Bridges That Carried Us Over Project: Documenting Black History in the IE

Bridges That Carried Us Over Project: Documenting Black History in the IE Founded by Wilmer Amina Carter & William Henry (Ratibu) Jacocks, now held at CSUSB Pfau Library

Photos on site by Henry Hooks, courtesy of San Bernardino County Museum. http://www.sbcounty.gov/museum/

We invite anyone with photos or stories about Black History in the Inland Empire to contact us. We are continuing to do oral histories on Zoom and are interested in collecting photos either online at this site or in person as soon as it is safe to do so.

Who remembers the Black Fathers’ organization founded back in 1969? This classic photo of Reverend Dillard and Hardy Bro...
10/01/2023

Who remembers the Black Fathers’ organization founded back in 1969? This classic photo of Reverend Dillard and Hardy Brown at Delmann Heights Church captures their sense of purpose. They mobilized fathers to support students and organize a school boycott as racial violence kicked off at Cajon High when more Black students began to attend schools into white north San Bernardino neighborhoods. The stress of fights in the schools led some Black parents to question why busing and integration usually meant Black students moving into sometimes hostile white schools. At a public meeting parent Wallace Greer asked, “Why can’t you build a high school in Black and Brown communities? You are building up white communities and tearing down Black and Brown communities. And why can’t we send whites to schools in Black communities?” With student organizing and the support of Black Fathers Inc., students won permission to start Black Student Unions and United Mexican American Student Clubs (UMAS) at the high school campuses. We’d love you to share your memories of the Black Fathers, the work of the early BSUs or what schools were like back during the desegregation struggles. Reach out if you have stories and memories to share. And thanks to Hardy Brown Sr and Cheryl Brown for sharing this amazing photo.

We love this photo of Bobby Bivens looking particularly fly at a Muscott PTA meeting in the early 1970s. This Westside s...
09/24/2023

We love this photo of Bobby Bivens looking particularly fly at a Muscott PTA meeting in the early 1970s. This Westside school was at the center of struggles for equal education in San Bernardino through the 70s and 80s. In 1972, several parents including Bobby Bivens signed on to the NAACP court case that ultimately forced the San Bernardino school to desegregate. And then again later in 1981, the community mobilized to save the school from closure. When Hardy Brown became a school board member, he helped get the school renamed in honor of Dr. Howard Inghram, longtime doctor from one of San Bernardino's pioneer Black families. Thank you Hardy Brown and Cheryl Brown for sharing this picture and helping to preserve the Black history of San Bernardino.

09/23/2023

the Current and past members of Social Lite, Inc. Sunday, September 17, in San Bernardino to pay tribute to longtime resident and honorary member, Ms. Edna Noble, at her 90th birthday celebration.

Read more at our website! Link in bio.

09/17/2023

Join Assemblymember Dr. Corey A. Jackson for the STATE OF THE BLACK I.E (Inland Empire) Symposium October 7th from 9 am to 3 pm. In the spirit of unyielding progress, let us come together to analyze our collective progress through the lens of health, housing, entrepreneurship, reparations, and more.

Register here: bit.ly/2023stateoftheblackie

Who remembers the Community League of Mother's protests at the San Bernardino School Board in September 1965? What start...
09/17/2023

Who remembers the Community League of Mother's protests at the San Bernardino School Board in September 1965? What started as a protest against cuts to bus routes for kids turned into a school boycott & a longer fight for school desegregation and equal education. Harry Carson took this beautiful photo of Frances Grice and Bonnie Johnson at one of the many contentious School Board meetings. Thanks to Bonnie Johnson's family for sharing it with Bridges and helping us keep Black history in the IE alive.

