IAIA Alumni

IAIA Alumni To empower and provide support by engaging alumni in the interest of sustaining and promoting the growth and development of the Institute of American Indian Arts.
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Created for IAIA alumni to stay connected.

Operating as usual

Let's all support our current grads, and up and coming Alumn
04/28/2021

Let's all support our current grads, and up and coming Alumn

The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) invites our community to “Walk to Graduation”—a fundraising initiative created by the IAIA Alumni Association and IAIA Alumni Council to help raise funding for the IAIA Alumni Scholarship. The Class of 2021 has shown unbelievable resilience in finishing a degree through a global pandemic, and the “Walk to Graduation” fundraiser will run through Friday, May 28, 2021 in celebration of all that our graduates have accomplished. We know that scholarships are an essential resource for IAIA students, and we hope to pay it forward for future IAIA Alumni. During this fundraiser, participants will have the opportunity to create their own fundraising page, recruit team members, and compete in social and fitness challenges with other teams or individuals to show their progress through social media. The goal is to have fun as a community and help grow the IAIA Alumni Scholarship fund. Please join the IAIA community as we “Walk to Graduation!”

For more information about #IAIAGradWalk21 and to sign up, visit www.iaia.edu/walk-to-graduation/.

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts

04/24/2021

USA TODAY 10Best has named the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) one of the top twenty “Best Art Museums” in the country—now it is up to the readers to make the final decision. Our community already knows our museum is amazing, now let’s show the country! Individuals can vote once per day until polls close on Monday, April 26 at noon (EDT).

You can show your support and cast your Readers’ Choice Awards 2021 “Best Art Museum” vote for MoCNA now at www.10best.com/awards/travel/best-art-museum-2021/iaia-museum-of-contemporary-native-arts-santa-fe-new-mexico/.

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts

Longstanding Emergency Grants program provides last-minute grants of $500-$2,500 to experimental artists in all discipli...
04/20/2021
Emergency Grants

Longstanding Emergency Grants program provides last-minute grants of $500-$2,500 to experimental artists in all disciplines who receive unanticipated opportunities to present their work to the public when there is too little time to seek other sources of funding and/or who experience unexpected expenses close to the date of a performance or exhibition. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and we hold monthly panels to review proposed projects.

https://www.foundationforcontemporaryarts.org/grants/emergency-grants/

Emergency Grants

03/31/2021
2021 Career Fair Student Registration

IAIA 2021 Virtual Career fair is open to Alumni and IAIA Community. If you wish to register please follow the link below.

IAIA 2021 Virtual Career Fair
Wednesday, April 7
11:00am – 1:00pm MDT

Register Here: Career Fair Student & Alumni Registration
https://iaiaacademics.wufoo.com/forms/q13oi7bi0uv68sg/

Virtual Career Fair Wednesday, April 7, 2021 11:00am - 1:00pm MDT It is important to register in order to be placed in the appropriate company breakout room. Seniors and recent graduates--companies employing any of IAIA's six degree pathways have been invited. View the "Happenings" IAIA web page for...

Please join us today to honor and celebrate the life of Alumn, faculty, mentor, and IAIA Family member Jeff Kahm (Plains...
03/31/2021

Please join us today to honor and celebrate the life of Alumn, faculty, mentor, and IAIA Family member Jeff Kahm (Plains Cree).

Please join us Wednesday at 11:00 am (MST) for a Memorial Gathering to honor the passing of our long-time faculty and alum, Jeff Kahm (Plains Cree).

As our campus is still closed to the public due to the pandemic, we kindly ask that those in our community please join us online for the live stream at https://iaia.edu

Photo by Jason S. Ordaz

Our condolences to his family, and to all those he inspired.
03/27/2021

Our condolences to his family, and to all those he inspired.

"We are shocked and deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Jeff Kahm, our beloved Studio Arts Professor. Please keep Professor Kahm's family in your prayers," stated IAIA President, Robert Martin, PhD (Cherokee Nation).

L. Jeff Kahm (Plains Cree heritage) was born in 1968 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in 1990 to study painting and photography. He was awarded a painting scholarship to attend the Kansas City Art Institute, where he earned a BFA in 1994. He continued graduate studies at the University of Alberta earning an MFA in 1997.

In 2002, Jeff returned to New Mexico, where he soon began teaching at the Institute of American Indian Arts as a visiting faculty member. He was an Associate Professor at IAIA where he taught studio art courses at the intermediate and advanced levels.

