dioxide between the land and the atmosphere during the pandemic to answer the question. With his collaboration with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Marc Rosenfield, Leona Neftaliem and their collaborators built and deployed 33 carbon dioxide sensors around the Washington DC metropolitan area, including the Enid A. Haupt Garden and the Anacostia Community Museum. The sensors have been collecting carbon dioxide, temperature, pressure, and humidity readings every 5 minutes for over a year. Now, Rosenfield is analyzing the data to see how photosynthesis, urban planning, and traffic changes have affected carbon dioxide cycling in and out of the atmosphere. The pandemic offered a rare opportunity for Rosenfield to observe how the environment reacts to drops in human activity.

To Register: https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ss7PAE1lR92SO-XMnK5jmw

#LetsTalkGardens #GardenChats #Webniar #GardenTalk

Join us Thursday, June 24th at noon EST for a chat on ‘Carbon in the Capital Region: Analyzing changes CO2 concentrations in Washington D.C. during the COVID Pandemic.’

The coronavirus-related lockdowns affected human beings and nature in many ways. Unusual animal sightings occurred in many cities, while human beings dramatically changed their daily lives and commuting patterns. But did these changes to everyday life affect the air we breathe? Marc Rosenfield, an ecosystem ecologist and PhD candidate at George Washington University, studied the exchange of carbon dioxide between the land and the atmosphere during the pandemic to answer the question. With his collaboration with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Marc Rosenfield, Leona Neftaliem and their collaborators built and deployed 33 carbon dioxide sensors around the Washington DC metropolitan area, including the Enid A. Haupt Garden and the Anacostia Community Museum. The sensors have been collecting carbon dioxide, temperature, pressure, and humidity readings every 5 minutes for over a year. Now, Rosenfield is analyzing the data to see how photosynthesis, urban planning, and traffic changes have affected carbon dioxide cycling in and out of the atmosphere. The pandemic offered a rare opportunity for Rosenfield to observe how the environment reacts to drops in human activity.

To Register: https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ss7PAE1lR92SO-XMnK5jmw

#LetsTalkGardens #GardenChats #Webniar #GardenTalk

Just a garden-variety "dad joke" for you:  What did Baby Plant say to Papa Plant on Father’s Day? 🤔 “Thank you very mulc...
06/20/2021

Just a garden-variety "dad joke" for you:
What did Baby Plant say to Papa Plant on Father’s Day? 🤔
“Thank you very mulch for your support!!”

Enjoy your Sunday with this vintage photo from the Archives of American Gardens.

📸: Sibley C. Smith [?] with child. c. 1910-1920. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.

Just a garden-variety "dad joke" for you:
What did Baby Plant say to Papa Plant on Father’s Day? 🤔
“Thank you very mulch for your support!!”

Enjoy your Sunday with this vintage photo from the Archives of American Gardens.

📸: Sibley C. Smith [?] with child. c. 1910-1920. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.

The hundred thousand roses of Harriet Risley Foote (1863-1951) 🌹 This Newport garden was designed by Mrs. Foote, a horti...
06/18/2021

The hundred thousand roses of Harriet Risley Foote (1863-1951) 🌹 This Newport garden was designed by Mrs. Foote, a horticulturist who developed rose-growing methods far ahead of her time.

In her home garden she grew and tested about 650 rosebushes in 250 different varieties – about 100,000 blooms!

Mrs. Foote began experimenting with roses shortly after her marriage to a minister. She covered the four acres surrounding their rectory in Massachusetts with plants of all kinds.

Word of Mrs. Foote’s extraordinary garden spread. With her assistant Emma Schumaker she designed formal rose gardens for several clients around the Northeast and upper Midwest United States - including industrialist Henry Ford.

Many of the techniques Harriet Risley Foote tested and used are now standard practice among rose growers, such as pruning conservatively to keep enough leaves to feed the plant during winter.

📸 Beacon Hill, Newport, Rhode Island. c. 1920-1940. Harriet Risley Foote, rosarian and John Greatorex, landscape architect. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America Collection.

#HorticultureHERstory #NationalRoseMonth

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