National Lighthouse Museum

National Lighthouse Museum The National Lighthouse Museum's mission is to preserve and educate on the maritime heritage of lighthouses and lightships for generations to come.
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LIGHTHOUSE OF THE WEEKFort Wadsworth Lighthouse, Staten Island, N.Y.On a clear day, visitors to the restored Fort Wadswo...
06/02/2021

LIGHTHOUSE OF THE WEEK
Fort Wadsworth Lighthouse, Staten Island, N.Y.

On a clear day, visitors to the restored Fort Wadsworth Lighthouse are greeted with a stunning panorama of New York Harbor, while all manner of ships, large and small, pass below. The lighthouse structure sits atop Fort Wadsworth’s Battery Weed, itself a historic and fascinating structure.

At several places in the United States, the best location for defending a harbor entrance also happened to be the best location for a lighthouse to mark the harbor entrance, and so it is that forts and lighthouses were often neighbors. Construction of Fort Tompkins, named after Governor Daniel D. Tompkins of New York, started atop the hill overlooking the Narrows that separate Upper and Lower New York Bay in 1807, while work on Fort Wadsworth, the current fortification at the water’s edge that was originally named Fort Richmond, commenced a couple years later. In 1902, the name Fort Wadsworth was applied to the entire military reservation on the headland, and the former Fort Wadsworth was renamed Battery Weed. Both James S. Wadsworth and Stephen H. Weed, whose names are applied to the fortifications, were brigadier generals during the Civil War.

Mariners entering New York Harbor during the early nineteenth century had been expectantly waiting for the first lighthouse at this site on Staten Island, then known as Fort Tompkins. A contemporary guide read: “You will be up with the Can Buoy of the S.W. Spit, and may then alter your course to N. by E. ¼ E. for the bluff of Staten Island, where a light-house is to be built by December, 1827, showing a fixed light.”

On March 18, 1826, Congress appropriated $30,000 for the construction of a lighthouse on the bluff near Fort Tompkins, a lighthouse at Princes Bay, and two towers on the Highlands of Navesink. The original Fort Tompkins Lighthouse, which opened in 1828, was a conical tower that rose forty feet to the base of its lantern room from which a fixed white light, produced by twelve lamps and reflectors, was displayed at a height of eighty-nine feet above the bay. In an 1843 report, E. Curtis, the New York Superintendent of Lights, described the condition of the lighting apparatus as being much worn, and in want of replacement. “The light is not a good one,” he wrote. “I have had an opportunity to observe it for nearly two months this summer. The glass in the lantern is of the poorest quality, and would impair and destroy the most brilliant light.” In 1849, the lantern room was refitted with nine brass lamps set in twenty-one-inch parabolic reflectors, and in 1855, a fourth-order Fresnel lens was installed.

The tower and keeper’s dwelling were positioned so close to Fort Tompkins that practice artillery firings often broke the lantern room glass. This problem, along with expansion of the fort, required a search for a new site for the station. In 1871, a temporary frame tower was erected for displaying the light, and a request was made for $8,000 to construct a dwelling surmounted by a tower that would have a smaller footprint. Congress provided the requested amount on June 10, 1872, and on December 20, 1873 a new gingerbread-style lighthouse went into operation, showing a fixed white light from a fourth-order lens. No longer needed, the old tower and dwelling were then torn down, and the property on which they stood was returned to the Army so a new battery could be constructed.

Read more about this lighthouse here:
https://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=754

LIGHTHOUSE OF THE WEEK
Fort Wadsworth Lighthouse, Staten Island, N.Y.

On a clear day, visitors to the restored Fort Wadsworth Lighthouse are greeted with a stunning panorama of New York Harbor, while all manner of ships, large and small, pass below. The lighthouse structure sits atop Fort Wadsworth’s Battery Weed, itself a historic and fascinating structure.

