Arctic Studies Center

Arctic Studies Center The Arctic Studies Center invites you to explore the history of northern peoples, cultures, and environments and the issues that matter to northern residents today.
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Visit our blog: http://nmnh.typepad.com/arctic_studies/ Welcome to our page! Please feel free to share thoughts about our posts, ask us questions, or tell us about your visit. We hope you’ll contribute to this interactive forum and to our ongoing conversation about the work we do to further the Smithsonian's mission to increase and diffuse knowledge. While on-topic discussion is encouraged, we ask that you express yourself in a civil manner and treat other users with respect. The Smithsonian also monitors and may remove posts consistent with its terms of use, as described at http://si.edu/Termsofuse#user-gen.

Operating as usual

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center
03/21/2020

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center

During this time when many museums are temporarily closed, we'll be sharing from the online collections and tours from museum friends around the globe. Take a virtual tour of some of the permanent and current exhibitions at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Protip: Read the Virtual Tour Tips to maximize your experience.

https://naturalhistory.si.edu/visit/virtual-tour

Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close March 14
03/18/2020
Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close March 14

Smithsonian Museums and the National Zoo To Close March 14

As a public health precaution due to COVID-19 (coronavirus), all Smithsonian museums in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area and New York City, including the National Zoo, will temporarily close to the public starting Saturday, March 14. The health and safety of Smithsonian visitors, staff and vo...

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center
02/19/2020

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center

Smithsonian Spotlight: James Temte
5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21

“Our Seas Are Rising and So Are We.” Artist James Temte (Northern Cheyenne) discusses Indigenous identity, climate change, resilience and how nature fuels his latest body of work. Temte is working with the Alaska Venture Fund to generate an art forward platform for reclaiming, sharing and validating Indigenous narratives. Included with admission (free for museum members). Meet in the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center.

Recovering Voices
02/19/2020

Recovering Voices

Closing Night of the #MotherTongueFilmFesitval will feature One Day in the Life of Noah Piugattuk from acclaimed director Zacharias Kunuk. Set in Kapuivik, north Baffin Island 1961, were Noah Piugattuk’s nomadic Inuit band live and hunt by dog team as his ancestors did. When a white man known as Boss arrives what appears to be a chance meeting soon opens the prospect of momentous change. Come see One Day in the Life of Noah Piugattuk ,Sunday Feb 23rd at Georgetown University. IsumaTV

Join us next week for the Mongolian Studies Conference!  https://nmnh.typepad.com/arctic_studies/2020/01/14th-annual-mon...
01/31/2020
14th Annual Mongolian Studies Conference

Join us next week for the Mongolian Studies Conference! https://nmnh.typepad.com/arctic_studies/2020/01/14th-annual-mongolian-studies-conference.html

The 14th Annual Mongolian Studies Conference, co-hosted by the Mongolian Cultural Center, the Embassy of Mongolia to the U.S., the Mongolian National University of Arts and Culture, and the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, is being held on February 7-9, 2020, at the Smithsonian Natura...

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center
01/01/2020

Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center

These cuffs by Haida Creations embody traditional Haida motifs inspired by Haida legends. The anodizing process is what gives these niobium bracelets their amazing color. Niobium is a rare and strong precious metal, #DidYouKnow it's also hypoallergenic? Available at the Anchorage Museum store.

Sealaska Heritage Institute
05/28/2019

Sealaska Heritage Institute

Haida master weaver Delores Churchill standing next to the Haida exhibit at the #SoboleffBuilding today. The hat was made for Delores by her mother, the master weaver Selina Peratrovich. Selina also made the Haida button blanket, which was designed by Nathan Jackson. The Chilkat apron seen in the photo was the first Chilkat weaving Delores made. The artist-in-residence space at the #SoboleffBuilding is named for Delores Churchill. (Photo by Steven Pfister)

An incredibly well preserved foal from the Siberian permafrost may help scientists understand more about the extinct Len...
05/16/2019
Scientists Extracted Liquid Blood From 42,000-Year-Old Foal Found in Siberian Permafrost

An incredibly well preserved foal from the Siberian permafrost may help scientists understand more about the extinct Lenskaya horse. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/scientists-extracted-liquid-blood-42000-year-old-foal-found-siberian-permafrost-180971979/

The team hopes to grow viable cells out of the foal’s tissue, paving the way for further experimentation aimed at cloning the extinct horse

Here at the Arctic Studies Center we explore the history of northern people, cultures and environments as well as the is...
05/03/2019

Here at the Arctic Studies Center we explore the history of northern people, cultures and environments as well as the issues that matter to northern residents today. This infographic gives a good overview of where we work and what we do. We hope you’ll join us as we excavate arctic sites, support indigenous efforts to preserve cultural heritage, and work with communities and scholars to share the knowledge preserved in museum collections and archives.

