University of Utah College of Humanities

University of Utah College of Humanities The College of Humanities at the University of Utah provides our students with critical skills that prepare them to succeed – personally and economically - in our increasingly complex and global society.
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Assistant Professor of History Julie Ault shows us how to #MaskUpUtah!#UofU #UofUHumanities #FaceCoveringFriday
08/14/2020

Assistant Professor of History Julie Ault shows us how to #MaskUpUtah!

#UofU #UofUHumanities #FaceCoveringFriday

Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is located in Centennial Valley, Montana and is now home to the University of Ut...
08/13/2020

Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is located in Centennial Valley, Montana and is now home to the University of Utah’s Taft-Nicholson Center. Red Rock Lakes is best known for being the primary location for the efforts saving the trumpeter swan from extinction, which by 1932 had fewer than 200 known specimens in the United States and Canada. By the year 2002, an estimated 3,000 trumpeters were wintering on the refuge, many having migrated south from their summer range in Canada. For #TBT let’s take a look at photos of the amazing swans living on the refuge from the 1940s to the early 1990s.

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #TaftNicholsonCenter #SatelliteCampus #EnvironmentalHumanitiesEducation

For #WednesdayWisdom let's get some #AlumniAdvice from Chris Gonzalez who graduated in 2018 with a degree in Communicati...
08/12/2020

For #WednesdayWisdom let's get some #AlumniAdvice from Chris Gonzalez who graduated in 2018 with a degree in Communication.

When I graduated college in 2018 I had no idea what I wanted to do professionally. Right after graduating, I worked for two NBA Franchises in the Marketing and Public Relations Departments. I coordinated all of the social media planning which included things like writing copy, copy editing, coordinating photoshoots, buying radio time, and coordinating with all of the other departments to make sure we had enough content to post on various platforms. When I worked in Public Relations I wrote press releases, wrote up fact sheets and press kits, and had to make sure that all of the writers and press workers had access to the arena and players, additionally, I got to respond to fan emails.

After working in the NBA I got a position working for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City at Temple Square in the Marketing Department. The department created content in 90 languages and 120 countries. I specifically worked with the E-Commerce Team and helped manage the general presentation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints E-Commerce website. Most days I wrote copy and made sure the photoshoots were going well and on schedule as well as working on other marketing projects.

Currently, I work for Sportsman's Warehouse in the OmniChannel/E-Commerce/Marketing departments.

Advice for Students

During my first two years of college, I jumped from major to major. I started with Film, then tried Psychology, Art History, Pre Medicine, Pre Law, before finding and majoring in Communication. So much of my success today I can link back to my time in the College of Humanities. I learned to become a critical, independent thinker and it has prepared me for a lifetime of learning and success.

#UofU #UniversityOfUtah #UofUHumanities #UofUAlumni

It's #TeamTuesday! Let's get to know Nichole Hutchins, one of the undergraduate advisors in International and Area Studi...
08/11/2020

It's #TeamTuesday! Let's get to know Nichole Hutchins, one of the undergraduate advisors in International and Area Studies.

If I didn’t work in advising, I’d be... Base jumping through life.

Quote you live by: “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” -Leo Tolstoy

Most memorable college class: Education in Islamic Countries.

If I were a student now I’d major in: International Studies!

Tips for college success: Ask questions, find your niche, make flexible goals, and make the most of your experiences.

Hashtag that describes your life: #explore

Fictional character you most identify with: Chewbacca

Last book you finished: War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

Your go-to psych-up song? Mr. Blue Sky by Electric Light Orchestra

#UofU #UofUHumanities #AcademicAdvisor

The Career and Professional Development Center's virtual career fair season is starting soon! Whether you’re looking for...
08/10/2020

The Career and Professional Development Center's virtual career fair season is starting soon! Whether you’re looking for a part-time job, a volunteer opportunity or an internship position, or you’re ready to find a career after graduation, they've got you covered!

Learn more here: https://careers.utah.edu/career-fair-season/

#UofU

Jay Jordan, Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric Studies, show us how to #MaskUpUtah! "I wear my mask because I t...
08/07/2020

Jay Jordan, Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric Studies, show us how to #MaskUpUtah!

"I wear my mask because I trust the science that tells me it's far better to wear it than not to. (I need to find a tiny mask for Vitruvian Panda here.)"

