Echoes Through Time

Echoes Through Time The ONLY Civil War Museum and Learning Center in Western NY. We have a large reference library for research, We do educational, history programs & tours
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The ONLY Civil War Museum and Learning Center in Western New York.

Mission: To help Education those who are interested in the War Between the States era, and to help promote - Battlefield Preservation & awareness

We at the Echoes Through Time museum and Facebook would like to wish all of you a very Merry Christmas and a spectacular...
12/25/2019

We at the Echoes Through Time museum and Facebook would like to wish all of you a very Merry Christmas and a spectacular 2020!

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~WE re Coming Father Abraham (300,000 More) - By the summer 186...
12/24/2019

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~
WE re Coming Father Abraham (300,000 More) - By the summer 1862, it was evident that a short war was no longer possible, but Lincoln still aspired. In a July 1 statement, he outlined a plan for massive escaltion " I have decided to call into the service an additional force of 300,000 men" he told 17 NOrthern Governors, "to bring this unnescessary and injurious civil war to a speedy and satisfactory conclusion" 2 weeks later, the New York Evening Post featured an elegy by Northern abolitionist James Sloan Gibbons. The nationalist chorus not only guaranteed "300,00 more" volunteers, it also labeled the President "Father Abraham". Boston Daily Journal printed "We are coming" 2 days later, and it quickly spread to unionist rallies in metropolitian areas. Within months the poem was turned into a melody, and sheet music sales boomed.
"We are coming" was the only song that Gibbons ever published, yet it proved lucrative, During his life time, sales for the sheet music neared 2 million copies!

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~"Lorena" ... the theme of Love scored well among legions of yo...
12/23/2019

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~
"Lorena" ... the theme of Love scored well among legions of your warriors. Boys in blue prined for "Aura Lea"(better known to Elvis fans as "Love me Tender_ while the grays cherished "The Yellow Rose of Texas" Mutual affections included "Blanche Alpen" Carrie Bell, Lillie Terrell and Nelley asleep in the Hazel Dell.
These tributes to the pure of heart, and others less reputable, were standard fare on the march and in camp. Arguably the most popularlove song of the war was "Lorena", a slow and expressive grieving and through Confederates appeared to sing her praises more often, "Lorena" was created by a northern.
Reverend Henry Webster, and New Yorker by birth, wrote the poem about his own experiences of a broken heart. while a poor pastor in Ohio, he fell in love with a member of his congregation, and she with him. but her family intervened, citing his poverty as reason enough to prevent any chance of marriage. Devasted, Webster wrote a poem of a young and forbidden kinship that would remain unfulfilled until the couple rejoined in heaven. A friend matched the poem with a mournful music, and by 1858 it was published in Chicago.

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~"Maryland, my Maryland" ... Days after the fall of Fort Sumter...
12/22/2019

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~
"Maryland, my Maryland" ... Days after the fall of Fort Sumter, 22 year old James Ryder Randall was teaching at a small college in Louisiana when he heard of tragic events in his native Balitmore. A fight had broken out between the 6th Mssachusetts Regiments en route to Washington and an angry pro-South crowd that had confronted them.. Taunts had quickly develoved into an exchange of gunfire, leaving 4 soldiers and12 civilians dead.
Devasted by the news, the young writer found it difficult to sleep. In a moment of inspiration, he rose in the night, as if in a trance, and scratched out a poem in the glowing tremble of a dying candle.
Sung to the tune of "Lauriger Horatius" (aka O Tannenbaum" this song was lambasted the North for its trespass into his old Line State. Soon southern voices were ringing with ths passionate, political zeal, condemning the "tyrant" Lincoln and calling for open warfare against the Federal govenment.
Despite its anti-Union rhetoric, including the words Northern scum, the anthem "Maryland, my Maryland" became the official song of the state in 1939 with lyrics intact.