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History
04/26/2019

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

We mourn the loss of our beloved friend and colleague, Dennis Stanford, Curator of North American Archaeology and Director of the Paleoindian Program.

Dennis joined the Department of Anthropology in 1972, launching a 47-year career at the museum. He became one of the best-known archaeologists in North America, with a gift for communicating research to both scholarly and public audiences. At a time when Paleoindian archaeology was still in its formative stages, Dennis helped advance the field through his studies of lithic materials, especially the distinctive stone tools known as Clovis points.

The last few decades of his research focused on the origins of the first inhabitants of North America, along with human adaptations to the changing environment as the last Ice Age was ending.

During his career Dennis authored 136 publications, including several books. "Across Atlantic Ice," which described his theory for an Atlantic route taken by the earliest Americans, was his most recent book.

Today we want to celebrate our wonderful volunteer, Gina. So much of what we do is possible because of our volunteers an...
04/23/2019
Volunteer Appreciation: Gina Reitenauer

Today we want to celebrate our wonderful volunteer, Gina. So much of what we do is possible because of our volunteers and we truly appreciate all the work they do. https://nmnh.typepad.com/arctic_studies/2019/04/volunteer-appreciation-gina-reitenauer.html

Here at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center, our volunteers do some amazing work. For Volunteer appreciation month, we’d like to highlight Gina Reitenauer who has been working with us on preparing materials for publication. She has assisted with bibliographic formatting, acquiring image permissi...

Judge strikes down oil drilling in Arctic Ocean, reinstating restrictions put in place in 2015 and 2016.
04/02/2019
Judge Blocks Oil Drilling in Arctic Ocean

Judge strikes down oil drilling in Arctic Ocean, reinstating restrictions put in place in 2015 and 2016.

The ruling says only Congress—not presidential executive orders—has the authority to reverse bans on oil drilling leases

Smithsonian
04/02/2019

Smithsonian

You can see cherry blossoms in peak bloom without the crowds in this lantern slide from about the 1920s. The shot of the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., is in Smithsonian Gardens' Archives of American Gardens.

Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian
03/26/2019

Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian

“It can be argued that the needle was the critical artifact that made life in the North possible—the needle and the ingenuity of northern Native seamstresses who could craft waterproof parkas out of seal intestines and fish skins; make parkas, pants, mittens, and boots that stood up to the harshest winter conditions from polar bear fur and the hides of bearded seals, moose, and caribou; sew lightweight parkas of bird skins; weave moisture-wicking socks from grass; and create baskets and containers from animal bladders and fish and bird skins, as well as grasses and birchbark.”
—Stephen Loring, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center, in “Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian”

Photo: Tlingit woman’s moose-horn sewing box containing sinew used for thread, an awl with a wooden handle in a piece of skin, a wooden stamp representing a flower, a stone scratcher, a lancet made from a bear’s tooth, a bear’s tooth used to smooth seams, a paint bag containing red paint, a piece of hemlock fungus used as paint, a black paint stone, a mussel-shell knife, and a pair of abalone-shell earrings; 1850–1880. Sitka, Sealaska Native Corporation, Alaska. 11/5411

#BecauseOfHerStory #WomensHistoryMonth Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center Sealaska Heritage Institute Sitka National Historical Park

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History
03/19/2019

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

Happy Birthday to...us! #OTD in 1910, we opened our doors to the public for the first time. Thank you for filling our halls with millions of memories for the past 109 years.

Tongass Historical Museum
03/19/2019

Tongass Historical Museum

Haida master weaver Delores Churchill speaking to Museum Midday goers about her art, family history, and the basketry of her lineage that shows the continuation of traditional weaving through generations.

