4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge

4th Middlesex/85eme Regiment Saintonge Learn more about Saintonge and 4th Middlesex by going to http://www.saintonge.org
In 1781, the 85ème Régiment de Saintonge and four other regiments of the French army marched south from Newport, Rhode Island to Virginia where they would join the American forces under General Washington and make the critical contribution to the final defeat of the British Crown forces at Yorktown. Today, we maintain the élan and esprit de corps that characterized these crack troops. Our faithfulness to that spirit has made the recreated Régiment de Saintonge widely known and respected both on and off the field. In addition to the 85ème Régiment de Saintonge, we also portray the 4th Regiment of Militia (Middlesex County, Massachusetts), part of the colonial forces that contributed to the defense of the colonies as a complement to the regular army.
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6th Pennsylvania Regiment
06/06/2020

6th Pennsylvania Regiment

Happy Birthday Nathan Hale (June 6, 1755)

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield
06/05/2020

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield

Shari Seachrist Anderson took these of Yorktown Onions around the earthworks.

Warlord Games
06/03/2020

Warlord Games

Operation Bookworm!

Our friends at The British Modern Military History Society are looking to publish a book, comprising of articles on military and wartime experiences and recollections from members and their families.
This will also be supported by articles from other associates, authors, and historians.

All profits will go to the charity Blind Veterans UK.

To find out more hit the link: https://www.bmmhs.org/bmmhs-operation-bookworm/

06/01/2020
Sudbury Companies of Militia & Minute

Sudbury Companies of Militia & Minute

Sadly, for the first time in the history of the Sudbury Companies of Militia and Minute, there will be no Colonial Faire in September of 2020. It has been officially canceled by the Faire Committee

Lecture and Garden Tour: Fever and Sickness in the Continental Army - Washington Crossing Historic Park
04/28/2020
Lecture and Garden Tour: Fever and Sickness in the Continental Army - Washington Crossing Historic Park

Lecture and Garden Tour: Fever and Sickness in the Continental Army - Washington Crossing Historic Park

Lecture Historian Kim Burdick will visit Washington Crossing Historic Park (PA) on Sunday, May 31 at 2 PM. She’ll present a free lecture discussing the dangers of the rampant spread of disease in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. The most dangerous place for a soldier during the w...

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield
04/27/2020

Colonial National Historical Park - Yorktown Battlefield

Redoubt 9, late spring.
NPS Photo/ljw

Virtual Sudbury march
04/20/2020

Virtual Sudbury march

And a BIG thank you to all who contributed these photos!

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/20/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Minute Man National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service)
04/20/2020
Minute Man National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Minute Man National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service)

At Minute Man National Historical Park the opening battle of the Revolution is brought to life as visitors explore the battlefields and structures associated with April 19, 1775, and witness the American revolutionary spirit through the writings of the Concord authors.

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 5:30 - 6:00 p.m. Menotomy (continued)

The bloodiest fighting of the Battle of Lexington and Concord was actually in Menotomy. Nearly 40 out of 73 British soldiers who died that day were killed in Menotomy, and 25 out of 49 colonists killed. Colonial forces in that area swelled to nearly 4,000 men as companies and regiments from Essex County joined other arriving from Needham and Dedham. That, combined with a more densely built environment meant the fighting was no longer at distance but very close quarters.

It was here that 80 year old Samuel Whittemore, heavily armed with musket, pistols and sword, attacked the British column and was subsequently shot and bayoneted multiple times. He died... at the age of 98!

It was also here that two rather unwise non-combatants, Jason Winship and Jabez Wyman, lingered too long over their drinks at Cooper's Tavern and were killed. A deposition of Benjamin and Rachel Cooper said the two were "“most barbarously and inhumanely murdered… being stabbed through in many places, their heads mauled, skulls broke, and their brains beat out on the floor and walls of the house.”

Mercifully for all, the column was not far now from Boston. With sunlight fading, the battle would soon end.