His landmark exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico (2012), Urban Shaman Contemporary Aboriginal Art in Winnipeg, Manitoba (2013) and Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art in Santa Fe (2016) highlighted his most recent work – a striking series of small works on paper and panels and an impressive collection of large scale paintings on canvas – work he described as "rooted in Indigenous abstraction and Modernist aesthetics".

Memorial services will be scheduled in the near future.

Biographical information from jeffkahm.com

03/23/2021

AIANTA is seeking a graphic designer or artist to create a series of original clip art graphics to be utilized throughout AIANTA’s domestic and international marketing programs. This opportunity is open to all artists; however, preference will be given to artists who are of Native American, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian descent.

Click for more information
https://www.aianta.org/rfp-call-for-artist/

03/18/2021
www.santafecf.org

Call For Artist

We're delighted to announce a call for the design and creation of the visual identity of the Native American Advised Fund at the Santa Fe Community Foundation. An honorarium of $1,000 will be awarded to the winning logo design.

Submission Deadline: Monday, May 31, 2021.

https://www.santafecf.org/file/NAAF-Logo-Design-FINAL.pdf

Something to tune into!
03/02/2021

Something to tune into!

Tomorrow, Wednesday, March 3, tune in to KSFR 101.1 from 8:00 - 9:00 am, to listen to a special program with Deborah Begel, as she interviews Linda Lomahaftewa (Hopi/Choctaw). The exhibition "The Moving Land: 60+ Years of Art by Linda Lomahaftewa" is on exhibit through July 17 at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Arts.

You may also listen at: https://www.ksfr.org/#stream/0

Photo by Jason S. Ordaz.

This is another opportunity, looking at our artists who are in the Valley of this Sun area. Scottsdale is looking for so...
03/02/2021
RFP Canal Convergence 2021: Request for Temporary Public Art Proposals - CODAworx

This is another opportunity, looking at our artists who are in the Valley of this Sun area. Scottsdale is looking for some artists to come up with some temporary public art proposals.

https://www.codaworx.com/rfp/rfp-canal-convergence-2021-request-for-temporary-public-art-proposals/

Canal Convergence | Water + Art + Light Request for Temporary Public Art Proposals Deadline: Friday, March 26, 2021, 11:59… Read More

This Opportunity deadline has been pushed back to March 10th, Please spread the word to artists who may be interested. I...
03/02/2021
Placemaking Art for New CUNA Mutual Building - CODAworx

This Opportunity deadline has been pushed back to March 10th, Please spread the word to artists who may be interested. It specifically for Native Americans.

THIS CALL HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO MARCH 10, 2021. Summary: CUNA Mutual Group seeks iconic placemaking art for its new… Read More

Happy Monday! I wanted to forward this to you all. PLEASE, PLEASE, there are fellowships in this program specifically fo...
02/23/2021
2021 CALL FOR APPLICANTS ARTTABLE FELLOWSHIP.pdf

Happy Monday! I wanted to forward this to you all. PLEASE, PLEASE, there are fellowships in this program specifically for Native women. They DO NOT have to be graduate students! They can be recent grads or seniors this year. This is a great opportunity to Museum studies students. Art Table is an incredible organization that is trying to make sure that women of color are being represented in museums and the art world in general.

For those who are interested in working with IAIA, there are some job opportunities that are available. Please check the...
02/22/2021
Employment > Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)

For those who are interested in working with IAIA, there are some job opportunities that are available. Please check them out.

Apply for positions at the Institute of American Indian Arts and learn more about our mission.

Congratulations!
02/22/2021

Congratulations!

Congratulations to IAIA Alum Cannupa Hanska Luger, who received a 2021 United States Artists Fellowship in the craft category.

Luger is one of 60 artists to earn an unrestricted $50,000 USA Fellowship, which honors the artists’ creative accomplishments and supports ongoing artistic and professional development.

A multi-award winning, multidisciplinary artist, Luger interweaves performance and political action to communicate stories about 21st Century Indigeneity.

You may learn more about his work at his website:
http://www.cannupahanska.com/current
Cannupahanska Luger

Open Call :)
02/08/2021

Open Call :)

Attention Artists,

Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Announces Open Call for Social Change and Emerging Artist Support Programs.