#FaceCoveringFriday #UofU #UofUHumanities #MaskUp

📚 Virtual Book Launch! 📚August 13 | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM MDTJoin Professor of History Nadja Durbach for her virtual book ...
08/06/2020

📚 Virtual Book Launch! 📚

August 13 | 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM MDT

Join Professor of History Nadja Durbach for her virtual book launch of her recently published work, "Many Mouths: The Politics of Food in Britain from the Workhouse to the Welfare State."

Challenging the assumption that state ideologies and practices were progressive and based primarily on scientific advances in nutrition, Nadja Durbach examines the political, economic, social and cultural circumstances that led the state to feed some of its subjects, but not others. Durbach follows food policies from their conception to their implementation through case studies involving paupers, prisoners, famine victims, POWs, schoolchildren, wartime civilians and pregnant women. She explores what government food meant to those who devised, executed, used, and sometimes refused, these social services. Many Mouths seeks to understand the social, economic, and political theories that influenced these feeding schemes, within their changing historical contexts.

Register for FREE here: https://bit.ly/30ywYht

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UofUHistory

Today for #WednesdayWisdom we are getting some #AlumniAdvice from Jordan Gross who graduated with a BS in Communication ...
08/05/2020

Today for #WednesdayWisdom we are getting some #AlumniAdvice from Jordan Gross who graduated with a BS in Communication in 2002.

Jordan Gross knew he wanted to be a professional football player, but he also knew the odds of that happening from a high school career to a professional career is .09%. At a young age, he decided a college career and a plan B were absolute requirements. During his recruitment phase, he fell in love with Coach McBride and the University of Utah.

As Jordan analyzed what he liked to do aside from play football, he realized he enjoyed public speaking and working with people, which lead him to choose a degree in Communication.

After graduation, Jordan was ranked as the number one offensive tackle available in the NFL Draft. He was taken in the first round, 8th overall by Carolina, and started every game for his career, which was 11 years long. He assisted the Panthers getting to Super Bowl ###VIII and was featured in Pro Football Weekly and Sports Illustrated. During this time, Jordan used his communication skills and started his own podcast, This Is Gross, where he would interview his teammates. After retiring he continued using his communication degree and became a sideline reporter during the regular season, a TV reporter during the preseason, and radio announcer at night.

Advice for Students

For those seeking a career in the field of sports journalism, Jordan has advice gleaned from years of personal experience: “For those who are looking for a career sports journalism, you need to figure out how to present the information in a way that is relevant and accurate, but entertaining so people want to hear what you are saying. Sports journalism is a competitive field, especially if you don’t start by playing a sport. My advice is to have a small ego because you are in the public eye. Naturally, you are going to start small. Start as an intern and work hard to deliver well on tasks that are assigned to you. Then, you may move up to a cameraman, then help write a script, then, after proving yourself, you will continue to move up the ladder. But be patient. It takes time and perseverance.”

#UofU #UofUHumanities #Alumni #UtahAlumni

As we get closer to the beginning of a new semester, let’s not forget to #CheckOnYourUCrew! This fall semester will be v...
08/04/2020

As we get closer to the beginning of a new semester, let’s not forget to #CheckOnYourUCrew! This fall semester will be very different, so start to form a plan now! How can we support each other and ourselves?

-Make a plan for weekly virtual check-ins with friends, family, classmates, and professors.

-Make a plan for what you will do when feeling overwhelmed. Who can you talk to? Practice mindfulness and deep breathing exercises. Take a break. Make a to-do list and tackle one thing at a time.

-Make a plan for managing your schedule. How will you make sure you don’t overcommit?

-Make a plan for being physically active and getting exercise.

-Make a plan on how you can ask for help if you need it, and how you can offer help to others.

We are all in this together and we will get through this together!

#UofU #UofUHumanities

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) at the University of Utah helps students apply their proficiency in ...
08/03/2020

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) at the University of Utah helps students apply their proficiency in a second language to courses in a variety of majors. Most CLAC classes are one-credit discussion sections linked to a regular three-credit class and offer a unique way for students to use and improve their language skills. CLAC students also gain new perspectives on countries and cultures and deepen their understanding of the course work. The languages offered in fall 2020 include Spanish, Japanese and Korean.

Wilson Wosnjuk, a sophomore majoring in business and Latin American studies, has already taken two CLAC courses in Spanish and is looking forward to taking more. Below, he answers some questions about the courses and how they have impacted his language acquisition and overall education.