Today we celebrate the friendship and mentorship of Lois Carson, who Wilmer Amina Carter remembers took her to every mee...
09/10/2023

Today we celebrate the friendship and mentorship of Lois Carson, who Wilmer Amina Carter remembers took her to every meeting and taught her everything about community work and politics. Lois Carson was best known for her work as an NCNW Leader, the executive director of the Community Action Partnership for Riverside County (CAP) for 30 years, and a long time trustee of San Bernardino Community College District Board. Bridges is blessed she shared a couple of oral histories with the archive, which you can see at https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/bridges/16/

A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Lois was the valedictorian of St. Augustine Catholic High School. Lois earned several scholarships and attended Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio, the first private historically Black owned and operated university in the United States. After moving to California, Lois graduated from California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB) in 1967 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English. Additionally, Mrs. Carson earned two master's degrees (English and Education) from the University of California, Riverside (UCR).
Mrs. Carson founded the San Bernardino County Status of Women Commission and the Inland Empire section for the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW). In 1973, Mrs. Carson was the first African American woman elected to the San Bernardino Community College Board of Trustees. During her 24-year tenure as trustee, Lois served two terms as president, as well as board clerk and vice president. In her capacity as trustee, Mrs. Carson advocated for childcare, transfer centers, the Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOP&S), welfare reform, and community dialogues. From her dedicated work as trustee, Lois served on the Board of the Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT) and as a member of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC).
A recipient of several awards, Mrs. Carson was the recipient of the 2007 Lyndon Baines Johnson Human Services Award from the National Community Action Partnership. Also, Mrs. Carson was recognized as the Woman of the Year in the California 62nd District in 2008, by Assembly Member Wilmer Amina Carter (D-Rialto, Ret.) and she was named the National Community College Trustee of the Year in 1992. Lois Carson passed away on July 14, 2021, at the age of 90.
Read more about Lois Carson here:
https://blackvoicenews.com/.../educator-and-family.../
https://www.sbvcfoundation.org/.../lois-montgomery-carson...
https://www.highlandnews.net/.../article_b07f323e-01ca...
https://blackvoicenews.com/.../community-leader-lois-j.../
https://www.calstate.edu/.../san.../Pages/carson.aspx
https://www.precinctreporter.com/.../lois-carson-legacy.../
https://www.sbsun.com/.../lois-carson-public-servant-in.../

09/09/2023

Doors Open is back! It will be "gates open" at the National Historic Landmark Harada House, stewarded by the Museum of Riverside, on Saturday, September 9, 2023, from 2:00 - 7:00 p.m. Walk around this important house and learn where plans currently stand on the path to opening the house to the public. During Doors Open, you can tour many local sites. This statewide event highlights historic preservation and provides free access to both public and private buildings.

www.doorsopenriverside.com

San Bernardino history
09/07/2023

San Bernardino history

In 1851, many Southern families decided to leave the Salt Lake Valley and move to California. Latter-day Saint apostles Charles C. Rich and Amasa Lyman led a large wagon train across Utah and the Mohave Desert. The group founded the city of San Bernardino.

On the way south, questions arose about which members of the group supported the church mission. Charles C. Rich compiled a list of loyalists. As shown in orange, the list included Oscar Smith, Grief Embers, Toby Embers, Hark Wales and Philemon. They're all called Crosby in the document, but none of them used that as their family name. Unfortunately we don't know what family name Philemon used for himself! Note the term "cold" to the side of the five names. That means "colored," or African American. All five men were kept in bo***ge in California even though it was a free state.

This week we want to honor the community that has given so much time to build the Bridges Project since Amina Carter & R...
09/03/2023

This week we want to honor the community that has given so much time to build the Bridges Project since Amina Carter & Ratibu Jacocks first starting recruiting people to join their effort to document Black history of the IE. This photo by John Coleman captures the spirit of the community who has built Bridges, here at a celebration of the work at CSUSB back in 2014. Over 140 oral histories have been completed, and so many people have participated behind the scenes doing interviews, sharing photos and recruiting others to the effort. Carolyn Tillman did some of the first oral history interviews of WAG members way back in 2003, and so many more in later years. Lea Michelle Cash and Haniyyah Mubashshir also did some great interviews to build the collection, and more recently Romaine Washington, Cheryl Brown, Denise Spencer, Devona Robertson and Jackie Green helped student interns interview many elders so that their stories can live on, even when some of them have passed on. And of course, through it all Flo Williams has worked on the project as camera person and office organizer for more than a decade. We continue to depend on the community of volunteers who share family photos and stories, and work with us to keep these stories alive and share them with the next generation. If you want to join the effort, have something to share, please reach out.