Let's learn about some of the Songs during the Civil War ~"Bonnie Blue Flag" (We are a Baand of Brothers) ... British em...
12/21/2019

Let's learn about some of the Songs during the Civil War ~
"Bonnie Blue Flag" (We are a Baand of Brothers) ... British emigre and comedic actor Harry Maccarthy was in Mississippi, and possibly at the secession convention itself, when its political leaders voted to remove their state from the Union. When Florida and Alabama followed suit within 48 hours, the pro-secession Macarthy wrote a very serious poem commenorating this Southern Surge. Later setting his words to th music of "the Irish Jaunting Car" he performed it to adoring crowds and the sheet music sold faster that it could be printed.

Emerging Civil War
12/20/2019

Emerging Civil War

On this day 159 years ago-December 20, 1860-South Carolina became the first state to declare itself seceded from the United States. Secession commissioners issued a brief ordinance of secession that read:

"We, the People of the State of South Carolina, in Convention assembled do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, That the Ordinance adopted by us in Convention, on the twenty-third day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven hundred and eighty eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States of America was ratified, and also all Acts and parts of Acts of the General Assembly of this State, ratifying amendment of the said Constitution, are here by repealed; and that the union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of “The United States of America,” is hereby dissolved."

A lengthier, more detailed "Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union" followed on December 24. Several other southern states soon followed South Carolina in seeking to secede from the United States.

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~ "Battle Cry of Freedom"  (Rally Round the Flag) .. George F R...
12/20/2019

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~
"Battle Cry of Freedom" (Rally Round the Flag) .. George F Root was among the North's most prolific songwriters, composing -"Just before the Battle Mother", "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp" and more than 500 other tunes in his long career. He crafted his most successful piece in 1862, writing sets of lyrics for soldiers and civilians. Over a half-million copies of Root's sheet music sold during its release soon after the Battle of Antietam and the announcement of the Emancipation proclamation.
"Battle Cry of Freedom was so effective in stirring Northern crowds into a frenzy that the Republican Party used it as one of their main campaign songs during the 1864 elections.

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ..."Home Sweet Home"  ~ In September 1864, Private Samuel Melvi...
12/19/2019

Let's learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ...
"Home Sweet Home" ~ In September 1864, Private Samuel Melvin of the 1st Massachusetts Heavy Artiillery laydying in the prison hospital at Andersonville. Unfolding a tattered journal, one that he had kept since his capture at Spotsylvania, he wrote down his finial words on earth... "I want to go home"
Mournful bands played the song in unison after the bloodbath of Fredericksburg, sending its mystic chords back and forth across the Rappahannock.
Fittingly, after Lee's surrender at Appomattax, General Phil Sheridan's band played several movements to commemorate the end of fighting and their featured piece was "Home Sweet Home.
A few federal officers actually ordered their troops not to play or sing "Home Sweet Home" on the assumption that it promoted thoughts of desertion.

Lets learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~ "John Brwon Body" ( Battle Hymn of the Republic) In the spring...
12/18/2019

Lets learn about some of the songs during the Civil War ~
"John Brwon Body" ( Battle Hymn of the Republic) In the spring of 1861, a committee of esteemed New Yorkers announced a contest offering $500 to anyone who could write an outstanding "National Hymm" Over twelve hundred copies of sheet music pouted in. But as committee mumber George Templeton Strong soon discovered, the entire lot of submissions produced a little more than "bushels of rubbish", In the end, the judge terminated the contest and refused to grant the prize money.
In late 1861, 43 year old poet and abolitionist Julia Ward Howe was in Washington when she overheard a column of soldiers singing "John Browns Body" a lyrical parody of an old revival turn. That same night rising from restless sleep, Howe proceeded to write out a new set of verses, turning the jocular piece into a vengeful ballad. The song became immortal when the Atlantic Monthly published her poem in February 1862.
President Theodore Roosevelt, among others, expressed the desire to have "Battly Hymn of the Republic to become the national anthem of the United States in 1931, Congress ultimately chose a poem from another less divisive war.

