4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge

4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge Learn more about Saintonge and 4th Middlesex by going to http://www.saintonge.org
In 1781, the 85ème Régiment de Saintonge and four other regiments of the French army marched south from Newport, Rhode Island to Virginia where they would join the American forces under General Washington and make the critical contribution to the final defeat of the British Crown forces at Yorktown. Today, we maintain the élan and esprit de corps that characterized these crack troops. Our faithfulness to that spirit has made the recreated Régiment de Saintonge widely known and respected both on and off the field. In addition to the 85ème Régiment de Saintonge, we also portray the 4th Regiment of Militia (Middlesex County, Massachusetts), part of the colonial forces that contributed to the defense of the colonies as a complement to the regular army.
(1)

Joseph Plumb Martin
11/23/2019
Joseph Plumb Martin

Joseph Plumb Martin

At age 70, Joseph Plumb Martin wrote "A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers, and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, Interspersed with Anecdotes of Incidents that Occurred Within His Own Observations," one of the only accounts of the Revolutionary War told by one of the common soldiers w...

11/21/2019
The Swords of George Washington

The Swords of George Washington

Author, Erik Goldstein discusses his new book "The Swords ofGeorge Washington." This interview is 1 of 4 by Erik Goldstein discussing his book "The Swords of...

He Tells the Stories of Black Soldiers Erased by History - Re-enact: Lifestyle, History, War Stories, and Events for Re-...
11/12/2019
He Tells the Stories of Black Soldiers Erased by History - Re-enact: Lifestyle, History, War Stories, and Events for Re-enactment Enthusiasts

He Tells the Stories of Black Soldiers Erased by History - Re-enact: Lifestyle, History, War Stories, and Events for Re-enactment Enthusiasts

Living historian Joe Becton created a tour company to educate visitors to Philadelphia on the roles of Africans during the Revolutionary War outside of slavery. Thanks to his power as a storyteller and a growing interest in history through a black lens, most days, he’s booked.

Fort Devens
11/11/2019

Fort Devens

Today, we honor Veterans who have served and are serving to protect the freedoms we enjoy #VeteransDay2019

Revolutionary Reflections: French Memories of the War for America - The American Revolution Institute
10/29/2019
Revolutionary Reflections: French Memories of the War for America - The American Revolution Institute

Revolutionary Reflections: French Memories of the War for America - The American Revolution Institute

The American Revolution marked the beginning of an age of democratic revolutions that swept over France and challenged the old order throughout the Atlantic world. The French officers who served in the American War of Independence, whether as idealistic volunteers or resolute soldiers of their king,...

10/29/2019

Did you take a picture of the 4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge at an event this year? Would you be willing to share it with us?

French Wargames- Le Camp de Vaussieux 1778
10/21/2019
French Wargames- Le Camp de Vaussieux 1778

French Wargames- Le Camp de Vaussieux 1778

Historians have long debated, proved, or debunked connections between the revolutions of the United States and of France. The societies whic...

W3R (Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route)
10/14/2019

W3R (Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route)

Sat. November 16, 2019 7:30PM - 9:30PM
American Revolution Round Table of Northern Delaware.
Hale Byrnes House. 606 Old Stanton-Christiana Road, Newark, DE 19713-2109. The Public is Cordially Invited to Attend.
"Our Greatest Allies: How the Revolutionary War
Changed American Opinions of the French"
Speaker: Norman Desmarais
Well-behaved children always welcomed
$5 at the door includes coffee & dessert

