Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum

Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum Earth Stewardship, Outdoor Learning, Food Consciousness, Arts and Rural Culture, Well-Balanced Life museum, nat'l historic site, & edu. outreach center
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The Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum (LHBM) is the birthplace and childhood home of America's Father of Modern Horticulture, Liberty Hyde Bailey (1858-1954), built in the Greek Revival style in 1858. We are a National Historic Place on the National Register of Historic Places; the only museum in the world dedicated solely to Bailey's life and work; a botanic garden featuring a collection of interpretive horticultural gardens, community garden plots, and a wooded nature trail; a research center featuring one of the most extensive library collections of Bailey's publications in the world and recently the home of the Bailey Family Library Collection spanning 1,000+ volumes; the site of South Haven's historic blacksmith's shop; and an educational outreach center serving the greater South Haven community. We would like to extend a heartfelt welcome to you, your friends, and your family to come investigate one of history's most interesting characters. Feel free to join us for events throughout the summer and fall, and, if you're so inclined, we hope you'll make a small contribution to help keep Bailey's beliefs alive. Summer hours run May through September. During the "off-season," we are open by appointment only, but do give us a ring, and we'll set up a time to meet and show you the place! Please send mail to P. O. Box 626. Follow us on Twitter @LHBMuseum or on Google+ at www.google.com/+LibertyHydeBaileyMuseumSouthHaven. Treasurer of the Board of Trustees Joan Hiddema. "Little children love the dandelions: why may not we?" -LHB

Mission: We are dedicated to educating people about America’s Father of Modern Horticulture, Liberty Hyde Bailey. He believed in putting people in sympathy with their environment. We strive to fulfill his vision.

05/20/2020
Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

THANK YOU to the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs for funding the South Haven Center for the Arts emergency grant request alongside the Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum, and so many other dedicated arts organizations throughout Michigan who need help right now.

Emergency Relief Fund Announcement

The Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs has awarded a total of $502,400 in Emergency Relief Fund grants to 176 nonprofit arts and cultural organizations around Michigan to assist with negative impacts resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation announced today.

Arts Midwest, a nonprofit regional arts organization and partner to MCACA, also contributed another $83,834 to assist an additional 28 Michigan organizations.

The list of grant recipients by county can be found

https://www.michiganbusiness.org/49b16a/globalassets/documents/mcaca/erf-final-funding-plan-by-county.pdf,

and the overall list can be found
https://www.michiganbusiness.org/49b178/globalassets/documents/mcaca/erf-funding-plan.pdf

• Highlighted Organizations funded through Arts Midwest

Learned something new about bird friendly coffee 😄
05/19/2020
Chasing Bugs

Learned something new about bird friendly coffee 😄

Creating a backyard oasis for wildlife often includes attracting birds to your yard. Planting for insects and reducing pesticides are great first steps in creating a bird-friendly backyard. But there are several other tangible steps you should think about when designing for birds! Keeping cats indoors (they are one of the greatest threats to birds) and safeguarding your windows against bird strikes are important too!

We’ve seen more diversity in birds this year than ever before. Rose-breasted grosbeaks, Baltimore orioles, and ruby-throated hummingbirds to name just a few! What birds are you seeing in your yards? 🏡

“Little children love the dandelions , why may not we? Love the things nearest at hand , and love intensely”.- Liberty H...
05/13/2020

“Little children love the dandelions , why may not we? Love the things nearest at hand , and love intensely”.
- Liberty Hyde Bailey

The best part about allowing dandelions to grow in your yard? Watching your children blow wishes into the sunset.

All that lawn in the background is getting converted to gardens. We’re starting with a woodland garden in the corner. 🤩

Ralstonia solanacearum can infect hundreds of different plant species, however, race 3 biovar 2 is primarily limited to ...
05/01/2020
Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 detected in greenhouse geraniums

Ralstonia solanacearum can infect hundreds of different plant species, however, race 3 biovar 2 is primarily limited to geranium, potato, tomato and solanaceous weeds. Common weed hosts include Carolina horsenettle, climbing nightshade and stinging nettle

https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/ralstonia-solanacearum-race-3-biovar-2-detected-in-greenhouse-geraniums

Local officials are involved due to the tight regulation of this bacterial pathogen.