08/29/2023

The Social Lites, Inc., of the Inland Empire, is preparing for its 57th Annual Beautillion Scholarship Program, “A Moment of Greatness,” to be held at California State University, San Bernardino, on March 30, 2024.

Read more at the full article, link in bio.

08/28/2023

Haven't toured our Still I Rise: The Black IE Fight for Justice exhibit? Join us Sunday, September 3, for our Sunday Series Kickoff, where we will tour the exhibition and hold a panel discussion with Curator Dr. Vincent Moses and other guest speakers.

08/28/2023

Just added! Fidel Chagolla, Organizer, Starting Over, Inc., will join our 'There's No Place Like Home' panel discussion on the state of affordable housing in the region. Join us this Wednesday, August 30, at 6 p.m.

Dorothy Inghram helped document some of the early Black history of the city in her great book Beyond All This. From one ...
08/27/2023

Dorothy Inghram helped document some of the early Black history of the city in her great book Beyond All This. From one of the early Black families who settled in San Bernardino before 1900, she was a pioneer herself as the first Black teacher in San Bernardino county, the first Black principal and the first Black superintendent too. Her decades of teaching and leading the Mill School in the Valley Truck Farm community left its mark on generations of students who she inspired to strive for excellence. Living to the age of 106 in 2012, she literally served as a bridge from the early 20th century into the 21st century and she kept San Bernardino history alive in her wonderful writing. We celebrate her work and life with this picture of her at a book signing with Bridges founder Wilmer Amina Carter. You can read an excerpt of her story here: https://www.sbcity.org/about/history/pioneer_women/dorothy_inghram.

Check out this lovely photo taken at the Seventh Day Adventist Church on 16th Street and donated to the Bridges Project ...
08/20/2023

Check out this lovely photo taken at the Seventh Day Adventist Church on 16th Street and donated to the Bridges Project by Carolyn Tillman. These three leaders from San Bernardino & Rialto have tirelessly worked for the community over the years. and each has recently helped Bridges Project collect photos and stories that capture the rich history of San Bernardino's Black communities. Thanks to Rikki Van Johnson and family for sharing historic photos of Bonnie Johnson, to Beverly Jones-Wright for sharing photos of the NAACP & stories of growing up in Redlands, and special thanks to Carolyn Tillman for sharing her own story and photos and also for playing such a leadership role in doing interviews and outreach for the Bridges project.

In the 1920s and 30s, Black kids growing up in the I.E. grew up in multiracial immigrant neighborhoods. Mexican families...
08/13/2023

In the 1920s and 30s, Black kids growing up in the I.E. grew up in multiracial immigrant neighborhoods. Mexican families were the majority in many neighborhoods like north Redlands where they lived alongside Italian, Black, Portuguese and Anglo neighbors. In this multiracial context, Black young people often learned Spanish and participated in cultural celebrations like this one at the Home of Neighborly Services alongside their Mexican American neighbors in Redlands. While to our eyes, these performances may seem to traffic in stereotypical images, they also give us a window into these integrated spaces of the IE's past. Natalie Collins saved this great photo with notes identifying all the Black kids she grew up with including Dolores Burton, Reuben Burton, Margharita Hocker, on the floor Mildred Burton, James Burton, MerryLee Bullard, Arthur Beal, Lilly Bullard, Wilfred "Scram" Harris. Her notes did not include the names of her Mexican neighbors, though, which probably indicates that Black and Mexican communities lived alongside each other, but were not fully integrated into the same social circles. Photo courtesy of Denise Diggs and her archivist mother Natalie Collins Diggs. Without the elders who saved everything and their kids who keep things safe, the Bridges Project couldn't exist. Please contact us if you're the family history keeper for your family and you have photos to share.

