University of Utah College of Humanities

University of Utah College of Humanities The College of Humanities at the University of Utah provides our students with critical skills that prepare them to succeed – personally and economically - in our increasingly complex and global society.
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01/22/2020

Today on #HumanitiesRadio: Rebecca Bateman, an honors student living in the Humanities House, discusses how her majors in philosophy and economics complement each other and how she prioritizes and manages her responsibilities. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts!⁠⠀

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/student-life-rebecca-bateman/id1489998929?i=1000463253196

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #Humanities #Podcast #HIgherEducationPodcast #HigherEdPodcast #UtahPodcast #HumanitiesPodcast

01/20/2020
The National Endowment for the Humanities announced $30.9 million in grants to support 188 humanities projects in 45 sta...
01/14/2020

The National Endowment for the Humanities announced $30.9 million in grants to support 188 humanities projects in 45 states and the District of Columbia. Grant awards support innovative digital projects for the public, humanities initiatives on college campuses and infrastructure projects at cultural institutions.

Robin Jensen, professor of communication at the University of Utah, received a $60,000 fellowship grant for her book project, “A History of Women Shaping the Trajectory of Fertility Science, 1870-1970,” about the rhetorical practices of three American women involved in the study of fertility.

"This award will allow me do the kinds of intense archival research necessary to bring this project into fruition,” said Jensen. “I will have the resources to account for the many, diverse ways that the women at the center of this exploration communicated to alter the trajectory of fertility science."

https://humanities.utah.edu/awards/robin-jensen.php

“There’s a blurry line between popular culture and what we might think of as ‘high literature.’ Traditionally, people te...
01/09/2020
Humans of the U: Jeremy Rosen | @theU

“There’s a blurry line between popular culture and what we might think of as ‘high literature.’ Traditionally, people tend to think of popular literature as more fun, fast-paced fiction, while high literature includes the classics and contemporary works that are more ‘serious’ and tackle major issues.

I’m most interested in where those neat categories break down in something we might call popular literary culture. I love teaching courses on genre and have taught detective fiction, science fiction and most recently ‘cli-fi,’ which is fiction that deals with the effects of climate catastrophe on the present and possible futures. In my first book, I examined what I call ‘minor character elaboration’ where novels and films take a minor character from a classic work of literature and retell the classic story from the minor character’s point of view."

Read more about Associate Professor of English Jeremy Rosen: https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/humans-of-the-u-jeremy-rosen/⠀

#UofU #UHumanities #UofUHumanities #HumansOfTheU #English

Popular culture and high literature are not mutually exclusive.

01/08/2020

The start of a new semester also means new episodes of #HumanitiesRadio! Academic advisors at the University of Utah advocate for students as they navigate their education and help them reach their academic goals. Cameron Vakilian, advisor in the College of Humanities, discusses his role and why it’s important to meet with an advisor on a regular basis.

Listen here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/academic-advising/id1489998929?i=1000461733702

We are officially on Apple Podcasts now, so be sure to rate and subscribe!

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #Podcast #HigherEducationPodcast #HigherEdPodcast #AcademicAdvising

"I decided to study linguistics after my undergrad Intro to Linguistics class. I was fascinated that this tool that we a...
01/07/2020

"I decided to study linguistics after my undergrad Intro to Linguistics class. I was fascinated that this tool that we all used without conscious thought was governed by hidden rules that we could seek to describe. I now work as a Product Manager for software products where I use my experience from my degree to think deeply and logically about a software product's requirements and then communicate it appropriately to different audiences from developer to investor. I value my humanities background and believe it trained me to think broadly, learn quickly, ask questions, and communicate clearly. I naturally draw connections between disparate systems which makes me great at my job, identifying possible solutions across technical domains."