04/27/2020
Chasing Bugs

So interesting - and beautiful photography

Please enjoy the world premiere of Chasing Bugs, the film!

I've dedicated many hours over the last two years on this solo film project and I’m so excited to finally bring it to all of you!

Insects and other arthropods are fundamental to the health of our world, yet, many view insects as little more than pests. Chasing Bugs explores the decline of insects while highlighting their global importance. Experts weigh in on media reports of insect decline and offer advice for conserving these beautiful animals in the home landscape.

On #LHBailey and the parallels between remote instruction of college students and educational extension to nontraditiona...
04/09/2020
Snail mail to Wi-Fi: Cornell’s history of remote instruction

On #LHBailey and the parallels between remote instruction of college students and educational extension to nontraditional students at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University—an interesting read! Bailey strongly believed in the university's ability to extend education beyond the walls of academe. #remotelearning https://cals.cornell.edu/news/snail-mail-wi-fi-cornells-history-remote-instruction

“Cornell was among the pioneers of extension education, particularly in home economics and nature study, with Liberty Hyde Bailey being a driving force behind both,” said Corey Ryan Earle ’07, a visiting lecturer in American studies who teaches a popular course on Cornell history.

Chasing Bugs
04/06/2020

Chasing Bugs

Humbling message. 🌎

Author unknown

04/05/2020
“Victory Gardens” for the pandemic

From John Stempien and an appropriate quote from LHB

"Sooner or later, every person feels this desire to plant something. It is the return to Eden, the return to ourselves after the long estrangement of our artificial lives." -Liberty Hyde Bailey

#GardenersCompanion #LHBailey #gardening

With spring in the air, people are looking to plant gardens. But the coronavirus pandemic and the challenging times facing those in lockdown have brought to ...

Van Buren Conservation District
03/30/2020

Van Buren Conservation District

You don't have to choose between a beautiful yard and habitat for pollinators and other wildlife! Native plants can give you the best of both worlds, and are available during our spring tree sale!
https://shop.vanburencd.org/collections/tree-sales

We are currently in the process of working with our suppliers to re-schedule our Tree Sale for a later date, but are still accepting pre-orders! Keep an eye out for later this week for new dates.

The Liberty Hyde Bailey Library
03/28/2020

The Liberty Hyde Bailey Library

Greetings from the editors. We hope you’re all staying happy and healthy. With all the time we’re all spending at home, we think there has never been a better time to start a garden. We are happy to share that, based on numbers we’ve recently received, we’re on course to hit our goal of selling 1,000 copies of the book in our first year—thanks so much to all the readers who have found the earth’s joy and comfort through Bailey’s timeless words thus far! We would be happy to know what passages have resonated with you. Or if you don't have your own copy yet, or know someone who should have one on their own shelf (or in their garden shed), know that Bailey’s philosophy of the garden is as relevant as ever in this time of slowing down—we can all benefit from his comfort and companionship, as well as that provided by the good things of the garden. We never need to socially distance ourselves from the marvels at our feet!

Orders due by April 10 for tree seedlings
03/23/2020

Orders due by April 10 for tree seedlings

Did you know that many of our common landscape plants are actually invasive?😱 Instead, opt for native plants to provide habitat pollinators and beauty in your yard.
https://shop.vanburencd.org/collections/tree-sales

Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum's cover photo
03/22/2020

Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum's cover photo

Van Buren Conservation District
03/17/2020
Van Buren Conservation District

Van Buren Conservation District

While the kiddos are at home, we're going to be sharing some of our favorite resources to get them thinking! Did you know that you can earn Junior Ranger badges and patches from some of our National Parks without leaving the house? From Keweenaw National Historical Park here in Michigan to War in the Pacific National Historical Park all the way in Guam, get your kids learning about some of the most special places in our nation! Check out this great blog for a list of badges available remotely!
http://craftknife.blogspot.com/2018/06/heres-every-national-park-junior-ranger.html

Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum's cover photo
03/16/2020

Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum's cover photo

Happy Birthday Liberty Hyde Bailey!Liberty Hyde Bailey (March 15, 1858 – December 25, 1954) was an American horticulturi...
03/15/2020

Happy Birthday Liberty Hyde Bailey!