A lovely old photo from the mid 1920s on 6th Street in north Redlands. Here you see the Collins family children (in the ...
08/06/2023

A lovely old photo from the mid 1920s on 6th Street in north Redlands. Here you see the Collins family children (in the front seat Van & Ruth, Helen & Natalie in the backseat). They are in the family car in front of the barn beside their home in Redlands. Though they had left ranch life in the Imperial Valley by this time, there will still chickens and a barn in the home they bought in Redlands. Thanks to Natalie Collins Diggs for keeping everything, and to Denise Diggs for sharing the photos and preserving your family memories with the Bridges Project! If you have old family photos that will help us bring to life historic Black communities, please reach out and let us know. We can create digital copies for the archive (and for your family) so they can be shared and preserved forever.

Check out this beautiful photo of Mary Lou Phillips preserved by her childhood friend Natalie Collins Diggs. Mary Lou Ph...
07/31/2023

Check out this beautiful photo of Mary Lou Phillips preserved by her childhood friend Natalie Collins Diggs. Mary Lou Phillips Smith grew up on the Westside of San Bernardino in the 1930s and early 40s living with her parents Herman Phillips and Annaleen Phillips and sister Tommie at 964 6th St. Their home was listed in the 1938 Green Book as one of two tourist homes that would safely welcome Black travelers in the area. Herman Phillips worked as a porter at the railyard and Annaleen worked as a caterer for private families, while both girls were in school. Mary Lou graduated from San Bernardino Valley College in 1932 (one of the first black graduates) and then from UCLA where she trained to be a teacher. Natalie Collins, her childhood friend, remembered that she first became a teacher in a segregated Black school in Imperial County because that was one of the only places where Black teachers could find jobs. In 1945, she married J. Robert Smith who was a newspaper man (who had worked as labor editor for the Amsterdam News, editor for the Baltimore Afro American) and worked with him to launch the Tri-county Bulletin, a Black newspaper which documented Black community life and organizing efforts from 1945-1946. She also became a pioneer Black teacher hired in the Inland valley region, when she got a job at Mt. Vernon Elementary in 1947. Indeed she may have been the first Black teacher hired in the district since she was hired a year before Juanita Blakely Jones. They moved to Pasadena in the late 1940s and only a few people still living remember their leadership in San Bernardino in the mid 1940s.
Photo courtesy of Denise Diggs, archived at Bridges Project
Citations: 1930 & 1940 Census, CA Eagle Nov 1 1945, p. 7, 1938 Green Book, San Bernardino Sun, December 4, 1947, p. 20, Natalie Collins Diggs Oral History

Today it is with great sorrow that we celebrate and mourn Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal church founded in the...
07/22/2023

Today it is with great sorrow that we celebrate and mourn Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal church founded in the Valley Truck Farms community in 1939. Just a couple days ago, there was a fire at the abandoned historic church and the building has been significantly damaged. Reverend Toussaint Patterson was the founding Pastor (pictured in last weeks post). Family members tell us that the church was launched when members from St. Paul A.M.E. wanted to keep the leadership of Reverend Patterson after the three years pastors were normally assigned to A.M.E. Churches. By founding the new church, he was able to lead the congregation into the early 1940s and his family continued to fellowship there as he moved onto found several other congregations in the inland empire, including AME churches in North Fontana and Perris. The Valley Truck Farm Scrapbook reports that the congregation first met in the home of Reverend Patterson and then met weekly in the home of Mrs. White until they were able to buy land at the corner of Norman Road and Foise for $750 and broke ground in September 1943. The building was dedicated in July 1945. The building that just recently burned was bought from the First Presbyterian church of Redlands in 1954 and moved to the site. This historic church was the site of early celebrations of Black history week in the 1940s and San Bernardino Mayor Bob Holcomb named November 28, 1976 Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal church Day.“ Faced with the massive transformations in Valley as warehouse has replaced community, the congregation abandoned the church building in recent years. The fire has now erased another building in this historic community. Please share memories of photos you might have of the Valley Community and this church, and contact us if you might be able to continue to add to our efforts to document and memorialize this historic community. Read more about this community and its history in our StoryMap at https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/7343b0fe57b34cd18950547008ea4439

Thank you to Dr Bailey for your years of service to the community and for sharing your wisdom with the Bridges Project i...
07/20/2023

Thank you to Dr Bailey for your years of service to the community and for sharing your wisdom with the Bridges Project in your oral history.

