Smithsonian Gardens

Smithsonian Gardens Engage. Inform. Inspire.

#SmithsonianGardens

Legal: http://s.si.edu/legal Established in 1972 to manage the museum grounds, Smithsonian Gardens extends the Smithsonian’s museum experience in a public garden setting, inspiring visitors with exceptional displays and educating them about horticulture, plants, the natural and built environments, and artistic design.

Operating as usual

09/13/2021
Garden_Clubs_Final.mp4

One hundred years ago, a garden club could be more than just a social group for plant lovers: it was one way women could influence political and community issues before the right to vote. Watch:

Join us Thursday, September 16th at noon EST for a chat on 'Seeds and How to Find Them.'Join us as we explore the botani...
09/12/2021

Join us Thursday, September 16th at noon EST for a chat on 'Seeds and How to Find Them.'

Join us as we explore the botanical wonder that is seeds! Ever wondered where seeds come from or how they are made? From flower, to fruit, to seed, we will take a deep dive into the various changes that plants go through in a year. Learn how to fold your own seed packet and the basics of seed collecting to get you out in the garden and saving seed for the future!

Philip Evich is a Pathways Horticulturist currently working with the Smithsonian Gardens team at the National Museum of Natural History. He has a passion for native plants and sustainable agriculture, as well as ecology and taxonomy.

To register: https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uPH2_-9hTWCxjqpaWYG0dg

#LetsTalkGardens #GardenTalks #GardenWebinar

Join us Thursday, September 16th at noon EST for a chat on 'Seeds and How to Find Them.'

Join us as we explore the botanical wonder that is seeds! Ever wondered where seeds come from or how they are made? From flower, to fruit, to seed, we will take a deep dive into the various changes that plants go through in a year. Learn how to fold your own seed packet and the basics of seed collecting to get you out in the garden and saving seed for the future!

Philip Evich is a Pathways Horticulturist currently working with the Smithsonian Gardens team at the National Museum of Natural History. He has a passion for native plants and sustainable agriculture, as well as ecology and taxonomy.

To register: https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uPH2_-9hTWCxjqpaWYG0dg

#LetsTalkGardens #GardenTalks #GardenWebinar

After six months of waiting, Smithsonian Gardens is excited to share that one of our × Rhyncattleanthe Smithsonian Sunbu...
09/09/2021

After six months of waiting, Smithsonian Gardens is excited to share that one of our × Rhyncattleanthe Smithsonian Sunburst 175th has opened! Besides being our beloved Smithsonian namesake orchid, our team can finally see and share the outcome of this new hybrid. No one ever really knows the final result from the recombination of genes. For example, this plant produced ombré orange sunset shades while another could be bright yellow. We are waiting for 29 more to bloom and each will be unique. One thing is for certain, we hope you enjoy this luminous moment within our Orchid Collection and look forward to seeing how the others bloom!

💬: Justin Kondrat, Horticulturist
📷: Hannele Lahti, Living Collections Photographer

09/08/2021
Landscape_Architects_SQR.mp4

#DidYouKnow Garden design was a man's world one hundred years ago.
Learn how a few women landscape architects determined to practice in their chosen career slowly made their way into the field - and get a look through the historic photos in the Smithsonian Gardens archive!

🎥: Smithsonian Gardens

The tropical bed in the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden is loving our tropic-like weather! Schizolobium parahyba, the Braz...
09/07/2021

The tropical bed in the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden is loving our tropic-like weather!

Schizolobium parahyba, the Brazilian Fire tree, is expanding quickly. It, along with most of the plants in this bed, is not hardy in our Mid-Atlantic winters. These tropical plants will be dug out and overwintered in our greenhouses.

📷: Janet Draper, Horticulturist

#SmithsonianGardens #MaryLivingstonRipleyGarden #RipleyGarden

Join us Thursday, September 9th at noon EST for a chat on 'Plants, Passion and Perseverance: A Focus on Positive Solutio...
09/05/2021

Join us Thursday, September 9th at noon EST for a chat on 'Plants, Passion and Perseverance: A Focus on Positive Solutions and Experience Gained.'

Gardening is challenging wherever it is that you put a shovel in the dirt. Mother Nature continually reminds you that you are not in control, and to remain sane, you need to roll with the punches! Gardening at Smithsonian Gardens presents opportunities to share with countless people from around the globe, but it also comes with its own unique challenges. Join Horticulturist Janet Draper as she looks back on her 20-plus years of learning and sharing in the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden. She will share some of her lessons learned the tough way and how she deals with challenges and turns them into opportunities.