At several places in the United States, the best location for defending a harbor entrance also happened to be the best location for a lighthouse to mark the harbor entrance, and so it is that forts and lighthouses were often neighbors. Construction of Fort Tompkins, named after Governor Daniel D. Tompkins of New York, started atop the hill overlooking the Narrows that separate Upper and Lower New York Bay in 1807, while work on Fort Wadsworth, the current fortification at the water’s edge that was originally named Fort Richmond, commenced a couple years later. In 1902, the name Fort Wadsworth was applied to the entire military reservation on the headland, and the former Fort Wadsworth was renamed Battery Weed. Both James S. Wadsworth and Stephen H. Weed, whose names are applied to the fortifications, were brigadier generals during the Civil War.

Mariners entering New York Harbor during the early nineteenth century had been expectantly waiting for the first lighthouse at this site on Staten Island, then known as Fort Tompkins. A contemporary guide read: “You will be up with the Can Buoy of the S.W. Spit, and may then alter your course to N. by E. ¼ E. for the bluff of Staten Island, where a light-house is to be built by December, 1827, showing a fixed light.”

On March 18, 1826, Congress appropriated $30,000 for the construction of a lighthouse on the bluff near Fort Tompkins, a lighthouse at Princes Bay, and two towers on the Highlands of Navesink. The original Fort Tompkins Lighthouse, which opened in 1828, was a conical tower that rose forty feet to the base of its lantern room from which a fixed white light, produced by twelve lamps and reflectors, was displayed at a height of eighty-nine feet above the bay. In an 1843 report, E. Curtis, the New York Superintendent of Lights, described the condition of the lighting apparatus as being much worn, and in want of replacement. “The light is not a good one,” he wrote. “I have had an opportunity to observe it for nearly two months this summer. The glass in the lantern is of the poorest quality, and would impair and destroy the most brilliant light.” In 1849, the lantern room was refitted with nine brass lamps set in twenty-one-inch parabolic reflectors, and in 1855, a fourth-order Fresnel lens was installed.

The tower and keeper’s dwelling were positioned so close to Fort Tompkins that practice artillery firings often broke the lantern room glass. This problem, along with expansion of the fort, required a search for a new site for the station. In 1871, a temporary frame tower was erected for displaying the light, and a request was made for $8,000 to construct a dwelling surmounted by a tower that would have a smaller footprint. Congress provided the requested amount on June 10, 1872, and on December 20, 1873 a new gingerbread-style lighthouse went into operation, showing a fixed white light from a fourth-order lens. No longer needed, the old tower and dwelling were then torn down, and the property on which they stood was returned to the Army so a new battery could be constructed.

Read more about this lighthouse here:
https://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=754

Sunday, June 13 at 2:00pmHeroes of NY HarborAuthor, Marian Betancourt(Book-Signing Opportunity)Heroes of New York Harbor...
05/26/2021

Sunday, June 13 at 2:00pm
Heroes of NY Harbor
Author, Marian Betancourt
(Book-Signing Opportunity)
Heroes of New York Harbor is a collection of human stories – lives that intersected with the Harbor – that appeals to readers of history, family drama, and the power of place to influence lives.
$10 per Person • $5 for Museum Members
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/lighthousemuseum/items/309080/availability/663922786/book/?flow=452712

Sunday, June 13 at 2:00pm
Heroes of NY Harbor
Author, Marian Betancourt
(Book-Signing Opportunity)
Heroes of New York Harbor is a collection of human stories – lives that intersected with the Harbor – that appeals to readers of history, family drama, and the power of place to influence lives.
$10 per Person • $5 for Museum Members
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/lighthousemuseum/items/309080/availability/663922786/book/?flow=452712

LIGHTHOUSE OF THE WEEKAlligator Reef Lighthouse, Islamorada, FLOn November 2, 1820, the USS Alligator, the newest member...
05/26/2021

LIGHTHOUSE OF THE WEEK
Alligator Reef Lighthouse, Islamorada, FL

On November 2, 1820, the USS Alligator, the newest member of the fledgling U.S. Navy, was launched at Boston, Massachusetts. Measuring eighty-six feet from bow to stern, the schooner was outfitted with twelve guns to provide a little authority. During 1821, the vessel made two voyages to the west coast of Africa to intercept ships engaged in the by then illegal importation of slaves to the United States and to secure territory for the repatriation of former slaves. The following year, the Alligator was dispatched to the West Indies under the command of Lieutenant William H. Allen to suppress piracy.