The life of Ancient African scholar, historian, author, philosopher, humanitarian, doctor, veteran, professor and philanthropist, Dr. Joseph A. Bailey, II, who passed away April 7, 2023 will be honored at the Civil Rights Institute of Inland Southern California on Saturday, July 22, 2023.

Wilmer Amina Carter often tells stories of how Art Townsend would take her and Ratibu out to coffee at a local diner and...
07/16/2023

Wilmer Amina Carter often tells stories of how Art Townsend would take her and Ratibu out to coffee at a local diner and share stories of the rich history of the Black community in San Bernardino. Art Townsend had moved to the community in the 40s and got to know all the people who built communities on the Westside and in the Valley. He heard stories from John Lee and many others who led the NAACP during the active years during and after WWII, and he passed all those stories down. Those stories later inspired Amina and Ratibu to found the Bridges Project. So today we share this beautiful photo of our founders and their mentor, who all helped to build Bridges so that future generations can learn from the past and walk forward to create a stronger future.

Check out this stunning photo of the Patterson & Taylor wedding at the historic St. Paul A.M.E. church during WWII. Tous...
07/09/2023

Check out this stunning photo of the Patterson & Taylor wedding at the historic St. Paul A.M.E. church during WWII. Toussaint Patterson Sr. sitting on the far left was a prominent A.M.E. preacher who started several churches in the I.E. from the 40s-70s, including Allen Chapel A.M.E. in Valley Truck Farm, Bethel A.M.E. in Fontana, and in Perris. This photo was donated to the archive by the wonderful Patterson Stokes family when Alma Patterson Stokes did an interview with the archive and then invited us to their family reunion to digitize the photo albums that her son Richard Patterson had carefully organized. Thanks to all the family historians who document the rich history of the Inland Empire. Please reach out if you have photos and memories to share!

Clarence Butler (in plaid) and his friend Johnny Taylor grew up in Redlands on 6th and High, at the center of the Black ...
07/02/2023

Clarence Butler (in plaid) and his friend Johnny Taylor grew up in Redlands on 6th and High, at the center of the Black community clustered around two Black churches in the Stuart Street neighborhood in the 1940s and 50s. They were young inventors and builders, building carts like this one and even whole buildings, out of lumber donated by the packing houses and lumber yards that sounded the neighborhood. Thanks to Clarence Butler and Marcella “Susie” Pruitt Grier (baby in the picture) for sharing your memories and photos of the community with Bridges so we can bring this historic Redlands community to life.

06/30/2023

Students can expect to receive workshops and activities centered around Black history, culture, and art. Lunch will be provided each day for the students. Only fill out this form only if your scholar is committed to attending ALL 4 days. The deadline to RSVP is Thursday, 6/29/23.

Black History Camp:
https://forms.gle/rM68ziwgsUJVV3V47

Jerome R Collins & Callie Collins came to California from Robertson Texas where they had both been teachers. Family stor...
06/25/2023

Jerome R Collins & Callie Collins came to California from Robertson Texas where they had both been teachers. Family stories say that they had to leave Texas because they had helped a black man hide from a white mob and because Callie was so light skinned that some in the white community assumed they were an in*******al couple. They first settled in the Imperial Valley where they had a ranch in the Dixieland community. While he liked farming in Imperial Valley, Callie Collins emphatically did not. By 1930 she had relocated with the kids to Redlands where she began to work as a domestic and bought a house at 903 6th Street. For years he commuted back and forth from until he finally relocated permanently to Redlands. He was active in political organizing to increase Black voting power and founded the Political, Economic and Commercial League in the 1930s. His daughter Natalie remembered driving him to political meetings in Riverside and him organizing actively in Valley Truck farms. Natalie Collins herself was an archivist, preserving all the old photos and stories of her family. Her children Denise Diggs and Richard Allen Diggs continue the tradition, researching and writing their family history. Thanks for sharing your family history and photos with Bridges Project to keep Black history alive in the I.E.