See also:https://allthingsliberty.com/author/norman-desmarais/

5th Connecticut Regiment
10/12/2019

5th Connecticut Regiment

As there are few flags that survive from the American Revolution and none from the original Fifth, our current flag’s design is based on information from a number of sources. The result is, I believe, an accurate representation of an early war regimental standard. The following information should help in discussing the design with the public.
COLOR
In "Record of Service of Connecticut Men in the Revolution," compiled by the State Adj. General, Hartford, p.93. the colors of the "Regimental Standards" are given as follows: 1st Regt, yellow; 2d, blue; 3d, scarlet; 4th, crimson; 5th, white; 6th, azure; 7th, blue; 8th orange.
STATE SEAL
The “Colony arms, with the motto ‘qui transtulit sustinet’ round it in gold” was placed on the standards and drums carried by Connecticut troops who marched to Boston in 1775. The surviving standard of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Regiment has the state arms and motto on one side and the unit designation on the other. The motto (Who Transporteth Sustaineth) refers to the Biblical transplantation of the vines from Egypt. This is because the Puritans equated their migrations to the wanderings of the Israelites. Most issues of state paper currency starting with the 1709 carried the grapevine and the motto seal with three vines, each holding three clusters of grapes. It is believed that the three vines the original settlements of Hartford, Windsor and Wethersfield.
VICTORY WREATH
The divisional colors of Webb’s Additional Continental Regiment are adorned with a painted victory wreath, sword and the numeral ‘1”.
“LIBERTY”
General Charles Lee, in 1775, urged that Army flags bear the motto “Liberty.”
Adjutant General Major Baurmeister of the Hessian forces reported that “. . .We came into possession of eleven enemy flags with the motto ‘Liberty. . .” at the battle of Long Island fought August 26, 1776.
CONSTRUCTION
The flag is made of silk fabric hand painted with oil based paint.

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield
10/11/2019

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield

October 11, 1781 - Allies begin to dig the Second Parallel.

Hubbard on Black Soldiers at Bennington, 9 Oct.
10/09/2019
Hubbard on Black Soldiers at Bennington, 9 Oct.

Hubbard on Black Soldiers at Bennington, 9 Oct.

Also at the Massachusetts Historical Society, tonight’s public lecture is “The Black Presence at the Battle of Bennington” by Phil Holla...

10/04/2019

Great day working with the kids camp is going up

Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School
10/03/2019

Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School

Join us at Daniels Farmstead in Blackstone on Saturday, October 5th – Sunday, October 6th, as we stroll through time, back to the 18th century when America was in the midst of a battle for freedom from British rule. This live-action historical simulation is a wonderful opportunity to combine our academic and vocational curriculums and bring history alive for our students and our community.

(www.valleytech.k12.ma.us/alivinghistoryevent)

Fort Ticonderoga
09/30/2019

Fort Ticonderoga

Happy #MuseumMonday! This medal, known as the Ordre de Saint-Louis, was created by King Louis XIV to recognize officers of distinction in the French military. Featuring a depiction of Saint Louis, a French king and Catholic saint, this award was restricted to France’s Catholic officers who had served more than ten years. Both Jean-Nicholas Desandrouins (an army engineer that assisted in fortifying Fort Carillon) and Anne-Joseph-Hippolyte de Maurès de Malartic (the Marquis de Montcalm’s aide-de-camp) were presented with this order in recognition of their valor in the 1758 Battle of Carillon. Few of these medals have survived to the present day, as many were destroyed during the French Revolution as symbols of France’s overthrown monarchy.

This medal was inventoried and photographed in a project made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (Grant# MA-30-18-0166-18).
#ticonderogacollections #MedalMonday

Experienced reenacors know how important it is to stay hydrated at events
09/29/2019

Experienced reenacors know how important it is to stay hydrated at events

Have to fact check this
09/27/2019

Have to fact check this

Coolest thing you’ll see today:

Monty Python's House of Memes
09/18/2019

Monty Python's House of Memes

Life is short. Taunt someone today.