While at anchor in the harbor at Matanzas on Cuba’s northeast coast, Lieutenant Allen was informed that pirates were holding several ships for ransom in a nearby bay. The following morning, the Alligator surprised the pirates and dispatched its launches to confront them. In the ensuing battle, Lieutenant Allen took two musket balls but led his comrades to a rout of the pirates before succumbing to his wounds. Now under the command of Lieutenant John M. Dale, the Alligator escorted the small flotilla of liberated vessels north to the states.

With ships of varying speeds, keeping them together proved difficult, and the Alligator had to occasionally tack back and forth to slow her progress. By the evening of November 19, 1821 no other ships were in sight. In the darkness, a lead line was thrown out at regular intervals to measure the depth of the surrounding water. Notwithstanding this precaution, at 9:30 p.m. the vessel ran aground on Matacumbee Reef at a speed of about five knots. Several heavy items were tossed overboard in a futile attempt to refloat the ship.
]
Finally, around midday on November 21, the Anna Maria, one of the vessels traveling with the Alligator, was sighted and successfully hailed. All government property, including the cannons, was transferred to the Anna Maria and the unfortunate Alligator was set afire to prevent pirates from claiming her. The reef was subsequently known as Alligator Reef in honor of its victim. A few surviving hull timbers from the Alligator still lie in shallow water just offshore from Islamorada.

The first effort to mark the dangerous reef was made in 1852 by Lieutenant James Totten of the U.S. Army Coast Survey. Under his direction, one of fifteen iron shaft daymarkers being placed along the reefs was erected on a screwpile foundation at Alligator Reef and topped by a black barrel. Five years later, the barrel was replaced by a white, hoop-iron cylinder and a red vane displaying the letter "C" to uniquely identify the reef.

Click here to learn more about this lighthouse:
https://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=702

LIGHTHOUSE OF THE WEEK
Alligator Reef Lighthouse, Islamorada, FL

On November 2, 1820, the USS Alligator, the newest member of the fledgling U.S. Navy, was launched at Boston, Massachusetts. Measuring eighty-six feet from bow to stern, the schooner was outfitted with twelve guns to provide a little authority. During 1821, the vessel made two voyages to the west coast of Africa to intercept ships engaged in the by then illegal importation of slaves to the United States and to secure territory for the repatriation of former slaves. The following year, the Alligator was dispatched to the West Indies under the command of Lieutenant William H. Allen to suppress piracy.

While at anchor in the harbor at Matanzas on Cuba’s northeast coast, Lieutenant Allen was informed that pirates were holding several ships for ransom in a nearby bay. The following morning, the Alligator surprised the pirates and dispatched its launches to confront them. In the ensuing battle, Lieutenant Allen took two musket balls but led his comrades to a rout of the pirates before succumbing to his wounds. Now under the command of Lieutenant John M. Dale, the Alligator escorted the small flotilla of liberated vessels north to the states.

With ships of varying speeds, keeping them together proved difficult, and the Alligator had to occasionally tack back and forth to slow her progress. By the evening of November 19, 1821 no other ships were in sight. In the darkness, a lead line was thrown out at regular intervals to measure the depth of the surrounding water. Notwithstanding this precaution, at 9:30 p.m. the vessel ran aground on Matacumbee Reef at a speed of about five knots. Several heavy items were tossed overboard in a futile attempt to refloat the ship.
]
Finally, around midday on November 21, the Anna Maria, one of the vessels traveling with the Alligator, was sighted and successfully hailed. All government property, including the cannons, was transferred to the Anna Maria and the unfortunate Alligator was set afire to prevent pirates from claiming her. The reef was subsequently known as Alligator Reef in honor of its victim. A few surviving hull timbers from the Alligator still lie in shallow water just offshore from Islamorada.