#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 3:30- 4:00 p.m. April 19, 1775

After a brief rest and time to tend the wounded, the British column now under the command of Hugh Earl Percy (both Major John Pitcairn and Lt. Colonel Francis Smith were wounded) resumed their march to Boston. With the addition of 1st Brigade, the column is now more than 1600 strong. Smith's exhausted soldiers were placed at the head of the column while fresh troops from the brigade form the rear-guard, the most dangerous post. Lt. Frederick MacKenzie of the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers wrote in his journal...

"...our Regiment received orders to form the rear guard. We immediately lined the walls and other cover in our front with some marksmen, and retired from the right of companies by files to the high ground a small distance in our rear, where we again formed in line, and remained in that position for near half an hour, during which time the flank companies, and the other regiments of the Brigade began their march in one column on the road towards Cambridge... before the column had advanced a mile on the road, we were fired at from all quarters, but particularly from the houses on the roadside, and the adjacent stone walls. Several of the Troops were killed and wounded in this way, and the soldiers were so enraged at suffering from an unseen Enemy, that they forced open many of the houses from which the fire proceeded, and put to death all those found in them..."

#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, TIME OUT
Peter Salem and Patriots of Color

Peter Salem was born enslaved. In 1775 he enlisted, with his owner's permission, as a minute man in Capt. Simon Edgell's Company. Salem's unit entered the fight on the Battle Road near Brooks Hill. A few weeks later, during the Siege of Boston, Salem enlisted in the Massachusetts army and fought at Bunker Hill. There, as a traditional story of the time claimed, he was likely responsible for killing Major John Pitcairn, who led the British attack. The next year, Salem enlisted in the Continental Army for three years. He served in the 6th Massachusetts Regiment, trained at Valley Forge, and fought in the Battles of Saratoga (1777), Monmouth (1778), and Stony Point (1779). At the war's end, Peter Salem was a free man. He married and built a small house in Leicester, Massachusetts. In his old age, no longer able to support himself, Salem was forced to return to Framingham. He died in 1816 and was buried in a pauper's grave. A monument was later erected to honor Salem's service in the American Revolution.
Learn More! https://www.nps.gov/mima/patriotsofcolor.htm

#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

04/19/2020
Parker’s Revenge!

Parker’s Revenge!

Ranger Jim explores the Parker’s Revenge battle site and highlights new evidence.

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. April 19, 1775
The Regulars wrap up their search and destroy operation. Captain Parsons of HM 10th Reg't, who was out with 4 companies searching for arms and supplies returns to Concord and the main body. Carts are procured for their wounded, including a chaise for Lt. Sutherland who was wounded at the North Bridge. By about noon, the column is reformed and Lt. Colonel Smith gives the order to march. They now have 18 miles to go before they reach the safety of Boston. The enemy, however, is growing in strength and is also on the move. Private Thaddeus Blood, of Capt. Nathan Barrett's Concord militia company wrote, ""...it was thot best to go to the east part of the Town & take them as they came back……”
#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 9:00 a.m. April 19, 1775
The minute men and militia advanced from Punkatasset Hill to a field on high ground overlooking North Bridge. With additional companies from Bedford and Acton, their numbers now exceed 400 men! The British companies left to guard the bridge have concentrated at the bridge itself, still on the same side of the river as the rebels. Both the British and the colonists were content to stay where they were, but smoke was seen rising above the roofs of the town. The colonial soldiers assumed the worst, that the town was being destroyed. The regulars had set fire to a pile of tents, carriage parts and other supplies. But when the flames spread to the townhouse, they put it out after an elderly widow, Martha Moulton insisted they do so.
From her deposition to the General Court, February 4, 1776 …
"they had set fire to the great gun carriages just by the house, and while they were in flames your petitioner saw smoke arise out of the Town House higher than the ridge of the house. Then your petitioner did put her life, as it were, in her hand, and ventured to beg of the officers to send some of their men to put out the fire; but they took no notice, only sneered. Your petitioner, seeing the Town House on fire, and must in a few minutes be past recovery, did yet venture to expostulate with the officers just by her, as she stood with a pail of water in her hand, begging of them to send, etc. When they only said, “O, mother, we won’t do you any harm!” “Don’t be concerned, mother,” and such like talk. The house still burning, and knowing that all the row of four or five houses, as well as the school house, was in certain danger, your petitioner (not knowing but she might provoke them by her insufficient pleading) yet ventured to put as much strength to her arguments as an unfortunate widow could think of... At last, by one pail of water after another, they sent and did extinguish the fire."
#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 8:30 a.m. April 19, 1775: The search of Barrett Farm
Colonel James Barrett, at age 65, commanded the 3rd Middlesex Militia Regiment. He was also a member of the Provincial Congress, and responsible for the arms and military supplies being gathered and stockpiled by the Congress. Their goal was to raise and equip an army of 15,000 men! General Thomas Gage knew there were supplies and even cannon stored at the Barrett property, which is why he wanted it searched.