-Katherine Matsumoto, University of Utah Alumni
Linguistics MA 2009, Linguistics PhD 2015

Check out this great article Katherine wrote for Medium: https://medium.com/@kathmatsumoto/8-jobs-in-tech-for-linguists-f7399ce12f9f

#UofU #UofUAlumni #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #Linguistics #UofULinguistics #HumanitiesandTech #HumanitiesInTech #Linguists

For the past three years, the College of Humanities has invited a select group of first-year students to join the Humani...
01/04/2020

For the past three years, the College of Humanities has invited a select group of first-year students to join the Humanities Scholars, a learning community that immerses students in the dynamic landscape of the humanities. Throughout the program, students explore the range of opportunities available within the humanities, experience each discipline’s approach to addressing today’s most pressing issues, and learn how to connect ideas and apply classroom learning to community challenges.

“Although I don’t have a concrete career choice, Humanities Scholars has assisted me in realizing my potential and solidifying my goals. This program has shown me the value of the humanities. This field is meant to make connections between various groups of people, finding what we have in common, and building off our similarities. It has allowed me to dive deeply into my consciousness, exploring tough questions through literature and rhetoric. It has taught me the importance of history and how our past mistakes can guide us toward a better future. Humanities has also given me the courage to ask the hard questions, which can result in greater understanding and deeper connection.” – Chasity Mayo

Read more about the Humanities Scholars program in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities.

https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/preppedforsuccess%20.php

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #Humanities #HumanitiesScholars #LearningCommunity

In the past five years, the number of journalism majors in the University of Utah’s Department of Communication has jump...
01/03/2020

In the past five years, the number of journalism majors in the University of Utah’s Department of Communication has jumped more than 133%. As more students declare journalism as their emphasis of choice and as newsrooms continue to transform in the age of digital media, the U’s program is growing and adapting to create successful graduates. Although the fundamentals of storytelling are the same, the way the stories are told continues to change. “Students today have grown up with social media and the 24-hour news cycle,” said Avery Holton, associate professor of communication and former coordinator for the journalism media sequence. “They need to be prepared to enter the evolving media industry, where traditional media isn’t the only option”

Holton and his colleagues in the Department of Communication have made extensive changes to meet the demand of the changing media culture. With an already strong foundation in history, law, and ethics, the journalism sequence has added digital and social media skills to the mix to better prepare students for careers within the industry. “Now students want to cover social justice, crime, politics, and climate change. It’s a different kind of student and they’re really into harder issues,” said Holton.

That’s exactly why Emily Anderson, a current journalism student and writer for The Daily Utah Chronicle, decided to join the program. “I've always been interested in politics and government, but the prospect of playing a direct role in holding society's most powerful institutions accountable was fascinating to me,” said Anderson. “Personally, I felt journalism was the best way I could contribute to the pursuit of truth and justice.”

Read more about the journalism program in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities.
https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/findingyourvoice-creatingyourpath.php

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #UofUJournalism #Journalism #UofUCommunication

During his 13-year tenure as director of the University of Utah’s Obert C. and Grace A. Tanner Humanities Center, Robert...
01/02/2020

During his 13-year tenure as director of the University of Utah’s Obert C. and Grace A. Tanner Humanities Center, Robert Goldberg, professor of history, raised nearly $5 million to fund such projects as the Gateway to Learning Teacher Workshops, the World Leaders Lecture Forum, Professors Off Campus Program and the Latter-day Saints Studies Initiative. In 2008, he was awarded the Rosenblatt Prize for Excellence, the U’s highest faculty accolade.

Goldberg was responsible for bringing writers, artists, world leaders, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints scholars to campus to cultivate lively and inclusive dialogue about the humanities. The diverse speakers also enabled the Tanner Humanities Center to reach across campus and connect with multiple disciplines. Medical ethicist Abraham Verghese and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee connected the center to the medical school. Neil deGrasse Tyson connected the center with the sciences. While Tony Kushner, Anna Deavere Smith, and Suzan-Lori Parks linked the center with the arts. With a keen eye to community interests, the center also hosted Latter-day Saint scholars Richard Bushman, Kathleen Flake, and Greg Prince.

Read more about Robert Goldberg in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities. https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/legacyofhumanities.php

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #TannerHumanitiesCenter

For English alumna Karen Anastasopoulos, the University of Utah has always felt like home. She grew up in Salt Lake City...
12/30/2019

For English alumna Karen Anastasopoulos, the University of Utah has always felt like home. She grew up in Salt Lake City, attending Utah basketball and football games with her family, and when it was time for her to choose a college, there was never any doubt she would attend the U.