Lets learn about some of the Songs during the Civil War...." I wish I was in the Land of Dixie" ~Ohio-born Dan Decatur E...
12/17/2019

Lets learn about some of the Songs during the Civil War....
" I wish I was in the Land of Dixie" ~Ohio-born Dan Decatur Emmet composed "Dixie" in 1859 as a closing number for a musical troupe. It became a prewar hit in Dixie, and grew thereafter. Brass bands played it at Jefferson Davis' inaugurtion. Young southerners sang it on their way to volunteer. Secessionist even played it at Church services. President Lincoln's eldest son Robert, among others heard Southern sympathizers hum and play it in the prlors and streets of Washington.

12/16/2019

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil War
London Times ~ The eminent international newspaper covering the Civil War was the London Times, a paper Lincoln called "one of the greatest powers in the world" Yet for Lincoln it was an ominous force, Aristocratic, nationalistic, and openly critical of American populist democracy, the Times offered hope and exposure for the Confederacy.
In july 1863, the Union captured Vicksburg and won decisively at Gettysburg. The Times saw things differently. The loss of the Mississippi River town, reported the dailyh, was probably a rumor. Meanwhile, Gettysburg and Robert E Lee was on the verge of another attack into Maryland. Futhermore, large protions of Indiana were under Confederate occupation, New Orleans was about to be retaken, and members of Lincoln's cabinet were debating whether to sue for peace and repeal the Emancipation Proclamation.
The denial never abated. Sherman's march to the sea was instead a desperate escape attempt by isolated bluecoats, sprinting for the coast in hopes of a naval rescues. By January 1865, in the Confederacy's painful twilight, the Times maintained. "The rebellion lives and thrives and gathers force and increasing resolution day after day, and year after year.
Finally acknowleding the remote possibility of a Union victory, the Times predicted at least five million white Confederates would first lay down their lives, followed by three million slaves " all as bitterly opposed to the Yankees as their masters"
The Times ultimately proved incorrect on most of its predictions, but it did reflect a widely held European contempt toward the blood shed of the Civil War. In 1914 American newspapers presented a similar attitude toward a European war of greater carnage.

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil WarRichmond Examiner ~  Self educated, clever, judgemental, unrestrained John M Danie...
12/15/2019

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil War
Richmond Examiner ~ Self educated, clever, judgemental, unrestrained John M Daniel led his Richamond Examiner on a crusade of bitter enmity against just about everything. Borrowing a page from the New York Tribune, Daniel used controversy and intrigue to establish a readership reaching as far away as Texas.
He spurred his readers with fabricated stories of universal graft, elaborate conspiracies and extramarital escapades. No one was safe from the newspaper's wrath - not Governors, not nurses, not prisoners. The rag described Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg as having " an iron heart and an iron hand and a wooden head" Certainly the assesment of Braggs was closer to the truth than the paper's description of slaves, calling them a "a totally distinct and inferior animal or species of animal from the Caucasian"
Predictably, neither Davis nor Lincoln fared well in its editorials. The Confederate president was "an amalgam of malice and mediocrity" and "affable, kind and subservient to his enemies" By January of the war's final year, the Exminer was calling for Davis's overthrow. Similarly the Federal Army was a "horde of theives, robbers and assassins in the in the pay of Abraham Lincoln", and Lincoln himself was a "Yankee monster of inhumanity and falsehood" and ugly and ferocious old Orang-outang from the wilds of Illinois".
Swinging from insightful wit to degenerate sarcasm, the Examiner spearheaded a fleet of skeptical newpapers in the South, including the Raleigh Standard, Richmond Whig and Charleston Mercury. But neither its editor nor the newpaper would survive the war. Daniel died of illness just as the Union Army stormed the city of Richmond.