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) is pleased to announce its open call for two new award programs. After a year of strategic planning and working closely with our network of artists, grantees and stakeholders, NACF moves into its second decade with SHIFT, a two-year program designed to support artist and community-driven projects responding to social, environmental or economic justice issues through a Native lens. NACF is also launching LIFT, a one-year award and early career support program for emerging Native artists to develop and realize new projects.

SHIFT PROGRAM-

NACF is now accepting Letters of Interest for the SHIFT–Transformative Change and Indigenous Arts program. SHIFT is a two-year award that includes financial resources, professional development, artist/stakeholder convening, cross-sector collaboration, evaluation, exhibiting and presenting opportunities for Native artists, cultural practitioners, and community partners. The program’s focus is to bring attention to Native communities to shift a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. SHIFT will provide invaluable resources for project development, production and presentation for artists and their collaborators.

Eligible Letters of Interest must include both a Native artist applicant (individual or an artist collective) and a partner organization/co-applicant working in dance/choreography, fiction/poetry writing, film/video, multi-disciplinary arts, music, performance art, theater and screenplay writing, traditional arts, or 2D + 3D visual arts. Artist applicant must be an enrolled member or citizen of a federally-recognized or state-recognized American Indian tribe or Alaska Native corporation, or of Native Hawaiian ancestry. Partner organization/co-applicants must be a US-based non-profit organization, for-profit business, or tribal agency working in collaboration with Native artists or Native artist collectives. We encourage artists to apply who: have experience developing projects focused on engaging communities and the public to address community issues; build upon community cultural assets; and partner with organizations to develop and present the work.

SHIFT is a monetary award totaling $100,000 for two years, with $50,000 of the award earmarked for the lead artist or artist collective. Up to ten projects will be selected to receive SHIFT awards.

For a full description of the award, eligibility requirements and to apply, please visit http://bit.ly/NACF-shift.

The deadline to submit the online Letter of Interest form for SHIFT is Tuesday, March 16, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. Pacific time.

LIFT PROGRAM-

NACF is also accepting applications for the LIFT–Early Career Support for Native Artists program. LIFT will provide one-year awards for early-career Native artists to develop and realize new projects. The program’s focus is to provide financial support and professional development to artists whose work aims to uplift communities and advance positive social change.

Eligible applicants must be individual Native artists working in dance/choreography, fiction/poetry writing, film/video, multi-disciplinary arts, music, performance art, theater and screenplay writing, traditional arts, or 2D + 3D visual arts. Artist applicant must be an enrolled member or citizen of a federally-recognized or state-recognized American Indian tribe or Alaska Native corporation, or of Native Hawaiian ancestry. We encourage artists to apply who are shaping their practices and for whom the award may serve as a launching point in their career.

LIFT is a monetary award of $10,000 for a proposed project with $2,500 earmarked for the artist’s benefit and wellbeing. Up to twenty artists will be selected to receive LIFT awards.

For a full description of the award, eligibility requirements and to apply, please visit http://bit.ly/NACF-lift.

The deadline to submit the online application form for LIFT is Tuesday, March 16, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. Pacific time.

To learn more about the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation visit www.nativeartsandcultures.org

Check out this article written by MFA Alumni and Student Council Member George Cramer on Alumni Cristosto Apache. "It is...
01/28/2021
Crisosto Apache - Poet - Educator - Leader - Author George Cramer

Check out this article written by MFA Alumni and Student Council Member George Cramer on Alumni Cristosto Apache.

"It is fascinating to me to examine the interaction of language and the mapped direction the language interaction takes me, which resembles the action of “unfolding” or “uncovering."

https://gdcramer.com/2021/01/28/crisosto-apache-poet-teacher-leader/

Mescalero / Chiricahua Apache and Diné Navajo from New Mexico. Crisosto Apache is an alumnus from Insitute of American Indian Arts (AFA 1992 / MFA 2015) and Metropolitan State University of Denver (BA, 2013) for English and Creative Writing. His work also includes Native LGBTQI / ‘two spirit’ a...

For those who might be interested in this webinar. It's not just for students but also or those who may be interested in...
01/26/2021

For those who might be interested in this webinar. It's not just for students but also or those who may be interested in the Hiring Process for Federal Employment.