To register: https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SL956ob9QSqooG900wZBJw

#LetsTalkGardens #GardenTalks #GardenWebinars

Join us Thursday, September 9th at noon EST for a chat on 'Plants, Passion and Perseverance: A Focus on Positive Solutions and Experience Gained.'

Gardening is challenging wherever it is that you put a shovel in the dirt. Mother Nature continually reminds you that you are not in control, and to remain sane, you need to roll with the punches! Gardening at Smithsonian Gardens presents opportunities to share with countless people from around the globe, but it also comes with its own unique challenges. Join Horticulturist Janet Draper as she looks back on her 20-plus years of learning and sharing in the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden. She will share some of her lessons learned the tough way and how she deals with challenges and turns them into opportunities.

To register: https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SL956ob9QSqooG900wZBJw

#LetsTalkGardens #GardenTalks #GardenWebinars

Acis autumnalis (formerly Lecojum autumnalis) is an easy to miss, late summer bulb that’s only a whopping 4-6 inches tal...
09/01/2021

Acis autumnalis (formerly Lecojum autumnalis) is an easy to miss, late summer bulb that’s only a whopping 4-6 inches tall but its oh-so-sweet! Autumn Snowflake is native to Spain and Portugal, and hardy from zones 7 to 9b. The dainty white flowers are popping up through the foliage of Aristolochia fimbriata in the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden. This cute bulb can be grown in the ground or in a container.

📷: Janet Draper, Horticulturist

#SmithsonianGardens #MaryLivingstonRipleyGarden #RipelyGarden

“Grow” your gardening know-how! Our free online gardening program, Let’s Talk Gardens, covers a wide range of topics pre...
08/29/2021

“Grow” your gardening know-how! Our free online gardening program, Let’s Talk Gardens, covers a wide range of topics presented by our own professional staff, as well as guest speakers. No matter your level of gardening knowledge, there’s always something new to learn!

Our September topics and presenters are the following:

September 9th- 'Plants, Passion and Perseverance: A Focus on Positive Solutions and Experience Gained' by Janet Draper, Smithsonian Gardens, Horticulturist

September 16th- 'Seeds and How to Find Them' by Philp Evich, Smithsonian Gardens, Horticulturist

September 23rd- 'Getting the Most out of Small Space/Urban Gardens' by Kathy Jentz, Editor and Publisher, Washington Gardener Magazine

September 30th- 'Washington National Cathedral Gardens: Divine Inspiration & Earthly Challenges' by Sandra Flowers, Director of Horticulture & Grounds Washington National Cathedral

To learn more about these presentations visit: https://gardens.si.edu/learn/lets-talk-gardens/

“Grow” your gardening know-how! Our free online gardening program, Let’s Talk Gardens, covers a wide range of topics presented by our own professional staff, as well as guest speakers. No matter your level of gardening knowledge, there’s always something new to learn!

Our September topics and presenters are the following:

September 9th- 'Plants, Passion and Perseverance: A Focus on Positive Solutions and Experience Gained' by Janet Draper, Smithsonian Gardens, Horticulturist

September 16th- 'Seeds and How to Find Them' by Philp Evich, Smithsonian Gardens, Horticulturist

September 23rd- 'Getting the Most out of Small Space/Urban Gardens' by Kathy Jentz, Editor and Publisher, Washington Gardener Magazine

September 30th- 'Washington National Cathedral Gardens: Divine Inspiration & Earthly Challenges' by Sandra Flowers, Director of Horticulture & Grounds Washington National Cathedral

To learn more about these presentations visit: https://gardens.si.edu/learn/lets-talk-gardens/

Our greenhouse team has been super busy this summer. From growing our fall annuals, mums, and poinsettias to caring for ...
08/28/2021

Our greenhouse team has been super busy this summer. From growing our fall annuals, mums, and poinsettias to caring for the interior plant displays in the museums.

📷: Alexandra Thompson & Virginia Thaxton, Horticulturist

We're celebrating #WomensEqualityDay! The "Dean of Women Landscape Architects," Ellen Biddle Shipman (1869-1950), was a ...
08/26/2021

We're celebrating #WomensEqualityDay! The "Dean of Women Landscape Architects," Ellen Biddle Shipman (1869-1950), was a pioneering landscape architect and an advocate for women’s equality in the field.

In the 1920s and 30s, women landscape architects often had a tough time breaking into the profession. Some male landscape architects were hesitant to hire or train women.

Shipman tried to level the playing field by hiring only women to work at her design firm – specifically, graduates from Massachusetts’ Lowthorpe School of Landscape Architecture for Women.

📸: Bonaire, Orange, New Jersey, circa 1914-1940. Ellen Biddle Shipman, landscape architect. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America Collection.