For Juneteenth, we share some of the earliest celebrations of Emancipation Day that we've found in the I.E. & celebrate ...
06/19/2023

For Juneteenth, we share some of the earliest celebrations of Emancipation Day that we've found in the I.E. & celebrate the formerly enslaved people who helped to build our communities right here in San Bernardino county. These stories remind us that the quest for Black freedom extended long after formerly enslaved people were legally emancipated. People like Lizzie Flake, Israel Beal & Johnson Mason brought the fight for freedom with them to California where they built communities, bought property and organized to demand respect and full citizenship.

06/15/2023

Don't forget to RSVP for our Arts Speaks Juneteenth Art Exhibit on June 19th. This special community celebration will be hosted at the Bank of America Diversity Center. https://bit.ly/3WHSYCc

Join us for Redlands Juneteenth Freedom Awards ReceptionFriday June 16 12:00 PM Networking | 12:30 PM Awards ReceptionUn...
06/14/2023

Join us for Redlands Juneteenth Freedom Awards Reception

Friday June 16
12:00 PM Networking | 12:30 PM Awards Reception
University of Redlands Frederick Loewe Performance Hall Rm. 107
1200 East Colton Avenue, Redlands, California 92374

Hosted by Unity in the Community Inc. and The University of Redlands BSFSAA

The Redlands community is invited to be a part of our Juneteenth Freedom Awards Reception as we celebrate individuals who have made a difference in our community by Building Bridges to the Generations through their work and commitment.
CLICK THIS LINK TO GET YOUR FREE TICKET FOR THE EVENT:

City of Redlands Juneteenth Day of Freedom Awards Reception Tickets, Fri, Jun 16, 2023 at 12:00 PM | Eventbrite or scan the QR code on the attachment.

2023 Honorees for this year's Redlands Juneteenth Freedom Awards:

Dr. Jennifer Tilton a professor at the University of Redlands who has conducted extensive research work of the history and contributions of African Americans who lived within the Redlands community.

State Assemblyman James Ramos has always recognized the importance of diversity and inclusion. He continues to uplift communities of color.

Joe Richardson, Civil Rights Attorney and a former planning commissioner and civil rights advocate in the City of Redlands as well as the Inland Empire.

Travis Martinez, Deputy Chief of Police is a native and strong supporter of Unity in the Community Inc. and Redlands Juneteenth.

Pathway Church for their support and help to create media for “What to do when stopped by law enforcement.” The church provided staff and their own equipment.

Kelechi Amboi is a leader who serves on the Human Relations Commission and is a Redlands East Valley High School student representative of the Black Student Union.

Gail Howard a Redlands native and has been a strong advocate for victims of gun violence.

You're Invited,

Unity In The Community Inc.

This week we feature Rochelle Roberts who did an interview with the Bridges project years ago, which will soon be upload...
06/11/2023

This week we feature Rochelle Roberts who did an interview with the Bridges project years ago, which will soon be uploaded to the Bridges Project Archive. We thank him for sharing his memories and for his decades of service to youth in the San Bernardino community and for his leadership in WAG, Kutania People, Black Athletes Hall of Fame, Black History Parade & the Dr. King Breakfast.