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OFCCP’s HBCU, HSI and TCU Student Webinar Applying for Federal Employment
Hosted by the Southwest and Rocky Mountain Region OFCCP and OASAM
Do you have an interest in starting a career in the Federal Government? Please join us on January 27, 2021 from 12:30 p.m. -2:00 p.m. Central Time to learn about the federal hiring process. The U.S. Department of Labor, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration & Management (OASAM) will share information on the following:
• How to Prepare a Federal Resume • Navigating USAJobs Website • How to Apply for a Federal Job

We welcome Students and University Staff to participate in this webinar. SPACE IS LIMITED! Guarantee your spot by registering today.

If you have any questions or need webinar accommodations, please contact Allen Boyd at [email protected] or Monica Hoflich at [email protected].

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ofccps-hbcu-hsi-and-tcu-student-webinar-applying-for-federal-employment-tickets-133997549277

For those who might be interested in this webinar. It's not just for students but also or those who may be interested in the Hiring Process for Federal Employment.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

OFCCP’s HBCU, HSI and TCU Student Webinar Applying for Federal Employment
Hosted by the Southwest and Rocky Mountain Region OFCCP and OASAM
Do you have an interest in starting a career in the Federal Government? Please join us on January 27, 2021 from 12:30 p.m. -2:00 p.m. Central Time to learn about the federal hiring process. The U.S. Department of Labor, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration & Management (OASAM) will share information on the following:
• How to Prepare a Federal Resume • Navigating USAJobs Website • How to Apply for a Federal Job

We welcome Students and University Staff to participate in this webinar. SPACE IS LIMITED! Guarantee your spot by registering today.

If you have any questions or need webinar accommodations, please contact Allen Boyd at [email protected] or Monica Hoflich at [email protected].

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ofccps-hbcu-hsi-and-tcu-student-webinar-applying-for-federal-employment-tickets-133997549277