Join us tomorrow at the National Museum of the American Indian at 4 PM for a series of talks on The Art and Science of C...
02/26/2019
The Art and Science of Celestial Navigation Across the Smithsonian Universe

Join us tomorrow at the National Museum of the American Indian at 4 PM for a series of talks on The Art and Science of Celestial Navigation Across the Smithsonian Universe. Dr. William Fitzhugh will be discussing the methods used by Vikings, Inuit, and Narwhals to navigate in the arctic.

The Art and Science of Celestial Navigation Across the Smithsonian Universe 02/26/2019 Posted at 01:50 PM in Anthropology, Arctic, Events, Material Culture, Museums, Science | Permalink | Comments (0) | | |

Recovering Voices
02/16/2019

Recovering Voices

Drawing its name from the #Haida saying, “the world is as sharp as the edge of a knife”, Gwaai Edenshaw and Helen Haig-Brown’s film is the first spoken entirely in dialects of the Haida language. SGaawaay K'uuna: Edge of the Knife screens on Thursday, February 21st at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in partnership with Canadian Embassy, Washington, D.C. and Arctic Studies Center.

For information on all the films featured in this year’s festival, visit https://mothertongue.si.edu/ #MotherTongue2019 #HaidaGwaii

Recovering Voices
02/16/2019

Recovering Voices

From North American filmmaker Sam Osborn, Tǫǫ Oozhrii Zhit Tsyaa Tsal Dhidii (Boy in the Moon) is an animated film in the Gwich'in (Athabaskan) language, following a boy that leaves his family to save them from famine. It screens on Thursday, February 21st at Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in partnership with Canadian Embassy, Washington, D.C. and Arctic Studies Center

For information on all the films featured in this year’s festival, visit mothertongue.si.edu #MotherTongue2019

Be sure to check out our narwhal as well.
01/26/2019

Be sure to check out our narwhal as well.

Our elephant and the Hope Diamond—not to mention our staff—are looking forward to seeing you! Our doors will open on Tuesday, January 29 at 10am.

Smithsonian Global
11/19/2018
Smithsonian Global

Smithsonian Global

#SISpotlight: Aron Crowell works as the Alaska Director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center, founded in 1988. Crowell has many areas of expertise, including cultural anthropology, archaeology, and oral history. Crowell is continuously inspired by the Smithsonian’s 140 years of work and research in Alaska, and continues the Smithsonian’s legacy of exploration there through his work with the Arctic Studies Center.

To read more about Crowell’s work: https://s.si.edu/2OmnvAo

The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum
08/21/2018

The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

We're featuring the schooner Bowdoin under full sail (1978) for our August collectible button-of-the-month! Small but strong, the Bowdoin was built specifically to navigate icy Arctic waters. Read more about her here: http://www.bowdoin.edu/arctic-museum/biographies/bowdoin.shtml

National Anthropological Archives
08/15/2018

National Anthropological Archives

#DAMS (n): After imaging, where do the image files go? We import our data into the Smithsonian Institution's Digital Asset Management System. A DAMS is software which supports creation, storage, and access to digital objects! Since the high-resolution image files being made in the NAA digilab are so large, it isn't sustainable to preserve them on a local machine or hard drive. Importing our data to the DAMS also ensures that audio-visual files created around the institution receive uniform metadata and have a secure place to live. There are many different DAMS available for museums and cultural institutions to use, but the SI DAMS was designed just for our purposes. #ABCDigi

Recovering Voices
05/30/2018
Recovering Voices

Recovering Voices

Visit the Arctic Studies Center's website and check out Material Traditions: Twining Cedar – a set of 15 instructional videos and a bilingual guide with comprehensive instruction and cultural context on how to prepare materials and weave Annette Island-style red cedar bark twined baskets.

What do you think this whale shaped object was used for? Find out in this week’s #collectionhighlight! http://nmnh.typep...
05/15/2018
Collections Highlight E48384: Weight

What do you think this whale shaped object was used for? Find out in this week’s #collectionhighlight! http://nmnh.typepad.com/arctic_studies/2018/05/collections-highlight-e48384-weight.html

By Tiffany Priest This weight, made from plumbago, also known as graphite, and carved in the image of a bowhead whale, was donated by Edward Nelson in 1882. It was collected from Sledge Island in Alaska. The catalog record notation says, “Used on line to be passed over the flukes...

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