The U campus did, in fact, become her home as she majored in English and worked on campus for famed English professor Brewster Ghiselin in the late 1960s. When graduation neared in 1970 and she finished her student teaching at Granite High and Olympus High, the U pulled her back in and she began a 40-plus year career in administration across campus. “For my entire life, the U has been my second home. This university is the only employer I’ve ever had! I’m a truly dedicated Utah woman and love this institution so much.

I’ve even raised a family that has followed in my footsteps,” Anastasopoulos reflected. “Both my sons are Utah grads, and my 4-year-old grandson shouts ‘Go Utes!’ at the mere sighting of the red block U.”

Read more about Karen in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities. https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/karensaltasanastasopoulos.php
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#UofU #UofUHumanities #UHumanities #Alumni #UofUAlumni #UofUEnglish #EnglishAlumni

Cristina Biaggi is an artist, author, and feminist activist who has been actively involved in the women’s movement since...
12/27/2019

Cristina Biaggi is an artist, author, and feminist activist who has been actively involved in the women’s movement since 1975, both nationally and internationally. In the foreword to her latest book, Activism Into Art Into Activism Into Art: A Personal History of Feminist Art, women’s rights activist Gloria Steinem said, “Cristina and I are about the same age, so I can also testify that she did this before there were words to describe what she was doing. She didn’t wait for a revolution. She lived a revolution.”

Needless to say, Biaggi has lived an incredible life in the nearly 60 years since she graduated from the U with a degree in classics and sculpture. She found her lifelong passion studying Neolithic and Paleolithic prehistory surrounding female deity and feminine spirituality, creating works of art entwined with activism in celebration of the Great Goddess. The U will soon house her legacy, as Biaggi is graciously donating her collection of papers, speeches, photos, artwork, and correspondence with feminist leaders to the Aileen H. Clyde 20th Century Women’s Legacy Archive at the Marriott Library.

Read more about Cristina Biaggi in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities. https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/cristinabiaggi.php

#UofU #UofUHumanities #UofUAlumni #CristinaBiaggi #Classics #ClassicsMajor #Humanities

Happy holidays from the College of Humanities! Our social media might be a little quiet over the next few days because w...
12/24/2019

Happy holidays from the College of Humanities! Our social media might be a little quiet over the next few days because we are spending time with family and friends. However you choose to celebrate this holiday season, we hope you enjoy it! #HappyHolidays #UofU #UHumanities

The Department of Philosophy in the College of Humanities has blended two disciplines to establish a new undergraduate p...
12/16/2019

The Department of Philosophy in the College of Humanities has blended two disciplines to establish a new undergraduate philosophy of science major, which just launched in fall 2019. The major provides students with a technical grounding in a scientific discipline of their choosing, core knowledge in ethical, analytical, and logical reasoning, and highly developed verbal and writing skills. The major is open to all undergraduate students. “Philosophy of science is a field that concerns the nature of science in general and individual branches of science,” said Matt Haber, chair of the Department of Philosophy. “This includes identifying what distinguishes good science from bad, assessing and evaluating forms of scientific reasoning, exploring what makes scientific activity distinctive and the moral dilemmas and social implications of science, among other philosophical issues.” Students in the new program will gain a strong scientific foundation that will intersect with their philosophy courses and other interests. This interdisciplinary training encourages innovative and creative approaches to problem solving and develops highly refined critical thinking skills.
Read the full story in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities.

https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/philosophy-and-science.php

#UofU #UHumanities #UofUHumanities #PhilsophyOfScience

In a letter read to her congregation in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1982, Freda Lucretia Magee Be...
12/14/2019
Recovering Identities of Black Latter-Day Saints - Perspectives - College of Humanites - The University of Utah

In a letter read to her congregation in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1982, Freda Lucretia Magee Beaulieu described July 21, 1978, as the happiest day of her life. This day came after she traveled nearly 1,000 miles from her home in New Orleans, to the church’s temple in Washington, D.C. to be sealed by proxy to her husband who had passed away six years earlier.