Colonel Barrett was out with the militia on the morning of April 19, 1775. His wife Rebecca and other family members were home. Read the 1831 interview with Mary Prescott Barrett about what happened at the house that morning!
https://www.nps.gov/mima/learn/historyculture/upload/Barrett-Farm-HSR-Appendix-Creduced.pdf

#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020
Minute Man National Historical Park

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 8:00 - 9:00 a.m. April 19, 1775
When the regulars entered Concord, the militia, outnumbered by 3 to 1, and not wanting to provoke a fight, retreated back along the ridge towards town, then over the North Bridge to a hill nearly a mile beyond called Punkatasset. There they waited for reinforcements. The British then moved to secure both the North and South bridges.

General Gage, in his orders to Lt. Colonel Smith, commander of the Britsh expedition to Concord, directed him to take control of the two bridges in town, the South Bridge and the North Bridge. "You will observe...that it will be necessary to secure the two bridges as soon as possible..."

Securing the bridges was necessary to prevent rebels from slipping across from remote parts of town to threaten the mission. Also, Lt. Colonel Smith sent seven companies across the North Bridge with orders to search for supplies and artillery known to be hidden at Barrett's farm, about a mile west of the bridge. They left three companies (about 96 men) at the bridge to guard it and keep it open for their return.
https://www.nps.gov/mima/north-bridge-questions.htm
#VirtualPatriotsDay
#MinuteManNHP
#FindYourPark

04/19/2020
Amos Doolittle's View: The Regulars Enter Concord

Amos Doolittle's View: The Regulars Enter Concord

Amos Doolittle, a solider from Connecticut who came up to take part in the Siege of Boston just days after the outbreak of war on April 19, 1775, went out to...

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/19/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

Revolution in Real Time, 2:00 a.m. April 19, 1775
The British column is across the river, assembled in Cambridge and ready to march. Apparently it wasn't much fun. :(

"Last night between 10 and 11 o'clock all the Grenadiers and Light Infantry of army...embarked and were landed upon the opposite shore on Cambridge marsh; few but the commanding officers knew what expedition we were going upon. After getting over the marsh where we were wet up to the knees, we were halted in a dirty road and stood there 'till tow o'clock in the morning waiting for provisions to be brought from the boats and be divided, and which most of the men threw away, having carried some 'em. At 2 o'clock we began our march..." Lt. John Barker, 4th Regiment of Foot, King's Own

#MinuteManNHP
#VirtualPatriotsDay
#RevolutionInRealTime

Untapped History
04/19/2020

Untapped History

245 years ago NOW...

For the next sixty seconds, a pair of lanterns will be displayed in the steeple of the Old North Church. It is a signal to men in Charlestown to prepare Alarm Riders to alert the countryside. A British military operation has been launched and is leaving Boston by water.