American Revolution Round Table of Philadelphia
09/11/2019

American Revolution Round Table of Philadelphia

The Prayer
September 11th is soon approaching and while we remember the terror attacks of 2001, we should also remember the largest land battle of the Revolutionary War that occurred on September 11, 1777 at Brandywine.
Before the battle, Reverend Joab Trout gathered with the troops on the night of September 10, 1777 and said the following prayer:
The entire sermon, which can be found in the New Hampshire State Archives, is too long for me to copy in this post, so I have chosen excerpts that moved me the most.
“Soldiers and Countrymen: We have met this evening perhaps for the last time. We have shared the toil of march, the peril of flight, and the dismay of the retreat; alike we have endured the cold and hunger, the contumely of the internal foe and the courage of foreign oppression. We have sat, night after night, beside the campfire; we have together heard the roll of the reveille which called us to duty, or the beat of the tattoo which gave the signal for the hardy sleep of the soldier with the earth for his bed and knapsack for his pillow.
And now, soldiers and brethren, we have met in the peaceful valley on the eve of battle while the sunlight is dying away behind yonder heights, the sunlight that, tomorrow morn, will glimmer on scenes of blood. We have met amid the whitening tents of our encampment, in time of terror and gloom, have gathered together, God grant it may not be the last time.
It is a solemn moment, Brethren, does not the voice of nature seem to echo the sympathies of the hour? The flag of our country droops heavily from yonder staff; the breeze has died away along the green plains of Chadd's Ford--the heights of the Brandywine arise gloomily beyond yonder stream--all nature pauses in solemn silence, on the eve of tomorrow.
***
Soldiers, I look around upon your familiar faces with a strange interest. Tomorrow morning we will go forth to battle, for I need not tell you that your unworthy minister will march with you, invoking God's aid in the fight--we will march forth to battle! Need I exhort you to fight the good fight, to fight for your homesteads, for your wives and children? I might urge you by galling memories of British wrongs; I might paint all this again in the vivid colors of the terrible reality, if I thought your courage needed such wild excitement. But I know you are strong in the might of the Lord. You will march forth to battle on the morrow with light hearts and determined spirits, though the duty of avenging the dead may rest heavy on your souls.
And in the hour of battle, when all around is lit by the lurid cannonade-glare, and the piercing musket-flash, when the wounded strew the ground, and the dead litter your path, then remember that God is with you; God the awful and infinite fights for you and will triumph Great Father, we bow before thee, we invoke thy blessing, we deprecate thy wrath, we thee return thanks for the past, we ask thy aid for the future; for we are in times of trouble, O Lord, and sore beset by foes, merciless and unpitying. The sword gleams over our land, the dust of the sod is dampened with the blood of our neighbors and friends. O God of mercy, we pray thy blessing upon the American arms. Make the man of our hearts strong in thy wisdom; bless, we beseech thee, with renewed life and strength, our hope and thy instrument, even George Washington. Shower thy counsels on the Honorable the Continental Congress. Visit the tents of our host, comfort the soldier in his wounds and afflictions; nerve him for the fight and prepare him for the hour of death. And in the hour of defeat, O God of hosts, do thou be our stay, and in the hour of triumph be thou our guide. Teach us to be merciful. Though the memory of galling wrongs be at our hearts knocking for admittance, that they may fill us with the desire of revenge, yet let us, O Lord, spare the vanquished, though they never spared us. In the hour of death do thou guide us to the abode prepared for the blest. So shall we return thanks to thee through Christ our Redeemer. God prosper the cause. Amen.”

Sadly, Chaplain Joab Trout did not survive the battle.

Histoires de France 2.0
09/05/2019

Histoires de France 2.0

Chesapeake, 5 septembre 1781, conclusions (19/19)
La victoire de la flotte française ce 5 septembre 1781 empêche la Royal Navy de secourir les forces du général Charles Cornwallis à Yorktown. Elle évite également toute interférence britannique avec les renforts et provisions envoyés depuis Newport et les Antilles françaises aux armées coalisées de George Washington, Rochambeau et La Fayette. Cette bataille amène ainsi la chute de Yorktown un mois plus tard, puis l'indépendance des États-Unis reconnues par les Britanniques en 1783. Dans son roman historique, James A. Michener écrit sur la bataille de la baie de Chesapeake :

« Il est curieux de constater qu’aucun Américain ne participa au combat décisif de la guerre d’indépendance américaine, à l’engagement que Washington considérait comme déterminant. Des canonniers de Marseille et de Bordeaux, ainsi que des jeunes officiers du Kent et du Sussex, mais pas un seul Américain. Il n’y avait pas de marins du Nantucket, ni de tireurs du New Hampshire, ni de sloops ou de frégates de Boston. Le destin de l’Amérique fut scellé par des Français engagés dans un combat sans merci contre les Anglais. »