Liberty Hyde Bailey (March 15, 1858 – December 25, 1954) was an American horticulturist, botanist, and co-founder of the American Society for Horticultural Science. Bailey is credited with being instrumental in starting Land Grant College agricultural extension services (i.e., MSU Extension), the 4-H movement for youths, the nature study movement, and the Commission on Country Life. His input from this work caused rural mail service to be started, and rural electrification. He was considered the father of rural sociology and rural journalism.
Born in South Haven, as the third son of farmers Liberty Hyde Bailey Sr. and Sarah Harrison Bailey, Bailey entered the Michigan Agricultural College (now Michigan State University) in 1878 and graduated in 1882. The next year, he became assistant to the renowned botanist Asa Gray, of Harvard University. Bailey spent two years with Gray as his herbarium assistant. In 1883, he married Annette Smith, the daughter of a Michigan cattle breeder, whom he met at the Michigan Agricultural College. They had two daughters, Sara May, born in 1887, and Ethel Zoe, born in 1889.
In 1885, he moved to Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, where in 1888 he assumed the chair of Practical and Experimental Horticulture. He was elected an Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1900. He founded the College of Agriculture, and in 1904 he was able to secure public funding. He was dean of what was then known as New York State College of Agriculture from 1903-1913. In 1908, he was appointed Chairman of The National Commission on Country Life by President Theodore Roosevelt. Its 1909 Report called for rebuilding a great agricultural civilization in America. In 1913, he retired to become a private scholar and devote more time to social and political issues. In 1917 he was elected a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences.
He edited numerous books, articles and cyclopedia. He dominated the field of horticultural literature, writing some sixty-five books, which together sold more than a million copies, including scientific works, efforts to explain botany to laypeople, and a collection of poetry. He edited more than a hundred books by other authors and published at least 1,300 articles and over 100 papers on taxonomy. He also coined the words "cultivar", "cultigen", and "indigen" (now commonly used as “indigene”), which are widely used today. His most significant and lasting contributions were in the botanical study of cultivated plants.
Liberty Hyde Bailey embraced rural civilization and technological progress simultaneously. The overproduction resulting from technological progress would, however, eventually marginalize agriculture. Bailey represented an agrarianism that stood in the tradition of Thomas Jefferson. He had a vision of suffusing all higher education, including horticulture, with a spirit of public work and integrating "expert knowledge" into a broader context of democratic community action. As a leader of the Country Life Movement, he strove to preserve the American rural civilization, which he thought was a vital and wholesome alternative to the impersonal and corrupting city life. In contrast to other progressive thinkers at the time, he endorsed the family, which, he recognized, played a unique role in socialization. The family farm especially had a benign influence as a natural cooperative unit where everybody had real duties and responsibilities. The independence it fostered made farmers "a natural correction against organization men, habitual reformers, and extremists". It was necessary to uphold soil fertility in order to maintain the welfare of future generations.

He is widely regarded to this day as the Father of Modern Horticulture and his influence is found around the globe today.

Orders due by April 10. You can pick up at the museum April 16-19
03/11/2020

Orders due by April 10. You can pick up at the museum April 16-19

Who else is thinking spring? 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️🐝🌸
Check out native early spring blooming trees at our Spring Tree Sale! Orders are due April 10th!
https://shop.vanburencd.org/collections/tree-sales

3rd Grade Visits
03/08/2020

3rd Grade Visits

Bailey's  Budding Naturalists will be in July 2020! Stay tuned for more info !
03/06/2020

Bailey's Budding Naturalists will be in July 2020! Stay tuned for more info !