#Newburyport1775
#MinuteManNHP
#VirtualPatriotsDay

untappedhistory.com

Minute Man National Historical Park
04/18/2020

Minute Man National Historical Park

The Patriot Vigil
EDIT: Video link here. https://youtu.be/StjIkxFScF8

Join us as we remember those who fell on the "ever memorable" 19th of April, 1775. This year, the Patriot Vigil has been recreated as a video featuring dramatic renditions of the accounts of Hannah Davis Leighton and Rev. Samuel West, followed by various volunteer readers in period clothing who will read the names of the fallen.
You too can participate! On the night of Sunday, April 19th place a lit candle in a window or on a porch in remembrance of the April 19th dead and post a photo of it on Facebook with the hashtag #PatriotVigil

151ème Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne (WWI French Reenacting)
04/10/2020

151ème Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne (WWI French Reenacting)

Today, 9 April, marks the 104th anniversary of the German attack against Mort Homme during the Battle of Verdun 1916. The 151e RI was one among a number of French units to suffer under the terrible blow of the strongest artillery and infantry attack since the opening of the offensive on 21 February.

After enduring hours of a powerful artillery bombardment under the heaviest of shells, the 151e withstood repeated assaults by German infantry armed with flame-throwers, grenades, and machine-guns. After the 2e Bataillon was decimated on the right, 3e Bataillon was thrown into a counter-attack and retook the summit, suffering catastrophic casualties in doing so.

You can read the gripping story in The Verdun Regiment by Johnathan Bracken.

The Redcoats
04/06/2020

The Redcoats

😅😅🤣

The Connecticut National Guard
04/03/2020

The Connecticut National Guard

#ThisDayInHistory: On April 3, 1918, the 26th “Yankee” Division relieved the U.S. Army’s 1st Division near Saint-Mihiel, France during World War I. The area under the 26th command extended from Apremont, in the west, to the front through Xivray-Marvoisin, Seicheprey – where Connecticut’s 102nd was stationed – Bois de Remieres, and as far as Bois de Jury to the right where the American and French lines converged.

The 26th Division, the first National Guard and second American Division to enter the war, fought on the front lines until May 3, 1919 when they returned to the states and demobilized at Fort Devens, Massachusetts.

#KnowYourMil #CTsFinest

03/31/2020
Minute of Calm - The Muster Field, Concord MA

Minute of Calm - The Muster Field, Concord MA

Feeling stressed? Perhaps you need a Minute Man National Historical Park "Minute of Calm." (See what we did there?) Take a few moments, sit quietly and enjoy...

03/30/2020
Northeast Museum Services Center

Northeast Museum Services Center

It's #MuseumMadnessMonday!

It's EXTRA mad today, because we have TWO match ups, so make sure you vote on each. This match up is between Minute Man National Historical Park and Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine. Who will be in the final tomorrow!?

USS Constitution Museum
03/30/2020

USS Constitution Museum

In the early days of the United States Navy, recruiting was a somewhat informal affair. Navy officers opened houses in shore-side communities to advertise for recruits. While the Museum is closed, learn more about “U.S. Naval Recruiting during the War of 1812,” one of the publications available on our website. bit.ly/33zKXU4
Image: ©Stephen Biesty

Les Chasseurs de Rochambeau
03/18/2020

Les Chasseurs de Rochambeau

Soldat du Régiment de Saintonge au règlement de 1779.

03/17/2020

Happy Saint Patrick's Day:
Oh bad, the march, the weary march, beneath these alien skies
But good, the night, the friendly night, that soothes our tired eyes
And bad, the war, the tedious war, that keeps us sweltering here
But good, the hour, the friendly hour, that brings the battle near
That brings us on the battle, that summons to their share
The homeless troops, the banished men, the exiled sons of Clare

Oh little Corca Bascinn, the wild, the bleak, the fair
Oh little stony pastures, with flowers sweet, if rare
Oh rough, the rude Atlantic, the thunderous, the wide
Whose kiss is like a soldier's kiss that cannot be denied
The whole night long we dream of you, and waking think we're there
Vain dream and foolish waking, we never shall see Clare