This hole in our garden brought to you by Rose Rosette Disease (RRD).🥀 RRD is an incurable virus spread by a mite that c...
08/24/2021

This hole in our garden brought to you by Rose Rosette Disease (RRD).🥀 RRD is an incurable virus spread by a mite that can float on the wind. Excessive thorniness is a telltale sign your rose is infected. To reduce the spread you must remove the entire plant including the roots. Bag the debris. Do not compost.
For more info visit: https://roserosette.org/

📷: Shelley Gaskins, Horticulturist

It’s #NationalHoneybeeDay! Did you know Smithsonian Gardens is collecting a hive of garden photos and stories from plant...
08/21/2021

It’s #NationalHoneybeeDay! Did you know Smithsonian Gardens is collecting a hive of garden photos and stories from plant lovers of around the country – like you? 🐝

Celebrate our pollinating friends with this story from the Community of Gardens archive, or tell us the buzz on your own garden by contributing your own story: https://communityofgardens.si.edu/contribution

“I had actually wanted chickens for years in my little urban garden but my husband was not keen on that so I brought up bees. …When you first get the hive, it is one single tray. Over the course of the summer, they expand it as the little bee babies are born and as they make honey. We used to call it the condo. They would get a new level to the condo.

We ended up having a fascination and love for them. We were very excited one morning when we woke up. We used to check on them every single morning. One morning we came down and they had formed a heart, almost a perfect heart on the outside of the hive, which we, of course, took as a sign that they loved us too.”

💬: Michelle K., “Urban Garden with Honeybees,” Community of Gardens, accessed August 17, 2021, https:/​/​communityofgardens.​si.​edu/​items/​show/​55.​

📸: “Planting a Pollinator Garden in the Greenbelt/Treebelt/Verge,” Community of Gardens, accessed August 17, 2021, https:/​/​communityofgardens.​si.​edu/​items/​show/​12406.​

It’s #NationalHoneybeeDay! Did you know Smithsonian Gardens is collecting a hive of garden photos and stories from plant lovers of around the country – like you? 🐝

Celebrate our pollinating friends with this story from the Community of Gardens archive, or tell us the buzz on your own garden by contributing your own story: https://communityofgardens.si.edu/contribution

“I had actually wanted chickens for years in my little urban garden but my husband was not keen on that so I brought up bees. …When you first get the hive, it is one single tray. Over the course of the summer, they expand it as the little bee babies are born and as they make honey. We used to call it the condo. They would get a new level to the condo.

We ended up having a fascination and love for them. We were very excited one morning when we woke up. We used to check on them every single morning. One morning we came down and they had formed a heart, almost a perfect heart on the outside of the hive, which we, of course, took as a sign that they loved us too.”

💬: Michelle K., “Urban Garden with Honeybees,” Community of Gardens, accessed August 17, 2021, https:/​/​communityofgardens.​si.​edu/​items/​show/​55.​

📸: “Planting a Pollinator Garden in the Greenbelt/Treebelt/Verge,” Community of Gardens, accessed August 17, 2021, https:/​/​communityofgardens.​si.​edu/​items/​show/​12406.​

It’s #FlowerFriday and this week we’re featuring nature’s art at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden! Photos:1. Ec...
08/20/2021

It’s #FlowerFriday and this week we’re featuring nature’s art at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden!

Photos:
1. Echinacea ‘Green Jewel’ with Lantana ‘Lucky Lavender’
2. Asclepias ‘Ice Ballet’
3. Canna ‘Intrigue’
4. Lantana ‘Lucky Lavender’
5. Salvia ‘Rockin Deep Purple’
6. Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’
7. Sanguisorba officinalis
8. Gaura lindheimer Walberton’s ‘Silver Fountain’ with Sanguisorba officinalis and Sesleria autumnalis
9. Torenia ‘Summer Wave Large Silver’

📷: Melinda Whicher & Hannele Lahti

Our Ghost Orchid (Dendrophylax lindenii) is blooming!This orchid is a great example of a “leafless orchid.” It only prod...
08/18/2021

Our Ghost Orchid (Dendrophylax lindenii) is blooming!

This orchid is a great example of a “leafless orchid.” It only produces small, scale-like “leaves” and mostly photosynthesizes via its roots. Because of its unique growth habit, ghost orchids are notoriously difficult to cultivate, let alone getting them to produce flowers. That means these blooms are a big accomplishment for our orchid collection! It is native to the Florida Everglades but was nearly poached to extinction. Smithsonian Gardens acquired this collection item from Chicago Botanic Garden in 2020 as part of an objective to establish conservation partnerships. There are only a few public gardens in the world that have this plant, and to our knowledge, we are one of the few that have successfully bloomed them.