The first effort to mark the dangerous reef was made in 1852 by Lieutenant James Totten of the U.S. Army Coast Survey. Under his direction, one of fifteen iron shaft daymarkers being placed along the reefs was erected on a screwpile foundation at Alligator Reef and topped by a black barrel. Five years later, the barrel was replaced by a white, hoop-iron cylinder and a red vane displaying the letter "C" to uniquely identify the reef.

Click here to learn more about this lighthouse:
https://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=702

JOIN US TODAY!!!11am-5pmSunday, May 23, 2021The National Lighthouse Museumcollaborating with Three Amigas and VAN Associ...
05/23/2021

JOIN US TODAY!!!
11am-5pm
Sunday, May 23, 2021

The National Lighthouse Museum
collaborating with Three Amigas and VAN Associates presents
Riverside Craft Show
30+ Craft Vendors
Activities & Raffles
Come for a fun day of shopping at our outdoor market. Support small businesses, entrepreneurs and artists.
Craft Show: Free Entry
Plus Discount Entry into the
National Lighthouse Museum
Lighthouses of Delaware
Author Judith Roales
2-3pm
Judith Roales is a retired newspaper person whose love of lighthouse history in Delaware began with her first job as a reporter there in 1964. Currently she is president of the Delaware River and Bay Lighthouse Foundation, which is preserving three historic lighthouses.
Judith Roales Presentation:
$10 Per Person includes National Lighthouse Museum Entry
$5 Per Member of National Lighthouse Museum
Order tickets here:
https://fareharbor.com/.../availability/652333154/book/...

JOIN US TODAY!!!
11am-5pm
Sunday, May 23, 2021

The National Lighthouse Museum
collaborating with Three Amigas and VAN Associates presents
Riverside Craft Show
30+ Craft Vendors
Activities & Raffles
Come for a fun day of shopping at our outdoor market. Support small businesses, entrepreneurs and artists.
Craft Show: Free Entry
Plus Discount Entry into the
National Lighthouse Museum
Lighthouses of Delaware
Author Judith Roales
2-3pm
Judith Roales is a retired newspaper person whose love of lighthouse history in Delaware began with her first job as a reporter there in 1964. Currently she is president of the Delaware River and Bay Lighthouse Foundation, which is preserving three historic lighthouses.
Judith Roales Presentation:
$10 Per Person includes National Lighthouse Museum Entry
$5 Per Member of National Lighthouse Museum
Order tickets here:
https://fareharbor.com/.../availability/652333154/book/...

Sunday, June 13 at 2:00pmHeroes of NY HarborAuthor, Marian Betancourt(Book-Signing Opportunity)Heroes of New York Harbor...
05/18/2021

Sunday, June 13 at 2:00pm
Heroes of NY Harbor
Author, Marian Betancourt
(Book-Signing Opportunity)
Heroes of New York Harbor is a collection of human stories – lives that intersected with the Harbor – that appeals to readers of history, family drama, and the power of place to influence lives.
$10 per Person • $5 for Museum Members
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/lighthousemuseum/items/309080/availability/663922786/book/?flow=452712

Sunday, June 13 at 2:00pm
Heroes of NY Harbor
Author, Marian Betancourt
(Book-Signing Opportunity)
Heroes of New York Harbor is a collection of human stories – lives that intersected with the Harbor – that appeals to readers of history, family drama, and the power of place to influence lives.
$10 per Person • $5 for Museum Members
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/lighthousemuseum/items/309080/availability/663922786/book/?flow=452712

JOIN US TOMORROW...The Great Staten Island Lighthouse Hunt
Sunday, May 16, 2021 from 10:00am – 4:00pmStart time at eithe...
05/16/2021

JOIN US TOMORROW...

The Great Staten Island Lighthouse Hunt

Sunday, May 16, 2021 from 10:00am – 4:00pm

Start time at either the Conference House in Tottenville or National Lighthouse Museum
in St. George between 10am – 12pm.