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
03/06/2020

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA

****These comments are from our guest curators April Bryan & Brittany Williams as they were creating the exhibit "Growin...
03/02/2020

****These comments are from our guest curators April Bryan & Brittany Williams as they were creating the exhibit "Growing Up Bailey" ****

Liberty Hyde Bailey – South Haven’s Favorite Son

What was it like to be a boy growing up in the 1860s in rural West Michigan? How did young Bailey grow up to become the influential man we are all here because of today? Who were the people that helped him become the Father of Modern Horticulture?

It was these questions and more that April and I asked ourselves just four short months ago. We were introduced to the dedicated, passionate volunteers here at the Bailey Museum through mutual museum colleagues. We spend most of our time at our “home” museums near Kalamazoo – April as the Collections and Exhibits Manager at the Air Zoo in Portage while I am the Collections Manager at the Gilmore Car Museum in rural Hickory Corners.

When we were presented with the opportunity to spend some quality time learning about Bailey’s beginnings, it was an offer that we could not refuse and a project we were beyond delighted to pursue.

The idea of “growing up Bailey” was intriguing ------ how did this young boy grow up to become a profound and inspirational man? It is a feat that only a select few ever achieve. The motivation that young Bailey had for learning inspired our creativity.

When Bailey walked this very yard and the orchard that used to populate the land, he saw color. Green in the leaves, blue in the creek that ran through the family’s homestead and in the big lake nearby, the rough brown bark of the trees all around him, and the pink of his favorite flowers that reminded him of his mother.

He heard sounds. The chirping of the birds swooping through the sky, the buzzing of the insects in the fields, and the sharp clish of his father working the land around them. It is these sights and sounds that influenced the aesthetic that we wanted to bring inside the Bailey home.

The story was already written. Bailey’s life had been wonderfully documented through the family’s hardships and successes – and there were many of each. Births, deaths, marriages. The family felt both tragic loss and celebrated happy times in this home. It is these stories --- and the people that were present in these times --- that influenced the man Bailey would become.

And as he became that man, he influenced many others in return. Through his teachings, books, poems, and passion, he did what no man had done before him. He brought a higher level of understanding to nature and the world around him, and he will forever remain a remarkable man because of it.

April and I spent four short months with Bailey, but really, we’ve gotten to walk with him through each of his 96 years. When people make the pilgrimage to see the birthplace of Liberty Hyde Bailey, Jr --- it is our wish that they will leave seeing the world as Bailey did. Full of the color, sounds, and beauty that the Earth offers each one of us.

New Exhibit 2018- Growing Up Bailey
03/02/2020

New Exhibit 2018- Growing Up Bailey

This is the link to the podcast of the interview with co-hosts Teresa Getman, Rosalie Plechaty and Rob as they dig deep ...
03/02/2020

This is the link to the podcast of the interview with co-hosts Teresa Getman, Rosalie Plechaty and Rob as they dig deep with Dan Williamson, Anne Long and Beth Clawson at Studio 2B about the ins and outs of the Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum and Gardens.
This is part of Rob Byrd's Moondog Saturday Morning Show, episode 60.
Photo of Teresa Getman, Dan Williamson, Rob Byrd, Anne Long and Beth Clawson .
https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-3vai4-d4ad49?fbclid=IwAR3L7zeIvDZ2Y5Tdi5iVMSAVyUPYjte9KZXW0NSZYRpyP2Es4eK6nYXfywU#.XlQlbGLD-bs.facebook

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903 S Bailey Ave
South Haven, MI
49090