To learn more visit: https://si.gardenexplorer.org/taxon-28876.aspx

Our Ghost Orchid (Dendrophylax lindenii) is blooming!

This orchid is a great example of a “leafless orchid.” It only produces small, scale-like “leaves” and mostly photosynthesizes via its roots. Because of its unique growth habit, ghost orchids are notoriously difficult to cultivate, let alone getting them to produce flowers. That means these blooms are a big accomplishment for our orchid collection! It is native to the Florida Everglades but was nearly poached to extinction. Smithsonian Gardens acquired this collection item from Chicago Botanic Garden in 2020 as part of an objective to establish conservation partnerships. There are only a few public gardens in the world that have this plant, and to our knowledge, we are one of the few that have successfully bloomed them.

To learn more visit: https://si.gardenexplorer.org/taxon-28876.aspx

Planted among a sea of Joe Pye w**d at Smithsonian Gardens you will find a special urn memory of landscape designer Andr...
08/13/2021

Planted among a sea of Joe Pye w**d at Smithsonian Gardens you will find a special urn memory of landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing. The Downing Urn was originally placed on the Mall in 1856 before being restored and moved to the Enid A. Haupt Garden in 1989.

Read more about the Downing Urn: https://gardens.si.edu/gardens/haupt-garden/downing-urn/

📷: James Gagliardi, Supervisory Horticulturist

Planted among a sea of Joe Pye w**d at Smithsonian Gardens you will find a special urn memory of landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing. The Downing Urn was originally placed on the Mall in 1856 before being restored and moved to the Enid A. Haupt Garden in 1989.

Read more about the Downing Urn: https://gardens.si.edu/gardens/haupt-garden/downing-urn/

📷: James Gagliardi, Supervisory Horticulturist

The Smithsonian Gardens that almost were 🌺 In 1852 a young  landscape designer, Andrew Jackson Downing, was commissioned...
08/12/2021

The Smithsonian Gardens that almost were 🌺 In 1852 a young landscape designer, Andrew Jackson Downing, was commissioned to develop a plan to beautify the public spaces around the National Mall in Washington, D.C. This included land around the White House and the U.S. Capitol building, as well as the Smithsonian Castle.

Downing’s plan to create “a public museum of living trees and shrubs” for the Smithsonian grounds was funded by Congress, but before the work was completed Downing died tragically in a steamboat accident. A few of Downing’s other designs for sites in D.C. survive to the present day. You can see his work at Lafayette Park, which lies across the street from the White House.

📸: From Washington Monument (E.) over Agricultural Grounds to the Capitol, Washington, U.S.A., 1908. Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Historic gardens stereograph collection.

Andrew Jackson Downing, “Downing's Plan for the Mall,” Histories of the National Mall, accessed August 12, 2021, http://mallhistory.org/items/show/356.

#Smithsonian175

08/11/2021

Oh no, what’s eating these leaves?!

No need to worry this is simply evidence of LOTS of happy leaf cutter bees. These bees use the hollowed out tubes of dried plant stems, branches, or other cavities as a nest for their eggs. They cut pieces leaves, in this case those of redbud (Cercis canadensis), to wrap up and protect their babies in the tubes. Be glad to see these holes, it means a #pollinator is happy and at home in your garden!

Video description: heart shape green leaves with many circular cuts on the edges.

🎥: Sylvia Schmeichel, Horticulturist

#LeafCutterBee #PollinatorGarden #BotanicalGarden #CercisCanadensis #Bee #PublicGardens #SmithsonianGardens #GardenDC #PollinatorPlant

Address

600 Maryland Ave SW
Washington D.C., DC
20024

General information

Welcome to our page! Please feel free to share thoughts about our posts, ask us questions, or tell us about your visit. We hope you’ll contribute to this interactive forum and to our ongoing conversation about the work we do to further the Smithsonian's mission to increase and diffuse knowledge. While on-topic discussion is encouraged, we ask that you express yourself in a civil manner and treat other users with respect. The Smithsonian also monitors and may remove posts consistent with its terms of use, as described at http://si.edu/Termsofuse#user-gen. For our Privacy Policy: http://www.si.edu/Privacy TOURS To arrange special tours for school groups, garden clubs and groups of 10 or more, please contact us at [email protected] INTERNSHIPS Internship, Fellowship and Volunteer Program Telephone (202) 633-5840 Fax (202) 633-5697 Email [email protected]

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Smithsonian Gardens posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Smithsonian Gardens:

Videos


Other Washington D.C. museums

Show All