Learn more about CLAC: https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/a-new-way-to-apply-second-language-skills/

#UofU #UniversityOfUtah #UHumanities #UofUHumanities

It's #FeatureFriday! Let's meet Faith Brown, one of our undergraduate advisors in International and Area Studies. Fun fa...
07/31/2020

It's #FeatureFriday! Let's meet Faith Brown, one of our undergraduate advisors in International and Area Studies. Fun fact: Faith just joined our college very recently!

If I didn’t work in advising, I’d be... Traveling and teaching English abroad.

Last book you finished: Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.

Your go-to psych-up song? High Five by Sigrid.

If I were a student now I’d major in: International Studies! After I graduated with my Bachelor’s degree in 2016, I went on to teach English in Bulgaria. I never took very many courses that focused on different cultures and places around the world, yet there I was in an unfamiliar place, learning a new language and trying to understand a culture that was new to me. I think that international studies really gives people a leg up on the rest of us, especially in this increasingly globalized world we live in.

Hashtag that describes your life: #ForeverSleepy

Fictional character you most identify with: Aladdin

#AcademicAdvisor #Feature #UofU #UofUHumanities

Vince Pecora, the Gordon B. Hinckley Presidential Endowed Chair in British Studies in the Department of English, has pub...
07/30/2020

Vince Pecora, the Gordon B. Hinckley Presidential Endowed Chair in British Studies in the Department of English, has published a new book.

Tell us a little bit about the book.

Land and Literature in Cosmopolitan Age reexamines the widely assumed cosmopolitan nature of modern European literature. For a variety of reasons, literary critics have tended to stress both the urban—and urbane—nature of literature after Victoria’s reign in England. In concert with our focus on urbanity, we have emphasized the degree to which authors expanded aesthetic constraints and conventions, transgressed religious, class, and national affiliations, and pointed to an increasingly mobile and internationalist future. One prominent critic even referred to the “revolution of the word” in this period in order to capture the sense that, while actual political revolution may have failed to emerge—or failed in practice, as in the USSR—the literary revolution foretold a bright, cosmopolitan tomorrow.

But this account is, at the very best, no more than half of the story. It is not so much wrong as terribly starry-eyed. In the book, I use the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71 as a convenient turning point, where a wholesale embrace of regional, national, and civilizational enthusiasm rides the waves of a newly born, or reinvigorated nationalism in Germany and France. Great Britain, with the jingoism of the Boer Wars and the struggle for Irish independence, is similarly driven by the question of who belongs where in its realm. Despite Woodrow Wilson’s seeming internationalism at the Conference of Versailles, World War I ends up producing greater depths of regional, national, and cultural affiliation than had existed before the war.

What prompted you to write the book?

The project began in earnest about 10 years ago, when I was asked to write something about race and political theology. This latter term has been used to define the way religious ideas, mostly Christian ones, even when they have faded, have tended to be integral to the way the nation-state has evolved in Europe.

I needed to sort out all the different ways our supposedly cosmopolitan modernists, from George Eliot to T. S. Eliot, from Thomas Hardy to Gertrude Stein, and including the more contemporary Indian scholar Ashis Nandy, worked through their own relationships to the land.

Why do you think land and geography have an influence on literature, and in what ways?

I think both the motif of autochthony—literally being born of the soil—and the motif of promised land have had a large influence on the way Western culture has understood the human relationship to the land. I look at psychological theories of attachment and at ethology, especially the study of chimpanzees and bonobos, to think about what human societies owe to their deepest psychological experiences (for example, attachment to the mother) and to their nearest primate ancestors. I end by looking at a beautiful poem, supposedly by Friedrich Hölderlin (“In Loveliest Blue”) and at the way the philosopher Martin Heidegger interprets it in one of his late essays. For Heidegger’s rather complicated early sense that being too easily at home was the sign of an inauthentic life is combined here (as in much of his late work) with the complementary idea that an authentic life depends on feeling that one’s existence is somehow appropriate to—wanted by—the place on earth that one occupies. It is, for me, another way of talking about our need to belong, and as I hope to have shown in the earlier chapters, it comes at very great risk.

Tell us more about your research and work in the Department of English.