Today we honor Donald Griggs, a longtime business owner and community leader who passed away in 2020. You may remember h...
06/04/2023

Today we honor Donald Griggs, a longtime business owner and community leader who passed away in 2020. You may remember his business Irv Silver's Men's Clothing at the Inland Center Mall in the 70s and 80s. He made enormous contributions to the IE community through his work to diversify hiring practices in local businesses, through his 30 years as a small business owner and through his work with the Boy Scouts and with WAG. His interview with the Bridges project shares wonderful memories of his time in the Marines and some stories of his move to San Bernardino. Read more from Hardy Brown Sr.'s memories of his longtime friend in this BVN article https://blackvoicenews.com/2020/07/19/remembering-don-griggs-my-good-friend-since-1965/ and in this article that honored him and his wife in 2018 https://iecn.com/san-bernardino-black-culture-foundation-2018-senior-king-queen-don-celeste-griggs/

This week we celebrate the emotional, intuitive, and imaginative HARRY L. CARSON, who lived a great full life and always...
05/28/2023

This week we celebrate the emotional, intuitive, and imaginative HARRY L. CARSON, who lived a great full life and always ensured he gave back to his community. Harry Carson actively participated in the Civil Rights movement along with his wife Lois Carson and their children. In her oral history, she remembered that he sometimes would go alone to the more potentially disruptive events, like the sit-ins at the San Bernardino School Board at the height of the School desegregation struggle, so one of them would be available to take care of their children in case of police arrests. Finally, as a co-owner of Wilcoz-Carson Photography, he captured some highlights of the civil rights movement as well as icons such as Jimi Hendrix, Cicily Tyson, Fats Domino and Dr. Martin Luther King. When he passed in 2007, he had over 1000 photographs which he has shared with many in the community.

05/23/2023

We invite you to follow the conversation, regarding The History of Redlining in the IE: The Thick Red Line, between Black Voice News guest reporter, Blaire Langley and special guests, Catherine Guidis, associate professor of History and Chair for Interdisciplinary Research and Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences at UCR and Jennifer Tilton, Professor of Race and Ethnic Studies at the University of Redlands.

Link: https://voicemediaventures.activehosted.com/index.php?action=social&chash=d61e4bbd6393c9111e6526ea173a7c8b.475&s=834dd91606bf5b4e5a66a852c8dcb075

This week we share stories of redlining and racial segregation in the Inland Empire created from the recent collaboratio...
05/21/2023

This week we share stories of redlining and racial segregation in the Inland Empire created from the recent collaboration between the Bridges Project, a People's History of the IE and Black Voice News. Several voices from the Bridges oral histories are feature in the first part of Black Voice News series The Thick Red Line which you can on their home page is StoryMap entitled Color Lines in San Bernardino which documents how segregation was build in the Inland Empire. See the first part of BVN series here https://blackvoicenews.com/2023/05/12/the-line-begins-here-a-history-of-redlining-in-southern-californias-inland-empire/. Thanks to all the community volunteers and elders who shared the stories that make this kind of reporting and historical research possible and especially to archive founder Wilmer Amina Carter

Mapping Housing Segregation on San Bernardino's Westside

Today we celebrate Marion Black, a leader in the Air Force, the Black Culture Foundation, the Chamber of Commerce and th...
05/14/2023

Today we celebrate Marion Black, a leader in the Air Force, the Black Culture Foundation, the Chamber of Commerce and the Kiwanis Club. Thanks for sharing memories with the archive. The interview is transcribed and soon will be available online.

05/06/2023
To continue celebrating Poetry Month, we wanted to share another poem from the archive, this one featuring the story of ...
04/30/2023

To continue celebrating Poetry Month, we wanted to share another poem from the archive, this one featuring the story of Henry Hooks, one of San Bernardino's most beloved photographers who has helped us preserve Black history in the region in his amazing photos. Thanks to Romaine for a wonderful interview with Henry Hooks which is at the Bridges Archive and for this amazing poem. See https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/bridges/ for the full interviews that inspired this poem

Today we celebrate poetry month with a poem by Romaine Washington about Bridges Project founder Wilmer Amina Carter, lon...
04/22/2023

Today we celebrate poetry month with a poem by Romaine Washington about Bridges Project founder Wilmer Amina Carter, long time resident of San Bernardino and Rialto. We hope to feature more poems and artistic productions emerging out of the archive as more and more people are inspired by the wisdom and voices preserved in the Bridges That Carried Us Over Project.

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