The wind is wild tonight, there's battle in the air
The wind is from the west, and it seems to blow from Clare
Have you nothing, nothing for us, loud brawler of the night
No news to warm our heart strings, to speed us through the fight
In this hollow, star-pricked darkness, as in the sun's hot glare
In sun-tide, in star-tide, we thirst, we starve for Clare

Hark! Yonder through the darkness, one distant rat-a-tat
The old foe stirs out there, God bless his soul for that
The old foe musters strongly, he's coming on at last
And Clare's Brigade may claim its own whenever blows fall fast
Send us, ye western breezes, our full and rightful share
For faith, and fame, and honour, and the ruined hearths of Clare!

-Emily Lawless, 'Fontenoy, 1745 - The Night Before The Battle'

Address

Sudbury, MA
01776

General information

If you are interested in joining us, we are always interested in people who share our enthusiasm and interest in history, as well as high standards of authenticity and safety. Because we are a family-oriented group, we welcome the involvement of children as well as their parents, and our children are actively involved in the life of the regiment. To assist you in learning more about our activities, you can go to our webpage, www.saintonge.org, for additional resources and related links and to look at our scheduled events. If you have any questions, you can contact us by email at [email protected]

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Comments

Might be of interest:
Hello - I'm new here. I've been a silent follower for a while now, always admiring the photos shared here. I've always had a particular interest in French troops in North America from F&I to Rev War period. I'm here because, in the wider context of our shared interest in historical matters, I found something yesterday I thought many of you might find interesting. Studying the Battle of Wörth/Frœschwiller (August 6, 1870, Franco-Prussian War) I came across information regarding an attack led by the French 3e Cuirassier against Prussian/Bavarian forces....the goal of which was to clear a nearby hill of enemy cannons. The French cavalry attack was vicious, and for about 10-15 minutes the outcome was in doubt. Eventually, superior Prussian cannon fire destroyed the French cavalry and the battle was lost. An incident occurred at the beginning of the battle - the Cuirassier who led from the very front was Colonel Louis-Charles-Henry de Lacarre de Lafutsun. A previous leg wound worried him as he might fall out of his saddle during the charge, so he had himself strapped to his horse to prevent this. When the attack came, the Colonel, at the front of his men, came upon the Prussians when a cannon volley was fired and a ball took the Colonel's head clean off. The headless body, still sitting upright with sword still in hand and masses of blood gushing from the headless neck still charged forward and scaring the living crap out the front line Prussian infantry. One can only imagine the sight of this! Why post this here? I spent much of the day yesterday communicating with others interested parties and we delved into Colonel Lacarre de Lafutsun's family history. It turns out he came from a very illustrious military family. His father, it turns out, happens to be Jean-Henri de Lacarre de La Futsun, a Captain in the Régiment de Saintonge who fought along sides the Americans at Yorktown. Hope you may find this interesting.
My husband and I did reenacting between 2000 and 2009 (when he passed away) – mostly French & Indian War period. Our equipment and clothing is now for sale. I have created a page where you can see pictures. Colonial Reenacting Equipment Please send me a message if you are interested. Please forward to anyone who might be interested. Thank you!
These reenactments make history come alive. I still believe in my country although the view is dismal now. I wish Florida and other states would teach the citizens their histories. Massachusetts does it very well.
Dear Saintonge Reg't; I have a request from a high-profile friend in France for a photo of a Saintonge member in full officer uniform. Sent a message to your website "info" email last week. Hoping you can check that and get back to me, or PM me from here - Thanks
New officer's table.
Hi there. I met some of your members at the AGM in Philadelphia in January and discussed your regiment attending Loyalist Days in Prescott, Ontario in August. I notice you have it on your schedule, have you registered? It would be wonderful if you could attend. Here is the website with all the information pertinent to the event.