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil WarChicago Times ~ Editor Wilbur F Storey was a tall, white haried die-hard Democrat ...
12/14/2019

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil War
Chicago Times ~ Editor Wilbur F Storey was a tall, white haried die-hard Democrat and a bully of a man. Uning sensationalist rhetoric to undermine the Union war effort, he became a major voice of the dissenting Copperhead movement.
Papers were thick with the accounts of alleged testimonials from Federal soldiers lamenting the endless hardships of Army life, corruption, disease and bad Generals. Editorials predicted an inevitable Confederate victory.
The newspaper was particularly brutal against Linccoln. The president's Gettysburg address was, according to the Times, a national embrassment of dishwatery utterances and a preserversion of history. Lincoln's second Inaugural fared little better. After hearing the president wish "malice toward none, with charity for all" the Times labeled the speech "slipshod and puerile"
Proving any publicity is good publicity, the Times vauled into the natinal spotlight when the U S Military attempted to silence its presses. Union Commander Ambrose E Burnside, relocated to the Department of the Ohio, after his failure at Gredericksburg, ordered the Times closed for its "disloyal and incendiary sentiments" In the early hours of June 3 1864, a company of blue coats surrounded the Times, stormed the building, and destroted copies of the day's edition. Days later Licoln recinded Burnside's well meaning but politically hazardous edict and allowed the paper to resume business. Yet the incident cementd the status of the Times as the voice of opposition.

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil WarRichmond Enquirer ~ A venerable sandard of the Democratic Party prior to the war, ...
12/13/2019

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil War
Richmond Enquirer ~ A venerable sandard of the Democratic Party prior to the war, the Richmond Enquirer had a reputation of prudence and objectivity, much in the same manner as the New York Times. In 1860 it opposed secession, as did most of Virginia. After Fort Sumter, however, the Enquirer became a fortress for Southern morale, and its traditional candor took a short hiatus.
When describing the Confederate repulse of the Army of the Potomac in the 1862 Peninsula campaign, the Enquirer marveled how the success came " in so short a time and with so small cost to the victors" Its editors failed to mention that the "small cost" was nearly twenty thousand Confederate dead and wounded in a week of fighting. The daily continued to present most battles, win or loss, in a favorable light. Somehow it translated Lee's defeat at the battle of Antietam as " one of the most complete vicitories that has yet immortalized confederate arms"
By late 1863 the newspaper kept up a brave front in spite of the tightening blockade and a string of Conferedrate defeats. If its writers refrained from bad news, the physical appearance of the paper itself reported otherwise. Printed with blurred and feeble ink, the daily came as a single sheet of ratty pulp, speaking volumes of the Confederacy's withering supplies.
Over the course of 1864 the newspaper gradually returned to its roots of accurate reporting. Its columns began to acknowledge critical food shortages and inflation and critized the Confederate Congress for lack of action. Yet it continued to recognize the resolution of citizens and soldiers and remained confident in "Lee's indomitable Army" even as "the sullen sound of the distant gun" rattled the windows of its downtown Richmond office"
In October 1864, the Richmond Enquirer publicly endorsed the arming of slaves. It was the first major newspaper in the South to do so.

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil WarCharleston Mercury ~ Robert Barnwell Rhett's Charleston Mercury was the voice of t...
12/12/2019

Top 10 Newspapers during the Civil War
Charleston Mercury ~ Robert Barnwell Rhett's Charleston Mercury was the voice of the fire - eaters. Despite a very small readership ( around five thousand), the newpaper was one of the most quoted periodicals prior to the war, reaching the most influential desks in the country.
Certainly the Mercury enjoyed its largest political influence beofre the war, acting as the most prominent Secessionist newpapers in the nation. More ediorial this informational, the daily retained a strict doctrine. It was for State's rights, namely southern Sates rights, and would defed them against any threats.
The dogmatic loyalty superseded all else, including the Confederate war effort. The newpaper vehemntly opposed Jefferson Davis's attempts to enforce a national draft, collect income tax and dictate military operations over and above the wishes of the states. Its editorials called Davis "egotistical, arrogant and vindictive" and a man of "terrible incompetency and perversity" The anti-administration message held considerable appeal among governors and state legislators, who began to sense little difference between Washing DC and Richmond.
One wonders if there were personal motives directing the perpetual attacks upon the executive branc. In 1861 Mercury owner Rhett fervently believed he was to be the first president of the Confederate States of America. He was more than a little disappointed when a moderate from Mississippi was elected in his place.

Address

45 E Main St
Springville, NY
14141

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 14:00
Saturday 12:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(716) 957-2740

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