Baptized in 1909, it wasn’t until 69 years and 23 days later that Beaulieu, who was black, was allowed to enter a church temple to be sealed for eternity to her husband. A faithful member of the church since the age of 9, the happiest day of her life was one she feared may never come. Regardless, she remained devoted to the faith following the foundation set by her parents.

She recalled her childhood as happy and filled with fun times, especially when the family would surround the piano, sing and enjoy each other’s company. She learned to read the scriptures, pray, observe the World of Wisdom (the church’s health code), and make her charitable contributions.
. “We always had prayer morning and night and scripture study before going to bed,” said Beaulieu in 1982. “Once in a while missionaries would come by and spend some time teaching us more about the gospel.”

Stories like Beaulieu’s can be found in Century of Black Mormons, a digital history database, documenting and recovering identities and voices of black Latter-day Saints during the faith’s first 100 years (1830-1930). It contains digitized versions of original documents, photographs, a map documenting baptismal locations, a timeline, and biographical essays telling the stories of black Latter-day Saints. The archive currently contains almost 70 biographies and over 200 more will be added before the project is completed.

Read the full article about Century of Black Mormons featured in Perspectives, the official magazine of the College of Humanities: https://humanities.utah.edu/perspectives/2018-2019/recovering-identities-black-lds.php

#UofU #UHumanities #UofUHumanities #UofUHistory #CenturyOfBlackMormons #History

Recovering Identities of Black Latter-Day Saints

Shortly after moving to Salt Lake City and starting school at the University of Utah, Janie DeFriez was diagnosed with r...
12/12/2019

Shortly after moving to Salt Lake City and starting school at the University of Utah, Janie DeFriez was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, an incurable and progressive eye disease. With this new diagnosis and knowing her vision would continue to degenerate, she felt she needed to change her future plans when it came to school, research and her career. However, her perspective changed when she was accepted into the GURU Program, a National Institutes of Health-funded research initiative at the U for students who identify as having a disability.

“The GURU program is about embracing the idea of ‘nothing about us without us,’ a term often used in the disability community,” said James Tabery, associate professor of philosophy and co-director of the program alongside Jeffrey Botkin, professor of pediatrics. “The program includes an enormous community of scholars from law, medicine, humanities and fine arts that wrestle with difficult issues revolving around genetics. The idea is that we should have people with lived experiences with disabilities so they can shape the conversations and the way we approach the research.”

https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/nothing-about-us-without-us/

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255 Central Campus Dr, Rm 2100
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84112

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About Our College

The humanities teach us to question the world around us to better understand our place within it. In the University of Utah’s College of Humanities, you’ll learn to question the issues – past, present and future – consider the impact those issues have on cultures, science, technology, medicine and the human experience and connect the ideas with those of your peers and community to broaden your historical, ethical, social and international perspective.

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A Salt Lake Interfaith Month one of the key events: What would Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) do, if he were alive today, with regard to contemporary issues the world is facing? Of course, we have no way of knowing for sure, but some of his practices in the 7th century Arabia has surprising clues about what he might have said or done. We will discuss anecdotes from his life on contemporary issues such as interfaith relations, peace and war, racism, freedom of religion, gender relations, empowerment of women, environment, animals, and people with disabilities and more. Save the date and bring any question in your mind to ask. For questions and info email at [email protected] https://www.facebook.com/events/374756979757556/
How would one get a copy of the poster you made about Science VS. Humanities. It is for my high school classroom.
The reduction of the discussion of race in the church to include only those of African descent continues to perpetuate the myth that only those who were barred from the Priesthood / temple have faced discrimination and victimization in the church. This white/black Mormon binary is as offensive in Mormon studies as it is American studies.
Hi friends! Come celebrate culture next weekend in Draper with the non-profit 100 Humanitarians. $2 discount for students who use their school name as a promo code or wear your school sweatshirt at the door. It's a competition between BYU, UVU and U of U to see which college is best represented. Winning school gets pizza coupons from Papa Murphy's! There will be food trucks as well. Proceeds will go towards building a cultural center for the Maasai in Kenya. Check out their website to learn more www.100humanitarians.com. Tickets can be bought at www.100humanitarians/humanijam-2017