Finish before 4pm at either location.
Follow map and visit lighthouses in Staten Island.
Take selfies or group photos with lighthouses in the background,
receiving your lighthouse stickers at each site.
Learn about the ten lighthouses on and off shore Staten Island.
Have a family friendly fun day learning about Staten Island’s lighthouse history…
while socially distancing in your cars, bicycle or motorcycle!

Participation Admission: $30 per carload & $10 per bicycle
INCLUDES:
Self directed maps to lighthouse locations both on and off shore will be
picked up at either starting location along with wristbands. Free return admission ticket to the Museum

Certificate of Hunt Participation


Receive Lighthouse Hunt Totebag to remember this special day!


Don’t forget binoculars, your camera/cell phone, snacks and sunglasses!

RULES:
We suggest two or three participants- one designated driver/navigator, one photographer.
Post pictures on Facebook or Instagram.

For more information, please contact the National Lighthouse Museum.
718-390-0040 or [email protected].

Order tickets here:
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/lighthousemuseum/items/299865/availability/641799898/book/?flow=452712

JOIN US TOMORROW...

The Great Staten Island Lighthouse Hunt

Sunday, May 16, 2021 from 10:00am – 4:00pm

Start time at either the Conference House in Tottenville or National Lighthouse Museum
in St. George between 10am – 12pm.

Finish before 4pm at either location.
Follow map and visit lighthouses in Staten Island.
Take selfies or group photos with lighthouses in the background,
receiving your lighthouse stickers at each site.
Learn about the ten lighthouses on and off shore Staten Island.
Have a family friendly fun day learning about Staten Island’s lighthouse history…
while socially distancing in your cars, bicycle or motorcycle!

Participation Admission: $30 per carload & $10 per bicycle
INCLUDES:
Self directed maps to lighthouse locations both on and off shore will be
picked up at either starting location along with wristbands. Free return admission ticket to the Museum

Certificate of Hunt Participation


Receive Lighthouse Hunt Totebag to remember this special day!


Don’t forget binoculars, your camera/cell phone, snacks and sunglasses!

RULES:
We suggest two or three participants- one designated driver/navigator, one photographer.
Post pictures on Facebook or Instagram.

For more information, please contact the National Lighthouse Museum.
718-390-0040 or [email protected].

Order tickets here:
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/lighthousemuseum/items/299865/availability/641799898/book/?flow=452712

Address

200 The Promenade At Lighthouse Point
Staten Island, NY
10301

General information

The purposes of The National Lighthouse Museum shall be: ■To establish and maintain a history museum open to the public relating to lighthouses and located on Staten Island, County of Richmond, New York. ■To collect, preserve, and interpret objects related to the history and technology of lighthouses located, in the past or present, at sites throughout the United States. ■To research, document and disseminate information on the history and technology of American lighthouses. ■To create and maintain an archive of artifacts and materials related to American lighthouses. ■To foster research of American lighthouse history. ■To serve as a contact point for public inquiry and assistance with respect to American lighthouse history, research, education, collections and programs ■To celebrate American lighthouse heritage through education programs, publications, films, festivals, living history, lighthouse trails, conferences, and other such offerings. ■To support other existing and future lighthouse museums, organizations and sites. ■To establish partnerships with other organizations to attain the above goals.