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Hi everyone! I'm not sure if this is of interest, but a few pretty great Native American artists are sharing their experiences in producing public art in an upcoming (free) webinar. Check it out if you're interested in learning more!
Today’s Spotlight falls on Kathryn “Kat” Wilder. Her story and writing are inspiring. We share an appreciation of Joy Harjo as the catalyst for our study in the MFA Low-Rez program. Kat as a friend, and me as a student exposed to Joy’s work. Here in her own words, is Kat’s story: In 2017, I graduated from the Institute of American Indian Arts with an MFA in creative nonfiction. This followed a Master of Arts degree in creative writing from Northern Arizona University earned twenty-five years earlier. In the years in between, I edited two anthologies (Walking the Twilight: Women Writers of the Southwest and Walking the Twilight II) and co-authored two children’s books (Forbidden Talent with Redwing T. Nez and Sunpainters: Eclipse of the Navajo Sun with Baje Whitethorne (no byline in this one)). I also wrote unpublished novels, and found my strongest voice in the genre of creative nonfiction—my articles and essays have appeared in many periodicals and literary reviews, and essays have been listed as Notable in The Best American Essays. During and since my time at IAIA, I was the 2016 winter Artist-in-Residence at Denali National Park and Preserve, a finalist for the 2016 and 2019 Ellen Meloy Fund Desert Writers Award, and 2018 finalist for the Waterston Desert Writing Prize. Two essays were finalists for the Crab Orchard Review’s Rafael Torch Literary Nonfiction Award in 2016, and additional publications include the following: • “Withdrawal” in Torrey House Press’s “That Thing with Feathers: Hope and Literature in the Time of Pandemic” (https://www.torreyhouse.org/single-post/2020/04/22/That-Thing-with-Feathers-Hope-and-Literature-in-a-Time-of-Pandemic); • “Sex on Slickrock” in New Millennium Writings Musepaper (https://musepaper.org/2019/sex-on-slickrock-by-kathryn-wilder/); • “The Weight of It” in Contra Viento’s “Open Range” (https://contravientojournal.org/the-weight-of-it/); • “Getting Ready” in Deserts: The First Five Years of the Waterston Desert Writing Prize. • “Grounded” in High Desert Journal (https://www.highdesertjournal.com/copy-of-28-10); • “October” in River Teeth‘s “Beautiful Things” (https://www.riverteethjournal.com/blog/2019/02/18/october; • “Fubar” in The Southwest Anthology: The Best of the Writing Programs, Texas A&M University Press. • “Geology of My Body” and “Into the Dread” in the 2017 IAIA Student Anthology. • “An Outsider Inside Denali National Park and Preserve,” National Park Service (https://www.nps.gov/dena/getinvolved/air-wilder.htm); and • “Where hope, science and mustangs meet” in High Country News’s “Writers on the Range” (http://www.hcn.org/articles/pzp-where-hope-science-and-mustangs-meet). The best writing news is that Desert Chrome: Water, a Woman, and Wild Horses in the West, which evolved from my IAIA thesis, will be published by Torrey House Press in March of 2021 (!). The tale of a woman lost in grief who finds her way out by following mustangs, Desert Chrome is based on personal backstory and the mustangs that share a fence with me at my home in Disappointment Valley, southwestern Colorado. I learned of IAIA’s MFA program through Joy Harjo in 2015. I immediately applied to the creative nonfiction portion with the hopeful intention of completing the manuscript under the guidance of IAIA’s stellar faculty, which at the time included Linda Hogan, one of my favorite authors ever—then and now. I was lucky to have Linda as a mentor, as well as Chip Livingston and Lidia Yuknavitch (Lidia for a year—wow!), and also to have workshops with Elissa Washuta, Melissa Febos, and Pam Houston in addition to Lidia. Fresh material written for Chip and from Lidia’s workshop have places in the book, all of the workshopped pieces are chapters in Desert Chrome, and six of the above-mentioned publications are part of Desert Chrome. Clearly, my writing and I have benefitted in myriad ways from my investment in IAIA and the low-rez MFA program’s investment in me. Not the least of these benefits is my lasting friendship with fellow alum Ina Leonard (whose piece in Orion can be found here: https://orionmagazine.org/2020/04/shore-leave/), and heartfelt exchanges with George Cramer, Elissa Washuta, and Melissa Febos, which continue to sustain me in these challenging times. In addition to writing, with my elder son, I run a ranch in Disappointment Valley and Dolores, Colorado, raise Criollo cattle, and sell grass-fed-and-finished beef at local farmers’ markets and restaurants. The ranch consists of about 19,000 acres of private, BLM, and USFS lands, and maybe it keeps us running more than we run it. Some weeks I hardly write at all. I leave at daylight and get home after dark, and while all I want to do is read and write, sleep overcomes. Today is the first time I’ve been home long enough to write several consecutive paragraphs. This will change next month when we move the cows up to the high country (9,000 feet), where grass and water and aspens abound. I envision writing in dToday’s Spotlight falls on Kathryn “Kat” Wilder. Her story and writing are inspiring. We share an appreciation of Joy Harjo as the catalyst for our study in the MFA Low-Rez program. Kat as a friend, and me as a student exposed to Joy’s work. Here in her own words, is Kat’s story: In 2017, I graduated from the Institute of American Indian Arts with an MFA in creative nonfiction. This followed a Master of Arts degree in creative writing from Northern Arizona University earned twenty-five years earlier. In the years in between, I edited two anthologies (Walking the Twilight: Women Writers of the Southwest and Walking the Twilight II) and co-authored two children’s books (Forbidden Talent with Redwing T. Nez and Sunpainters: Eclipse of the Navajo Sun with Baje Whitethorne (no byline in this one)). I also wrote unpublished