In the ten years prior to my writing of this book, I worked most intensely on the notion of secularization, which is to say, the way culture deals, or does not deal, with the decline of religion and the increasing focus on the world—on worldliness, as the prophets like to say. Before that, most of my attention had been focused on the intersections of literature and anthropology in the modern era, including how we have come to understand things like national identity. But I have always been interested—for better and worse, I might add—in the big questions, and I suppose this more recent turn to the land is just part of my evolution. Perhaps being in Utah, where there is indeed a lot of open land, of various sorts, was an inspiration, though I should admit that my concern is far less with the burgeoning field of environmental studies than it is with how and why human beings come to believe that they—rather than anyone else—belong to their land, and do so quite independently of any legal notion of ownership.

For more information about the book visit: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/land-and-literature-in-a-cosmopolitan-age-9780198852148?q=pecora&lang=en&cc=us

#UofU #UofUHumanities

We have some #AlumniAdvice for #WednesdayWisdom!Charles ParkB.A. in International Studies, 2010Career InsightCharles sai...
07/29/2020

We have some #AlumniAdvice for #WednesdayWisdom!

Charles Park
B.A. in International Studies, 2010

Career Insight
Charles said he started studying biology as an undergraduate at the U in 2010, since his goal was to serve people who are most in need in the least-developed parts of the world when it comes to health. "Having a strong biology background was essential to enter public health graduate school," he said. "However, biology normally focused on laboratory-based science, and I was more interested in being on the spot to put myself in the lowest position for understanding people's life truly, especially in Africa." He said he decided to do a double major in Biology and International Studies to bridge the gap between natural science and social science.

Advice for Students
"There are diverse and various opportunities at the U, and College of Humanities particularly provides perspectives on social, political, economic and health issues outside of the United States," Charles said. "If you feel excited about interacting with people overseas to discuss global issues or experiencing new environment to see and learn at the opposite side of the earth, pursuing a Humanities degree should be the right career path for you to enter the new world after graduation with big confidence."

Charles says he believes biology and international studies matched well with his masters-level study of international health that emphasized global disease epidemiology and control. "Studying for two majors from different fields at the U was challenging, but I wanted to pave the unique way that people in the future are willing to follow," he explained. "Studying international studies, emphasizing global health, was absolutely helpful for me to establish a global mindset. I appreciate the fact that I got to know passionate colleagues, faculty members, and professors at the College of Humanities, but also that I still contact them to share each other's lives and strengthen alumni networking."

#UofU #UofUHumanities #Alumni #HumanitiesAlumni #UofUAlumni

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255 Central Campus Dr, Rm 2100
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About Our College

The humanities teach us to question the world around us to better understand our place within it. In the University of Utah’s College of Humanities, you’ll learn to question the issues – past, present and future – consider the impact those issues have on cultures, science, technology, medicine and the human experience and connect the ideas with those of your peers and community to broaden your historical, ethical, social and international perspective.

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Comments

After hearing that U of U will not be offering ASL 2010 and 2020 as they have done in past summers and what I was lead to believe would be happening this summer by many advisers at U, is there any exception to complete the Gen Ed requirement or opportunity to take the class elsewhere?
Hi, please help the Salt Lake Japanese American Citizens League get the word out about this film screening and panel discussion on Feb. 22 - thank you! https://www.facebook.com/events/1450245318476591/
A Salt Lake Interfaith Month one of the key events: What would Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) do, if he were alive today, with regard to contemporary issues the world is facing? Of course, we have no way of knowing for sure, but some of his practices in the 7th century Arabia has surprising clues about what he might have said or done. We will discuss anecdotes from his life on contemporary issues such as interfaith relations, peace and war, racism, freedom of religion, gender relations, empowerment of women, environment, animals, and people with disabilities and more. Save the date and bring any question in your mind to ask. For questions and info email at [email protected] https://www.facebook.com/events/374756979757556/
How would one get a copy of the poster you made about Science VS. Humanities. It is for my high school classroom.
The reduction of the discussion of race in the church to include only those of African descent continues to perpetuate the myth that only those who were barred from the Priesthood / temple have faced discrimination and victimization in the church. This white/black Mormon binary is as offensive in Mormon studies as it is American studies.
Hi friends! Come celebrate culture next weekend in Draper with the non-profit 100 Humanitarians. $2 discount for students who use their school name as a promo code or wear your school sweatshirt at the door. It's a competition between BYU, UVU and U of U to see which college is best represented. Winning school gets pizza coupons from Papa Murphy's! There will be food trucks as well. Proceeds will go towards building a cultural center for the Maasai in Kenya. Check out their website to learn more www.100humanitarians.com. Tickets can be bought at www.100humanitarians/humanijam-2017