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Today, August 7th is National Lighthouse Day. Here are some of my lighthouse paintings and "Thatcher Island Lighthouses on a Peaceful Day": https://fineartamerica.com/featured/thatcher-island-lighthouses-on-a-peaceful-day-matt-starr.html
“Mind the Light, Kate” The most famous occupant of New York Harbor is surely Lady Liberty, who first struck her now permanent pose in 1886, just three years after the second Robbins Reef Lighthouse was built. In the lighthouse community, Kate Walker, keeper of Robbins Reef for over thirty years, runs a close second to the torch-bearing statue that stands just over two miles north of the lighthouse. To gain an appreciation for Kate Walker, you have to travel back to northern Germany, where she was born Katherine Gortler in 1848. After finishing school, she married Jacob Kaird. The couple's only child, also named Jacob, was only seven years old when his father died. Seeking a new life, Kate took Jacob to America, where she accepted a position waiting tables at a boarding house in Sandy Hook, New Jersey. It was here where she met John Walker, assistant keeper of the Sandy Hook Lighthouse. Kate knew very little English and gladly accepted Walker's offer of free English lessons. The student-teacher relationship quickly converted into a romantic one, and the two soon married. Kate enjoyed her life at the lighthouse, where there was land for her to grow vegetables and flowers. However, this life was short-lived as John was offered the position as keeper of the recently reconstructed Robbins Reef Lighthouse. "When I first came to Robbins Reef," Kate recalled, "the sight of the water, whichever way I looked, made me lonesome. I refused to unpack my trunks at first, but gradually, a little at a time, I unpacked. After a while they were all unpacked and I stayed on." John received an annual salary of $600, while Kate was paid $350 to serve as his assistant. The couple, along with their son and new daughter Mary, quickly adjusted to their home with a 360-degree harbor view. Tragedy touched the station in 1886, when John contracted pneumonia. As he was being taken ashore to a hospital, his parting words to his wife were "Mind the Light, Kate." John never returned to his family. For the second time in her life, Kate was a widow, but she carried on, motivated by the need to provide for her two children and fulfill her husband's wish. "Every morning when the sun comes up," Kate said, "I stand at the porthole and look towards his grave. Sometimes the hills are brown, sometimes they are green, sometimes they are white with snow. But always they bring a message from him, something I heard him say more often than anything else. Just three words: 'Mind the Light.' " Although Kate had competently served as assistant keeper, the position of head keeper was only offered to her after two men had turned it down. Perhaps the Lighthouse Service doubted that a petite, 4'10" woman, with two dependent children, could handle the job - and a tough job it was. Every day, Kate would row her children to school, record the weather in the logbook, polish the brass, and clean the lens. At night, she would wind up the weights multiple times to keep the fourth-order lens rotating, trim the wicks, refill the oil reservoir, and in times of fog, she would have to start up the steam engine in the basement to power the fog signal. As her son John matured, he started to help with the tasks and was later made an assistant. Besides keeping the lighthouse in fine order, Kate also rowed out to assist distressed vessels and is credited with having saved fifty lives. Most of her rescues were fishermen whose boats were blown onto the reef by sudden storms. Kate observed, "Generally, they joke and laugh about it. I've never made up my mind whether they are courageous or stupid. Maybe they don't know how near they have come to their Maker, or perhaps they know and are not afraid. But I think that in the adventure they haven't realized how near their souls have been to taking flight from the body." After several years, Kate was more at home in the lighthouse than on land, and she was well acquainted with her nearest neighbors, the boats that frequently passed by her kitchen window. Recalling a trip she had made to New York City, Kate stated, "I am in fear from the time I leave the ferryboat. The street cars bewilder me and I am afraid of automobiles. Why, a fortune wouldn't tempt me to get into one of those things!" Upon hearing the noon whistle sound at a factory during one of her trips to the big city, she remarked, "If I hadn't known that the Richard B. Morse had been scrapped many years ago, I would have said that was that ship's whistle." It was later determined that the whistle was indeed from the Morse. After a scrap dealer purchased the ship, the whistle was salvaged and sold to the factory. Kate served at the light until 1919, and then retired to nearby Staten Island where she could still keep an eye on the beacon. Even after her retirement and eventual passing in 1935 at the age of eighty-four, captains