novels, and found my strongest voice in the genre of creative nonfiction—my articles and essays have appeared in many periodicals and literary reviews, and essays have been listed as Notable in The Best American Essays. During and since my time at IAIA, I was the 2016 winter Artist-in-Residence at Denali National Park and Preserve, a finalist for the 2016 and 2019 Ellen Meloy Fund Desert Writers Award, and 2018 finalist for the Waterston Desert Writing Prize. Two essays were finalists for the Crab Orchard Review’s Rafael Torch Literary Nonfiction Award in 2016, and additional publications include the following: • “Withdrawal” in Torrey House Press’s “That Thing with Feathers: Hope and Literature in the Time of Pandemic” (https://www.torreyhouse.org/single-post/2020/04/22/That-Thing-with-Feathers-Hope-and-Literature-in-a-Time-of-Pandemic); • “Sex on Slickrock” in New Millennium Writings Musepaper (https://musepaper.org/2019/sex-on-slickrock-by-kathryn-wilder/); • “The Weight of It” in Contra Viento’s “Open Range” (https://contravientojournal.org/the-weight-of-it/); • “Getting Ready” in Deserts: The First Five Years of the Waterston Desert Writing Prize. • “Grounded” in High Desert Journal (https://www.highdesertjournal.com/copy-of-28-10); • “October” in River Teeth‘s “Beautiful Things” (https://www.riverteethjournal.com/blog/2019/02/18/october; • “Fubar” in The Southwest Anthology: The Best of the Writing Programs, Texas A&M University Press. • “Geology of My Body” and “Into the Dread” in the 2017 IAIA Student Anthology. • “An Outsider Inside Denali National Park and Preserve,” National Park Service (https://www.nps.gov/dena/getinvolved/air-wilder.htm); and • “Where hope, science and mustangs meet” in High Country News’s “Writers on the Range” (http://www.hcn.org/articles/pzp-where-hope-science-and-mustangs-meet). The best writing news is that Desert Chrome: Water, a Woman, and Wild Horses in the West, which evolved from my IAIA thesis, will be published by Torrey House Press in March of 2021 (!). The tale of a woman lost in grief who finds her way out by following mustangs, Desert Chrome is based on personal backstory and the mustangs that share a fence with me at my home in Disappointment Valley, southwestern Colorado. I learned of IAIA’s MFA program through Joy Harjo in 2015. I immediately applied to the creative nonfiction portion with the hopeful intention of completing the manuscript under the guidance of IAIA’s stellar faculty, which at the time included Linda Hogan, one of my favorite authors ever—then and now. I was lucky to have Linda as a mentor, as well as Chip Livingston and Lidia Yuknavitch (Lidia for a year—wow!), and also to have workshops with Elissa Washuta, Melissa Febos, and Pam Houston in addition to Lidia. Fresh material written for Chip and from Lidia’s workshop have places in the book, all of the workshopped pieces are chapters in Desert Chrome, and six of the above-mentioned publications are part of Desert Chrome. Clearly, my writing and I have benefitted in myriad ways from my investment in IAIA and the low-rez MFA program’s investment in me. Not the least of these benefits is my lasting friendship with fellow alum Ina Leonard (whose piece in Orion can be found here: https://orionmagazine.org/2020/04/shore-leave/), and heartfelt exchanges with George Cramer, Elissa Washuta, and Melissa Febos, which continue to sustain me in these challenging times. In addition to writing, with my elder son, I run a ranch in Disappointment Valley and Dolores, Colorado, raise Criollo cattle, and sell grass-fed-and-finished beef at local farmers’ markets and restaurants. The ranch consists of about 19,000 acres of private, BLM, and USFS lands, and maybe it keeps us running more than we run it. Some weeks I hardly write at all. I leave at daylight and get home after dark, and while all I want to do is read and write, sleep overcomes. Today is the first time I’ve been home long enough to write several consecutive paragraphs. This will change next month when we move the cows up to the high country (9,000 feet), where grass and water and aspens abound. I envision writing in dappled sunlight to the sounds of the breeze in the aspen leaves, the many different birdcalls up there, and the water trickling from snow-ponds to nourish the open meadows. Today, though, I have to force myself away from this writing-work to haul water for the cows still in Disappointment Valley, where a dry winter merged with a dry spring to make drought. There is too much to mourn these days—the loss of too many. The strife and tragedy on the nearby Navajo Nation and among Indigenous communities everywhere. The impacts of our sh*tty government under this uncaring “leader”—and so, despite physical and spiritual exhaustion, I will willingly turn my head to a calf bawling for its mother. Because that is one small crisis, I might be able to solve, riding out across the dry valley to find the corresponding cow. To bring one small family unit back together. Kathryn Wilder P.O. Box 479 Dolores, Colorado 81323 (808) 344-3554 [email protected] www.wilderhorses.live appled sunlight to the sounds of the breeze in the aspen leaves, the many different birdcalls up there, and the water trickling from snow-ponds to nourish the open meadows. Today, though, I have to force myself away from this writing-work to haul water for the cows still in Disappointment Valley, where a dry winter merged with a dry spring to make drought. There is too much to mourn these days—the loss of too many. The strife and tragedy on the nearby Navajo Nation and among Indigenous communities everywhere. The impacts of our sh*tty government under this uncaring “leader”—and so, despite physical and spiritual exhaustion, I will willingly turn my head to a calf bawling for its mother. Because that is one small crisis, I might be able to solve, riding out across the dry valley to find the corresponding cow. To bring one small family unit back together. Kathryn Wilder P.O. Box 479 Dolores, Colorado 81323 (808) 344-3554 [email protected] www.wilderhorses.live