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The Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum (LHBM) is the birthplace and childhood home of America's Father of Modern Horticulture, Liberty Hyde Bailey (1858-1954), built in the Greek Revival style in 1858. We are a National Historic Place on the National Register of Historic Places; the only museum in the world dedicated solely to Bailey's life and work; a botanic garden featuring a collection of interpretive horticultural gardens, community garden plots, and a wooded nature trail; a research center featuring one of the most extensive library collections of Bailey's publications in the world and recently the home of the Bailey Family Library Collection spanning 1,000+ volumes; the site of South Haven's historic blacksmith's shop; and an educational outreach center serving the greater South Haven community. We would like to extend a heartfelt welcome to you, your friends, and your family to come investigate one of history's most interesting characters. Feel free to join us for events throughout the summer and fall, and, if you're so inclined, we hope you'll make a small contribution to help keep Bailey's beliefs alive. Summer hours run May through September. During the "off-season," we are open by appointment only, but do give us a ring, and we'll set up a time to meet and show you the place! Please send mail to P. O. Box 626 South Haven, MI 49090 "Little children love the dandelions: why may not we?" -LHB

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Comments

The conference was great. Here is a quote provided by Cybelle Shattuck during her session "Ministry of Place, Stewardship, Fellowship and Community", by Dr. James (Gus) Speth, that might be the most important message we should focus on: “I used to think that top global environmental problems were biodiversity loss, ecosystem collapse, and climate change. I thought that with 30 years of good science we could address these problems, but I was wrong. The top environmental problems are selfishness, greed, and apathy, and to deal with these we need a spiritual and cultural transformation. And we scientists don’t know how to do that.”
Be sure to look at the Bailey Conference website to learn about the 13 very good presenters. baileymuseumfallconference.com
Anyone interested in ride sharing to this conference on Oct. 5?
My Grandma was Maude Adkin Merson who lived in South Haven and knew Liberty Hyde Bailey.
Thank you for the wonderful field trip we had last week. My class was very interested and you did a wonderful job with them! I have some wonderful pictures that I have posted on my classroom page. I'm not sure how to put them on your page though. :) Thanks again!
Thank you to the MCACA and the City of South Haven 2018 has been a good year for the Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum. The Museum was the recipient of two grants from the Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs. The mission of the MCACA is broad, yet simple: To encourage, initiate and facilitate an enriched artistic, cultural and creative environment in Michigan. MCACA does this by increasing the visibility of arts and culture throughout the state, supporting arts education, encouraging new, creative and innovative works of art and broadening cultural understanding. The first was a Capital Improvement Grant in the amount of $18,200. By working with the City of South Haven, the years of debris was removed from the basement, the foundation was shored up, and a sump pump was installed. By doing this, the Bailey Board of Trustees can now catalog its extensive book collection and make two rooms on the second floor of the Museum a research library. It is the plan of the Board that the Museum becomes a research site for those seeing information about Liberty Hyde Bailey his work and his legacy. The second was an Operational Support Grant in the amount of $11,200. The purpose of these grants is Operational Support is to provide operational support to arts and cultural organizations only. Because of this support, the Bailey Museum was able to host the first Bailey Conference. The day-long Conference brought internationally known entomologist Douglas Tallamay, author of Bringing Nature Home, and 13 other noted botanists, agronomists, artists, authors, and farmers to South Haven. The Bailey Board thanks the MCACA for overseeing the distribution of these grants. Further, it thanks the people of the State of Michigan for making this possible through their taxes.
The first Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum 2018 Fall Conference is over. It was a success! Over 160 people attended. The keynote speaker was more than well received -- Douglas Tallamy was a hit. Of course every conference has a problem or two. This one had two: which of the 13 presentations to attend. For a fledgling conference the speakers where knowledgeable and well-spoken. The other problem -- how to eat all the food. The South Haven Public Schools food department provided a perfect lunch. And when I was the members of the South Haven Garden Club provided the continental breakfast and snacks, well need I say more. There was a good selection of vendors, all relating to Bailey's vision. This conference was the work of many people who worked many hours. The Bailey Board of Directors was pleased to bring this conference to southwest Michigan. However, it knows without the collaboration of the South Haven Garden Club, the South Haven Public Schools, the South Haven Community Foundation, and the MGC District III it would never have been the success it was. They were the perfect collaborators. It was a great day!!
The Vineyard tour was a great experience. Learned so much. Had a wonderful time.