and harbor pilots still referred to the lighthouse as "Kate's Light." When the Coast Guard assumed responsibility for Robbins Reef Lighthouse in 1939, a three-man crew lived in the lighthouse to perform the duties that not too many years prior had been carried out by the diminutive Kate Walker. In tribute to the heroic service offered by lighthouse keepers, each vessel in the Coast Guards fleet of fourteen, 175-foot Keeper Class Buoy Tenders is named after a keeper. The KATHERINE WALKER (WLM 552) was launched on September 14th, 1996, and appropriately, its homeport is in Bayonne, New Jersey, within sight of Robbins Reef Lighthouse. Katie Walker adds rescuing people to her light keeping duties At the sound of the gun and bugle on Governors Island, she climbed the stairs again to begin another night of work on the light. Despite her demanding duties as both light keeper and mother, Katie was an expert rower who managed to rescue a total of 50 people in the Robbins Reef light region, which was notorious for tidal whirlpools on the reef’s outer rocky fringe. One of her most grateful patrons was a dog. Kate Walker wearing a long dress ascends the wrought iron railing steps up to the Robbins Reef Lighthouse. Kate Walker is shown here using a brass can to fill up one of the lamps used to light the lens in the tower at Robbins Reef Lighthouse Katie Walker Rescues Scotty One frigid winter day, a three-masted schooner labored against strong winds as it tried to pass the Robbins Reef Light. It lurched, swayed, and went over on its beam ends on the reef landing. Katie let down the lifeboat and rowed out to the schooner. Five men clung to it, and she helped them hoist themselves into the boat. As the last man tumbled in, he cried, “Where’s Scotty?” Hearing a feeble whine, Katie looked down into the water and spotted a shaggy brown dog. She caught the dog between the roars as he drifted by and hauled him into the boat. “He crouched, shivering against my ankles. I’ll never forget the look in his big brown eyes as he raised them to mine”, Katie recalled. Katie and the sailors rowed against the wind for two hours before they could reach the lighthouse. Hugging Scotty inside her cloak, Katie hurried into her big kitchen. She sat him beside the stove and stoked the fire. Scotty fell over like a frozen co**se. Katie rushed to the stove and poured some coffee from the pot she always kept hot during bad weather. She forced it down Scotty’s throat, and he gasped and shivered. “Then his eyes opened and there was that same thankful look he had given me in the boat,” Katie said.
Lighthouse Digest Uncovers Statue of Liberty’s Lost History For the first time in the 132-year history of the Statue of Liberty, recently located photographs and memories of the first lighthouse keepers who staffed Lady Liberty have been published by Lighthouse Digest, the Maine-based lighthouse news and history magazine. Although most people don’t realize it, during the first 16 years of its existence, the Statue of Liberty was managed by the United States Lighthouse Board as an actual aid to navigation. It was also the first permanently electrified lighthouse in the United States operated by the lighthouse keepers using an onsite power plant. Among the never before published images in the January/February 2019 edition of Lighthouse Digest are photographs of Albert E. Littlefield, a native of Kennebunk, Maine, who was the head keeper for the entire 16 years that the Statue of Liberty operated as a lighthouse. There are also images of assistant keeper Charles Miller who, from 1890 to 1892, kept a daily journal that detailed duties, rescues, wildlife problems, and even finding dead bodies washed up on the island during morning rounds. The Lighthouse Digest article, which includes over two dozen rare photos, tells how the government also had trouble attracting reliable assistant keepers for the Statue of Liberty during its first four years of operation; 12 of the first 14 didn’t last a year. There were also some nefarious assistant keepers; one was found to be a member of the “Masked Burglar Gang” and another later served 20 years in prison for murdering his mistress. Tim Harrison, editor of Lighthouse Digest said, “There have been countless books and articles written about the Statue of Liberty, but other than briefly mentioning the Lighthouse Board, none have ever gone into any detail on the lives of the keepers and their families who lived with them at the lighthouse, let alone publish photos of them.” He continued by saying “The fact that no one has ever attempted to research, save, and then publish the history of the lighthouse keepers of the Statue of Liberty, was a national travesty, one that has now been corrected.” Harrison said that Part II of the article on the Statue of Liberty, also with many never before published photos, will be in the March/April edition of Lighthouse Digest. If you are not yet a subscriber, you can subscribe today and have your subscription start with the January/February 2019 edition, Go to www.LighthouseDigest.com/LHD or call them at 207-259-2121.