Histoires de France 2.0
09/05/2019

Histoires de France 2.0

Chesapeake, 5 septembre 1781, 20h (16/19)
Le soleil décline inexorablement à Chesapeake. Les canons français ont eu l’avantage. La flotte britannique est pulvérisée. Ses bateaux, privés de mâts et de voiles, ne peuvent plus adopter de manœuvres offensives. Sur les 19 vaisseaux de ligne engagés par les Britanniques, 6 sont devenus inutilisables, dont 1 le « Terrible » a lui plus souffert dans la bataille. Après un moment de flottement, l’amiral britanniques Graves commence à décrocher, il ordonne à sa flotte de battre en retraite. Le comte de Grasse exulte, la marine britannique est battue !

Histoires de France 2.0
09/05/2019

Histoires de France 2.0

Chesapeake, 5 septembre 1781, 17h (13/19)
Près du rivage, les Insurgés américains observent la bataille navale engagée entre les Français et les Britanniques qui doit sceller le sort de l’Amérique. Les Britanniques ont déjà engagé 2 salves, pulvérisant ainsi les ponts des vaisseaux français qui tardent à réagir. « Pourquoi est-ce que les Français ne rendent pas la pareille ? » s’interroge un Insurgé. On lui répond : « Les Français se battent autrement. Garde l’œil sur les mats anglais. »

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield
09/05/2019

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield

September 5, 1781 - British and French naval forces clash in the Battle of the Capes. Fleets maintain contact for several days, but do not re-engage. Ultimately, Graves returns to New York for repairs, and DeGrasse returns to the Chesapeake Bay to resume the blockade.
In one of the most, if not the most, important naval battles in US history, not one American sailor was involved.

Histoires de France 2.0
09/05/2019

Histoires de France 2.0

Chesapeake, 5 septembre 1781, le contexte (1/19)
À l’été 1781, l'amiral de Grasse est à Saint-Domingue. Il s’apprête à escorter vers la France un impressionnant convoi de 160 navires marchands chargés de sucre, épices, cacao et indigo. L’escadre qu’il commande comprend 24 vaisseaux de ligne, dont le navire amiral « Ville de Paris ». S’ajoutent des frégates et des corvettes. Grâce à la passion de Louis XVI pour la marine, et au programme de construction navale qu’il a lancé entre 1774 et 1778, la Marine royale dispose alors d’une flotte sans précédent. C’est là qu’intervient le comte de Rochambeau, qui dirige le corps expéditionnaire français allié aux Insurgés américains. Il demande à l’amiral de Grasse de délaisser cette mission d’escorte et d’acheminer des troupes à 600 km au sud de New York, dans l’estuaire du fleuve Chesapeake. C’est en effet là que se trouve Yorktown, un gros bourg de Virginie où sont concentrés 8 000 soldats britanniques, soit un tiers de leurs troupes. Rochambeau veut remporter contre eux une victoire décisive. Louis XVI laisse le choix à de Grasse, ce dernier choisit d'intervenir et quitte Saint-Domingue le 3 août 1781 avec 3 000 soldats embarqués. Il arrive à Chesapeake le 1er septembre, l’amiral britannique Graves arrive le 4 septembre au crépuscule, bien décidé à en découdre avec sa flotte composée de 19 vaisseaux de ligne.

Address

Sudbury, MA
01776

General information

If you are interested in joining us, we are always interested in people who share our enthusiasm and interest in history, as well as high standards of authenticity and safety. Because we are a family-oriented group, we welcome the involvement of children as well as their parents, and our children are actively involved in the life of the regiment. To assist you in learning more about our activities, you can go to our webpage, www.saintonge.org, for additional resources and related links and to look at our scheduled events. If you have any questions, you can contact us by email at [email protected]

Opening Hours

Monday 15:00 - 20:00
Tuesday 15:00 - 19:00
Wednesday 15:00 - 21:00
Thursday 15:00 - 20:00
Friday 15:00 - 21:00
Saturday 09:00 - 21:00
Sunday 09:00 - 18:00

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when 4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to 4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Sudbury

Show All